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The Master of Archives and Records Management (MARM) is accredited by the Archives and Records Association as the recognised qualification for archivists and records managers in the UK and Ireland. Read more
The Master of Archives and Records Management (MARM) is accredited by the Archives and Records Association as the recognised qualification for archivists and records managers in the UK and Ireland.

You’ll gain the knowledge you need to pursue an archives and records career in research, business, government, academia – indeed anywhere that qualified professionals are needed.

We’ll teach you to work in a way that provides the accountability and transparency demanded for effective public administration or which meets the needs of archive users in the wider cultural and heritage environments.

There’s a strong practical element and you’ll be attached to the Liverpool University Centre for Archive Studies (LUCAS) which coordinates our research and outreach activities.

The international pathway is available for overseas students who want to meet the practice requirements of their home countries and who need a masters award to do so.

Teaching takes place in interactive lectures or small-group seminars and workshops as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

Why Archives and Records Management?

Breadth of expertise

Academic staff working on the MARM programme have extensive professional experience with strong international links as well as academic expertise. Their research interests range from medieval record keeping to contemporary public policy.

ARM is located in the department of History and the School of Histories, Languages and Cultures. Recent conferences and workshops on recordkeeping topics have included 'The Local Record Office, past, present and future', 'Archives and Deaf Communities', 'Time in the Archives', and an international conference on ‘Records, archives and technology: interdependence over time'.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

MARM also provides the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge you need if you are considering progress to a research degree (Archives and Records Management PhD).

Support and skills training for PhD students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students at Liverpool have a voice and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff - student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Career prospects

The Masters in Archives and Records Management has a highly successful record with 90% of students in recent cohorts obtaining professional posts within six months of graduation.

50% of the 2013/14 cohort already had a professional post by September 2014. They have taken a range of positions (Records Manager, Cataloguer, Collections Development Officer and Heritage Activities Manager), and their destinations include The National Archives, Hertfordshire Archives, The National Gallery, Downing College Cambridge, and Channel 4. In previous years, students have also gained posts abroad, including at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt and the UN Food & Agriculture Organisation in Rome.

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more
The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

Degree information

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focussing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules:
-Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
-Creation and Capture
-Curation and Stewardship
-The Record-keeping Professional
-Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Preservation
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Information Governance
-Manuscript Studies
-Oral History: from Creation to Curation
-Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
-Standards for Digital Recordkeeping
-Extended Practicum

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, presentations and practical assignments.

Placement
The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip iexperience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capture core module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Assistant Record Manager, House of Lords
-Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces
-Project Archivist, Cambridgeshire County Council
-Archivist, National Motor Museum.
-Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)

Employability
This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

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The Master of Archives and Records Management International Pathway (MARMI) is accredited by the Archives and Records Association. Read more
The Master of Archives and Records Management International Pathway (MARMI) is accredited by the Archives and Records Association. It is available for overseas students who want to meet the practice requirements of their home countries and who need a masters award to do so.

You’ll gain the knowledge you need to pursue an archives and records career in research, business, government, academia – indeed anywhere that qualified professionals are needed.

We’ll teach you to work in a way that provides the accountability and transparency demanded for effective public administration or which meets the needs of archive users in the wider cultural and heritage environments.

There’s a strong practical element and you’ll be attached to the Liverpool University Centre for Archive Studies (LUCAS) which coordinates our research and outreach activities.

Teaching takes place in interactive lectures or small-group seminars and workshops as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

Why Archives and Records Management?

Breadth of expertise

Academic staff working on the MARM programme have extensive professional experience with strong international links as well as academic expertise. Their research interests range from medieval record keeping to contemporary public policy.

ARM is located in the department of History and the School of Histories, Languages and Cultures. Recent conferences and workshops on recordkeeping topics have included 'The Local Record Office, past, present and future', 'Archives and Deaf Communities', 'Time in the Archives', and an international conference on ‘Records, archives and technology: interdependence over time'.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

MARM also provides the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge you need if you are considering progress to a research degree (Archives and Records Management PhD).

