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The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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Taking heritage management into the 21st century. Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education. Read more
Taking heritage management into the 21st century

Why choose this course?

Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education.

It draws on the Archaeology department’s strengths in both Archaeological Information Sciences and Cultural Heritage Management – offering a unique qualification that combines the theoretical and ground-level study of heritage management with practical training in new technologies, from database systems and virtual-reality modelling to social media platforms.

You will be working with a team of technology pioneers and computing scholars, who lead the field in researching and developing interpretative content and digital applications for the heritage sector worldwide.
• Gain practical experience in new and mobile technologies used to publish, archive, analyse, visualise and interpret archaeological information.
• Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
• Develop essential IT knowledge and skills required in heritage-sector careers.
• Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The course draws on the skills and expertise of leading scholars in heritage management, interpretation and digital media, alongside staff from the Archaeology Data Service, which has been the UK digital archive for heritage data since 1997. It also has strong links with museums and other cultural heritage institutions in York, and work placements are a key feature of the programme.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Explore how digital technologies are used to present and curate heritage information.
• Gain experience of using the digital and internet technologies in disseminating, publishing and archiving heritage information.
• Develop your practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other heritage analysis and visualisation technologies.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Digital Heritage course is designed for people seeking professional training in digital archiving, visualisation, museums and heritage sector curation, interpretation, and education. It is ideally suited for graduates of Archaeology, History, Art History, Museum Studies, Education, Anthropology, Cultural Studies and related fields, and for candidates with proven IT experience.

What can it lead to?

The skills developed on this course lead graduates into careers in archaeological computing, archive management, education, marketing and IT services for commercial organisations, museums and the public sector. Equally, the course can be a stepping stone to further research at doctoral level.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, offering you the chance to apply your digital skillset in a professional or academic setting.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the heritage sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the heritage sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual-reality modelling).

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other work providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

Graduates of the MSc in Digital Heritage will be well equipped to work in IT-related roles in heritage management or presentation, in museums and education, and with a range of other heritage organisations.

By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research in the field of digital heritage;
-Critically evaluate claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem;
-Locate and use relevant information on the internet and add materials to it;
-Create an electronic text;
-Design and implement a simple relational database;
-Create effective applications in CAD and VR;
-Evaluate the cultural significance of sites, places and artefacts;
-Recognise areas of potential conflict in heritage management and museum practice;
-Evaluate the implications of stakeholder values and interests for heritage management and heritage interpretation/education;
-Appraise the utility of interpretative and educational media both on site and in museums.

The course opens the door to a wide range of careers in heritage-related organisations and in many other sectors, including:
-Archive management
-Museum curation
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The cultural hub of London is the venue for MA Theatre Criticism and Dramaturgy. The programme balances theoretical study of theatre and performance with the development of diverse skills in dramaturgy and criticism. Read more

ABOUT MA THEATRE CRITICISM AND DRAMATURGY

The cultural hub of London is the venue for MA Theatre Criticism and Dramaturgy. The programme balances theoretical study of theatre and performance with the development of diverse skills in dramaturgy and criticism. Graduates can apply this in academia and throughout the creative industries.

Engaging with theatre and performance practice of the past and the present, and attuned to the economy and ecology of the landscapes in which it takes place, students on this course embrace Central’s unique status as a conservatoire and a University of London college, a vibrant setting fostering the international theatre practice and scholarship of the future.

Students engage with how the city itself performs, and examine questions around tourism and experiences of living, working, and moving in the metropolis. MA Theatre Studies (Performance and the City) considers how theatre shapes and is shaped by the metropolis, taking students into the city and behind the scenes in the institutions that give it its character and potency. Study is grounded in engagement with buildings, events, organisations and practices. As such, the course is excellent preparation for work in various roles in the theatre sector; a critical approach is maintained throughout, and students develop academic and scholarly abilities.

UNITS STUDIED

Students on this programme take six units followed by a final independent unit. Each unit is self-contained, focusing on a specific aspect of theatre and performance.

Units may include:

Reviewing Performance
Shakespeare in London
Archiving Practices, Practising Archives
Critical Contexts
Performing Research
Cultural Landscapes.

