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The LLM in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict provides a thorough overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. Read more

About the course

The LLM in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict provides a thorough overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. The course builds upon this exhaustive academic foundation with the exploration of real case studies that underline the importance of this area of work – for example, it analyses the necessarily comprehensive human rights legislation and its violations in potentially harrowing detail in order to define the criminal activity ahead of prosecution. The teaching of this subject reflects the important truth that this area of law is rooted in the reality of life and death. Every study will take into account the humanitarian, economic and political perspectives.

This course will equip you with the skills and research practices required to assimilate, evaluate and critically appraise large sections of legal knowledge. You will have the opportunity to prove your newly-acquired expertise in writing your Master's dissertation. This is also your opportunity to select particular specialism – a major topic or issue in the field of international law and criminology of armed conflict. This project topic may have a direct influence on your career trajectory; previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have often reported that their dissertation was a significant asset in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, international organisations, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Aberystwyth Law School recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

This degree will suit you:

•If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance for human life and security
• If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to conflict and criminality in conflict
• If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
• If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course content

Core modules:

Criminology of International Conflict Personnel
Dissertation
International Human Rights Law
International Humanitarian Law
Public International Law

Optional modules:

Climate Change Law and Policy
Contemporary Issues in Food Policy and Law
Human Rights, Environment and International Business
Law and Gender
Philosophy of Human Rights Protection

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of international law and the criminology of armed conflict. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Study skills

You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information regarding criminology and armed conflict. You will refine your professional practices by engagement with challenging exercises and case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any legal or unrelated professional workplace.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

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In 1998, Nottingham became the first Law School in the UK to offer a postgraduate module in international criminal justice. Read more
In 1998, Nottingham became the first Law School in the UK to offer a postgraduate module in international criminal justice. Since then, the LLM in International Criminal Justice and Armed Conflict has been further enriched with a list of complementary modules and has grown from strength to strength attracting students from all over the world.

This specialisation provides a holistic overview of the law governing the use of force by States, the law applicable to the conduct of hostilities, the measures adopted to combat terrorism, as well as the legal and philosophical responses to international criminality through the examination of the emerging system of international criminal justice. Current affairs issues and modern challenges to the law and politics surrounding war and justice are extensively discussed as part of the above modules.

Taught by internationally recognised experts in the field, supported by an impressive list of visiting speakers, LLM students will be immersed in this fascinating and fast-moving area of the law. The LLM at Nottingham allows students to acquire the requisite expertise in order to understand the intimate details of the workings of the law applicable prior to, during and following an armed conflict. Students will successfully apply this knowledge to their professional careers in the future.

Through an exclusive co-operation agreement held between the Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre and the International Criminal Court, selected students undertaking the LLM in International Criminal Justice and Armed Conflict will be given the opportunity to work on a project which forms part of the Court’s Legal Tools, further enhancing their exposure to application of the law in practice. Past graduates of this specialisation have secured internships with international organisations, courts and tribunals as well as NGO’s specialising in the field with many of them subsequently undertaking employment in their chosen area of expertise.

Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its s

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Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more
Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, students can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

- The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high calibre training institution.

- It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.

- Students are taught by the best; experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

- Situated close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court students have unique opportunities to network with key high profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.

- The MA programmes in the Department of War Studies are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-of-war-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our programme prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master's degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

- Course purpose -
Our programme offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Designed as a research preparation degree for those wishing to continue and to study for a PhD, it is also a valuable stand-alone degree. Students on MA programmes in the department have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces. For more information about career prospects and graduate destinations see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/employability.aspx

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The War & Psychiatry MSc course will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge about the way individuals, both in the armed forces and civilians, respond to psychological trauma. Read more
The War & Psychiatry MSc course will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge about the way individuals, both in the armed forces and civilians, respond to psychological trauma. Drawing on multidisciplinary expertise, you will have the opportunity to compare the experiences of different nations to explore both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject. The programme is ideal for careers in military psychiatry and related NGOs, emergency and anti-terrorist services.

Key benefits

- You will gain an understanding of how people prepare themselves for war, cope during conflict and adjust to peacetime life.
- You will be taught by internationally-recognised researchers and clinicians.
- You will learn not only about the psychological effects on soldiers fighting on the front line but also how civilians cope when subjected to the trauma of war or acts of terrorism.
- You will examine the psychology of conflict through different cultures.
- You will develop knowledge and skills not necessarily provided by clinical training.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/war-and-psychiatry-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This course will give you a critical understanding of the complex methodological, ethical, historical, medical, cultural and empirical aspects of military psychiatry. You will also develop an ability to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship in the history, development and practice of military psychiatry.

