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Masters Degrees (Archivist)

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more

The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

About this degree

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focusing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
  • Creation and Capture
  • Curation and Stewardship
  • The Record-keeping Professional
  • Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include

  • Collections Care
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Information Governance
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
  • Database Systems and Design
  • Oral History

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, and practical assignments.

Placement

The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capturecore module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archives and Records Management MA

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Archivist, Beaulieu
  • Senior Digital Archivist, The National Archives
  • Archivist, Royal Asiatic Society
  • Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)
  • Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces

Employability

This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources. Read more

The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources.

Why this programme

  • The programme is designed for those with a vocational interest in records management, archives and digital curation. It will prepare you to work in these fields, and give you a thorough grounding for continuing with research.
  • You will complete a two-week work placement in an archive, records management or digital repository.
  • As a graduate you will be eligible to be accredited by both the Archives & Records Association and CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), providing valuable professional recognition in both the archive and library fields.

Programme structure

You will develop skills in the core competencies of archives, records, and information management, creating and managing digital records, digital curation and preservation issues, archival theory, user needs, and description,

cataloguing, and navigation.

The programme consists of six courses spread over two semesters. You will take courses in:

  • Archives and records information management
  • Records and evidence
  • Description, cataloguing and navigation
  • Management, curation and preservation of digital materials.

Optional courses include: 

  • 2D digitisation
  • Law for cultural heritage institutions
  • Archives and records theory
  • Records and the transition to the digital
  • Palaeography
  • Phenomenology.

To graduate with the MSc you will also need to complete a course in research methods and professional studies, and produce a dissertation.

Career prospects

As a graduate, you will be well placed for a career as an archivist, records manager or digital curator within a variety of public and private organisations.

Positions held by recent graduates include Assistant Archivist and Records Manager.



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Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. Read more
Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. This postgraduate course in history will help you develop the skills needed to become a historian, with a taught foundation module in the first term that will acquaint you with the theory, tools, techniques and research skills of historical analysis. We will look at the varied primary sources through which we study the past, from laws and official reports to diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers, oral testimony, paintings, cartoons, music, film, architecture, landscape, archaeological remains and the internet. We will consider how a secondary source differs from a primary one and the problems involved in interpreting a source and ascertaining its truthfulness and reliability.

Thereafter, the course offers 2 routes for you to choose between: the first route is research focused and will support you in producing a dissertation of 7000 words on the historical subject that most interests you; the taught route lets you select 1 module from any of the extensive range of option modules offered by the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology.

This programme is ideal for those who wish to pursue their passion for the past, those who want to experience postgraduate historical study without committing to a full Master’s degree, and those who are changing direction and moving to history from a different undergraduate subject.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/GCGHISTO_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Read about Birkbeck research that crosses disciplines and focuses on pressing questions within the social sciences and humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/sshp/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- This postgraduate course in history provides the opportunity to pursue your passion for history and undertake independent study and research in the time periods and subject areas that most interest you.

- If you have a degree in a subject other than history, but would like to study history at postgraduate level, this course is ideal for making the conversion between subjects.

- We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. Other nearby specialist centres of research include the Institute of Archaeology, the Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Historical Research, all of which have internationally renowned library collections and run seminars that you can attend.

- Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/) is ranked in the top 20 nationally and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.

- Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, delivering stimulating teaching.

- The department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.

- Find out more about why you should study with us (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/prospective-students/why-study-with-us).

- Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Course structure

To gain the graduate certificate, you must successfully complete modules worth 60 credits.

You take the module Foundations of History: Sources and Debates (worth 30 credits), and then choose either the:
- Research route: work towards a dissertation of 7000 words (worth 30 credits), or the
- Taught route: take 1 undergraduate module from those on offer from the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (worth 30 credits).

Module:
Foundations of History: Sources and Debates

Teaching and assessment

Teaching
This programme aims to encourage and support students in independent learning and original research. This will be facilitated through a mixture of seminars and one-to-one supervision supporting independent study.

