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Masters Degrees (Archiving)

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The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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Taking heritage management into the 21st century. Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education. Read more
Taking heritage management into the 21st century

Why choose this course?

Introduced in 2010 in response to the growth in digital heritage practices, this course provides training for professionals who wish to work in digital archiving, visualisation, and museums and heritage sector interpretation, curation and education.

It draws on the Archaeology department’s strengths in both Archaeological Information Sciences and Cultural Heritage Management – offering a unique qualification that combines the theoretical and ground-level study of heritage management with practical training in new technologies, from database systems and virtual-reality modelling to social media platforms.

You will be working with a team of technology pioneers and computing scholars, who lead the field in researching and developing interpretative content and digital applications for the heritage sector worldwide.
• Gain practical experience in new and mobile technologies used to publish, archive, analyse, visualise and interpret archaeological information.
• Understand all aspects of heritage management theory and practice.
• Develop essential IT knowledge and skills required in heritage-sector careers.
• Gain practical work experience in the heritage sector.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The course draws on the skills and expertise of leading scholars in heritage management, interpretation and digital media, alongside staff from the Archaeology Data Service, which has been the UK digital archive for heritage data since 1997. It also has strong links with museums and other cultural heritage institutions in York, and work placements are a key feature of the programme.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Explore how digital technologies are used to present and curate heritage information.
• Gain experience of using the digital and internet technologies in disseminating, publishing and archiving heritage information.
• Develop your practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other heritage analysis and visualisation technologies.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Digital Heritage course is designed for people seeking professional training in digital archiving, visualisation, museums and heritage sector curation, interpretation, and education. It is ideally suited for graduates of Archaeology, History, Art History, Museum Studies, Education, Anthropology, Cultural Studies and related fields, and for candidates with proven IT experience.

What can it lead to?

The skills developed on this course lead graduates into careers in archaeological computing, archive management, education, marketing and IT services for commercial organisations, museums and the public sector. Equally, the course can be a stepping stone to further research at doctoral level.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, offering you the chance to apply your digital skillset in a professional or academic setting.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the heritage sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the heritage sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual-reality modelling).

Placement opportunities
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other work providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

Graduates of the MSc in Digital Heritage will be well equipped to work in IT-related roles in heritage management or presentation, in museums and education, and with a range of other heritage organisations.

By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research in the field of digital heritage;
-Critically evaluate claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem;
-Locate and use relevant information on the internet and add materials to it;
-Create an electronic text;
-Design and implement a simple relational database;
-Create effective applications in CAD and VR;
-Evaluate the cultural significance of sites, places and artefacts;
-Recognise areas of potential conflict in heritage management and museum practice;
-Evaluate the implications of stakeholder values and interests for heritage management and heritage interpretation/education;
-Appraise the utility of interpretative and educational media both on site and in museums.

The course opens the door to a wide range of careers in heritage-related organisations and in many other sectors, including:
-Archive management
-Museum curation
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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The cultural hub of London is the venue for MA Theatre Criticism and Dramaturgy. The programme balances theoretical study of theatre and performance with the development of diverse skills in dramaturgy and criticism. Read more

ABOUT MA THEATRE CRITICISM AND DRAMATURGY

The cultural hub of London is the venue for MA Theatre Criticism and Dramaturgy. The programme balances theoretical study of theatre and performance with the development of diverse skills in dramaturgy and criticism. Graduates can apply this in academia and throughout the creative industries.

Engaging with theatre and performance practice of the past and the present, and attuned to the economy and ecology of the landscapes in which it takes place, students on this course embrace Central’s unique status as a conservatoire and a University of London college, a vibrant setting fostering the international theatre practice and scholarship of the future.

Students engage with how the city itself performs, and examine questions around tourism and experiences of living, working, and moving in the metropolis. MA Theatre Studies (Performance and the City) considers how theatre shapes and is shaped by the metropolis, taking students into the city and behind the scenes in the institutions that give it its character and potency. Study is grounded in engagement with buildings, events, organisations and practices. As such, the course is excellent preparation for work in various roles in the theatre sector; a critical approach is maintained throughout, and students develop academic and scholarly abilities.