ASSESSMENT

Students produce critical work and outputs relevant to theatre sector contexts, including visual presentations, conference papers, essays, reports and reviews. In some cases students are assessed on small-group projects.

The SIP may take the form of a dissertation or a portfolio, depending on the subject matter and the student’s focus.

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Our MA in Film Studies is one of the longest-established and most prestigious postgraduate degrees of its kind in the UK, drawing on the expertise of staff whose research has been assessed as world-leading. Read more
Our MA in Film Studies is one of the longest-established and most prestigious postgraduate degrees of its kind in the UK, drawing on the expertise of staff whose research has been assessed as world-leading.

This carefully-tailored degree programme enables students to explore the history, political significance and aesthetic qualities of a global range of cinema. It caters both to those who have previously studied media as well as those who are newer to the subject area.

Our research specialisms in gender studies and film, British cinema, genre, and audience studies, are reflected in the modules we offer.

Our thriving postgraduate community benefits from regular conferences on campus, use of the East Anglian Film Archive, as well as workshops from visiting media professionals.

Graduates from our MA programmes frequently progress to PhD study and have gone on to rewarding careers in various fields including archiving, academia, journalism, and in the film and television industries.

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This innovative course benefits from collaborative relationships with museums and galleries of national and international significance, notably the Holburne Museum, Bath; Spike Island, Bristol; Arnolfini, Bristol; and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery. Read more
This innovative course benefits from collaborative relationships with museums and galleries of national and international significance, notably the Holburne Museum, Bath; Spike Island, Bristol; Arnolfini, Bristol; and Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery.

It covers a wide range of curatorial approaches, from management of the historical collection to creative curating of contemporary art, craft and design. The course takes a broad view of curatorial practice and the programme includes consideration of activities in the private domain of the domestic interior, and in virtual reality, as well as commercial treatments, such as shop window display.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is offered in both full and part-time modes. It is normally one year, (3 trimesters) in duration in full time mode or 6 trimesters in part-time mode. The first two trimesters comprise taught sessions and assessed projects, while the Master’s Project in the final part of the course is by negotiated project. Completion of the first 2 modules on the course leads to the award of the Postgraduate Certificate, and completion of the first 4 modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Subsequent completion of the MA double module leads to the award of MA Curatorial Practice.

MODULES

Research Methodologies - Part one introduces generic research methodologies with part two considering subject specific material, analysis and evaluation techniques.

The Role of the Curator - The Role of the Curator considers the changing role of the curator and the ‘politics’ of curating. It addresses developments in critical theory and their impact on curatorial practices and includes topics such as representing communities, ethnicities, gender issues, ‘interventions’, gallery learning, the ‘post-museum’ and creative curating.

Collections and Collecting - This element of the course considers private activities in the domestic interior, as well as public collections and their management. It covers material culture, the urge to collect, the collection as shrine, oral history and its methods, object studies, research in the archiving and management of historical collections, with the collection at the Holburne Museum in Bath providing an important case study.

Cultures of Display - The module looks at public and private modes of display. As well as considering a range of museum and gallery practices, it includes studies in domestic display, commercial display and digital display.

Master’s Project - The Master’s Project is capable of accommodating a variety of approaches for assessment. Examples might include (but are not restricted to) the traditional written dissertation, perhaps drawing on historical or archival case studies, research into and/or curating of an exhibition in a particular venue, and forms of digital production, such as the construction of a museum or gallery specific web site.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The MA adopts a ‘practice-led’ approach; while some sessions are delivered by university academics at the Corsham Court Centre, others are delivered by our collaborators and relate to particular case studies or collections. There are field trips to museums and galleries in the Bath/Bristol area and opportunities to work alongside museum and gallery professionals on selected in-house activities. ‘Real life’ projects can be pursued in response to assessment assignments, especially in relation to the final ‘Master’s Project’ double module.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

• The ability to deal with complex issues in the area of curatorial practice history, theory and context, effectively employing skill in analysis and synthesis as necessary.
• The ability to independently plan and implement research activities in the subject fields of curatorial practice, demonstrating professionalism, self-direction and originality.
• The ability to effectively propose and curate exhibitions, drawing on research and understanding.
• The ability to initiate and contribute to debate and discussion in relation to curatorial practice.
• The capacity to advance knowledge, learning and skills in the subject fields of curatorial practice.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Typical career destinations include:
• Curatorial work in museums and galleries
• Freelance curatorship
• Galleries/Arts administration
• Public Art
• Critical writing, such as exhibition reviews and catalogue essays

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The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields. Read more
The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields.