Assessment
Assessment for Foundations of History: Sources and Debates consists of 1 essay of 2500-3000 words and either a second essay of 2500-3000 words or a literature review essay of 2500 words. Students on the research route submit a dissertation of 6000-7000 words.

Careers and employability

Graduates can pursue careers in research and archiving, education, the heritage industry, publication and the media, the charity sector, and journalism. Possible professions include historian, higher education lecturer, or archivist. This degree provides a range of transferable skills, which may be useful in becoming a journalist, heritage manager, politician’s assistant, academic librarian, or museum/gallery curator.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-history-classics-and-archaeology).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Gain a deeper understanding of economic fundamentals, and the origins and likely long-term consequences of contemporary economic policies. Read more
  • Gain a deeper understanding of economic fundamentals, and the origins and likely long-term consequences of contemporary economic policies
  • Learn how to apply rigorous economic analysis to deepen our understanding of the past
  • Compare economic growth and living standards across space and time using both qualitative and quantitative approaches to historical data
  • Make an original contribution to our understanding of past economies through your research dissertation

What will you study?

  • Research methods
  • Current themes in economic history research
  • Approaches to ancient trade and navigation
  • The archaeology of money: coins, power and society
  • Topics in the history of finance

What career can you have?

Thanks to the possibility of building your own pathway within our MA programme, you can specialise in your preferred area.

You may continue your academic development with doctoral research, or pursue a career as a teacher, archivist, or in museums. Many of our students have specialised in local history and later progressed to jobs in the heritage and conservation sector.

In addition, your experience of individual research will help you to develop valuable transferable skills. You will have demonstrated your ability to understand and apply complex ideas; to collect and analyse large quantities of information; to manage your own time and motivate yourself; to construct reasoned and articulate arguments; and to reach carefully balanced judgements. This should equip you to embark upon a range of professional careers.



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This online masters degree is for audio professionals who wish to enhance and formalise their industrial experience with industry relevant theory and practices. Read more
This online masters degree is for audio professionals who wish to enhance and formalise their industrial experience with industry relevant theory and practices.

The degree is made up of three parts: taught classes, work-based learning, and a research project. All of these elements are designed to apply theory and advanced practice to enhance current approaches to sound design for linear and interactive media.

The MSc Sound Design is delivered over either 18 or 30 months on a part time basis. All of the modules are delivered by distance learning. In addition, you will also develop a deep understanding of how to assess approaches of affecting audiences’ perceptions of linear and interactive media using sound design.

Emphasis is placed on cognisance with professional standards for the production and documentation of sound designs for linear and interactive media, and familiarity with a comprehensive set of methods of assessing listening experiences.

The course builds upon Edinburgh Napier University’s close contacts with internationally recognised professional sound designers for both linear and interactive media.

http://www.napier.ac.uk/courses/msc-sound-design-postgraduate-distance-learning-part-time

Year 1

• Listening
• Sound design for linear media
• Sound design for interactive media
• Advanced professional practice

In the first year, you will study Advanced Professional Practice (APP) for three trimesters. This allows you to tailor your learning needs to those of your organisation or the relevant industries.
Within the first few weeks of this module, under the direction of your academic supervisor you will develop your own learning agreement, which defines the deliverables of this module. If you are an employee you will do this in negotiation with your organisation.

If you are freelance, you may either negotiate with key clients or discuss an equivalent with your supervisor. Your supervisor will mentor you throughout the three trimesters towards the achievement of the deliverables. You will provide a reflective journal on your learning.
During the first year, you will also study one module per trimester: sound design for linear media, listening and sound design for interactive media. These modules will be taken in the order determined by the date of entry to the course.

Each module is independent of the others. One objective of the APP module is for you to apply immediately, in your practice, the knowledge gained from these three taught modules. After successful completion of the year, you will be eligible for a PG Dip Sound Design. In the second year, you will complete your MSc dissertation in part time mode.

