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Masters Degrees (Archivist)

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more
The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

Degree information

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focussing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules:
-Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
-Creation and Capture
-Curation and Stewardship
-The Record-keeping Professional
-Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Preservation
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Information Governance
-Manuscript Studies
-Oral History: from Creation to Curation
-Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
-Standards for Digital Recordkeeping
-Extended Practicum

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, presentations and practical assignments.

Placement
The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip iexperience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capture core module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Assistant Record Manager, House of Lords
-Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces
-Project Archivist, Cambridgeshire County Council
-Archivist, National Motor Museum.
-Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)

Employability
This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

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The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources. Read more
The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources.

Why this programme

◾The programme is designed for those with a vocational interest in records management, archives and digital curation. It will prepare you to work in these fields, and give you a thorough grounding for continuing with research.
◾You will complete a two-week work placement in an archive, records management or digital repository.
◾As a graduate you will be eligible to be accredited by both the Archives & Records Association and CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), providing valuable professional recognition in both the archive and library fields.

Programme structure

You will develop skills in the core competencies of archives, records, and information management, creating and managing digital records, digital curation and preservation issues, archival theory, user needs, and description,
cataloguing, and navigation.

The programme consists of six courses spread over two semesters. You will take courses in:
◾Archives and records information management
◾Records and evidence
◾Description, cataloguing and navigation
◾Management, curation and preservation of digital materials.

Optional courses include:
◾2D digitisation
◾Law for cultural heritage institutions
◾Archives and records theory
◾Records and the transition to the digital
◾Palaeography
◾Phenomenology.

To graduate with the MSc you will also need to complete a course in research methods and professional studies, and produce a dissertation.

Career prospects

As a graduate, you will be well placed for a career as an archivist, records manager or digital curator within a variety of public and private organisations.

Positions held by recent graduates include Assistant Archivist and Records Manager.

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This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. Read more
This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to develop relevant research skills.

Why study Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), of key aspects of the history of Britain and Ireland in the twentieth century. It is taught by leading researchers in their fields, and students attracted to this degree pathway will benefit from the latest research and historiography. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to further develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

The MLitt in Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's great about Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

The course is made up of the following modules:

Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This flexible course brings together a team of distinguished tutors and a rich field of optional course units. The MA has been specially devised to study the theories, concepts and practical skills that underpin the powerful discipline of history when studied at an advanced level. Read more
This flexible course brings together a team of distinguished tutors and a rich field of optional course units. The MA has been specially devised to study the theories, concepts and practical skills that underpin the powerful discipline of history when studied at an advanced level.

You will select your own optional units to make a bespoke course – whether with a broader/thematic or more concentrated focus, depending on your individual interests. You will also take a methodology unit and a skills unit which includes visiting speakers from the fields of archives, museums, publishing and the media. Finally, the dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake original research on a topic of your own choice, under individual supervision.

This is an attractive advanced qualification, especially suitable if you are seeking employment in fields involving the professional creation, evaluation and dissemination of knowledge. It is also ideal if you are intending to proceed to the MPhil leading to a PhD in History.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mahistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will have the opportunity to study units from across all MA History options, giving you the chance to tailor your course to suit your interests (options include some courses taught at other London colleges).

- You will have access to some of the richest facilities for historical research anywhere in the world; in addition to the College’s substantial library collections, there are the National Archives, British Library and libraries of the University of London.

- Our academic staff are at the leading edge of their research and as such offer you an exceptional variety of expertise.

- We host an exciting range of research seminars that are open for you to participate in.

Department research and industry highlights

Noted for depth, breadth and innovation, the research output of Royal Holloway historians ranges from ancient to contemporary times, from Britain and Europe to America, the Middle and Far East and Australia, and from political history to economic, social, cultural, intellectual, medical, environmental, and gender history. In particular, the History Department has special strengths in social, cultural, and gender history, and in the history of ideas - with research that covers a notable range of countries, periods, and approaches.

We have a number of research centres:
- Bedford Centre for the History of Women
- 1970s Network
- Research Centre for the Holocaust and Twentieth-Century History
- Hellenic Institute
- Centre for the Study of the Domestic Interior

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a high level of skill in the research, analysis and presentation of complex/fragmentary data

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of the major concepts and theories that inform the subject

- an understanding of the various explanations and theories for change and continuity in history