Degree information

The programme includes both practical and theoretical work through which students develop a deeper understanding of not just the technologies themselves but also the implications of applying and managing these technologies in varied information environments. The wide range of optional modules allows students to tailor the programme to fit their individual career specialisms and needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study over 2-5 years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, any four of the modules available (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years is offered but does not carry CILIP accreditation.

Core modules
-Systems Management
-Internet Technologies
-Database Systems Analysis and Design
-Introduction to Programming and Scripting
-Fundamentals of Information Science

Optional modules (indicative list):
-Server Programming and Structured Data
-XML
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Legal and Social Aspects
-Management
-Electronic Publishing
-Encoded Archival Description and Digitisation of Archives
-Individual Approved Study
-Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
-Introduction to Digitisation
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Introduction to Digital Curation

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project on a specific aspect of information technology and its application, which culminates in a dissertation of c. 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory practicals and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on informal teaching, discussion, and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination, and practical projects such as website design and data modelling.

Careers

The MSc in Information Science prepares students for management roles in the information industries with an emphasis on technology, for example: information systems manager, systems librarian, web manager, information architect, knowledge manager, data manager, or indeed any information management role. Our graduates find work all over the world with electronic systems for managing, retrieving, distributing and archiving vast quantities of information. The programme is recognised and accredited by CILIP, the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, for professional qualifications purposes.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Salesperson, ICBC (Industrial and Commercial Bank of China)
-Database Manager, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust
-Product Manager, Nokia
-Operations Manager, MHRA (Medical and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency)

Employability
This programme challenges students to think more deeply about the implications of using information technology of all kinds in the workplace, and to consider better ways of designing, specifying, implementing and managing systems in order to promote organisational success. Understanding these issues and having the skills to develop and manage practical solutions equips our students to succeed individually and to help their organisations succeed. Our students achieve a high employability rate on graduating, and rise in organisations as their skills are recognised. Many past students now occupy senior positions in the information world in government, commerce, industry and academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Information Studies combines the best of traditional library and archive studies with the latest developments in internet technologies and electronic communication and publishing.

It brings together an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders to help you understand, develop and shape the emerging information environment while elucidating and building on the historical developments that have created this environment.

Students benefit from UCL's central London location, close to many major libraries and repositories and information centres, including the British Library and many specialist collections, giving ready access to an unsurpassed range of materials.

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Radiography exists in a changing professional environment and requires practitioners to continually update and review clinical practice. Read more
Radiography exists in a changing professional environment and requires practitioners to continually update and review clinical practice. This course provides a flexible framework to prepare you for advanced practice by studying topics relevant to your needs and those of your clinical departments.

You may be granted credits for your previous academic and professional qualification through Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) scheme. An independent work-based learning module enables you to study around your individual CPD and workplace needs.

What will you study?

You will study modules relating to clinical roles, management, supervisory and assessment roles, quality issues, research methods and ethics, as well as taking a module of independent study to meet a particular professional need or interest.

Assessment

Case studies; research protocols; dissertation; essays; portfolios; practical assessment; OSCE; reflective log book.