UNITS STUDIED

Students on this programme take six units followed by a final independent unit. Each unit is self-contained, focusing on a specific aspect of theatre and performance.

Units may include:

Reviewing Performance
Shakespeare in London
Archiving Practices, Practising Archives
Critical Contexts
Performing Research
Cultural Landscapes.

ASSESSMENT

Students produce critical work and outputs relevant to theatre sector contexts, including visual presentations, conference papers, essays, reports and reviews. In some cases students are assessed on small-group projects.

The SIP may take the form of a dissertation or a portfolio, depending on the subject matter and the student’s focus.

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Our MA in Film Studies is one of the longest-established and most prestigious postgraduate degrees of its kind in the UK, drawing on the expertise of staff whose research has been assessed as world-leading. Read more
Our MA in Film Studies is one of the longest-established and most prestigious postgraduate degrees of its kind in the UK, drawing on the expertise of staff whose research has been assessed as world-leading.

This carefully-tailored degree programme enables students to explore the history, political significance and aesthetic qualities of a global range of cinema. It caters both to those who have previously studied media as well as those who are newer to the subject area.

Our research specialisms in gender studies and film, British cinema, genre, and audience studies, are reflected in the modules we offer.

Our thriving postgraduate community benefits from regular conferences on campus, use of the East Anglian Film Archive, as well as workshops from visiting media professionals.

Graduates from our MA programmes frequently progress to PhD study and have gone on to rewarding careers in various fields including archiving, academia, journalism, and in the film and television industries.

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields. Read more
The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields.

Degree information

The programme includes both practical and theoretical work through which students develop a deeper understanding of not just the technologies themselves but also the implications of applying and managing these technologies in varied information environments. The wide range of optional modules allows students to tailor the programme to fit their individual career specialisms and needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study over 2-5 years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, any four of the modules available (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years is offered but does not carry CILIP accreditation.

Core modules
-Systems Management
-Internet Technologies
-Database Systems Analysis and Design
-Introduction to Programming and Scripting
-Fundamentals of Information Science

Optional modules (indicative list):
-Server Programming and Structured Data
-XML
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Legal and Social Aspects
-Management
-Electronic Publishing
-Encoded Archival Description and Digitisation of Archives
-Individual Approved Study
-Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
-Introduction to Digitisation
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Introduction to Digital Curation

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project on a specific aspect of information technology and its application, which culminates in a dissertation of c. 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory practicals and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on informal teaching, discussion, and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination, and practical projects such as website design and data modelling.

Careers

The MSc in Information Science prepares students for management roles in the information industries with an emphasis on technology, for example: information systems manager, systems librarian, web manager, information architect, knowledge manager, data manager, or indeed any information management role. Our graduates find work all over the world with electronic systems for managing, retrieving, distributing and archiving vast quantities of information. The programme is recognised and accredited by CILIP, the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, for professional qualifications purposes.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Salesperson, ICBC (Industrial and Commercial Bank of China)
-Database Manager, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust
-Product Manager, Nokia
-Operations Manager, MHRA (Medical and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency)

Employability
This programme challenges students to think more deeply about the implications of using information technology of all kinds in the workplace, and to consider better ways of designing, specifying, implementing and managing systems in order to promote organisational success. Understanding these issues and having the skills to develop and manage practical solutions equips our students to succeed individually and to help their organisations succeed. Our students achieve a high employability rate on graduating, and rise in organisations as their skills are recognised. Many past students now occupy senior positions in the information world in government, commerce, industry and academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Information Studies combines the best of traditional library and archive studies with the latest developments in internet technologies and electronic communication and publishing.

It brings together an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders to help you understand, develop and shape the emerging information environment while elucidating and building on the historical developments that have created this environment.

Students benefit from UCL's central London location, close to many major libraries and repositories and information centres, including the British Library and many specialist collections, giving ready access to an unsurpassed range of materials.

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Radiography exists in a changing professional environment and requires practitioners to continually update and review clinical practice. Read more
Radiography exists in a changing professional environment and requires practitioners to continually update and review clinical practice. This course provides a flexible framework to prepare you for advanced practice by studying topics relevant to your needs and those of your clinical departments.

