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Masters Degrees (Art And Sociology)

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Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme will provide you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of art psychotherapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-art-psychotherapy/. Read more
This programme will provide you with a broad understanding of the theories and practices of art psychotherapy necessary for safe and effective clinical work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-art-psychotherapy/

The Masters enables you to practice as an art therapist in the NHS, Social Services, and educational establishments, and to become a practitioner registered with the British Association of Art Therapists and eligible to apply for registration with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Your learning is underpinned by the principles and practices of psychodynamic psychotherapy practised within the context of mental health care, and informed by contemporary art practice.

Via theoretical studies, clinical work and experiential learning you will integrate cognitive understanding and practical experience with a developing awareness of self and other. The nature of the therapeutic relationship between client, their art work, and the art therapist is explored, and you have the opportunity to put your learning into practice through two 60-day placements which are supervised and supported in-depth.

You are encouraged to develop your own art practice and to situate your work in relationship to your development as a therapist, to contemporary art practice and to psychoanalytic theories. You must be in personal therapy throughout the programme.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sally Skaife.

Modes of study

The MA in Art Psychotherapy is a course that leads to successful applicants becoming eligible to apply for registration as an Arts Therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), the body which regulates and monitors standards of practice in the public sector. The programme can be studied in two modes - full-time for 2 years or part-time for 3 years. A clear indication of the mode chosen should be stated on application forms.

Full-time study

Year 1: all day Monday and Tuesday in college. Clinical placement days are usually Thursday and Friday. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Years 2: all day Tuesday in college plus two days clinical placement to be arranged on other days – usually two consecutive days and these are negotiated with your placement. There are also three two day blocks of time for experiential groups (Mondays and Tuesdays). One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Part-time study

Year 1: all day Monday and Tuesday in college. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Year 2: all day Tuesday in college plus two days clinical placement to be arranged on other days – usually two consecutive days. There are also three two day blocks of time for experiential groups. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Year 3: Half a day in college on Tuesdays with some full-time Tuesdays (the yearly timetable will have details of which Tuesdays are half day or full day), plus, two days clinical placement to be arranged on other days – usually two consecutive days. One day should be set aside for on-going studio practice where possible.

Personal therapy

It's a mandatory aspect of the course that all students must be in personal therapy for the duration of their training. Therapy may be on a group or individual basis and can be art therapy or verbal psychotherapy.

Skills

The MA will develop skills including:

the ability to work with a range of client populations
an understanding of psychodynamic concepts
development of your own art practice
Careers
Completion of the programme provides eligibility for the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration as an art psychotherapist.

Our graduates are invariably seen as offering a valuable and unique service to their clients and to the multidisciplinary teams in which they work – graduates have gone on to practice as art psychotherapists in the NHS, social services and in the education sector.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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We offer opportunities for students who want to pursue research in art psychotherapy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art-psychotherapy/. Read more
We offer opportunities for students who want to pursue research in art psychotherapy- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-art-psychotherapy/

For MPhil study, you usually register for research by written thesis (although there are also possibilities for research based on a written element and studio practice).

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

Whatever your topic, you have your first supervisor in Art Psychotherapy and may have your second in another department – Art, Educational Studies, Psychology, or Sociology, for example.

You meet your supervisors regularly for discussion and guidance, and present your work to the Art Psychotherapy research student group.

You also attend the Goldsmiths Research Methods Training Course.

Supervision is currently available in the following areas:

-art therapists and their art
-cross-cultural issues
-evidence-based practices
-group work
-history and development of the professions in the UK and internationally
-occupational choice, career development and role change of arts therapists and arts therapy trainees
-clinical work with various client populations

Current research topics include:

-key issues in art psychotherapy with the blind
-the creative experience inside and outside an art psychotherapy group
-the image as an assessment tool with children who have an autistic spectrum disorder
-thinking about art with adults who have learning disabilities
-art therapists’ working environments

You'll be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sally Skaife.