Support and skills training for PhD students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students at Liverpool have a voice and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff - student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

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The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources. Read more
The programme provides you with an understanding of contemporary information and records management issues. It pays special attention to the management of digital records and electronic resources, and how to manage these alongside analogue resources.

Why this programme

◾The programme is designed for those with a vocational interest in records management, archives and digital curation. It will prepare you to work in these fields, and give you a thorough grounding for continuing with research.
◾You will complete a two-week work placement in an archive, records management or digital repository.
◾As a graduate you will be eligible to be accredited by both the Archives & Records Association and CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), providing valuable professional recognition in both the archive and library fields.

Programme structure

You will develop skills in the core competencies of archives, records, and information management, creating and managing digital records, digital curation and preservation issues, archival theory, user needs, and description,
cataloguing, and navigation.

The programme consists of six courses spread over two semesters. You will take courses in:
◾Archives and records information management
◾Records and evidence
◾Description, cataloguing and navigation
◾Management, curation and preservation of digital materials.

Optional courses include:
◾2D digitisation
◾Law for cultural heritage institutions
◾Archives and records theory
◾Records and the transition to the digital
◾Palaeography
◾Phenomenology.

To graduate with the MSc you will also need to complete a course in research methods and professional studies, and produce a dissertation.

Career prospects

As a graduate, you will be well placed for a career as an archivist, records manager or digital curator within a variety of public and private organisations.

Positions held by recent graduates include Assistant Archivist and Records Manager.

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Minimum English language requirements. please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. Read more
Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores.

Overview

This full-time programme aims to educate students to the principles, attitudes and skills that underpin the professional management of historical archives. It is particularly geared to the ‘sole operator’ who is entrusted with the care and development of archives in voluntary societies, religious institutions, historic houses and other small-scale but important settings. The aim is to educate archivists who will be able to draw up and implement archive management solutions appropriate to such collections.

In addition, the programme aims to give students an understanding of the historical processes that have generated records, the key repositories in which they are held and how to utilise such records in their work as archivists.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-historical-archives

Course Structure

The programme runs over two semesters and summer modules. The lecturing staff are drawn from the History Department, Library and An Foras Feasa. Modules include records management, archival arrangement and description, preservation, archives management, leadership and project management , the tradition and organisation of print, historical perspectives on records and record keeping in Ireland, digital humanities.

Career Options

Graduates of this course will be well equipped to manage the care of historical archive collections in smaller settings. As with other graduates in History, they can expect to find employment across a wide range of administrative, commercial, and other employments.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHP57

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Minimum English language requirements. please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. Read more
Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.
Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Overview

This full-time programme aims to educate students to the principles, attitudes and skills that underpin the professional management of historical archives. It is particularly geared to the ‘sole operator’ who is entrusted with the care and development of archives in voluntary societies, religious institutions, historic houses and other small-scale but important settings. The aim is to educate archivists who will be able to draw up and implement archive management solutions appropriate to such collections.

In addition, the programme aims to give students an understanding of the historical processes that have generated records, the key repositories in which they are held and how to utilise such records in their work as archivists.

Course Structure

The programme runs over two semesters and summer modules. There is no thesis requirement for the PGDip. The lecturing staff are drawn from the History Department, Library and An Foras Feasa. Modules include archival arrangement and description, information technology, preservation management, the tradition and organisation of print, electronic archive management systems, palaeography and diplomatic archives and managing an archives collection.

Career Options

Graduates of this course will be well equipped to manage the care of historical archive collections in smaller settings. As with other graduates in History, they can expect to find employment across a wide range of administrative, commercial, and other employments.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHP70

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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This is a flexible distance learning programme, delivered online over the Internet. The programme is suitable for information professionals employed in a wide range of fields including records management, legislative compliance, electronic media and records. Read more
This is a flexible distance learning programme, delivered online over the Internet.
The programme is suitable for information professionals employed in a wide range of fields including records management, legislative compliance, electronic media and records. Some modules, for example, Management for Information Professionals, will benefit a wider range of practitioners, including librarians, museum curators and other information specialists.