You may be granted credits for your previous academic and professional qualification through Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) scheme. An independent work-based learning module enables you to study around your individual CPD and workplace needs.

What will you study?

You will study modules relating to clinical roles, management, supervisory and assessment roles, quality issues, research methods and ethics, as well as taking a module of independent study to meet a particular professional need or interest.

Assessment

Case studies; research protocols; dissertation; essays; portfolios; practical assessment; OSCE; reflective log book.

Course structure

The postgraduate admissions administrator will help you to choose the most suitable combination of modules depending on your needs.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Available modules
-Research and Evidence Based Practice in Healthcare (for PgDip)
-Dissertation (for MSc)
-Advanced Principles and Practice of Breast Interventional Techniques
-Advanced Practice - Negotiated Independent Work Based Learning
-Clinical Breast Examination and Client Communication
-Contemporary Practice In Breast Cancer Genetics and Diagnosis
-Cross-sectional Imaging - Diagnostic
-Interpretation and Reporting in Mammography
-Professional Practice in Mammography 1 ^
-Professional Practice in Mammography 2 ^
-Ultrasound of the Breast
-Management of Resources and Quality within Healthcare
-Practice Education and Mentorship+
-PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) Administration

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A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations. Read more

Introduction

A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations.

Content

MA Fashion Curation is a unique opportunity to investigate the ways in which fashion and dress can be collected and displayed, and offers the opportunity to engage with theoretical discussions and debates that underpin this exciting and growing discipline. Fashion exhibitions are a key part of the national and international landscape of contemporary society, attracting some of the largest audiences to major museums. Fashion exhibitions have also become increasingly visible in department stores, galleries and the wider community. This shift represents the growing status of the curator as a central cultural mediator.

MA Fashion Curation will equip you with the skills to enter this fast paced and growing field. A key aspect of this course is the practical skills and experience gained in staging a live fashion-related exhibition. This group project presents students with an exciting collaborative opportunity to explore a range of approaches, mediums and practices that constitute the roles required in realising a curatorial project.

The changing possibilities of curating and the curator are introduced and examined through seminars, workshops, and lectures, given by LCF researchers and lecturers and key industry professionals. Students are encouraged to undertake internships whilst on the course and past placements have been at Victoria and Albert Museum, Museum of London, Kerry Taylor Auctions, Alexander McQueen Archives, Rambert Dance Company Archives, Museum of the City of New York and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Taught by a team of internationally renowned curators, including Professor Amy de la Haye and Professor Judith Clark, this course makes full use of fashion-related collections and archives both within and outside London to explore the issues and concerns that consume today's fashion curators. Areas that are explored with the MA include: displaying dress; creating 'stories' from objects; writing texts to target audiences; model-making; collecting, handling and archiving garments.

Our growing number of alumni can now be found in a perse range of organisations, including museums, galleries, universities, as well as developing freelance careers as consultants, archivists and curators.

Structure

15 months level 7 180 credits

Term One

The Past and Future of Fashion Curation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collect/Recollect (40 units)
Collaborative Unit (20 credits)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The MA degree is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

A number of funding options are available including two An Foras Feasa Taught Masters Bursaries, the University wide Taught Masters Scholarships and the Maynooth University Taught Masters Alumni Scholarships. Further details may be found at: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/ma-and-phd-funding

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Digital Humanities Theory and Practice’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

The project and dissertation over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments. Student who wish not to write the final thesis have the opportunity to exit the course with a postgraduate diploma in Digital Humanities.

Career Options

Graduates of the MA in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and research projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50F/MH51F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This innovative MA allows you to participate in an on-going dynamic of thinking, reading, and writing with 20th- and 21st-century texts, and to focus on the interrelation of literary, critical, and theoretical works. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to participate in an on-going dynamic of thinking, reading, and writing with 20th- and 21st-century texts, and to focus on the interrelation of literary, critical, and theoretical works. At its heart is the belief that the critical study of literature can also be inventive.

