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Masters Degrees (Architectural History)

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This MA is unique in architectural history, theory and criticism postgraduate study, providing a coherent and intensive forum in which students develop independent approaches to the subject. Read more

This MA is unique in architectural history, theory and criticism postgraduate study, providing a coherent and intensive forum in which students develop independent approaches to the subject. Graduates progress to academic, journalistic, curatorial and architectural professions with diverse skills in established and emerging subjects, theories and methodologies.

About this degree

The programme examines architecture and cities from early-modern 16th-century to contemporary 21st-century contexts. Rather than focusing on the work of individuals, stylistic classification or normative categories, the programme locates architecture within social, ideological, creative, political and urban processes, exploring the boundaries of what constitute legitimate architectural objects and sites of study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months is offered.

Core modules

  • Critical Methodologies of Architectural History
  • Research and Dissemination of Architectural History
  • Architectural History Dissertation (Report) with Oral Examination

Optional modules

Students choose four of the following:

  • Architecture in Britain since the 17thc
  • The Representation of Cities
  • Theorising Practices: Site Writing
  • History and Theory of Digital Design
  • Materialist Ecological Architectures
  • Multiple Modernities Architecture
  • Practices of Criticism

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 10,000-word dissertation and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, building and gallery visits, film screenings, group working and one-to-one tutorials, and a field trip (optional). Assessment is through coursework, consisting of short exercises, classroom presentations, and longer essays for individual modules, a 10,000-word report and oral examination, and verbal presentations.

Fieldwork

An annual programme field trip (optional) takes place, normally in May.

Departmental stipends of c. £250 are normally applicable. Maximum cost to the student is £250.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Architectural History MA

Careers

Graduates from the UCL Bartlett are very successful in gaining subsequent employment in the UK and internationally. At present there is a growing demand for our Master's graduates from a wide range of both public and private employers. Many graduates from the programme have gone on to research, teach and publish at universities and other institutions worldwide, including national media, publishing and heritage organisations, art galleries and museums.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Exhibition Project Manager, Eesti Meremuuseum (Estonian Maritime Museum)
  • Project Manager, British Council
  • Architect, Design Group
  • Collections Intern, Victoria and Albert Museum
  • Sub-Editor, Architects Journal

Employability

Postgraduate study at the UCL Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment is situated within a vibrant graduate and research environment, including a large cohort of PhD students and an extensive range of faculty members with interests in architectural history and theory. Students on the Architectural History MA are immersed in one of the world's largest and most innovative centres for architectural history and theory, and are able to engage in innumerable seminars, research representations and other events. Our graduates are highly sought after. Some choose to continue with academic research or teaching, others go on to roles in the visual arts, education, publishing, heritage, design and architecture.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary built environment faculty, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Located in London, it is at the heart of a large cluster of creative architects and engineering firms and has all the resources of a world city at hand.

This MA is the UK's longest established programme in its field, and prioritises the exploration of new and existing methodologies and critical theories as they might be applied to the study of architecture and cities.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Architecture

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Postgraduate Certificate in Architectural History covers English architectural history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Architectural History covers English architectural history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. It will be of interest to those seeking to develop their
• knowledge of the broad sweep of English architecture
• understanding of the evolution of the historic environment more widely
• practical skills of recording and analysing buildings.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-architectural-history

What the course offers

The Architectural History course is part-time and consists of three taught units and a dissertation. The taught units are delivered in association with the MSc in Historic Conservation course at Oxford Brookes University. The first two units, Historical Studies, are taught at OUDCE, Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford, and the third unit, Site Evaluation and Survey, is taught at Oxford Brookes in Headington. The dissertation is supervised within OUDCE.

Teaching takes place on Monday mornings, from 9.30am to 1pm, over three terms commencing in the autumn each year. Some sessions in Unit 3 will be held on Monday afternoons between 2pm and 5.30pm, and one continues on to a Tuesday.

The number of Certificate students is normally limited to10 in each year. There may be up to a further 25 students in each class from Oxford Brookes University.