All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

Aims

To provide professional training on a modular and distance learning basis for archivists and records managers.
To provide single modules on a range of topics for continuing professional development.

Methods of Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate); dissertation of 18,000 words.

All course materials are delivered via the virtual learning environment, a secure part of the University website. Each module has been written by experts and consists of text with embedded links to online resources such as websites, audio-visual files and PDFs.
Students work through each module at the same time as other students, guided by a tutor, and can expect support and regular communication from CAIS staff. Modules are designed to be interactive and students are required to submit tasks to their tutors every ten days or two weeks. The tasks act as a timetable, indicating how quickly students should be working through the course material. Tutors give constructive feedback on the tasks and provide guidance on finding and using sources and in developing research and analytical skills.

Students may also be required to complete tasks with other students who are taking the module. There are usually between five and 14 students on each module all of whom have different backgrounds and experiences. A discussion forum provides an opportunity to share these experiences and to discuss issues and questions.

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This is a flexible distance learning programme, delivered online over the Internet. The programme is suitable for information professionals employed in a wide range of fields including records management, legislative compliance, electronic media and records. Read more
This is a flexible distance learning programme, delivered online over the Internet.

The programme is suitable for information professionals employed in a wide range of fields including records management, legislative compliance, electronic media and records. Some modules, for example, Management for Information Professionals, will benefit a wider range of practitioners, including librarians, museum curators and other information specialists.

All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

Aims

To provide professional training on a modular and distance learning basis for archivists and records managers.
To provide single modules on a range of topics for continuing professional development.

Methods of Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate); dissertation of 18,000 words.
All course materials are delivered via the virtual learning environment, a secure part of the University website. Each module has been written by experts and consists of text with embedded links to online resources such as websites, audio-visual files and PDFs.

Students work through each module at the same time as other students, guided by a tutor, and can expect support and regular communication from CAIS staff. Modules are designed to be interactive and students are required to submit tasks to their tutors every ten days or two weeks. The tasks act as a timetable, indicating how quickly students should be working through the course material. Tutors give constructive feedback on the tasks and provide guidance on finding and using sources and in developing research and analytical skills.

Students may also be required to complete tasks with other students who are taking the module. There are usually between five and 14 students on each module all of whom have different backgrounds and experiences. A discussion forum provides an opportunity to share these experiences and to discuss issues and questions.

Length of Degree

The degree is normally completed in 30 - 60 Months but fast track options are available. The Programme combines two core and a choice of optional modules.

Modules last for 15 weeks (20 credits) or seven weeks (10 credits). There are three entry points a year in January, May and September. Start dates for 2013-14 are:

16th September 2013
13th January 2014
12th May 2014

After 60 credits students may exit with a Certificate in Family and Local History
After 120 credits they may exit with a Diploma. Students taking the full Masters will then complete an 18,000 word dissertation.

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This course is for anyone with an existing interest and some experience in genealogy and related subjects. It's been developed by academics and genealogy professionals to provide a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of genealogical research, family history, records, archives and heraldry. Read more

Why this course?

This course is for anyone with an existing interest and some experience in genealogy and related subjects. It's been developed by academics and genealogy professionals to provide a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of genealogical research, family history, records, archives and heraldry. You may wish to study the field in more detail or use it in your career. It’s of particular interest for:
- archivists
- lawyers & paralegals
- geographers
- land agents
- heritage sector staff
- historians
- librarians
- museum staff
- records agents

It's also suitable for those who are interested in:
- developing, evaluating or refreshing their expertise in genealogy, records, archives, documents, palaeography and heraldry
- advancing their academic and professional achievement in these subjects
- gaining a deeper, more critical understanding of the field, its literature and professional practice
- providing more expert knowledge and advisory capacity to employers and members of the public, such as in Family History Centres

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/genealogicalpalaeographicheraldicstudies/

How is the course delivered?

The course is delivered online and so it'll require computer access from home. You should be familiar with the use of computers in genealogy and the course is standardised on Microsoft Windows. You'll also need to subscribe or pay for certain online databases and services.