Course structure

The postgraduate admissions administrator will help you to choose the most suitable combination of modules depending on your needs.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Available modules
-Research and Evidence Based Practice in Healthcare (for PgDip)
-Dissertation (for MSc)
-Advanced Principles and Practice of Breast Interventional Techniques
-Advanced Practice - Negotiated Independent Work Based Learning
-Clinical Breast Examination and Client Communication
-Contemporary Practice In Breast Cancer Genetics and Diagnosis
-Cross-sectional Imaging - Diagnostic
-Interpretation and Reporting in Mammography
-Professional Practice in Mammography 1 ^
-Professional Practice in Mammography 2 ^
-Ultrasound of the Breast
-Management of Resources and Quality within Healthcare
-Practice Education and Mentorship+
-PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) Administration

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MA/MSc Broadcast Futures aims to provide you with the advanced knowledge and skills to operate at a high level and innovate in new and emerging areas of the broadcasting industry. Read more
MA/MSc Broadcast Futures aims to provide you with the advanced knowledge and skills to operate at a high level and innovate in new and emerging areas of the broadcasting industry. Digital broadcast media lie at the heart of the course that aims to investigate, to understand and test contemporary theory and practice in the media industry.

The Ravensbourne MA/MSc Broadcast Futures pathway is a unique course that seeks out cutting-edge broadcast technology and innovation - collaborating with leading media technology companies and broadcasters – and defines broadcasting in its widest industrial, creative, cultural and commercial sense. The course will explore the application of new technologies, new platforms, new methodologies, and new business models and the opportunities that they offer the broadcast professional.

You will develop and challenge your understanding of key processes and will expand and push at the extreme edges of current knowledge in analogue and digital media, linear and non-linear broadcast, media content, production and intellectual property. You will also explore the impact of emerging technologies such as: S3D; ultra high definition (UHD) 4K; super high definition (SHD) 8K; pre-production; production and post-production workflows; global distribution; media acquisition; storage and archiving; meta-data, and changing broadcast paradigms.

You will be able to individualise your learning and develop, manage and realise an individual project, which will have a professional and industrial rationale, developed in your chosen area of study.

You will develop, through practice, strong management/project management skills, a range of key business skills (business planning, high level budgeting, schedule development, marketing, audience development, etc.) and how to implement them, and an understanding of the issues of entrepreneurship.

Course structure

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

Within the Technology Issues unit, you will engage with three project cycles that will allow you to explore the technologies most relevant to your discipline area. Typical past projects have included an industry collaboration project with a camera technology support company (such as digital motion capture in a ‘live’ 3D environment); an individual project in which each student explained a ‘digital broadcast’ model (such as a short film or media-share environment); and a cross- disciplinary project with visual effects students.

In the Business Innovation unit, you will develop an understanding of business and innovative practices in the creative industries.

The Research Process unit will provide the grounding for research and development skills needed for your individual project.

The Concept and Prototyping unit allows you to further develop your skills to take a single line of inquiry, idea or theory embedded in broadcast futures and research and develop (investigate, challenge and test) the concept.

The Major Project represents the culmination of your investigation and the final stage of the research strategy. This is a substantial piece of self-managed work that is underpinned by advanced practice-based methodologies and processes.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations. Read more

Introduction

A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations.

Content

MA Fashion Curation is a unique opportunity to investigate the ways in which fashion and dress can be collected and displayed, and offers the opportunity to engage with theoretical discussions and debates that underpin this exciting and growing discipline. Fashion exhibitions are a key part of the national and international landscape of contemporary society, attracting some of the largest audiences to major museums. Fashion exhibitions have also become increasingly visible in department stores, galleries and the wider community. This shift represents the growing status of the curator as a central cultural mediator.

MA Fashion Curation will equip you with the skills to enter this fast paced and growing field. A key aspect of this course is the practical skills and experience gained in staging a live fashion-related exhibition. This group project presents students with an exciting collaborative opportunity to explore a range of approaches, mediums and practices that constitute the roles required in realising a curatorial project.

The changing possibilities of curating and the curator are introduced and examined through seminars, workshops, and lectures, given by LCF researchers and lecturers and key industry professionals. Students are encouraged to undertake internships whilst on the course and past placements have been at Victoria and Albert Museum, Museum of London, Kerry Taylor Auctions, Alexander McQueen Archives, Rambert Dance Company Archives, Museum of the City of New York and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Taught by a team of internationally renowned curators, including Professor Amy de la Haye and Professor Judith Clark, this course makes full use of fashion-related collections and archives both within and outside London to explore the issues and concerns that consume today's fashion curators. Areas that are explored with the MA include: displaying dress; creating 'stories' from objects; writing texts to target audiences; model-making; collecting, handling and archiving garments.