Our course will enable you to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding and skills in the following areas:

- The nature, significance and complexities of the history, development and practice of military psychiatry.
- Systematic and reflexive investigation of the literature and the conceptual, therapeutic, operational, historical and ethical issues surrounding the relationship between war and psychiatry.
- Advanced understanding of a comprehensive range of concepts, theories and methods relevant to military psychiatry.
- The course, which can be taken either in one year (full-time) or two years (part-time), places military psychiatry in its appropriate cultural, historical and social context and leads to an internationally recognised qualification.

- Format and assessment -

The MSc has four elements. All students take two core modules: an introductory series of 20 seminars held in the Department of War Studies and an advanced module of 10 seminars in various aspects of military psychiatry mostly delivered by external speakers. Students choose a third option module from a range of subjects offered by the Department of War Studies. The fourth element is a dissertation on a subject of the student's choice.

Career prospects

Much of the course content is of a practical nature designed to inform the assessment and treatment of psychological casualties. In addition, our course has invited speakers from the armed forces, military charities and the emergency services. Presentations are given by the IoOPPN’s Careers Consultant and individual meetings with students can be arranged to explore job opportunities.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/study/prospective-students/Masters-Scholarships.aspx

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MSc in International Defence and Security deals with some of the most pressing issues of world politics such as the causes of war and peace, the pressures and opportunities of globalisation, the threats posed by terrorism, and the problems of global poverty and injustice. Read more

Course Description

The MSc in International Defence and Security deals with some of the most pressing issues of world politics such as the causes of war and peace, the pressures and opportunities of globalisation, the threats posed by terrorism, and the problems of global poverty and injustice.

The programme draws upon our established expertise in international security, foreign and defence policy analysis, security studies, international law, conflict resolution, and environmental issues.

The course content is dynamic, challenging, and cutting edge, designed to equip you with the skills and insights needed to understand and authoritatively analyse contemporary debates in international relations using a mixture of theoretical and empirical tools to deal with and confront the challenges presented by contemporary world politics.

Course overview

The course consists of three core modules and a wide range of elective modules of which you must pass seven, followed by a dissertation.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Modules

There are three compulsory modules which must be taken whether studying the PgCert, PgDip or full MSc. There is then a choice of elective modules from a range of 14. For the PgCert, 1 elective module must be selected, and for the PgDip and MSc, 7 elective modules.

Core:
- Study Skills and Research Methodology
- Issues in International Security, Conflict and Development
- Defence in the 21st Century

Elective:
- Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution
- Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context
- International Law and Armed Conflicts
- International Criminal Law and Human Rights
- Intelligence in International Security
- Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
- Regional Security
- International Interventions for Peace and Statebuilding
- Managing Natural Disasters
- Weapons of Mass Destruction, Control and Verification
- Military Support to Disasters
- Crisis Management
- The Resilience Context
- Strategy for Resilience

Individual Project

A 20,000 word dissertation.

Assessment

There are a variety of assessment methods including written assignments, individual and group presentations, dissertation and examinations.

Career opportunities

This course is intended to attract students who are either currently employed in posts relating to Security Cooperation (Defence Attachés, Desk Officers within the MoD, representatives from the FCO and DFID) or those individuals who generally have an interest in issues pertaining to defence and security. Students may also wish to pursue careers with private security companies, think tanks, within academia or for foreign governments.

Applicants to this degree come from a range of backgrounds. While we have a number of candidates who have recently completed their undergraduate degrees, we also have a significant number who are civil servants working within defence, serving and retired military personnel and those who working within the financial services. The aim of this course is therefore to provide all students with a high quality, and transferable, postgraduate qualification.

The course therefore assists in taking you on to senior positions in the armed forces, government, international organisations, media and academia.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/international-defence-and-security.html

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Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations. Read more
Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations.

You will master key skills in political science that enable you to explore the links between local, national and international structures, and critically evaluate key contemporary debates in the field of international relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MSc International Relations programme is offered via two pathways. The International Relations pathway examines key issues in the contemporary international system and processes of global governance.

Secondly, the innovative International Intervention pathway deepens your understanding of this complex area and includes a placement option, allowing you to spend three months working in international politics.