Although it offers a qualification in its own right, the course is designed to enable successful students to progress to the Oxford Brookes MSc in Historic Conservation with exemption from the three taught units, subject to the admission requirements of Oxford Brookes University.

Programme details

Units 1 and 2 are linked and taught in consecutive terms. Their aim is to enable students to acquire an understanding of the evolution of England's architecture, and of different approaches to the history of buildings.

Unit 1: Historical Studies 1
Settlement, Landscape and Medieval Buildings

Unit 1 concentrates on the medieval period. It provides an introduction to the evolution of the landscape and the major elements of architectural history in England up to the sixteenth century.

The aim of the unit is to enable a student to acquire a sound understanding of the basic development of medieval buildings and their context.

Teaching is by means of lectures and field trips. Students also need to ensure they have sufficient time for directed reading and private study. Tutorials are available by request.

Assessment: three essays each of 1,500 words.

Unit 2: Historical Studies 2
Post-Medieval Buildings

The unit will continue the themes introduced in Historical Studies 1 and will analyse the major architectural developments from the sixteenth century to the present century.

The unit will seek to build on the achievements of Historical Studies 1 to enable students to acquire a sound understanding of the development of English architectural history and its broader context down to the present century in a manner which is relevant to historic conservation.

Teaching is by means of lectures. Students also need to ensure they have sufficient time for directed reading and private study. Tutorials are available by request.
Assessment: two essays each of 2,000 words.

Unit 3: Site evaluation and survey: Local Historic Building Survey
Held at Oxford Brookes University, Headington.

This is a skill-based unit designed to develop expertise in understanding the special architectural and historical characteristics of a particular site, building (or group of buildings) and to develop techniques for its representation through research, measurement, and drawn/photographic recording.

This unit will develop the skills necessary to plan, prepare and execute a programme for the recording of structures and sites, and will create an awareness of the main sources of archive material for investigations into historic buildings, sites and monuments. It provides an introduction to the making of a competent analytical record of a site through text, photographic and measured surveys, and drawn representation.

Teaching is by means of lectures, field trips and practical sessions, which need to be supplemented by private study and individual fieldwork.

Assessment: portfolio record of a selected building to be submitted by mid-May 2017.

Unit 4: Individual dissertation
To provide an opportunity for an extended exploration of a single topic based on primary and secondary research to demonstrate the skills and knowledge gained in the other elements of the course.

An 8,000-word dissertation on a subject relevant to architectural history, chosen in consultation with the course tutor and due for submission by the end of August 2017. Dissertations are supervised within OUDCE.

Dissertation topics are chosen during Hilary Term, and all students make a short initial presentation of their subject in the last session of that term. There may be another class seminar in June, by agreement with the students. Individual supervisions are given at mutually convenient times from May to the end of July. Dissertations are submitted by the end of August.

Programme outcome

By the end of the course students should have achieved:

• a broad understanding of English architectural history
• an awareness of the critical literature relating to the subject
• the ability to make a record of a building
• the ability to conduct independent research.

Assessment methods

Assessment will be by coursework. The three units and the dissertation will each count for 25% of the final mark. To be successfully awarded the Certificate, you will need to attend 80% of the taught classes and achieve an overall mark of 50%. Full regulations and examination conventions can be obtained from the Registry, OUDCE, Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/pgcert-architectural-history

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Architectural History and Theory pathway

If you select the Architectural History and Theory pathway you can take options that are both historical and theoretical, choosing from different periods spanning from the Medieval to the contemporary. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Architectural History and Theory. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Architectural History and Theory, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Architectural History and Theory) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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Programme description. This programme is intended for students who seek advanced training in the history and theory of architecture. Read more

Programme description

This programme is intended for students who seek advanced training in the history and theory of architecture. It provides methodological and conceptual tools essential for contemporary research and affords the opportunity for the in-depth study of a select topic in the history and theory of architecture.

The programme will provide you with a firm basis in the methodological and theoretical paradigms of architectural history. Through a combination of coursework and supervised dissertation research with optional internships, you will acquire both a breadth of historical understanding and rigorous research practices.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two compulsory courses focused on methodology and four option courses, which draw on staff research expertise, followed by a 12,000–15,000 word supervised dissertation.