Department

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies
has human relationships at its heart
Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies
You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
change people’s lives through dance, drama and music
You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. Postgraduate studies in Fine Art at Kent offer you an energetic, challenging and open framework in which to explore your artistic practice. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Postgraduate studies in Fine Art at Kent offer you an energetic, challenging and open framework in which to explore your artistic practice.

The programme welcomes independent thinkers who seek to develop their practice in a discursive environment that brings together a diverse set of attitudes to making and producing art work in contemporary culture. As a student, you are encouraged to realise your creative and intellectual potential within your discipline informed by specialists within your field.

The MA Fine Art programme prepares you for a professional career in the arts and we offer new workshops and studio spaces with excellent technical support to realise your practice-based projects. New opportunities to work together on ambitious group projects in public are encouraged and supported by a staff team made up of practicing artists.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/25/fine-art

Course structure

This programme develops your practice towards establishing a creative, critical and independent practice. You have your own studio space in which to explore and test your studio work, with full access to workshops and high-quality resources at our new multimillion-pound development on the Chatham Historic Dockyard, just 55 minutes from London.

The programme welcomes students who wish to pursue any form of artistic practice in an interdisciplinary studio-based research environment. A core series of critical studies lectures, seminars, tutorials and collaborative opportunities allow you to develop your awareness of key issues in contemporary culture. We also offer opportunities for working with museums and galleries outside of the University, developing your specialism towards the achievement of professional excellence within your field.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FA800 - Fine Art (60 credits)
FA801 - Development of Practice (30 credits)
FA803 - Collaborative Project (30 credits)
MU898 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by self-directed written and practice-based coursework for each of the modules.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- create and interpret knowledge at the forefront of the discipline through the development of critical, conceptual and practical abilities

- develop a self-directed programme of practice and related research

- contextualise and theorise practice in relation to, and through critical evaluation of, the work of contemporary practitioners and leading researchers within the discipline

- develop a comprehensive understanding of methodologies applicable to independent research

- develop autonomy in practice work within a context that fosters collaborative learning

- sustain an advanced practice that encompasses the disciplines of writing, discussion and producing practice-based outcomes

- achieve high-level skills and competencies as a preparation for professional practice and further development in the field of the arts

- embed your research within the context of the University and utilise the resources offered in the research environment such as staff expertise, symposia and colloquia

- develop public outcomes outside the University in a range of formats

- attract students from a diversity of arts contexts and contexts that inform artistic practice, including fine art, history of art, sociology, journalism, English literature, film studies architecture and philosophy

- attract intellectually able and talented students who are enquiring, open to experimentation, discussion and collaboration as well as able to work independently

- provide a forward-thinking, dynamic learning environment that responds to the current climate of debate and production in the arts

- forge an international identity within the field of study through developing partnerships with international universities and non-HEIs

- support specialism and progression by allowing you to opt for specific routes of study that include Fine Art, Curation and Critical Arts Writing as designators of the final degree award and to be taught together in an interdisciplinary environment.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in fine art is a valuable and flexible qualification which allow students to develop independent practice-based skills, hone analytical and critical thinking and to put these into practice through public projects.

Graduates leave the programme with a grounding and extended knowledge of the arts sector and are well equipped to enter a range of roles as curators, critics, arts administrators, teachers, librarians and other work in the creative industries. Graduates interested in a research career are supported by the University’s Graduate School Researcher Development Programme. The University’s Employability Weeks can also provide valuable support in terms of planning future careers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme, delivered by School of Arts and specialist visiting lecturers, develops your skills and provides experience relevant to a career in curating. Read more
This programme, delivered by School of Arts and specialist visiting lecturers, develops your skills and provides experience relevant to a career in curating.

Based at the School of Arts Studio 3 Gallery, you are involved in all aspects of the running of the Gallery. You work closely with partner organisations such as Canterbury museums and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA).