Year 2

Masters Dissertation

In this 60 credit module you will take control of your studies to produce a substantial piece of focussed academic research. Success in the dissertation module indicates an ability to work independently, so you are expected to take the initiative and manage your own project. In effect, you are undertaking independent research as an apprenticeship to an experienced academic supervisor.

Careers

This degree gives you the opportunity to build on existing competencies and develop new skills in linear and interactive media sound design. The emphasis is on becoming an advanced sound professional within linear and/or interactive media.

Career opportunities:
• sound engineer
• sound editor
• sound designer
• sound researcher
• sound archivist
• sound artist
• sound recordist

Currently sound designers can gain employment in:
• art
• audio Books
• audio Branding
• computing (Auditory Displays, Sonification, Web)
• education
• film
• product design
• radio
• soundscape design (domestic, leisure, retail, travel, workplace)
• television
• theatre
• video games

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

Fees and Funding

We have lots of funding options available such as the postgraduate tuition fee loan for Scottish & EU students, specifics scholarships for students from North or South America, Asia and Africa, as well as bursaries & grants for those closer to home in England, Northern Ireland and Wales.

Please see our website for up-to-date information about fee and funding and what you could be eligible for.
http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

Information for International Students

For applications whose first language is not English, the following is generally required: minimum IELTS 6.0, with no individual component score of less than 5.5 or equivalent. We also offer a range of pre-sessional English language courses to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme. Please see our website for up-to-date information.
http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/international-students/english-language/english-language-requirements

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Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. . This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Read more

Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. 

This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Or you may have recently completed a Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) or Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PDGipAHT), and want to continue on to do research.

You'll further develop your critical thinking and discussion skills with in-depth study into your area of interest. Increase your understanding of how architectural history and theory are applied to design, so you can express your own ideas and conclusions within a theoretical framework.

Expertise through research

Choose a thesis that reflects your current knowledge of the intellectual, technical, aesthetic and cultural conditions of architecture. Your research topic must have a basis in theory as well as method.

You'll get quality supervision and support from staff with international reputations for teaching, research and publishing.

You may be able to include media such as a drawing portfolio or video with your thesis submission. If you choose to use design as your primary research method in your thesis, it must be explained within a theoretical context.

Past research topics include:

  • architectural and urban design processes
  • sustainability in architecture
  • architectural history, theory and criticism
  • energy and environmental design of buildings, including sustainable design

The MArch does not qualify you for registration as an architect.

Duration and workload

The MArch can be completed within three trimesters or one calendar year of full-time study, or in a minimum of six trimesters if you're studying part time. You have a maximum of three years from enrolment to complete and present your thesis.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

If you are already working in the profession, you'll add a new level of expertise to your practice.

The skills and knowledge you gain will open doors to a range of other jobs including architectural conservator, archivist or museum researcher. You might also find work as a critic or writer, curator, historian or librarian.



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Master the management of information. Become an expert in managing information in a world driven by big data. Government departments, businesses, libraries, museums and archives all need people who can identify relevant information, retrieve it, organise it and make sure people can access it. Read more

Master the management of information

Become an expert in managing information in a world driven by big data. Government departments, businesses, libraries, museums and archives all need people who can identify relevant information, retrieve it, organise it and make sure people can access it.

Get the professional skills you need to understand and manage information in today's fast-changing world. Learn about information storage and retrieval, while gaining skills in management and communication, information technology and research methods.

You'll gain a thorough, technology-focused and research-based education in information organisation, oriented to the needs of New Zealand information professionals.

Study anywhere

You can study online from anywhere in New Zealand. Some courses are also available on campus in Wellington and Auckland.

Study full time and complete your Master's in two years, or study part time over three or four years so you can continue working.