Additionally, you may enrol in courses offered by allied disciplines such as history of art, archaeology, architectural conservation, history, literature and others.

The flexible profile of the programme reflects the diversity of positions within the fields of architectural history and theory, making it suitable for students from a broad range of backgrounds and with a variety of interests and career objectives.

Learning outcomes

The MSc Architectural History and Theory seeks to provide the following core learning outcomes:

  • Critical understanding of both contemporary debates and scholarly traditions within the history and theory of architecture.
  • Advanced methodological training in architectural research.
  • Acquisition of rigorous research skills and practices.
  • In-depth knowledge of a sub-field of architectural history or theory.
  • Ability to relate architectural research to interdisciplinary fields of inquiry.

Career opportunities

The programmes provides preparation for doctoral research, work in industries that document and interpret the built environment, work in museums and conservation agencies or journalism/media



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This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis of the usual length allowed for Buckingham Master’s degree dissertations, aspects of Western Architectural History from the medieval period to the mid-twentieth century. Read more

Course outline

This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis of the usual length allowed for Buckingham Master’s degree dissertations, aspects of Western Architectural History from the medieval period to the mid-twentieth century. Students will be encouraged to consider the interrelation of architectural history, art history and social history.

The seminar programme, which serves to complement the student’s individual research, will explore these themes in a series of twelve meetings, which will be addressed by some of the United Kingdom’s most distinguished architectural historians. These will be prefaced by a general introductory class led by the Course Director, offering an introduction to research techniques, relevant library resources available in London and through the University of Buckingham’s online subscriptions, to relevant museum collections and to the most recent academic approaches to the subject.

Each seminar will take place in central London in the early evening, followed by a 40-minute question-and-answer session with the seminar speakers, all recognised experts in their fields, and a dinner at which there will be further discussion with the speaker and a general conversation about the topic in hand. Six seminars will be scheduled for the period between October and December, and a further six in the period between the New Year and March.

After the course leader’s general introduction, there will be a series of twelve seminar papers which explore the architecture of the Western world: the medieval castle, the Gothic cathedral, Italian renaissance architecture, French and English baroque palace and country house architecture, European baroque church architecture, the inspiration of the Classical world, the Gothic Revival and historicism, Ruskin and Morris and the birth of conservation philosophy, industrialisation and the transformation of urban architecture, colonial architecture, Beaux-Arts architecture in America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, and the meaning of Modern architecture. Reading lists will be made available before each lecture to allow for background reading and discussion with the expert speakers.

Location for seminars: The Reform Club (104 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5EW) and the University of Buckingham’s London premises at 51 Gower Street (Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 6HJ)

Course director

Jeremy Musson has a distinguished reputation as an architectural and social historian. A former National Trust assistant curator, he was Architectural Editor of Country Life magazine in 1998-2007, and presented the BBC 2 series The Curious House Guest, 2006-2007. He is an author and historic buildings consultant, working with a range of clients including the National Trust and St Paul’s Cathedral.

He is a regular lecturer and supervisor on the Master’s in Building History course at the University of Cambridge, a second supervisor to the Buckingham Master’s in the English Country House, regular speaker and tutor on the Attingham Summer School and has been a course director for the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. He has also lectured The Royal Oak in the USA and at various US museums.

His books include The Country Houses of Sir John Vanbrugh, English Ruins, Up and Down Stairs: The History of the Country House Servant, English Country House Interiors and Robert Adam: Country House Design, Decoration and the Art of Elegance (2017). He recently contributed a chapter to the new monograph King’s College Chapel 1515-2015: Art, Music and Religion in Cambridge, 2014, and another to Fin de siècle Rediscovered. A Mosaic of the Turn of the Century, proceedings of a conference at the National Museum in Warsaw. He is co-editor with Sir David Cannadine of the forthcoming collection of essays The British Country House Revisited.