You have the opportunity to develop your own project, working within the Gallery’s exhibition programme.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/96/curating

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices, which draw upon our links with other subjects within the School of Arts and the Faculty of Humanities. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Course structure

Compulsory modules provide an overview of the history of collecting and exhibitions through a series of case studies, taking advantage of our proximity to major London collections. We also cover theoretical issues relating to curating and museology.

Optional modules focus on providing practice-based opportunities for developing curatorial skills.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating (30 credits)
HA827 - Curatorial Internship (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, critical logbooks and practice-based exercises. A long dissertation is required for the Exhibition Development and Design module.

[[Programme aims
This programme aims to:

- create and interpret knowledge at the forefront of the discipline through the development of critical, conceptual and practical abilities

- develop a self-directed programme of practice and related research

- contextualise and theorise practice in relation to, and through critical evaluation of, the work of contemporary practitioners and leading researchers within the discipline

- develop a comprehensive understanding of methodologies applicable to independent research

- develop autonomy in practice work within a context that fosters collaborative learning

- sustain an advanced practice that encompasses the disciplines of writing, discussion and producing practice-based outcomes

- achieve high-level skills and competencies as a preparation for professional practice and further development in the field of curating

- embed your research within the context of the University and utilise the resources offered in the research environment such as staff expertise, symposia and colloquia

- develop public outcomes outside the University in a range of formats

- attract students from a diversity of arts contexts and contexts that inform artistic practice, including fine art, history of art, sociology, journalism, English literature, film studies architecture and philosophy

- attract intellectually able and talented students who are enquiring, open to experimentation, discussion and collaboration as well able to work independently

- provide a forward-thinking, dynamic learning environment that responds to the current climate of debate and production in the arts.

- forge an international identity within the field of study through developing partnerships with international universities and non-HEIs

- support specialism and progression by allowing students to opt for specific routes of study that include curating, art history, cultural history, arts management, conservation or museum studies.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. Read more
This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. By combining cutting edge research from the fields of criminology, archaeology, art history, heritage studies, and law, via discussion of compelling case studies, this course will allow you to explore the criminal networks that function in the area of art crime and what can be done to protect our past and our culture for the future.

Why this programme

-This is the only online art crime and illicit antiquities research programme currently available and is the first University-accredited postgraduate degree offered on this topic.
-You will be taught by leading academics in this field, who are members of the Trafficking Culture Project, the only academic research group devoted to the study of the illicit trafficking of cultural objects .
-This programme is taught entirely online through pre-recorded lectures and optional real-time seminars. This allows distance learners maximum flexibility while maintaining the high level of instructure and peer interaction needed to explore such challenging topics.
-Students who successfully complete the PgCert will have the opportunity to come to Glasgow, to complete a full masters degree in the areas of criminology and art history.

Programme structure

You will take three courses across three semesters (includes summer teaching). During each course you will investigate and present an art or antiquities crime case study, produce a portfolio-quality ‘digital artefact’ and write an essay for assessment. Depending on your needs and goals, you can take one of the courses individually or all three to achieve the qualification.

Core courses
-Antiquities trafficking
-Art crime
-Repatriation, recovery return

Career prospects

This programme complements careers in the museums and heritage sector, in law enforcement and security, in related fields of law, in fine art and provenance research, and should qualify students to proceed to a full masters degree in archaeology, heritage studies, museums studies, art history, criminology or other related discipline.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-sociology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-sociology/

Goldsmiths’ research in sociology covers a range of areas, including:

art and literature
deviance
education
the sociology of governance and regulation
theories of industrial society
health, illness and psychiatry
interpersonal relations
knowledge
politics
‘race’ and ethnicity
class
religion
values in society
childhood and youth culture
the body and society
social aspects of the life sciences and bio-medicine, science and technology
the expansion of capitalism on a world scale
urban studies
gender and the sexual division of labour
culture and communications

We emphasise the importance of the relationship between you and your supervisor: we ‘match’ you with a supervisor whose current active research interests and expertise are compatible with your chosen topic of research.

You will be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

The Sociology MPhil programme is recognised by the ESRC for excellence in research training.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Research Officer, Sociology.