- an understanding of the underlying social, cultural, economic, religious, ideological and political changes occurring during the periods studied.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered roles such as university lecturer, archivist, curator, journalist, librarian, PR consultant, teacher, freelance researcher, radio producer and a wide variety of other jobs within the ‘knowledge industries’. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Since the world went online, information has grown rapidly in volume and become infinitely more accessible. At the same time, information science and systems have been converging towards a common focus on information discovery, organisation, and management. Read more
Since the world went online, information has grown rapidly in volume and become infinitely more accessible. At the same time, information science and systems have been converging towards a common focus on information discovery, organisation, and management. Information management is essential in libraries, archives, museums and business, and is a much sought-after skill in careers spanning the sectors for example, in governmental, legal, financial, media and publishing organisations. Meanwhile, owners and users of information need to be able to access and evaluate information in faster and more intuitive ways.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Course detail

The MSc Information Management is vocational and practice-oriented, designed to support information and knowledge managers. The course provides an excellent balance of traditional information management and library science, informed by cutting edge developments in information architecture and data management. It's an important route for anyone seeking professional chartership or progress to management roles.

Modules

• Information Contexts (30 credits)
• Knowledge Organisation (30 credits)
• Information and Digital Literacy (15 credits)
• Personal and Organisational Management (15 credits)
• Information and Knowledge Management
• Data Management
• Designing The User Experience
• Big Data
• Cloud Computing
• Linked, Open Data and The Internet of Things
• Machine Learning and Predictive Analytics
• Social Media and Web Science
• Dissertation

Format

You'll learn through lectures, discussions, tutorials, practical exercises and independent reading, as well as working together in small groups.

The course has a virtual learning environment online that supports you throughout your studies. It's a useful way to communicate with fellow students and teaching staff, find administrative details about the modules, and access course materials.

We regularly welcome specialist tutors to the department to contribute to specific modules.

Assessment

Assessment in most modules is through written coursework, portfolios, presentations and written exams. The supervisor and second marker will assess your dissertation.

Careers / Further study

This qualification is an excellent route to range of careers, and as a complement to existing career skills and professional development for example, for those moving into managerial roles. Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in a wide range of sectors, including educational, public sector and museum archivist roles, plus a variety of consultancy and professional services positions.

Alumni have prominent roles in local library services, university libraries in Bristol and Bath, with the government, and in records management roles in public and private sectors.

For anyone looking to pursue PhD research positions, this course is considered a highly valuable preparatory route.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. Read more
Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such as oral history or historical databases.

Why study History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), in wide areas of the history of Britain, Scotland, Europe, Russia and North America. Themes range across political, cultural, military, religious, economic and social history, taught within a department of research specialists. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as palaeography, historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Students can choose either a generic MLitt in History, or named pathways in:
Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

The MLitt in History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. Due to this a variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

All our History MLitt degrees have a common core module (40 credits):

History Skills and Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
If you are enrolled on the general History degree, you then choose two further modules, either specialist modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History of the Book (semester 2)
or one or two of our flexible modules, where you choose the topic:

Taught History MLitt module, (semester 1)
Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)
All students then complete a History dissertation (summer).

If you are enrolled on a specialist degree, then you replace the semester 1 flexible module with the relevant specialist module. Visit the course webpage for full details:

Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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A research degree in your chosen history subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise. Read more

A research degree in your chosen history subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise.

You work closely with a director of studies and a supervisor who are specialists in your chosen field to produce an extended thesis of up to 80,000 words in the case of doctoral research.

We have a vibrant research culture and we value and support all our research students who make a vital contribution to the intellectual life of the University. There are regular research training events, seminars and informal meetings where you can practise delivering conference papers in a supportive environment. Funds are available to support you in attending conferences and we encourage you to deliver papers and publish your work.

We are regularly advertising studentships funded by Sheffield Hallam University directly or through the North of England Consortium for the Arts and Humanities. It may also be possible to apply for Arts and Humanities Research Council studentships. Some part-time teaching may also be available.

We are a group of 18 historians specialising in the period from the late eighteenth century to the present. We have research clusters in:

  • imperial and global history
  • economic and business history
  • women’s and gender history
  • European history
  • popular culture and politics in Britain

Current staff research interests are wide-ranging and include • Africans in Europe/Black European history • modern Armenia • Britain and the Great War • the history of Czechoslovakia • colonialism and anti-colonialism in India • economic crises and disasters • European colonialism and imperialism • feminism and empire • German history in the twentieth century • globalisation • industrial and natural disasters • labour history • local and community history • migration • military and naval history • nineteenth-century radicalism and popular politics • rural history • Stalinism • US history.

Please see the Humanities staff pages for a list of staff and their current research.

This degree is hosted in the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School.

Course structure

Full-time – at least 35 hours a week on average over three years

Part-time – at least 12 hours a week on average for up to seven years

There is a split mode available for international students who want to study in their own country.

Various start dates

Your study depends on your chosen area of research but includes a compulsory research methods module for students without prior research qualifications at postgraduate level.