Course overview

You’ll focus on the sources available to genealogists and family historians. You’ll also gain the knowledge, skills and techniques to operate as a professional genealogist in a variety of settings.

The Postgraduate Certificate course deals mainly with Scottish, English/Welsh and Irish records. The Postgraduate Diploma adds American, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, British Empire, Jewish, European and other sources.

We work together with:
- the National Records of Scotland
- the National Archives at Kew
- various professional and commercial bodies including the Association of Scottish Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (ASGRA), DC Thomson Family History, Deceased Online and FamilyTreeDNA

When you complete the Certificate and Diploma degrees, you'll have a suitable portfolio to submit to various certification boards and other bodies for professional accreditation.

Course structure

There are three degree levels within this course.
Most of our students begin with the PG Certificate before moving to the PG Diploma and then onto the MSc.
There's also a one-year MSc option. This combines all three levels into one academic year.
There are a few external equivalents to the PG Certificate which would allow direct entry onto the PG Diploma. If you're interested in learning more about these contact our Course Administrator.

You’ll study

You’ll need to commit time each week to cover:
- reading
- participation in online discussion forums
- research
- completion of course work

Postgraduate Certificate

We offer two options with the PG Cert:

- One year
If you'd like to study over a year, and can commit 20 hours a week to the course, this is the option for you. It'll run from October until June with assessments throughout the course.

- Two year (modular)
If you'd like to study over two years, you can do this by studying the six classes individually over this time period. This option gives you the opportunity to begin studying in October, January or April - whichever suits you best. The classes must be taken in order, and are all compulsory to complete the PG Cert. This option will require roughly 14 hours a week of study.

- Topics
You'll study topics including:
- genealogical professional practice
- search strategies & using repositories
- social history, demography & geographic sources
- church & civil records (England/Wales & Scotland)
- census records & their substitutes (England/Wales & Scotland)
- genetic genealogy
- migration & records
- Irish records
- military & occupational records (England/Wales & Scotland)
- land & inheritance records (England/Wales & Scotland)
- palaeography
- Latin for genealogists
- heraldry

Once you successfully complete the certificate, you can progress to the Diploma.

Postgraduate Diploma

The PG Dip allows you to develop a greater understanding of social and historical contexts and provides an in depth study of the professional and academic aspects of genealogical work. We suggest you allow around 20-25 hours a week for studying this degree.

- Topics
You'll study topics including:
- methods of professional enquiry (includes submission of a 5,000-word research project)
- Irish records in depth
- US & Canadian sources
- British empire sources
- heraldry & mediaeval genealogy
- European & Jewish sources
- Australian & New Zealand sources
- palaeographic & document-focused studies

After successfully completing the Diploma you can progress to the MSc, if the tutor team agrees.

MSc

The Masters is the third year in the part-time course.
The MSc requires the student to plan, implement and evaluate a piece of research and development work, which involves carrying out a research project of genealogical relevance, which will be assessed on a report of 12,000-16,000 words.
The part-time MSc runs from October with the dissertation submitted the following June. There's tutor guidance on academic writing, study and research skills.

- One-year MSc option
If you have an undergraduate degree along with experience in genealogical research, this could be an option for you.
You'll have to commit around 40 hours a week and there will be compulsory online tutorials for you to attend every week.
This option will begin in the middle of September and will run through to late July. The course content is the same as the three degree levels of the course. You can find these in the course content tab.

Teaching staff

Academic input is provided by:
- the Centre for Lifelong Learning
- the University’s Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
- appropriate external specialists

Professional recognition

ASGRA (Association of Scottish Genealogists and Researchers in Archives) will admit PG Certificate graduates as Probationer Members and PG Diploma graduates as Full Members (additional evidence of client work is also required).
The Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (AGRA) recognises the PG Certificate as satisfying the requirement for Associate Members to hold a qualification in genealogy.

Computer & software access

You need to have regular access to a computer at home as we’ll issue you with various log-ins and passwords you can’t use on public computers.