Department

Sociology at Goldsmiths is ranked:
9th in the UK and 45th in the world for this subject area**
9th in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

The Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths is active, contemporary and inventive. We are interested in everything from the ‘global’ issues of poverty and injustice to the ‘micro’ issues of cultural identity and the presentation of self in a digital world.

Our staff are some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – they’re the pioneers who are pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. They’ve played a key role in developing social research methods, setting agendas in social and cultural policy, and linking theory to practice.

Through their world-leading research you’ll be at the forefront of current debates and will be encouraged to see the world differently.

Skills

You'll develop advanced research training covering a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sociological methods, and an ability to develop advanced and extended forms of written argument and scholarly practice.

Careers

Possible careers cover:

Academia
Social research in applied areas like health or urban regeneration
Research consultancy
Practice-orientated work
Work in the arts and cultural industries
Publishing

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. You should look at the staff research interests to see if we are the right department for you and whether there is a member if staff who may match your research interests.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 1,500-3,000-word statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources
the name of a staff member who you believe would be interested in acting as your supervisor

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the history of both art and design. Read more
This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the history of both art and design. As well as advancing your knowledge of developments that have occurred in these vibrant areas of practice in modernity - and, in particular, the last 50 years - the course will also provide you with transferable skills in history, theory and research.

Key features
-The dissertation or major project allows you to develop your own interests and gain valuable research skills.
-Field visits and activities supplement your lectures and seminars. Possible destinations include New York, Barcelona, Berlin and Paris.

What will you study?

You will study a series of dedicated taught modules that are concerned with issues of research methodology, subject-specific case studies and creative practice. You will be expected to conduct research around the broad themes and subjects addressed by each module. This will enable you to tailor your own path of study according to your particular interests and aspirations. You can also take part in activities and study trips organised by the School of Art & Design History.

Assessment is by a unique combination of essay, presentation, dissertation and optional project-led research, enabling you to develop your understanding and application of art and design history in ways that are relevant to your research and career aims.

Assessment

Seminar presentations, essays, dissertation (12,000-15,000 words), and major project (5,000+ words).

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Interrogating Art and Design: Critical Perspectives and Creative Practices
-Special Topics in Art and Design
-Creative Economies and Cultural Industries
-The Politics of Design: Artefacts, Identity and Protest
-Major Project

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This Master focuses on theoretically and methodologically advanced research in sociology; the aim is to develop testable theories to explain social phenomena. Read more

Sociology and Social Research

This Master focuses on theoretically and methodologically advanced research in sociology; the aim is to develop testable theories to explain social phenomena.

This programme is interdisciplinary in nature and focuses on theoretically and methodologically advanced research in the field of sociology and the social sciences. The substantive focus is on topics such as social networks and social capital, trust and cooperation, social integration, stratification and inequality, households, organizations, and policy studies.

Students learn to develop theories that are testable explanations of social phenomena rather than conceptual systems devoid of empirical content. They also learn to test such theories using authoritative empirical data-sets and state of the art tools of social science research methodology and data analysis. The integration of social theory, empirical research, and methods of data-analysis is a core feature of the programme. The programme offers many and varied career opportunities.

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During this Master's programme, you will be thoroughly trained to analyse and advise on contemporary social issues. You will therefore develop yourself into an academic professional and an expert on your chosen theme. Read more

Sociology: Comtemporary Social Problems

During this Master's programme, you will be thoroughly trained to analyse and advise on contemporary social issues.
You will therefore develop yourself into an academic professional and an expert on your chosen theme. In these themes, the boundary between public and private is often transcended, which means that once you complete the Master's, you can work in both the private and (semi) public sectors. Potential careers include social science expert, applied researcher in the corporate world, policy advisor at a ministry or municipality, advisor, project coordinator or consultant.

In the one-year Master's programme Sociology: Comtemporary Social Problems, you will be trained to become an expert on one important social theme. You choose one contemporary issue in which you will specialise: Crime and Safety - Internet, Social Media and Networks - Care, Policy and Organisations.