Associate students

For those wishing to attend the evening research seminar programme, but unable to devote the time to the coursework or to register for the MA degree, there is the option of becoming an Associate Student. This status will enable the student to attend the twelve research seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, in the first six months of the programme, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

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Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

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The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation. Read more
The MSc in Conservation of Historic Buildings provides training in the fundamental principles of structural and architectural conservation, within an academic framework of architectural history and theory, including the philosophy of conservation.

Our course is taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals and is based on the Department's well established tradition of interdisciplinary education and training.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/conservation/index.html

Key programme features

- Provides technical training within an academic framework
- Taught by leading architects, structural engineers and related professionals
- Based on interdisciplinary co-operation between architects and engineers
- International leader in its field
- Proven track record of employability
- Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
- Fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Buildings Conservation (IHBC)
- Suited to engineers, architects, surveyors, planners, geographers, archaeologists, historians and managers, but we also accept (and encourage) students who have either taken a non-vocational degree (usually history or history of art, but also geographers, archaeologists, etc.) or have a degree in a different field that they want to change from.

The programme draws profoundly on its unique location, the World Heritage City of Bath, an ideal study material and environment.

Structure and Content

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Teaching for taught units takes place on Wednesdays and Fridays, with one day given to each set of two units. The sequence in which units are taught is reversed each year so that part-time students attend on the same day over the period of their study.

- Full-time study: 12 months, with students attending two days a week (Wednesday and Friday)
- Part-time study: 24 months, with students attending one day a week (Wednesday or Friday)
- Extended part-time study: 48 months, with students attending one day/one semester per year.

Where students do not wish to write the dissertation, or are ineligible to progress, a PG Diploma is awarded after successful completion of the taught course only.

Dissertation:
During the final three months of the degree you will produce a dissertation. This is your opportunity to explore a particular topic that has been covered during the programme in far greater depth.

Transfer:
A student may request a transfer from part-time to extended part-time study. If approved, the transfer will take into account units completed already and will be applied on a pro rata basis. For example, if a part-time student completes four units in year one and then transfers to the extended part-time programme, they will be given two more years to complete.

Conservation techniques

- Structural conservation techniques: principles, faults and their causes, diagnoses and remedies, and surveying and analytical techniques
- Materials conservation techniques: technology and conservation of building elements from structure to finishes
- Information and awareness about related fields (including furniture and fabric conservation), and the experts who can be called upon
- The legal framework of conservation.

Philosophy

- A range of philosophies towards the repair and re-use of old buildings
- History of conservation, from John Wood and James Wyatt, the Victorian age, William Morris and the development of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings through to present day policies and the listing of twentieth century buildings
Stimulating debate and the opportunity to develop an individual viewpoint
- A body of knowledge on the history of British architecture from town planning to interiors
- An awareness of adjacent related fields including garden conservation and archaeology.

Teaching of the Theory of Classical Architecture

- Visual training based around the teaching of classical architecture within the context of Bath as a classical city
- Aims to achieve a high level of architectural correctness and competence in detailing architectural elements.

Case studies

- You will attend six case studies (a combination of large and small buildings at sites both local to Bath and further afield)
- The case studies cover the philosophy upon which the conservation work is based, the architectural and engineering principles involved and a study of the techniques and technologies employed.

Career Options

Bath students have an excellent track record for getting jobs.


The MSc provides a short cut to becoming a Chartered Surveyor. Graduates get exemption from the RICS internal examinations and are eligible for entry to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). This usually involves two years of structured training with an employer followed by the APC. Visit the RICS website for more information.

Graduate destinations:

- Inspector for the Victorian Society
- English Heritage (historic research department, inspectors, managers)
- Architects’ practices working on conservation and building new country houses in the classical style
- National Trust Manager of Uppark House
- Conservation officer, UNESCO, Paris
- Conservation architects with well-known practices working on every type of historic building from Salisbury cathedral to medieval timber-framed barns
- Development Officer with Turquoise Mountain repairing a mosque in Kabul
- Member of the Information Team, the Science Museum, South Kensington.

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.


Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. . This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Read more

Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. 

This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Or you may have recently completed a Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) or Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PDGipAHT), and want to continue on to do research.