Our growing number of alumni can now be found in a perse range of organisations, including museums, galleries, universities, as well as developing freelance careers as consultants, archivists and curators.

Structure

15 months level 7 180 credits

Term One

The Past and Future of Fashion Curation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collect/Recollect (40 units)
Collaborative Unit (20 credits)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It melds practices and traditions form the various disciplines of the humanities, computer science, information management and, cultural studies and design. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It melds practices and traditions form the various disciplines of the humanities, computer science, information management and, cultural studies and design. Ideal for those interested in acquiring digital skills to build on a humanities background, the Masters in Digital Humanities is also designed to suit those with a technical background who are seeking to compliment their knowledge and build their careers in the arts and humanities.

The Masters in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University is designed as an introduction to this new and dynamic research area for students from across the disciplines. The Masters delivered in collaboration with faculty from across the university, is in its fourth year, and we are now accepting applications for our fifth year.

A number of funding options are available including two An Foras Feasa Taught Masters Bursaries, the University wide Taught Masters Bursaries and the Maynooth UniversityTaught Masters Alumni Scholarships. Further details may be found at http://www.learndigitalhumanities.ie

- Commences
September 2016 with the required module in Structured Programming taking place in late August running into early September.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/our-courses/ma-digital-humanities

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

- Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

- Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

*This does not include the 10 ECTS allocated to Structured Programming which runs in late August through to early September each year before classes begin and is highly recommended for students who do not have substantial technical experience. If Structured Programming is not taken, another technology module is substituted

Required modules include Digital Humanities Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum. Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural institution or DH project.

Available electives include modules from across Media Studies and Computer Science ensuring that students build their digital skills to prepare them for the planning, building and implementing of DH projects and for the close analysis of data within the context of the arts and humanities.

The course is delivered in our state of the art facility in An Foras Feasa through face-to-face teaching and blended learning. It runs over one year for full time students and two years for part-time students. Assessment includes a substantial element of continuous assessment. A thesis, submitted in August at the end of the course, can include a significant practical element or may focus on Digital Humanities theory.

Career Options

Graduates of the MA in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are in an ideal place to use computational methods in approaching the arts and humanities leading to roles in research across Digital Humanities projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/our-courses/ma-digital-humanities#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This innovative MA allows you to participate in an on-going dynamic of thinking, reading, and writing with 20th- and 21st-century texts, and to focus on the interrelation of literary, critical, and theoretical works. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to participate in an on-going dynamic of thinking, reading, and writing with 20th- and 21st-century texts, and to focus on the interrelation of literary, critical, and theoretical works. At its heart is the belief that the critical study of literature can also be inventive.

There are two core modules. Living Modernism is devoted to the radical experiments of early 20th-century writing and the ways such experiments continue to resonate in the 21st century. Archiving the Contemporary explores contemporary writing in its engagement with the literary conventions, cultural heritage, philosophical traditions, and political ideologies it so vigorously interrogates. You will pursue further philosophical, critical, and creative-critical approaches through the choice of optional modules.

Students also have access to the UEA-based British Archive for Contemporary Writing, which includes material from Doris Lessing, J. D. Salinger, Nadine Gordimer, and many others.

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MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating offers sustained engagement with the visual arts from an intercultural perspective, training students in marketing, public relations, development, management, curating and gallery education within a visual arts context. Read more

Programme Overview

MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating offers sustained engagement with the visual arts from an intercultural perspective, training students in marketing, public relations, development, management, curating and gallery education within a visual arts context. The programme brings art and design historians, theoreticians, professional practitioners and studio artists together to; 1) offer a thorough grounding in the interdisciplinary, theoretical and methodological issues related to the study of the visual, and 2) equip students with the professional skills and experience to work successfully in a variety of arts and cultural industries.

Why Study MA in Visual Arts & Curating?

MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating is designed to develop professional excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. The course aims to develop Arts Management Leaders and Curators.

The programme focuses contemporary discourse and practice in curating and arts management
Archiving - Research and Relevance
Arts Curating Contemporary Arts/Historical Context
Public Relations and Marketing in the Visual Arts
Studio Art and Contextual Presentation
Commercial Perceptions and Value

Recent guest lecturers and visiting speaker

Danny Birchall, Wellcome Collection ; Russell Dornan, Wellcome Collection; Joanna Banham, V&A; Justine Locker, Tate; John Stack, Tate; Luisa Ulyett, Tate; Anita Bennett, Tate; Caro Howell, The Foundling Museum; Synthia Griffin, Tate; Emma Law, Camden Arts Centre; Jessica Stockford, Arts & Business; Kate Oliver, Horniman Museum; Tiana Tasich, Digitelling Agency; Matthew Cain, The Guardian; Claudia Lastra, The Arts Catalyst

Recent Study Visits – London

V&A; Tate; Wellcome Collection; British Library; Geffrye Museum; Serpentine Gallery; British Museum; Frieze Art Fair; Sotheby’s; Christies; National Art Library; British Museum; Camden Arts Centre; National Gallery; National Portrait Gallery; South London Gallery
Recent Study Trips – International:
Venice, Berlin, Istanbul

Core Modules

Arts Management & Marketing
Arts Policy
World Arts
Curating
Arts Education
The International Art Market

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ Please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP, UK.

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This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. Read more

Programme description

This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. It caters for a wide range of interests, with pathways in Traditional Arts and Culture, Medieval and Early Modern Celtic and Gaelic Development and Policy.

You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding in professional research methods and inquiry, language skills, literary and textual analysis or fieldwork and archiving, and a range of core topics in Celtic and Scottish studies.

You will undertake full research training in Celtic and Scottish studies. You will learn to analyse and synthesise this knowledge in an interdisciplinary context, question assumptions about the primacy of one specific discipline over others and receive an introduction to subjects which you may not have experienced at undergraduate level. You will also have the opportunity to take courses offered by the School of History, Classics & Archaeology.

Programme structure

The programme takes one academic year (12 months) of full-time study, or two years (24 months) of part-time study (part-time options are only available for UK or EU students).

You will complete one core course (20 credits total), five option courses (100 credits total) and a dissertation of 15,000 words (60 credits).

Compulsory courses:

Research Skills and Methods in Celtic and Scottish Studies
Option courses may include:

Celtic & Scottish Studies Internship
The Supernatural World
Material Culture in Scotland
Scottish Emigrant Traditions

Work placement/internship opportunities

The internship is an opportunity for students to gain valuable work experience in an area relevant to their studies. The economic environment is challenging for many graduates, and evidence of an internship is often a decisive factor in hiring decisions.

The internship has three main elements:

a work plan agreed between the host institution, the student, and the programme director
the work itself
an assessed final report

The precise nature of the internship will depend on agreements with the host institution, but it is likely to involve archival work, research assistance, curatorial work, or work in public relations.

Participating institutions may include Storytelling Centre, the National Library of Scotland Special Collections and Manuscripts departments, the National Sound Archive, the National Museums of Scotland, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, and the special collections of Edinburgh University.

Learning outcomes

You will develop the critical skills to evaluate and compare texts and a historical understanding of literature and culture, as well as transferable skills such as carrying out academic research, writing commentaries and essays, improving your analytical thought, using electronic resources and giving oral presentations.

You will gain:

familiarity with the broad context of Celtic and Scottish Studies
a solid understanding of bibliography and study methods
the ability to engage at a high level with the subject material
an awareness of current issues and concerns within selected research fields
the ability to engage in original research resulting in a dissertation in an area of specialism
opportunities for engagement with the professional field through an internship, if desired
the opportunity to study modern Scottish Gaelic or medieval Celtic languages

Career opportunities

There are a wide range of sectors within which you could apply your knowledge and skills such as journalism; social, government or cultural research; publishing; higher education; advertising; arts administration; information work; or programme research in broadcasting.

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