You design your own track in this programme, in which you quickly and rigorously immerse yourself in your specialisation. You will learn about the state-of-the-art in current scholarship. As an expert, you will also learn to think in multidisciplinary terms. In addition to sociology as your core subject, you will also take courses in the social psychology and social geography of your chosen theme.

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The aim of this intensive 12 month program is to train future managers of arts and cultural institutions and future entrepreneurs in the cultural industries. Read more
The aim of this intensive 12 month program is to train future managers of arts and cultural institutions and future entrepreneurs in the cultural industries.
Core teaching weaves together a range of different approaches to the cultural industries: high-level business management, creative entrepreneurship, art and culture fundraising, event management, and design and creative marketing.

This MBA program is designed to develop students’ understanding of the art and performing arts sectors and develop professional skills in arts management and business. Professional studies are underpinned by courses on the history of twentieth century art and theatre, providing students with a hands-on experience of the artistic and cultural backgrounds.

Structure

The curriculum in details:

This intensive twelve-month program is designed to develop students’ understanding of the art and performing arts sectors, while developing their professional skills in arts management and business, in order to become future managers of arts and cultural institutions and future entrepreneurs in the cultural industries. Throughout the year, students develop a professional project that they present in front of a jury, in validation of the Titre I diploma.

1st trimester (September – December):

Common courses: Marketing & Communication; International Business; Strategic Management; Finance for Managers; Digital Business

Electives: Sociology of Arts & Culture; History of the Decorative Arts

Performing arts track: History of Performing Arts
Arts track: Art history: Realism to 1945
Intensive January session:

Common courses: Research methodology; Business game; Leadership management; Computing software seminar; Career seminar

Performing arts track: European Cultural Policy & Artistic Creation; Culture Industries Survey; Event Management & Management Practices; Economics of Cultural Studies
Arts track: History of the Art Market; History of the Fine Arts; Curating Exhibitions; Economics of the Art Market
2nd trimester (February – April):

Electives: Public Relations & Branding through Social Media; Performance and Digital Arts

Performing arts track: Economics of Cultural Industries; Event Management; Performing Arts Production, Performing Arts Management; Creative Entrepreneurship; Cultural Industries Survey; Cultural Policy & Heritage Management; Legal Environment of Business Applied to the Arts
Elective: Organizing a Film Festival
Arts track: Museum Law; Intellectual Property Law; Legal Environment of the Arts: Economics of the Art Market; Financing Cultural Projects; Art History: 1945 to date; Curating Exhibitions; Mounting Exhibitions
Elective: Collecting Contemporary Art
3rd trimester (May – September): Internship, online classes; develop thesis and professional project.

The Program at a glance:

• Duration: 3 trimesters (12 months)
• Location: Paris
• Accreditation: Professional Master's degree from IESA: Titre 1 Degree recognized by the French governement. Double degree: MA in Arts & Cultural Management from PSB - Paris School of Business

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The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity. Read more
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity.

On this absorbing MA programme you’ll study one of the most exciting fields of historical inquiry; cultural history examines the culture of the time in order to understand how people made sense of the world they inhabited.

It will introduce you to the specialist research methods used by cultural historians, to ongoing historiographical and theoretical debates and to related disciplines such as cultural studies, literary studies, history of art and sociology. You will also get the opportunity to explore the area of cultural history that interests you most in your dissertation.

The MA draws together case studies from across Britain and continental Europe, the European Empires and North America from the 18th century to the present day. Taking the Cultural History MA will:

- Deepen your understanding of the cultural history of Britain and its Empire, continental Europe and North America since the 18th century
- Encourage you to think about a broad range of questions and debates in cultural history
- Allow you to engage with current debates on such themes as gender, modernity, national identity, sexuality and the politics of culture
- Give you the chance to work closely with a dynamic group of young historians and established scholars who themselves research and write about the cultural history of Britain, continental Europe and North America.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. It will suit practicing museum and heritage professionals who are interested in strengthening their knowledge of contemporary debates in critical museology, critical heritage studies and material culture studies. With its interdisciplinary focus, it will suit students interested in broadening their expertise across anthropology, art history and archaeology. It will also provide an excellent postgraduate foundation for students interested in pursuing PhD research concerned with museums, heritage, and material/visual culture in Asian, African, Middle Eastern and transnational/transcultural contexts.