There are a set of common compulsory modules for all pathways, in addition to two compulsory modules for your chosen pathway, and three optional modules from a range of international or European politics topics.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation or placement. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research
-Research in Practice
-Theories of International Relations
-Dissertation
-Placement
-Key Issues in International Relations
-Politics of International Intervention I
-Politics of International Intervention II
-Global Governance
-Critical Studies on Security and Terrorism
-International Political Economy
-International Security and Defence
-European Social Dimension
-EU External Relations
-EU and Neighbourhood
-International Trade
-Extractive Industries and Society: Problems and Policies
-Extractive Industries and Society: Case Studies
-Environmental Management, Development and Sustainability
-EU Counter-Terrorism Law
-International Human Rights Law
-Law of international organizations
-Law of Armed Conflict Optional
-Institutional Architecture of EU

CAREER PROSPECTS

Our MSc programme in International Relations is a great stepping stone in your career development, whatever your plans.

Through its assessed, three-month placement, the International Intervention pathway offers an excellent opportunity to enhance a wide range of transferable skills and build personal networks which will significantly enhance your employment opportunities upon graduation.

Students from the School have gone on to a wide range of employment choices. These include working for international organisations, national and local government, lobby groups and non-governmental organisations, as well as private businesses and media organisations.

We also offer doctoral supervision in a wide range of political subjects for talented students who wish to continue their studies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to:
-Enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of international relations, concerning global governance and/or terrorism and security and international intervention
-Deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of international relations, including theoretical developments in the sub-fields of terrorism and security and international intervention
-Enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding in at least three sub-fields of international politics: students take three programme compulsory modules, two pathway compulsory modules specific to their pathway (International Relations, International Intervention, Terrorism and Security), and two further modules from a list of optional modules particular to their pathway
-Provide students, with the opportunity, through the International Intervention pathway, to spend three months working in a field related to their degree (this will not only provide students with new insights into International Intervention but will also develop a broad array of transferable skills – such skills include self-management and development; managing tasks; communicating effectively and clearly; working with and relating to others; the application of specialist knowledge; the application of initiative and reflecting on one’s own learning outcomes)

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-Critical knowledge of contemporary debates in the study of international politics, particularly in relation to the international system and global governance, differing forms of intervention in response to poverty, humanitarian crisis, abuses of human rights, state failure and armed conflict
-In-depth understanding of international structures of governance and their impact on regional, national and local structures; and of theories of international relations
-Detailed knowledge and understanding within at least two sub-fields of international politics, for example development and humanitarian assistance; peace-making; peace-keeping and peace- building; use of international legal institutions and processes; and coercive military intervention to secure regime change
-Understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within international politics
-Understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of politics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
-Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
-Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
-Make sound judgements on the basis of incomplete evidence
-Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
-Construct reasoned argument
-Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills
-Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
-Carry out an advanced literature search
-Form effective arguments
-Organise own workload to meet deadlines
-Formulate research questions
-Design and conduct a research project, selecting appropriate methods of data collection and analysis
-Design and pilot questionnaires
-Design and conduct interviews
-Use software packages to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
-Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate and present ideas effectively
-Reason critically
-Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
-Organise and plan their own work
-Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
-Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
-Deploy a range of relevant research skills
-Make decisions in complex situations
-Take responsibility for their own learning

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?. Read more
We are world leaders in political science, asking difficult questions to find important answers. How do you put an end to armed conflict? What are the benefits and consequences of intervention? What role do national and international non-governmental organisations play in the prevention and resolution of conflict?

Our course helps you to understand the evolving field of conflict resolution, exploring the causes and effects of destructive conflict across the world, and scrutinising the theory and practice of how this can be managed peacefully. We provide you with a framework for understanding conflict resolution in inter- and intra-state issues, focusing on topics including:
-Mediation, negotiation, and collaborative problem solving
-Using conflict data sets and drawing geographical maps
-International development and human rights
-International relations and security studies
-Global and comparative politics

You additionally might have the option of studying an extracurricular module on non-violent movements, offered in collaboration with Slobdan Djinovic and Srdja Popovic of the Centre for Nonviolent Action and Strategies in Belgrade. This exciting course, previously offered at many US universities including Colorado College, Harvard University and New York University, has never been offered anywhere else in Europe.

Our dynamic, interdisciplinary approach combines traditional methods with contemporary theory and practices of non-violent movements, and we encourage you to experience the practical as well as the theoretical application of these topics through examining real case studies of international conflict.

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. You benefit from staff expertise in both conflict studies and international relations, with conflict and cooperation forming a core part of our Department of Government.