There are two core modules. Living Modernism is devoted to the radical experiments of early 20th-century writing and the ways such experiments continue to resonate in the 21st century. Archiving the Contemporary explores contemporary writing in its engagement with the literary conventions, cultural heritage, philosophical traditions, and political ideologies it so vigorously interrogates. You will pursue further philosophical, critical, and creative-critical approaches through the choice of optional modules.

Students also have access to the UEA-based British Archive for Contemporary Writing, which includes material from Doris Lessing, J. D. Salinger, Nadine Gordimer, and many others.

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MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating offers sustained engagement with the visual arts from an intercultural perspective, training students in marketing, public relations, development, management, curating and gallery education within a visual arts context. Read more

Programme Overview

MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating offers sustained engagement with the visual arts from an intercultural perspective, training students in marketing, public relations, development, management, curating and gallery education within a visual arts context. The programme brings art and design historians, theoreticians, professional practitioners and studio artists together to; 1) offer a thorough grounding in the interdisciplinary, theoretical and methodological issues related to the study of the visual, and 2) equip students with the professional skills and experience to work successfully in a variety of arts and cultural industries.

Why Study MA in Visual Arts & Curating?

MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating is designed to develop professional excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. The course aims to develop Arts Management Leaders and Curators.

The programme focuses contemporary discourse and practice in curating and arts management
Archiving - Research and Relevance
Arts Curating Contemporary Arts/Historical Context
Public Relations and Marketing in the Visual Arts
Studio Art and Contextual Presentation
Commercial Perceptions and Value

Recent guest lecturers and visiting speaker

Danny Birchall, Wellcome Collection ; Russell Dornan, Wellcome Collection; Joanna Banham, V&A; Justine Locker, Tate; John Stack, Tate; Luisa Ulyett, Tate; Anita Bennett, Tate; Caro Howell, The Foundling Museum; Synthia Griffin, Tate; Emma Law, Camden Arts Centre; Jessica Stockford, Arts & Business; Kate Oliver, Horniman Museum; Tiana Tasich, Digitelling Agency; Matthew Cain, The Guardian; Claudia Lastra, The Arts Catalyst

Recent Study Visits – London

V&A; Tate; Wellcome Collection; British Library; Geffrye Museum; Serpentine Gallery; British Museum; Frieze Art Fair; Sotheby’s; Christies; National Art Library; British Museum; Camden Arts Centre; National Gallery; National Portrait Gallery; South London Gallery
Recent Study Trips – International:
Venice, Berlin, Istanbul

Core Modules

Arts Management & Marketing
Arts Policy
World Arts
Curating
Arts Education
The International Art Market

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ Please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP, UK.

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Programme description. This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. Read more

Programme description

This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. It caters for a wide range of interests, with pathways in Traditional Arts and Culture, Medieval and Early Modern Celtic and Gaelic Development and Policy.

You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding in professional research methods and inquiry, language skills, literary and textual analysis or fieldwork and archiving, and a range of core topics in Celtic and Scottish studies.

You will undertake full research training in Celtic and Scottish studies. You will learn to analyse and synthesise this knowledge in an interdisciplinary context, question assumptions about the primacy of one specific discipline over others and receive an introduction to subjects which you may not have experienced at undergraduate level. You will also have the opportunity to take courses offered by the School of History, Classics & Archaeology.

Programme structure

The programme takes one academic year (12 months) of full-time study, or two years (24 months) of part-time study (part-time options are only available for UK or EU students).

You will complete one core course (20 credits total), five option courses (100 credits total) and a dissertation of 15,000 words (60 credits).

Compulsory courses:

  • Research Skills and Methods in Celtic and Scottish Studies

Option courses may include:

  • Celtic & Scottish Studies Internship
  • The Supernatural World
  • Material Culture in Scotland
  • Scottish Emigrant Traditions

Work placement/internship opportunities

The internship is an opportunity for students to gain valuable work experience in an area relevant to their studies. The economic environment is challenging for many graduates, and evidence of an internship is often a decisive factor in hiring decisions.

The internship has three main elements:

  • a work plan agreed between the host institution, the student, and the programme director
  • the work itself
  • an assessed final report

The precise nature of the internship will depend on agreements with the host institution, but it is likely to involve archival work, research assistance, curatorial work, or work in public relations.