Specialise

You can choose to specialise in either Library Science (LIBS) or in Archives and Records Management (ARCR) and this will be stated on your qualification. You don't have to specialise, or you can choose to specialise in both areas, which will take a little longer.

International connections and options–WISE

You'll benefit from the School of Information Management's membership of the WISE (Web-based Information Science) Consortium. This links top schools of library and information studies from the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Online courses are made available to other members and you can choose to do up to two of these in your qualification.

Diploma, certificate and single course options

Depending on your goals, you can opt for a shorter postgraduate Information Studies qualification by doing the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma. These are valuable programmes in themselves, or you can use them as stepping stones towards the Master's degree.

You can also study most courses in the MIS programme individually. This is useful for targeted professional development and you will receive a certificate of proficiency in that one subject area.

Bicultural awareness

Develop your awareness of the Treaty of Waitangi and biculturalism during your studies. You'll gain an understanding of Māori culture and language and a knowledge of Māori taonga, or artefacts, in libraries, archives and museums.

What you'll study

The MIS will give you the broad skills and knowledge you need to work in many information professions. Your studies will include:

  1. Six core courses—you'll learn about different information professions, services and databases, and explore information policy and access issues. You'll also find out how to carry out research in information management.
  2. A research project—you'll do your own investigation into an information management problem.
  3. Four other courses—choose from a wide variety of courses according to your interests and career goals in subjects like Māori information sources, managing archives, and digital technologies. These courses change regularly to include fast-developing subjects.

For the diploma programme, you need to do five core courses and three more courses of your choice. Certificate students do two core courses and choose a further two.

How you'll learn

Information Studies courses are available in a variety of formats. All classes are available online and some are available in person. Some classes require you attend via internet conferencing (iConferencing) or seminar and some can be downloaded and viewed at a time convenient to you.

Classes are held on weekday evenings or on Saturdays. Some classes for core courses or large courses are held in Wellington or Auckland and you can attend on campus or online.

Study materials are delivered through Blackboard—Victoria's web-based learning environment.

Workload

You can study full time or part time. If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Careers

Many employers in the information field are now looking for graduates with Master's-level education. Go on to work as a records manager, librarian, web content manager, archivist, knowledge manager or information manager.

Professional recognition

The Master of Information Studies is recognised by these local and international professional bodies:



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This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. Read more
This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to develop relevant research skills.

Why study Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), of key aspects of the history of Britain and Ireland in the twentieth century. It is taught by leading researchers in their fields, and students attracted to this degree pathway will benefit from the latest research and historiography. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to further develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

The MLitt in Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's great about Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

The course is made up of the following modules:

Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Taking your MA in History at Royal Holloway means that you will have maximum flexibility to fully tailor your degree to your own areas of interest. Read more

Taking your MA in History at Royal Holloway means that you will have maximum flexibility to fully tailor your degree to your own areas of interest. Our internationally renowned academics, who are at the forefront of research and methodological innovation, will inspire and challenge you. On graduation you will have a balance of theories, concepts and practical skills, making this degree ideal if you are looking to develop your career in areas that involve the professional creation, evaluation and dissemination of knowledge or wish to progress towards a PhD in History.

Depending on your individual interests your bespoke course can have either a broad or concentrated focus. The courses available cover gender and cultural history, British, European and World history, as well as Hellenic studies. You will also take wide-ranging methodology and research skills training courses which provide instruction in historical research, help with practical skills such as chairing and working in groups and briefings on the applications of history in the job market.

We are one of the largest and liveliest History departments in the UK yet our size is not at the cost of anonymity; you will receive our individual attention and become part of our close-knit post graduate community.

  • Access to some of the richest facilities for historical research anywhere in the world; in addition to the College’s substantial library collections, there are the National Archives, British Library and libraries of the University of London.
  • World-leading and internationally excellent research which is ranked joint first for its impact on greater society (Research Excellence Framework 2014, 4* and 3* research).
  • A vast range of research expertise ranging from ancient to contemporary times, from Europe to the Far East, and from political history to economic with particular strengths in social, cultural, and gender history, the history of ideas, as well as a notable range of countries, periods, and approaches.
  • Unique access to resources, though our own research centres, including 19th and 20th century women’s education, the Holocaust and South Asian Studies.

