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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. Read more
he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. This discipline encompasses a wide range of life science areas, including ecology (e.g. population dynamics), epidemiology (e.g. spread of diseases), medicine (e.g. modelling cancer growth and treatment) and developmental biology.

This programme aims to equip students with the necessary technical skills to develop, analyse and interpret models applied to biological systems. Course work is supported by an extended and supervised project in life science modelling.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Dynamical Systems;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine.

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Stochastic Simulation;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Biologically Inspired Computation;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Modelling Invasive Tumour Growth;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Wiring of Nervous System;
Vegetation Patterning in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

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Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. Read more
Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. This programme aims to provide an understanding of climate change causes, impacts, mitigation and adaptation measures from a life science perspective in conjunction with developing a wide variety of mathematical modelling skills that can be used to investigate the impacts of climate change.

The programme closely follows the structure of our Applied Mathematical Sciences MSc. Two of the mandatory courses will specifically focus on understanding the issues related to climate change and are taught by the School of Life Sciences.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures;
Dynamical Systems (recommended);
Stochastic Simulation (recommended)

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Applied Linear Algebra;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Bayesian Inference.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Climate Change Impact;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Vegetation Patterns in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

The final part of the MSc is an extended project in mathematical modelling the impacts of climate change on environmental systems, giving the opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth guided by leading research academics.

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Throughout the globe, the issues of water scarcity, water security, water economics and health and sanitation all rely on high-quality hydrogeology knowledge. Read more

Why this course?

Throughout the globe, the issues of water scarcity, water security, water economics and health and sanitation all rely on high-quality hydrogeology knowledge. This MSc will prepare you as a functional hydrogeologist to meet the needs of:
- industry
- regulators
- non-governmental organisations
- government
- consultants

The course provides you with the theoretical and practical skills to succeed in a career as a hydrogeologist. You’ll develop sound fieldwork skills which are sought-after by employers.

Study mode and duration:
- 12 months full-time
- 24 months part-time
- 36 months part-time, online
- 60 months Open access

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/hydrogeology/

You’ll study

The MSc involves a curriculum of seven core classes and a range of optional classes. Each module is taught two to three hours per week over eight to 12 weeks.

Alternatively, the Open Access programme allows professionals to take single modules for Continuous Professional Development (CPD) purposes, or build up towards six modules to gain a Postgraduate Certificate.

MSc research project

Following successful completion of the taught component, you’ll undertake a thesis project. We encourage you to complete this overseas. Our MSc course leader has extensive contacts in arid countries such as Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, the Middle East and Asia, giving you valuable, varied learning opportunities and practical experience around the world.

Field camp

In the spring semester you go on a week-long field camp in Scotland. You’ll get the opportunity to put much of the learned theory into practice.

Site visits introduce you to the geology and hydrogeology of the study area. You’ll gain practical experience in conducting pump tests, recovery tests and chemical sampling.

Work placement

As part of the class Study in Collaboration with Industry you undertake a work placement where you report to the offices of a hydrogeological organisation and actively contribute to one of their ongoing projects.

This is a very valuable experience for you as it allows you to work as hydrogeologists for a number of weeks exposing yourself to a working environment as well as allowing you to build up contacts within industry.

Attendance

One year full-time study involves attendance at classes over two terms, plus a dissertation during the third term.

Part-time (open to UK/EU students only) involves class attendance in Years 1 & 2 and a dissertation in Year 2. Depending on timetables, just two days work release per week may be needed for 24 weeks in the year.

You can also study this course part-time through online distance learning, over 36 months, offering a flexible learning mode of study.

Facilities

In the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering we have invested £6 million in state-of-the-art laboratories.

Teaching staff

The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Strathclyde has one of the strongest Geo-Engineering focus of any related department in the UK.
- Professor Bob Kalin, Course Leader
- Dr Francesco Sindico, Reader in International Environmental Law at the School of Law

Accreditation

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired a partial CEng accredited undergraduate first degree.

Industrial placement

You've the opportunity to undertake a work placement class where you’ll work with a hydrogeological organisation and actively contribute to one of their ongoing projects.

Open Access

Home students can also choose to study through Open Access. This is initially a non-graduating route. You register for one module at a time and have the option to build up credits eventually leading to a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc. You can take up to five years to achieve the qualification.

This option is popular with students in employment, who may wish to undertake modules for Continuing Professional Development purposes.

Home students who do not meet the normal MSc entry requirements for this programme are welcome to apply through the Open Access route instead.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Careers

Graduates with an MSc in Hydrogeology are in very high demand as there is an expected shortage of hydrogeologists that will continue for the next decade.

- How much will I earn?
Starting salaries for a hydrogeologist typically range from £20,000 to £25,000 per year. Salaries for senior hydrogeologists range from £30,000 to £45,000 per year, while experienced professionals and managers can expect to earn £50,000 to £60,000 per year. Salaries tend to be higher in private companies/ consultancies than in the public sector.*

*Information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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In the Water Engineering Department an academic staff of 15 professors and researchers is coaching small groups of international students in courses, lab… Read more
In the Water Engineering Department an academic staff of 15 professors and researchers is coaching small groups of international students in courses, lab and field experiments as well as projects concerning every part of the water cycle.The heads of all water related faculties of the TU Berlin are working together to address major challenges for the growing population in arid and semiarid regions while enhancing the cooperation with the closest disciplines Urban Development and Energy Engineering.