Your computer must have a recent version of Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office or Open Office. It should also be capable of running Java and be enabled for pop-ups.

We’ll communicate with you by e-mail and via the University's Virtual Learning Environment. Please make sure you can use the following programs:
- Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint or a compatible program, eg OpenOffice
- an e-mail program compatible with Microsoft software. We recommend Outlook
- a graphics program compatible with Microsoft software. We recommend Irfanview
- WinZip or the ability to un-zip files and folders
- Adobe Acrobat Reader

Family Tree Maker software is sent to you before the start of the course. You can also choose to use comparable software from other vendors. A six-month subscription to the worldwide version of Ancestry is normally included with the copy of Family Tree Maker but this is not guaranteed.

Entry requirements

Some assignments and assessments require the use of genealogy software. If you've not previously used such software you should learn the basics before the course begins.

- PgCert
Normally, a degree or similar, but non-standard educational or professional qualifications may also be considered. There's a requirement to have some relevant genealogical or related experience.
The Centre for Lifelong Learning offers a number of eight-week courses available both online and on-campus. These are intended to provide the basic skills and knowledge required to facilitate progression to the Postgraduate Certificate. Successful completion of one or more of these courses may serve as evidence of the necessary study skills and/or relevant genealogical experience.

- PgDip
Entry will normally follow successful completion of the PgCert.
Students who've gained equivalent academic qualifications at PgCert level may be accepted directly onto the PgDip. Those seeking admission with advanced standing may include prior learning in recognised courses and/or genealogical-based experience as entry criteria. Further information is available on request.

- MSc
Direct entry to the part-time MSc isn't available. Students must first complete the PgDip at an appropriate level before being allowed to continue on to the MSc.
For the one-year MSc, candidates should normally hold an undergraduate degree, though other forms of qualification and experience may be taken into account. First degrees may also be augmented by previous postgraduate qualifications, such as an MSc.
Some experience in genealogical (or other relevant) research is required and we may ask to see examples of reports and/or charts you have created.
Students who already hold the PgCert or PgDip in Genealogical, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies from Strathclyde, or certain other relevant qualifications from specified institutions, will be able to transfer credits, up to a defined limit. However, no fee discounts will be available. These students may wish to undertake the part-time versions of the MSc programme.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Public history refers to the pursuit of historical understanding and interpretation in the public realm. MTSU was in the first wave of American universities to embrace the study of public history and now offers a master’s degree, doctorate, and advanced certificates. Read more
Public history refers to the pursuit of historical understanding and interpretation in the public realm. MTSU was in the first wave of American universities to embrace the study of public history and now offers a master’s degree, doctorate, and advanced certificates. Students pursuing the Master of Arts in History with a concentration in Public History may choose from five tracks: historic preservation and cultural resource management, museum management, archival management, oral history, and public archaeology. Master’s candidates are exposed to the myriad career possibilities associated with each specialty, helping them select the curriculum best suited to their interests and aspirations. The program carefully balances academic historical methods and scholarship; the intellectual foundations and nature of public history; and professional development in several areas. To prepare students for professional practice, the program partners with a number of on-campus centers and initiatives, including the Center for Historic Preservation, Albert Gore Research Center, Center for Popular Music, and Walker Library digital collections.

Career

Public historians work in a wide range of professional settings with public audiences of all ages. Potential employers include archives, museums, historic organizations, historical societies, historic sites, private consulting firms, and historical agencies at all levels of government. Examples of career possibilities with an advanced degree in public history include:

Architectural historian
Archivist
Author
College professor/instructor
Consultant
Cultural heritage manager
Cultural resources manager
Digital librarian/cataloger
Historic preservation planner
Historian
Museum/collections curator or administrator
Oral historian
Public archaeologist

Employers of MTSU alumni include:

Alabama Department of Archives and History
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
American Association for State and Local History
Belle Meade Plantation
Belmont Mansion
East Tennessee Historical Society
Historic Home of T.R.R. Cobb
Historical Association of Catawba County, N.C.
History Center, Diboll, Texas
Huntsville (Ala.) Historic Preservation Commission
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve
Land Trust for Tennessee
Manzanar National Historic Site
Maymont Foundation, Richmond, Va.
Metro Nashville Arts Commission
Mike Curb Archives
New South Associates
Ohio History Connection
President James K. Polk Ancestral Home
Rutherford County Archives
Tennessee Agricultural Museum
Tennessee Department of Transportation
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Thomason & Associates
Vicksburg (Miss.) Foundation for Historic Preservation
Williamson County Archives and Museum
War in the Pacific National Hist

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Our MA in History at Kingston University offers an exciting and wide-ranging programme, teaching within a friendly and supportive department, and access to London's unrivalled research archives, libraries and museums. Read more
Our MA in History at Kingston University offers an exciting and wide-ranging programme, teaching within a friendly and supportive department, and access to London's unrivalled research archives, libraries and museums. Taught modules from which you can choose are built around our research expertise in 20th-century and contemporary Britain, modern international and imperial history, and the 18th century and French Revolutionary period. The course is also tailored to your interests and needs, with full- and part-time routes, and a dissertation on your own research interest.

Key features
-Taught modules built around our research expertise in 20th-century Britain, modern international and imperial history and the 18th century and French Revolutionary period.
-Benefit from London's vast range of historical centres, museums and resources, including the National Archives at nearby Kew and the British Library, and from access to cultural and policy-making figures working in the capital.
-Be taught in our friendly and supportive environment, in small groups, and with one to one supervision for your dissertation on a research project of your choice. Enjoy flexibility, with our full- and part-time routes.
-Engage with our programme of eminent visiting speakers, who give talks on their latest historical research
-Training in historical skills, such as using archives and exploring history through ICT. Also, contribute to our department's highly active history blog.

What will you study?

You will take a core module, Doing History, which ranges across historical debates, archives and digital resources. It will expose you to the latest debates within the historical profession, while also providing training in historical skills, such as using archives and exploring history through ICT. This will help equip you for your dissertation, on your chosen research topic, on which you will work one-to-one with an assigned specialist supervisor. Module assignments can be tailored to fit your research interests. You will also choose two option modules from the following three: Twentieth-Century Britain: Politics, Society and Culture; International History; and The Eighteenth Century: Revolution, Empire and Society.

We offer a wide range of events and social activities, through our student History Society, a guest speaker programme, and departmental blog: http://historyatkingston.wordpress.com/.

Assessment

Essays, written assignments, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Doing History: Theory Methods and Practice
-Dissertation

Option modules (choose two)
-Twentieth-Century Britain: Politics, Society and Culture
-International History
-The Eighteenth Century: Revolution, Empire and Society

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Photography has become the major form of image-making and visual communication since its development in the nineteenth century. Its importance has been recognised in many areas of scholarship. Read more
Photography has become the major form of image-making and visual communication since its development in the nineteenth century. Its importance has been recognised in many areas of scholarship: history of art, media and cultural studies, literature, memory and memorialisation, gender and identity, philosophy and law. Its role in all fields of the arts and sciences, including those most personal, is being expanded, renewed and questioned by the mushrooming of digital culture.

This programme enables you to learn about - and to negotiate your individual path through - historical and contemporary photographic cultures, in order to develop your interests, whether your engagement with the medium is academic, artistic, personal or vocational.

After an initial introductory core module, and with tutorial guidance, the programme allows you to specialise through your selection of option modules and topics for your research project and dissertation. Options cover a wide range of photographic practices and cultures, past and present, and allow you to explore diverse methodologies and internationally 'local' practices. The course also offers opportunities for work placements with London museums, galleries and archives.

You will develop subject-specific and transferable research, critical and writing skills that will enhance your career opportunities in the field and beyond, whether in academia or teaching, photography as a practice, galleries and museums, or in the media. The programme is also ideally suited to preparing students with a practice-based background considering a PhD, academic or practice-based.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our history of art programmes throughout the year.

As well as regular museum and gallery visits, the department offers an exciting study trip every spring.

Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the postgraduate Research Seminar, which brings art historians from all over the UK and beyond to speak at Birkbeck; the biennial Murray lecture; the Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

Staff teaching on this programme

Dr Patrizia Di Bello (Course Director)
Dr Suzannah Biernoff
Dr Fiona Candlin
Professor Annie E Coombes
Professor Mark Crinson
Professor Steve Edwards
Dr Tag Gronberg
Dr Akane Kawakami
Dr Gabriel Koureas
Dr Luciana Martins
Professor Lynda Nead
Dr Leslie Topp

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Unique international coverage of photographic cultures, making use of modules offered across the School of Arts.
Taught by renowned research-active academics and writers from a variety of disciplines, including history of art, media and cultural studies, journalism, modern languages and the humanities.
Cross- and interdisciplinary approach to the study of photography in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Research culture and networking opportunities offered by the Birkbeck History and Theory of Photography Research Centre.
You will have access to the Birkbeck Library and an in-house slide library and self-access centre (including the Vasari Digital Media Research Centre).
You will also have access to the Jo Spence Memorial Library and Terry Dennett Archive.
There are opportunities for you to become involved in curating and organising exhibitions in the Peltz Gallery in the School of Arts.
Our location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to specialist libraries and archives in the University of London. These include the University of London Library, Institute of Historical Research, Warburg Institute and School of Oriental and African Studies, together with the major national resource of the British Library.
Exclusive visits to photographic archives, and group visits to exhibitions, talks and events.
You will also have easy access to specialist libraries and photographic archives, including the Courtauld Institute of Art, the National Art Library and the photographic collection in the Prints and Drawings Study Room at the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Museum of London, the National Portrait Gallery (Heinz Archives), the Photographers’ Gallery and the Tate Gallery. We are also near many commercial galleries, photography book specialist dealers and exhibition spaces such as the Barbican, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Hayward Gallery, INIVA and the many other places that exhibit photographs from time to time.

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The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis. Read more
The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis.

The course allies theory and practice in seminar-based discussions that embrace various methodological issues and perspectives, including Marxism, discourse theory, phenomenology, semiology, museology, gender, race, class, memory and oral testimony. Depending on the material you analyse in your essays and seminars, as well as the dissertation topic you choose, you can also emphasise your own intellectual and subject-specific interests.

Since its inception in the late 1990s, the MA has garnered a national and international reputation as one of the pioneering and most successful programmes of its kind. As a research-led course, it harnesses the academic expertise of staff with a recognised wealth of teaching and research excellence in subject areas such as fashion and dress history, the history and theory of advertising, photography and the mass-reproduced image, and heritage and museum studies.

Under guidance, you will be encouraged to explore the relationship between theory and practice and to develop your own skills as an independent researcher, thinker and writer.

Course structure

The History of Design and Material Culture MA draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history.

It stimulates innovative and interdisciplinary study in the history of design and material culture in both their western and non-western contexts, considering the relationship between local, national and international patterns of production, circulation, consumption and use.

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, study visits and tutorials. Considerable emphasis is placed on student involvement in the weekly seminar readings and discussions within the two thematic core modules, Exploring Objects and Mediating Objects.

Based at Pavilion Parade, a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion, teaching takes place close to the seafront and city centre amenities.

Syllabus

• Exploring Objects

The Exploring Objects module introduces you to a series of different research methods and historiographical approaches, as you interrogate and make sense of designed objects in terms of how they are designed, produced, circulated, consumed and used in everyday life. It covers the period from the late eighteenth century to the present time and typically involves discussion and debate on the following themes, theories and methods: Marxist and post-Marxist historiography; production and consumption; gender and taste; phenomenology; object-based analysis; the use of archives; and 'good writing/bad writing'. It also introduces you to the academic rigour of postgraduate dissertation research.