Our key teaching staff for this course are Professor Han Dorussen, Professor Ismene Gizelis, and Professor Kristian Gleditsch.

Professor Dorussen is Associate Editor for the Journal of Peace Research, and specialises in the relationship between trade and conflict, the use of economic policies in international politics, the governance of post-conflict societies, and policy convergence in the European Union. He has recently completed fieldwork examining the impact of the UN mission on the perception of security in Timor Leste.

Professor Gizelis specialises in conflict dynamics, peacekeeping, gender equality and post-conflict reconstruction, and communicable diseases. In addition, Professor Gizelis is acting as Core Investigator on a new research project, ‘Armed Conflict and Maternal Health in Sub-Saharan Africa’ (2014-16), with the innovative aim of going beyond consideration of the direct effect of interventions to also consider relevant political, socioeconomic and cultural factors.

Professor Gleditsch’s research focuses on conflict and cooperation, democratisation, and spatial dimensions of social and political processes. He is the director of a large EU-funded research project on non-violent actions. He is also the director of the Michael Nicholson Centre of Conflict and Cooperation.

Specialist facilities

-The Michael Nicholson Centre for Conflict and Cooperation is distinctive in its scientific approach to the study of conflict, emphasising rigorous formal theory and the development of systematic data and statistical methods for evaluating theory
-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-Make use of web-assisted learning, simulations, and challenging role-playing exercises
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MA Conflict Resolution will prepare you for a career in areas such as non-governmental organisations, international and national government, or the private sector.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Conflict Resolution
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Macroeconomics (Advanced)
-Economics of the European Union
-Economics of Transition
-Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
-Environmental Economics
-Psycho Analytic Theory
-Psychoanalysis of Groups and Organisations (optional)
-Thinking Psychoanalytically (optional)
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)
-Media Theory (optional)
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity (optional)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Texts and Documents (optional)
-Ethnography (optional)
-Dynamics of Home and Work (optional)
-Formative Debates in Criminology (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (optional)
-Topics in Contemporary Social Theory (optional)
-Sociological Research Design (optional)
-Panel Data Methods (optional)
-Introduction to Survey Design and Management (optional)
-Applied Sampling (optional)
-Dealing with Survey Non-response (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design (optional)
-Work-Based Project

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With the MSc Aircraft Maintenance Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme. Read more
With the MSc Aircraft Maintenance Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme.

Who is it for?

This programme is for those who have been working within the aircraft maintenance industry (for at least two years). Current students include engineers, maintenance staff, the majority have a license/professional education. We also welcome students with a military background. This Aircraft Maintenance Management MSc programme is tailored towards those working who cannot attend regular university schedules.

This course is compatible with The MoD's Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) - an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the UK Armed Forces. If you are/have been a member of the UK Armed Forces, you could be entitled to financial support to take this course.

Objectives

Airlines, MRO and other aviation companies are mostly led by license holders, aircraft engineers and many more. This means the demand for management knowledge is growing. Our programme gives students the opportunity to freshen their knowledge, learn the latest management techniques and build a lifelong network of peers.

With unexpected events affecting the aviation industry as well as increased competition and technological and regulatory changes, every organisation needs a core of up-to-date managers ready to succeed into leadership positions.

The programme is designed to deliver individual success. First initiated by the AJ Walters (AJW) to increase the career opportunities of aircraft engineers, today the programme is recognised as a key resource within the aircraft maintenance industry and as a benchmark for innovation.

Academic facilities

As a student you will benefit from learning within modern lecture theatres (equipped with the latest interactive AV systems) and modern IT laboratories.

A dynamic virtual learning environment (Moodle) gives you access to online assessment and communication tools as you study and you can work with specialist School facilities including:
-A flight deck and flight test course
-A320 procedure training
-Wind tunnels and micro turbines
-Optical compressors and fuel injection systems.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

A dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

This course gives you a recognised industry qualification, control of your own career and the ability to contribute to aircraft maintenance management. The course is very flexible and you can study while you work.

At the end of the programme you will have improved your:
-Presentation/speaking skills - through regular opportunities within each module and the project.
-Report writing and analytical skills - through coursework and the project.
-Personal management skills - through the careful use of resources to complete assignments on time.

The successful MSc graduate will have:
-A good understanding of business analysis, crisis, human motivation, and management of the aircraft maintenance industry.
-A sound understanding for the national and international regulatory and commercial business environment and the ability to prepare a sound business case.
-Knowledge of aspects of accident and incident investigation, human factors, safety risk management.
-A proven ability to research and write a substantial analytical report.