Participating institutions may include Storytelling Centre, the National Library of Scotland Special Collections and Manuscripts departments, the National Sound Archive, the National Museums of Scotland, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, and the special collections of Edinburgh University.

Learning outcomes

You will develop the critical skills to evaluate and compare texts and a historical understanding of literature and culture, as well as transferable skills such as carrying out academic research, writing commentaries and essays, improving your analytical thought, using electronic resources and giving oral presentations.

You will gain:

  • familiarity with the broad context of Celtic and Scottish Studies
  • a solid understanding of bibliography and study methods
  • the ability to engage at a high level with the subject material
  • an awareness of current issues and concerns within selected research fields
  • the ability to engage in original research resulting in a dissertation in an area of specialism
  • opportunities for engagement with the professional field through an internship, if desired
  • the opportunity to study modern Scottish Gaelic or medieval Celtic languages

Career opportunities

There are a wide range of sectors within which you could apply your knowledge and skills such as journalism; social, government or cultural research; publishing; higher education; advertising; arts administration; information work; or programme research in broadcasting.



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Develop your individual, professional performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of performing or presenting in front of a camera, in situations including fictional drama and factual programming. Read more

Course Summary

Develop your individual, professional performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of performing or presenting in front of a camera, in situations including fictional drama and factual programming.

The course is designed for those with or without experience in acting and public speaking (eg actors, presenters, reporters, political figures, spokespersons and others), and you can tailor your studies around your individual needs through practice based research.

Your performance before the camera is an integral part of your research method and will enable you to produce your own professional show-reel.

Strong professional links embedded within the course provide opportunities to build professional contacts and experience from participation in master-classes run by experts working within television, film and other media/ professional industries.

Choose Performing Before the Camera PgCert at Bedfordshire and:

- Study on a course built around the requirements and demands of appearing before the camera in a professional capacity - constantly updated to reflect new developments and changes in professional and technical practices
- Explore a curriculum that anticipates the needs of the industry and opens up numerous career opportunities for postgraduates pursuing a professional career in acting and presenting for television, or film, or the internet
- Develop an understanding of professional procedures, requirements and challenges along with your ability to perform before the camera
- Gain experience of operating our recording and editing facilities to support your progressive development, archiving and final presentation of your show-reel
- Benefit from a course ideal for those pursuing careers in screen acting, presenting, journalism, politics and business who, in the course of their, work are frequently called upon to appear and present themselves and their ideas before a camera.

Why choose this course?

This course will help you perform of a professional standard before the camera. You will develop your individual performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of working before the camera.

Career Management Skills

The content and structure of the course is built around the requirements and demands of appearing before the camera in a professional capacity. The content is constantly updated to reflect new developments and changes in professional and technical practices.

Visits and talks with those currently working successfully within the industry enable you to network and to develop an understanding of professional procedures, requirements and challenges.

You will develop the ability to perform before the camera in related to your future career path genres and monitor, as well as enhance your progression from documenting your practice in seminars, masterclasses and tutorials. You will also develop skills in researching and evaluating, as well as in critical thinking in diverse performance to camera related situations, enhancing your ability to take an enquiring and critical viewpoint on the material you encounter.

On this journey, you will be encouraged to become self-aware, critical reflective practitioner, through a series of teaching methods and assessments which will instil an autonomous approach to learning, expected at Masters level (see the University of Bedfordshire level M learner descriptors).

Career/Further study opportunities

The course opens up numerous career opportunities for postgraduates pursuing a professional career in acting and presenting for television, or film, or the Internet. It would also benefit those pursing careers in journalism, politics, and business who in the course of their work are frequently called upon to appear and present themselves and their ideas before a camera.

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Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film. MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level. Read more

Introduction

Investigate fashion, dress and style in culture and society. Examine the evolving relationship between fashion and film.

Content

MA Fashion Cultures offers a unique experience in fashion education at postgraduate level.