Besides newest analytical and field equipment, various test stands enable the students to apply their theoretically acquired knowledge hands-on. Throughout their studies in Egypt and Germany our master students get trained to become tomorrow’s problem solving managers, engineers and researchers to cope with the challenges of the rapidly increasing water scarcity.

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Water security is a major concern facing humanity and engineers are the primary professionals tackling this issue. Read more

About the Course

Water security is a major concern facing humanity and engineers are the primary professionals tackling this issue. Annually, more than 3.4 million people die from water related diseases while 1 in 9 people world-wide do not have access to safe and clean drinking water and 1 in 3 people world-wide are affected by water scarcity. In addition, population growth, urbanisation, climate change and increasing energy demands, are placing unprecedented pressures on our finite water resources. This 1-year MSc programme aims to equip students with the skills needed to design solutions to deliver safe/clean water. The programme will also give opportunities to students to study the economics and management of large projects.

Programme Objectives

The MSc in Water resources Engineering will provide students with the technical competences to provide solutions to water security issues. Core modules will address technical aspects of water provision, water resource management and water / wastewater treatment. A primary objective of the programme is to ensure that students have a thorough understanding of modern hydrological modelling tools. The programme has a strong emphasis on the design of hydrological systems, with students working in groups to solve real-world problems. Graduates of this programme will be in a position to make significant contributions to solving water resource problems in both industry and academic roles worldwide.

Programme Structure and Content

This is a 90ECTS programme, one full year in duration, starting in September and finishing August. The programme comprises an individual research project and thesis (30 ECTS), an integrated group design project (15 ECTS) and a number of taught (core and elective) modules (55 ECTS).

The core taught modules include: Hydrology & Water Resources Engineering, Hydrological Modelling, Design of Sustainable Environmental Systems, Water Quality, Water Resources in Arid Regions, and Applied Field Hydrogeology. Sample elective modules include: Computational Methods in Engineering, Global Change, Offshore & Coastal Engineering, Environmental Economics, Project Management, and Estimates and Costing of Engineering Projects.

The Integrated Group Design Project involves the design of components of a water supply and/or treatment system and will be typical of real-world water resources engineering project. Each student will also complete an individual minor research thesis in the area of water resources engineering. This thesis accounts for one third of the overall programme mark.

What’s Special About CoEI/NUIG in this Area

• Water engineering has been taught at graduate level at NUI Galway for over 40 years. During this period students from over 50 countries have graduated from NUI Galway.
• The MSc in Water Resources Engineering is a re-launch of NUI Galway's International Postgraduate Hydrology Programme established by the late Prof Eamonn Nash. Many of the staff who lectured on the Hydrology Programme contribute to the current programme; so the recognised tradition of world-class teaching in water engineering at NUI Galway continues.
• Currently NUIG staff are involved in large-scale funded research projects in water resources, facilitated by the world-class research facilities at NUI Galway.

Testimonials

"It was a privilege and a pleasure to participate in the Galway MSc programme with world renowned hydrologists, excellent technicians and support staff, and Irish and international students. The comprehensive programme provided an excellent basis for my subsequent career in hydrology."
Charles Pearson, MSc Hydrology, NUIG, 1990 Graduating Class
Regional Manager, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand

"I am fortunate enough to have completed a world-class course in Hydrology at National University of Ireland, Galway which was taught by world-leading academics and researchers. Since my course completion in 1990, I have been able to play a key role in hydrologic application and research in Bangladesh and Australia based on the knowledge I gained from my studies in Galway."
Professor Ataur Rahman, MSc Hydrology, NUIG, 1990 Graduating Class
Water and Environmental Engineering, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney

"NUI Galway gave me priceless experiences; it was my first travel outside the Philippines. Being a graduate of NUI Galway opened doors of opportunities for me. My being who I am now started with my NUI Galway experience and I will always be grateful to the institution, to my friends and to my former professors."
Dolores San Diego-Cleofas, MSc Hydrology, NUIG, 1995 Graduating Class,
Assistant Professor at University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Phillipines

How to Apply

Applications are made online via the Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC): https://www.pac.ie
Please use the following PAC application code for your programme:
M.Sc. Water Resources Engineering - PAC code GYE23

Scholarship Opportunities

There are a number of funding opportunities for International Students planning to attend NUI Galway. Information on these can be found at: http://www.nuigalway.ie/international-students/feesfinance/internationalscholarships/

The College of Engineering and Informatics will also award the Nash Scholarship in Water Resource Engineering. This is in memory of our deceased colleague, Eamonn Nash who was our Professor of Engineering Hydrology for many years, and was a well-known in the international engineering community. The “Nash cascade” and “Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient” were named after him, and these still feature in scholarly publications. Over four hundred senior hydrologists throughout the world received their post-graduate hydrological education at this University. Please visit our website for more information on scholarships: http://www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/feesandscholarships/

The MSc in Water Resources Engineering is accredited by Irish Aid as an eligible course for their International Fellowship Training Programme (IFTP). Through the IFTP, Irish Aid provides funding for students from eligible developing countries to undertake postgraduate studies on selected courses in colleges and universities in Ireland. More information on Irish Aid Fellowships can be found on the website of the Irish Council for International Students at:
http://www.icosirl.ie/eng/irish_aid_fellowships/fellowship_training_programme

Further information is available on our website:
http://www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/mscwaterresourcesengineering/

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