These include:
-Being able to assimilate core themes from the talks given by a number of industry speakers, some of whom may have different positions.
-Being able to write succinct and clear English.
-Preparing a valid business case for a company and, at least as important, to know when a potential case is not viable.
-Having a wider knowledge of the interfaces of any single organisation with others in the industry.
-Being able to make a short verbal presentation and to defend a project under examination.

Assessment

Each elective is assessed by two pieces of coursework, the core modules are assessed by one piece of coursework and an examination. Each module comprises:

Part I: Prior reading before the onsite module where appropriate.
Part II: Attendance at the institution (or other locations) for the module over three days.
Part III: Examinations are held at the end of the core modules.
Part IV: Coursework for assessment. Coursework is required within six weeks of the onsite module.

Modules

We explore aircraft maintenance management from a broad perspective so you will be exposed to areas as diverse as human resources, regulation, and crisis management. The academic framework has been created by the industry for the industry. This means you learn from the former British Airways human resources director in one module, and the industry’s crisis management expert in safety or the chief executive officer of a major maintenance facility in another.

The course is based on completing the Induction Workshop plus eight modules over one to five years, which are taught over three-day periods. Teaching takes place across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt.

Students also take on a project/dissertation in an aircraft maintenance related subject, which is usually completed within six to twelve months. From developing new safety measures to social media marketing in the aviation world, students choose their own research focus and often use the project as a way into a new career.

Students who choose not to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme within the five years, receive a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of four modules, including two core modules, or a Postgraduate Diploma on successful completion of eight modules.

Core modules
-Airline Maintenance (EPM906)
-Airworthiness (EPM897)
-Airline Operational Regulatory Compliance (EPM825)

To begin your MSc, you will be required to attend the Induction Workshop (IW), which gives you a thorough introduction into Higher Education and introduces all the tools and facilities available for your MSc. You will have to write a short essay after the IW, which will be your final assessment to be accepted into City, University of London.

Elective modules
-Airline Operations (EPM825)
-Air Transport Economics (EPM823)
-Airline Business (EPM831)
-Human Resource Management (EPM822)
-Psychology in Aviation Management (EPM966)
-Active Safety Management (EPM836)
-Airline Marketing (EPM821)
-Fleet Planning (EPM829)
-Developing a Business Plan (EPM969)
-Crisis Management (EPM828)
-Financial Accounting (EPM824)
-Sustainable Aviation (EPM975)
-Airports and Ground Handling (EPM968)
-Airline Revenue Management, Pricing and Distribution (EPM972)
-Safety Management - Tools and Methods (EPM833)
-Air Accident Investigation (EPM970)
-Leadership in Organisations (EPM971)
-Safety Risk Management (EPM973)
-Aviation Law (EPM978)
-Future Aviation (EPM980)

Dissertation - a dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Career prospects

This is a professional programme recognised by the aviation industry and accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society.

Airlines are increasingly expecting their managers to study the MSc from City, University of London, and our alumni network includes high-ranking individuals including safety managers, training captains, quality managers, flight safety officers, safety inspectors, safety consultants and accident investigators in civil aviation authorities, airlines and with other aircraft operators and defence forces worldwide.

Graduates may change or transform their careers as a result of the MSc.

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The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. Read more
The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/madisconfres/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals- 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
- Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. Read more
The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/mahumrightslaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Human Rights specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World – 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. Read more
The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maintlaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme provides a critical appreciation of the new legal regime emerging between international law and criminal justice symbolised by the creation of the International Criminal Court. Read more
This programme provides a critical appreciation of the new legal regime emerging between international law and criminal justice symbolised by the creation of the International Criminal Court.
Through a strong foundation in both international law and international criminal law, the programme offers the opportunity to develop expertise in terrorism studies, international policing, international organised crime, the laws of war and armed conflict, human rights and Islamic law.

Programme structure

In addition to the two core modules, Current Issues and Research in International Law and International Criminal Law, candidates take at least one module from the following: Terrorism Studies, War and Human Rights, International Policing, International Organized Crime, Contemporary Islamic Legal Issues, law of Armed Conflict, Feminist Legal Studies. Candidates may chose another of the above or one module form any other LLM programme. . The Dissertation must be deemed by the Dissertation committee to be substantially related to the area of International Law and Criminal Justice.

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