This interdisciplinary programme brings together anthropological, art historical and archaeological perspectives to explore the interconnecting fields of museums, heritage and material culture studies. The MA disprivileges Western museum and heritage discourses and practices, and explores tangible and intangible cultural heritage as spheres of global interaction.

The MA will equip students with a theoretically-informed critical understanding of museums, heritage and material/visual culture. Taught across the Department of Anthropology and School of Arts, the MA provides a unique opportunity to learn about current debates in World Art and World Heritage, combining ethnographic, art historical and archaeological approaches.

Students will be introduced to a wide range of thematic and theoretical issues, and will have the opportunity to curate a small exhibition in the Curating Cultures module, and put into practice anthropological research techniques in the Ethnographic Research Methods course.

Situated in London’s ‘Museum Mile’, a few hundred meters from the British Museum, and with its own Brunei Gallery, SOAS provides a unique environment in which to study the cultural heritage of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits in total: 120 credits of modules and a dissertation of 10,000 words at 60 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed here - https://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-museums-heritage-and-material-culture-studies/

Students are advised to take one or both of the recommended modules listed below or may wish to select from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the School of Arts (Departments of Centre for Media Studies, History of Art and Archaeology or Music) options lists.

The remaining credits can be selected from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or the School of Arts options. See below for a detailed programme structure.

Language Entitlement Programme:

Many students choose to pursue a language through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Teaching & Learning

Students taking the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies will have the opportunity to achieve:

- A critical awareness of contemporary theoretical debates in museum studies, cultural heritage studies, and material/visual culture studies;
- A familiarity with the distinctive contributions of anthropology, art history and archaeology to these interdisciplinary fields;
- A critical awareness of World Art/World Cultures/World Heritage, with an emphasis on SOAS’s regional specialisms (Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as transnational/diasporic contexts;
- An understanding of ethnographic approaches to tangible and intangible heritage research;
- Experience of object-based knowledge and museological research methods.

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Cultural processes are creative and dynamic, meaning that our analysis of them must be too. This programme emphasises the critical analysis of cultural processes from an advanced theoretical perspective and with an interdisciplinary outlook- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-critical-creative-analysis/. Read more
Cultural processes are creative and dynamic, meaning that our analysis of them must be too. This programme emphasises the critical analysis of cultural processes from an advanced theoretical perspective and with an interdisciplinary outlook- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-critical-creative-analysis/

How can cultural analysis engage with the most significant challenges of the contemporary globalised world, with all its inequities and all its possibilities? Can the critical traditions of sociological thought provide adequate responses to today’s world?

The principal disciplinary resources the programme draws on are those of sociology of culture, cultural studies, post-structuralist philosophy, critical literary aethetics and textual analysis. Together they provide atudent swith a critical grasp on contemporary cultutral processes and central issues in the theory and analysis of contemporary culture.

Our most flexible MA, the programme benefits from an expanded choice of option modules.

In addition to the core module and one chosen from within a wide range of Sociology options, you are able to choose two further modules from across a range of participating departments, allowing you to tailor the degree to your individual interests.

The MA attracts students with backgrounds in social science, humanities and philosophy as well as more creative pursuits, and from across the world.

This course covers the following disciplines:

sociology and social sciences
anthropology
art
philosophy
other humanities

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Monica Sassatelli.

Modules & Structure

The MA enables you to develop critical and analytical interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary socio-cultural processes. It offers a sense of the breadth of possible approaches, while developing the skills necessary to produce original analyses in a scholarly and inventive manner. You take:

- A core module (30 credits)
- Three option modules (or equivalent; 90 credits in total)
- A dissertation (60 credits)

The core module is taught within the Department of Sociology, and provides an introduction to critical contemporary sociological conceptualisations of culture, presenting opportunities for the development and exploration of interdisciplinary perspectives on the analysis of contemporary cultural processes.