Assessment

  • research programme submitted for approval by our research degrees committee
  • report and oral presentation for the confirmation of PhD stage
  • submission of thesis and viva

Employability

Following your research degree, you can go on to teach history in further and higher education. You can also find careers in other related areas such as

  • museums
  • work as an archivist
  • a career in libraries
  • university administration
  • the media.


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This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

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This course will provide you with an understanding of the diverse forces at work in Scottish history since the early modern period, with a special focus on social, cultural and political development, and Scottish connections with the wider world. Read more
This course will provide you with an understanding of the diverse forces at work in Scottish history since the early modern period, with a special focus on social, cultural and political development, and Scottish connections with the wider world.

Why study Scottish History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), of Scotland's history from the Reformation to the present. It is taught by leading researchers in their fields, and students attracted to this degree pathway will benefit from the latest research and historiography. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to further develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

The MLitt in Scottish History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about Scottish History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

The course is made up of the following modules:

Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Read more
Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. This course addresses issues of growing concern, and builds on the current expertise within our department to offer a distinctive programme which is not found in any other Scottish university.

Why study Global Empires at Dundee?

This degree programme is designed to provide you with an understanding of the development of the major European empires from the early modern period to the present. The course provides an opportunity for you to examine issues such as the impact of empires on the rest of the world, their rivalries, and the economic consequences of their imperial activity.

The course is taught by leading specialists in American, Spanish, Dutch and British history and utilises archival and digital resources held at the university and in nearby collections.

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. The MLitt in Global Empires is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for all students who wish to gain a grounding in, and a deeper appreciation of, the major topics and historiography of the major European global empires and the historical origins of modern globalisation. It is also suitable if you are interested in gaining additional skills and knowledge to further your employment prospects. If you wish to proceed to further study for a PhD, this course will also provide you with the necessary research skills.

Research Skills:
You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such oral history or historical databases. The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Aims of the Programme

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of aspects of imperial and global history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed these developments over the past five centuries.

In addition the course aims to equip you with the core competencies, knowledge and skills required to understand and interpret sources and historiography in the context of your own research and to gain experience in using those skills in independent research. Finally the course aims to further develop your written communication and presentation skills.

How is the course taught?

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. The modules are taught through mixtures of introductory lectures, seminars, involving students in weekly journals, and group work.

Programme content

The course is made up of the following modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

Careers

Due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

However, for those wishing to use their studies directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of Scottish history and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

The course will therefore contribute to enhancing prospects in careers such as: teaching, libraries, archives, museums, heritage and tourism industries, as well as providing content relevant to the continuing professional development of employees in many public-facing roles.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Build a pathway, tailored to your personal and professional interests, through a range of optional modules and individual research projects. Read more
  • Build a pathway, tailored to your personal and professional interests, through a range of optional modules and individual research projects
  • Includes a unique pathway in public history and public engagement delivered by staff actively engaged in the media and eminent researchers in material culture
  • Focus on building your own research network and engagement in social media
  • Work with academics at the cutting edge of research

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • USA and China
  • Early modern emotions
  • Bolshevik visions
  • Violence and conflict in twentieth century Africa
  • Building a new Jerusalem: the emergence of the Labour Party at the turn of the twentieth century

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Thanks to the possibility of building your own pathway within our MA programme, you can specialise in your preferred area.

You may continue your academic development with doctoral research, or pursue a career as a teacher, archivist, or in museums. Many of our students have specialised in local history and later progressed to jobs in the heritage and conservation sector.

In addition, your experience of individual research will help you to develop valuable transferable skills. You will have demonstrated your ability to understand and apply complex ideas; to collect and analyse large quantities of information; to manage your own time and motivate yourself; to construct reasoned and articulate arguments; and to reach carefully balanced judgements. This should equip you to embark upon a range of professional careers.



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This is the only history of art and archaeology degree in Europe focused on the great religious traditions of Asia. Read more
This is the only history of art and archaeology degree in Europe focused on the great religious traditions of Asia. It includes within its scope diverse countries, regions and time periods from antiquity to the present, with a particular emphasis on Buddhism in South, Central and Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, China, Korea and Japan. Hinduism, Shinto and animistic and syncretic practices are also studied. Students consider iconography, ritual, faith and pilgrimage in their multiple regional and historical guises. They study temple buildings, statues and paintings, formal, informal and popular.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of Asia, many of whom are principally concerned with religious art. Their ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as music and religion in Asia, historically and in the present. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the religions, languages, history and cultures of Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maraa/

Teaching & Learning

- Teaching
Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

- Assessment
For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This unique interdisciplinary programme provides the opportunity for intensive historical, literary and art-historical study. The MA provides a thorough grounding in the skills required for advanced study in the medieval and early modern periods. Read more
This unique interdisciplinary programme provides the opportunity for intensive historical, literary and art-historical study.