The course has two specific but interrelated pathways: History and Culture; and Fashion / Film. On this course you will have the opportunity to study fashion and dress within its historical, social and cultural contexts. A dynamic in-depth exploration of theoretical and methodological perspectives will give you a grounding in the history of fashion and an underpinning of social and cultural theory for both pathways. You will then undertake more specialised study on your chosen pathway. On the History and Culture pathway you will investigate fashion as object, representation and practice through an interdisciplinary approach from both historical and contemporary perspectives. On Fashion/Film you will investigate the ongoing changing relationship between fashion, costume and forms of film as well as the relationship between cinema and consumption within a global context. While you will choose one pathway, you will have the opportunity to attend the lectures for the other pathway if you wish to, so you can gain the fullest possible understanding of a variety of disciplines and their impact upon visual and material cultures.

The pathways are led by renowned experts in their respective fields, and they are supported by research fellows, professors, authors, curators and historians who contribute to the course. Based in one of fashion’s most important cities, our students benefit from access to the special collections and archives of many leading institutions in London, including the V and A, Museum of London and the British Film Institute. You will also have the opportunity to work with other graduate students from the Culture and Curation Programme on some units of the course.

We attract students from a wide variety of academic and industry backgrounds, some of whom have completed theory-based first degrees, while others come with practice-based backgrounds. After completing their Masters studies, some students from both former courses have progressed to higher level research degrees, and others have established themselves in a number of related fields including curation, visual merchandising, styling, archiving, fashion buying, lecturing and research.

Structure

Block One September to January

Social and Cultural Theories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Fashion Histories (20 credits) (both pathways)
Research Methods (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Two February to May:

Cycles of Fashion (20 units) (History and Culture pathway), or
Fashion, Stardom and Celebrity Culture (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Sustainability and Fashion (20 credits) (either pathway)

Gendering Fashion (20 credits) (History and Culture pathway), or
Film Concepts, Global Cinema (20 credits) (Fashion / Film pathway), or
Consumer Behaviour and Psychology (20 credits) (either pathway); Collaborative Unit (20 credits) (both pathways)

Block Three May to September: Masters Project (60 credits) (both pathways)

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The Public History degree looks at how historical knowledge is produced, mediated and consumed in public spaces beyond the formal education sector. Read more
The Public History degree looks at how historical knowledge is produced, mediated and consumed in public spaces beyond the formal education sector.

Why study Public History?

Most people's sense of the past comes from public history, through film and television, fiction, museums, heritage sites and memory work.

This course looks at the kinds of pasts that are produced in these popular forms. It examines how they are made and the ways in which they are consumed and understood.

As part of your study you will be able to gain practical experience of working in a cultural heritage site, museum, gallery or archive.

The degree will help to prepare you for a career in public history related fields. It will also show you why the uses we make of the past are not just matters of academic interest.

Why St Mary's?

This is the only degree in the UK that is taught in partnership with The National Archives, which is a leading national and international site not just for archiving government documents, but also for engaging with the past in other forms.

You will attend workshops at The National Archives, delivered by their highly experienced staff and drawing on their wealth of original materials.

With the St Mary's campus located in South-West London, we also have excellent opportunities for field visits, and unrivalled links for volunteering and work experience with Hampton Court Palace, Strawberry Hill House, Turner's House, Sir John Soane Museum and Orleans House Gallery.

The degree is taught by historians with a strong record of publication and high-quality teaching.

Course Content

What you will study
› Public History
› Making Histories
› History: Spaces and Places
› Memory, History, Testimony
› Research Methods and Dissertation
› Professional Attachment

Please note: All information is correct at the time of publication. However, course content is regularly updated and this may result in some changes, which will be communicated to students before their programme begins.

Teaching and Assessment

Modules will be taught using a variety of modes – classroom-based discussions, field work, distance learning, work placements (where appropriate). You will write essays, produce project work, critique different types of source material, and learn to create work using a variety of digital tools. You will also design and deliver presentations about your work. In order to complete the MA, you will produce an extended, independent research project. This will either be a project based on your work placement or a text-based piece of academic research.

This course is designed to help you find a career in fields such as cultural heritage, archives, education and media. It can be used as part of your professional development if you are already employed in these sectors. It will also provide a critical and methodological platform for you if you wish to progress to doctoral level research.

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