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Your future career

On completion of your History Masters degree at Royal Holloway you will have developed and finessed skills, such as research, analysis and presenting, which will appeal to future employers. Your degree also demonstrates that you enjoy being challenged, understand complex issues as well as other values and cultures, all of which will equip you to operate successfully in a fast-changing and increasingly globalised and multi-cultural environment. On graduation you will have ideally placed to develop your career in areas that involve the professional creation, evaluation and dissemination of knowledge or wish to progress towards a PhD in History. 

Our Careers team will work with you to enhance your employability and prepare you for the choices ahead. Their support doesn’t end when you graduate; you can access the service for up to two years after graduation.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered roles such as university lecturer, archivist, curator, journalist, librarian, PR consultant, teacher, freelance researcher, radio producer and a wide variety of other jobs within the ‘knowledge industries’. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.



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Since the world went online, information has grown rapidly in volume and become infinitely more accessible. At the same time, information science and systems have been converging towards a common focus on information discovery, organisation, and management. Read more
Since the world went online, information has grown rapidly in volume and become infinitely more accessible. At the same time, information science and systems have been converging towards a common focus on information discovery, organisation, and management. Information management is essential in libraries, archives, museums and business, and is a much sought-after skill in careers spanning the sectors for example, in governmental, legal, financial, media and publishing organisations. Meanwhile, owners and users of information need to be able to access and evaluate information in faster and more intuitive ways.

Key benefits

This course is accredited by The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Course detail

The MSc Information Management is vocational and practice-oriented, designed to support information and knowledge managers. The course provides an excellent balance of traditional information management and library science, informed by cutting edge developments in information architecture and data management. It's an important route for anyone seeking professional chartership or progress to management roles.

Modules

• Information Contexts (30 credits)
• Knowledge Organisation (30 credits)
• Information and Digital Literacy (15 credits)
• Personal and Organisational Management (15 credits)
• Information and Knowledge Management
• Data Management
• Designing The User Experience
• Big Data
• Cloud Computing
• Linked, Open Data and The Internet of Things
• Machine Learning and Predictive Analytics
• Social Media and Web Science
• Dissertation

Format

You'll learn through lectures, discussions, tutorials, practical exercises and independent reading, as well as working together in small groups.

The course has a virtual learning environment online that supports you throughout your studies. It's a useful way to communicate with fellow students and teaching staff, find administrative details about the modules, and access course materials.

We regularly welcome specialist tutors to the department to contribute to specific modules.

Assessment

Assessment in most modules is through written coursework, portfolios, presentations and written exams. The supervisor and second marker will assess your dissertation.

Careers / Further study

This qualification is an excellent route to range of careers, and as a complement to existing career skills and professional development for example, for those moving into managerial roles. Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in a wide range of sectors, including educational, public sector and museum archivist roles, plus a variety of consultancy and professional services positions.

Alumni have prominent roles in local library services, university libraries in Bristol and Bath, with the government, and in records management roles in public and private sectors.

For anyone looking to pursue PhD research positions, this course is considered a highly valuable preparatory route.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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At the beginning of the 21st century the cultural sector was playing an increasingly significant role in public policies; politically, socially and economically. Read more

At the beginning of the 21st century the cultural sector was playing an increasingly significant role in public policies; politically, socially and economically. The cultural industries, such as the film industry, are now a particular focus of this attention because of their potential to bridge the perceived gap between culture and commerce, that is, their capacity simultaneously to enhance cultural life and generate wealth. In this context, there is a strong awareness of the importance of professionalism in cultural management. The MA Film and Cultural Management is designed for students who wish to combine study of film at postgraduate level with a knowledge of cultural management. This course provides a framework through which the contemporary cultural sector can be analysed and understood; it situates the film industry in that context and at the same time provides theoretical knowledge of film and its industrial dimensions.