• Mediating Objects

This module complements Exploring Objects by focusing on the mediation between 'this one' (the object itself) and 'that one' (the object as represented in word and image). On one level, it examines how objects are translated in various texts and contexts, from museum and private collections to photographs, advertisements, film and fiction. On another level, it examines how objects are transformed through the embodied processes of everyday rituals such as gift-giving and personal oral and collective memories. The module therefore deals with the idea of intertexualities and how the identities of things and people are phenomenologically bound up with each other. By extension, you examine objects in relation to ideas concerning sex, gender, class, generation, race and ethnicity.

• Dissertation

The centrepiece of your MA studies, the dissertation is a piece of original writing between 18,000 and 20,000 words on a research topic of your own choosing. It allows you to pursue a specific research topic related to your own academic and intellectual interests in a given area of the history of design and material culture, for example fashion and dress, textiles, ceramics and glass, product design, interior design and architecture, graphic communications, advertising and photography, film, museums, collecting and curating, and design pedagogy. The dissertation is largely based on primary research, often using specialist archives and surviving historical material.

Facilities

This course makes use of the University of Brighton Design Archives, which include the archives of the Design Council, Alison Settle, FHK Henrion and the South of England Film and Video Archive.

Close professional contact with national institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, as well as with local collections and centres of historical interest (such as Brighton’s unique Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, with its internationally famous collection of decorative art from the 1890s onwards), present research opportunities for students registered on the course.

The course is closely linked to our arts and humanities research division through a joint research lecture series, and we have successfully encouraged high achievers to register for the MPhil/PhD programme.

The student environment also includes the thriving postgraduate Design History Society as well as opportunities for conference presentation, professional contact and career development in the field.

Careers and employability

The course has an extremely healthy track record in helping students to take up careers in related areas of employment and further study. Many of our postgraduates have succeeded in finding work as lecturers, curators, journalists, designers and design consultants, while many others have pursued doctoral research, most often also securing prestigious funding from the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council).

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MA Culture, Criticism and Curation offers a unique framework for critically engaging with the history and present scenarios of culture. Read more

Introduction

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation offers a unique framework for critically engaging with the history and present scenarios of culture. We create outcomes through which new understandings can be generated through critical writing and expanded forms of curation.

Content

This postgraduate course combines interdisciplinary and innovative research, using techniques of image, object and textual analysis, and practical work in handling archives, curating and writing. Its combination of critical engagement and creative skills bridges scholarly research and the cultural and creative industries. The Course aims to teach students to be high level researchers and innovative practitioners, responding to a need for professionals with a broad interest in cultural production and the skills to communicate this to specialist and general audiences alike.

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation is aimed at candidates with an interest in research and its application in organising cultural events. Students should be keen to collaborate and work in teams, as well as able to work alone. Taking advantage of its location in an art school, MA CCC is neither a ‘straight’ academic course, nor one aimed at training cultural managers. Rather it integrates theoretical issues and practical skills, interrogating history and working critically and creatively to consider how potential new knowledge can be presented in the public realm.

The course will make use of London’s wealth of collections, archives and creative practitioners, staging the teaching in relation to ‘live’ resources. Key focuses of the course are collections and archives, including those that are institutional, personal and /or produced in the context of creative art practices, which you will address from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Collections and archives are historical constructions as much as physical (or other), and the course encourages you to see them as discursive, technological, social and political.

The course is taught by a team of tutors who bridge academic research and writing and professional practices of criticism, journalism, art, exhibition design, curating and collections management, most of whom developed and currently teach on the successful BA Criticism, Communication and Curation: Arts and Design degree. We will support your acquisition of high-level critical and practical skills enabling you to work in the field of art and culture or progress to a research degree. MA CCC aspires to generate criticality, as a skill and mode of address, applicable both within and outside the Humanities. The course’s main aim is to take research based in the academic environment and make it accessible to larger or new audiences.

Structure

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation lasts 45 weeks, arranged across one academic year – 3 terms of 10 weeks – plus an additional 15 weeks of independent work.

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation is credit rated at 180 credits. It comprises two Units:

Unit 1, (60 credits), for the first 15 weeks of the course

Unit 2 (120 credits) that runs for 30 weeks.

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