In addition to the core module, you also study three option modules (or equivalent). One of these must be chosen from Sociology; the others may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics and Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

You also write a Dissertation for which you meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff and participate in Dissertation workshops.

As a full-time student, you would normally complete the core module and one option in the Autumn term, and two further options in the Spring term. As a part-time student you will spread these over two years. Core and option modules are normally taught by one hour lectures, followed by one hour seminars.

Core module

What is Culture?- 30 credits

Option modules

You have 90 credits at your disposal; of these, 30 credits must be taken from within the Department of Sociology. You can choose either one regular option (30 credits) or two 'mini options' (2 x 15 credits) from the department's extensive list.

For your other options, you can choose modules from the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

-Media and Communications
-Centre for Cultural Studies
-English and Comparative Literature
-Anthropology
-Politics
-Music
-Educational Studies

Dissertation

For your Dissertation you'll meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff and participate in Dissertation workshops led both by staff and students (based on presentation and discussion of your work in progress). The dissertation is a substantive piece of research, empirical or theoretical, on a topic of your choice.

Assessment

Each module and the Dissertation are individually assessed. The core module and most option modules are assessed by a 5-6,000 word essay (2-3,000 word essays for mini-options). The Dissertation is a 12-15,000 word original piece of scholarship.

Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) awards are also available in this programme. For the award of Postgraduate Diploma, you would need to successfully complete the core module and option modules to the value of 120 CATS; for the Postgraduate Certificate you would need to successfully complete the core module and option modules to the value of 60 CATS. Please note that these are exit awards; if you successfully complete the whole programme you'll be awarded an MA.

You'll develop the following skills during the programme:

- advanced analytical skills
- the ability to evaluate complex theoretical positions and to deploy those within appropriate formats and frameworks

Recent graduate have embarked on professional careers in social research, thinks tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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In this new programme, you will explore the relationships between dance and society. You will be encouraged to challenge your thinking about dance within a framework of conceptual, political and social ideas throughout dance history. Read more

Summary

In this new programme, you will explore the relationships between dance and society.

You will be encouraged to challenge your thinking about dance within a framework of conceptual, political and social ideas throughout dance history. Engaging in rich discussions with an international dance community, you will examine dance, dancers and dancing through sociological and political lenses. You will be introduced to a range of concerns about dance, dancing and performance: from the body in society, to issues of representation, and relations of power.

You will have the opportunity to collaborate with experts in the field of dance in our supportive teaching community and with students from all over the world. Our holistic teaching approach will help you gain a strong foundation in understanding of the political and sociological implications for how dance functions in society. You will also gain in-depth knowledge of dance and the dancer as a social and political construct. This programme also provides you with an opportunity to reflect upon your experiences and develop creative ideas to gain a critical perspective in practice and theory.

The Department is home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Dance Research, which foregrounds the research of dance as cultural and artistic expression beyond, and including, theatre performance. Through seminars, forums and conferences involving staff and international invited guests, the centre supports a compelling research culture.

We also have excellent links with dance companies and creative organisations. In easy reach of London’s vibrant dance scene, the campus has superb studios and a state-of-the-art theatre for dance students.

Content

In this programme, you will take a compulsory research methods module, the programme core module of Politics Sociology and Dance and your Dissertation module. Flexibility is built into the programme, so you can also choose some of your modules to suit your interests and needs.

In the module Ways of Knowing, which is shared by all dance postgraduate taught programmes, you will be introduced to research methods including ethnography, analysis, and practice-as-research.

The module Politics and Sociology and Dance encompasses theoretical perspectives that engage with hegemonic and resistive issues relating to dance as a social and economic practice.

The module Dissertation is an individually tutored module that allows you to delve deeply into a research project that reflects your interests and experience in dance.

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