Introducing your course

Apply for the MA Film and Cultural Management degree and examine the importance that film has on society. Study film policy in a variety of comparable and contrasting national and global contexts and use the modules learned on this course for a career in the cultural management sector. Take these skills towards a vocation as an archivist, film critic or curator.

Overview

The programme aims to facilitate your engagement with contemporary debates of current concern in the cultural sector, to develop your critical awareness of issues and debates in film studies and cultural management, and to reflect upon different methodologies and their effective use in applied research. You will be encouraged to develop your own research interests, applying the skills and resources you acquire during the programme. At the same time, we foster a collaborative ethos in which students exchange knowledge and ideas. The emphasis is on progression towards shaping the direction of your degree yourself, rather than relying on your tutors to set the agenda for you.

View the programme specification document for this course



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Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. Read more
Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such as oral history or historical databases.

Why study History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), in wide areas of the history of Britain, Scotland, Europe, Russia and North America. Themes range across political, cultural, military, religious, economic and social history, taught within a department of research specialists. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as palaeography, historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Students can choose either a generic MLitt in History, or named pathways in:
Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

The MLitt in History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. Due to this a variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

All our History MLitt degrees have a common core module (40 credits):

History Skills and Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
If you are enrolled on the general History degree, you then choose two further modules, either specialist modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History of the Book (semester 2)
or one or two of our flexible modules, where you choose the topic:

Taught History MLitt module, (semester 1)
Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)
All students then complete a History dissertation (summer).

If you are enrolled on a specialist degree, then you replace the semester 1 flexible module with the relevant specialist module. Visit the course webpage for full details:

Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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A research degree in your chosen history subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise. Read more

A research degree in your chosen history subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise.

You work closely with a director of studies and a supervisor who are specialists in your chosen field to produce an extended thesis of up to 80,000 words in the case of doctoral research.

We have a vibrant research culture and we value and support all our research students who make a vital contribution to the intellectual life of the University. There are regular research training events, seminars and informal meetings where you can practise delivering conference papers in a supportive environment. Funds are available to support you in attending conferences and we encourage you to deliver papers and publish your work.

We are regularly advertising studentships funded by Sheffield Hallam University directly or through the North of England Consortium for the Arts and Humanities. It may also be possible to apply for Arts and Humanities Research Council studentships. Some part-time teaching may also be available.

We are a group of 18 historians specialising in the period from the late eighteenth century to the present. We have research clusters in:

  • imperial and global history
  • economic and business history
  • women’s and gender history
  • European history
  • popular culture and politics in Britain

Current staff research interests are wide-ranging and include • Africans in Europe/Black European history • modern Armenia • Britain and the Great War • the history of Czechoslovakia • colonialism and anti-colonialism in India • economic crises and disasters • European colonialism and imperialism • feminism and empire • German history in the twentieth century • globalisation • industrial and natural disasters • labour history • local and community history • migration • military and naval history • nineteenth-century radicalism and popular politics • rural history • Stalinism • US history.

Please see the Humanities staff pages for a list of staff and their current research.

This degree is hosted in the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School.

Course structure

Full-time – at least 35 hours a week on average over three years

Part-time – at least 12 hours a week on average for up to seven years

There is a split mode available for international students who want to study in their own country.

Various start dates

Your study depends on your chosen area of research but includes a compulsory research methods module for students without prior research qualifications at postgraduate level.

Assessment

  • research programme submitted for approval by our research degrees committee
  • report and oral presentation for the confirmation of PhD stage
  • submission of thesis and viva

Employability

Following your research degree, you can go on to teach history in further and higher education. You can also find careers in other related areas such as

  • museums
  • work as an archivist
  • a career in libraries
  • university administration
  • the media.


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