The MA provides a thorough grounding in the skills required for advanced study in the medieval and early modern periods. It challenges you to engage with the evidence and methods of different disciplines in order to equip you with the wide range of research techniques crucial for studying the period.

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)

We are an interdisciplinary centre for the study of Medieval and Early Modern periods. Our 28 teaching staff are drawn from English, History, Architecture, Classical & Archaeological Studies, History & Philosophy of Art, and the Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

MEMS offers a successful, interdisciplinary MA programme, which attracts students from across the world. A thriving community of enterprising, supportive graduate students study for research degrees and benefit from the Centre’s involvement in the prestigious EU-funded Erasmus Mundus doctoral programme, Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME). We have close relationships with Canterbury Cathedral and the Archaeological Trust, which allow our students access to a wide range of unique historical, literary and material evidence.

National ratings

School of English -

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of English was ranked 10th for research intensity and 15th for research power in the UK.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 95% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

School of History -

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of History was ranked 8th for research intensity and in the top 20 in the UK for research power.

An impressive 100% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality. The School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

As well as a compulsory module in disciplinary methods and an exciting and varied range of optional modules. In addition, you produce a final dissertation of 12-15,000 words, for which you receive one-to-one supervision.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MT864
HI874 - Religion and Society in Seventeenth-Century England (30 credits) - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/HI874
MT859 - Word and Image in Tudor England (30 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MT859

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and dissertation. The skills modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examination.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in the medieval and early modern periods
- introduce you to a wide range of literary and historical sources and to encourage you to identify and develop your own interests and expertise in the medieval and early modern periods
- enable you to undertake interdisciplinary work
- enable you to understand and use a variety of concepts, approaches and research methods to develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between and within the relevant disciplines
- develop your capacities to think critically and to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form
- develop your abilities to assimilate and organise a mass of diverse information
- offer you the experience of a variety of teaching, research and study skills
- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement
- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate
- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development
- offer you learning opportunities that are enjoyable, involve realistic workloads, are pedagogically based within a research-led framework and offer appropriate support for students from a diverse range of backgrounds.

Careers

The transferable skills gained from this postgraduate programme are enhanced by the University of Kent’s employability initiative and careers advice service. Many of our recent graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, museum or archivist work. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.htmlhttps://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture. Read more
We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture.

Academic staff interests include: early modern material culture; late medieval art history; medieval and early modern religious history; Anglo-Saxon archaeology and liturgy; early modern politics; medieval and early modern drama; and textual editing.

At present, research topics include: the Reformation; visual and manuscript culture; community; the plays of John Lyly; medieval ecclesiastical architecture; female sexuality and transexuality; priory management; deviant and vernacular language; and kingship. You will be part of a vibrant and varied community of researchers from different disciplines.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/152/medieval-and-early-modern-studies

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)

We are an interdisciplinary centre for the study of Medieval and Early Modern periods. Our 28 teaching staff are drawn from English, History, Architecture, Classical & Archaeological Studies, History & Philosophy of Art, and the Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

MEMS offers a successful, interdisciplinary MA programme, which attracts students from across the world. A thriving community of enterprising, supportive graduate students study for research degrees and benefit from the Centre’s involvement in the prestigious EU-funded Erasmus Mundus doctoral programme, Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME). We have close relationships with Canterbury Cathedral and the Archaeological Trust, which allow our students access to a wide range of unique historical, literary and material evidence.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library have unparalleled holdings of manuscripts and early printed books. Kent’s Templeman Library holds a good stock of facsimiles, scholarly editions, monographs and journals, and we are within easy reach of the British Library, The National Archives, and other London research libraries. There are good online computing facilities across campus and, in addition, our students have special access to postgraduate computer terminals and the postgraduate student room provided by the School of History.

The Centre runs a weekly research seminar, and special termly, public lectures to which we welcome distinguished speakers. These events are at the heart of the Centre’s activities. We also run a full programme of conferences and colloquia.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Historical Research; English Historical Review; Renaissance Studies; Medium Aevum; Transactions of the Royal Historical Society; and Studies in the Age of Chaucer.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

The research interests of our staff cover areas as broad as: religion, ideas, material culture, theatre and performance culture, gender, economy, food and drink, legal history, war, visual culture, politics, architecture, history of books and manuscripts, environment and travel, art history, and literature.

Careers

The transferable skills gained from this postgraduate programme are enhanced by the University of Kent’s employability initiative and careers advice service. Many of our recent graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, museum or archivist work. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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