You'll further develop your critical thinking and discussion skills with in-depth study into your area of interest. Increase your understanding of how architectural history and theory are applied to design, so you can express your own ideas and conclusions within a theoretical framework.

Expertise through research

Choose a thesis that reflects your current knowledge of the intellectual, technical, aesthetic and cultural conditions of architecture. Your research topic must have a basis in theory as well as method.

You'll get quality supervision and support from staff with international reputations for teaching, research and publishing.

You may be able to include media such as a drawing portfolio or video with your thesis submission. If you choose to use design as your primary research method in your thesis, it must be explained within a theoretical context.

Past research topics include:

  • architectural and urban design processes
  • sustainability in architecture
  • architectural history, theory and criticism
  • energy and environmental design of buildings, including sustainable design

The MArch does not qualify you for registration as an architect.

Duration and workload

The MArch can be completed within three trimesters or one calendar year of full-time study, or in a minimum of six trimesters if you're studying part time. You have a maximum of three years from enrolment to complete and present your thesis.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

If you are already working in the profession, you'll add a new level of expertise to your practice.

The skills and knowledge you gain will open doors to a range of other jobs including architectural conservator, archivist or museum researcher. You might also find work as a critic or writer, curator, historian or librarian.



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The environment we live in nowadays is very complex and the architect is forced to work on the existing heritage paying particular attention to its sustainability and considering the enviroment together with the built heritage as a resource to protect. Read more

Mission and Goals:

The environment we live in nowadays is very complex and the architect is forced to work on the existing heritage paying particular attention to its sustainability and considering the enviroment together with the built heritage as a resource to protect.
The new MSc programme "Architectural Design and History" is offering a study plan based on this very attitude.
Its mission is to train students to be cultured architects, well-aware of the historic and artistic context in which they work as well as of the other cultural fields.
New designs shall be included in and compared to the already existing ones.
The respect of the built heritage is the starting point for the new design to become a reutilization project, a requalification project, sometimes even completion and new integration.

The programme is entirely taught in English

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/architectural-design-and-history/

Career opportunities:

Master of Science graduates -designers recognized by the European Union- have many different career opportunities:
- as freelance architects or in association with professional studios, they may work at new solutions in the field of architecture, a professional field which is undergoing many transformations;

- the wide set of jobs at a private and public level in institutions, companies, service and design companies, offers to the graduates the possibility to work in different positions with different expertise even at a high level of responsibility

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Architecture-Mantova.pdf
Politecnico di Milano, a distinguished University in the field of heritage preservation and valorization, decided to launch a new MSc programme in Mantova Campus: Architectural Design and History.
The rich and well-preserved heritage of the city of Mantova, the presence of the UNESCO site and the dedicated facilities of the Mantova Campus are the ideal conditions to host this programme. In addition, the curriculum is launched in cooperation with the “Mantua Unesco Chair”, which will offer dedicated scholarships for graduates, international internships, summer schools and open lectures held by world-famous architects. From the a.y. 2015/2016 Eduardo Souto de Moura is going to teach at Mantova Campus
as full professor of Architectural Design in Historical Context. In the “Mantua Unesco Chair”, Politecnico di Milano leads a worldwide network of twelve highly qualified universities, heritage research and management centres. These synergies will considerably enrich the education, training and career opportunities of the students. The programme is taught in English eventhough some of the elective subjects will be offered in Italian.

Subjects

- First year subjects:
Architectural Design in Historical Context 1, History of Italian Architecture (XV-XVIII century), Mechanics and Design of Structures, Architectural Design in Historical Context 2, Sustainability and the Built Environment.

- Second year subjects:
Design in Historical Landscapes, History of Contemporary Architecture, Planning in Historical Cities, Final Workshop, internship.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/architectural-design-and-history/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/architectural-design-and-history/

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Building History is an academically rigorous yet practical course aiming to equip students for careers in historic building investigation, research, recording, assessment, management and interpretation. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Building History is an academically rigorous yet practical course aiming to equip students for careers in historic building investigation, research, recording, assessment, management and interpretation. The MSt in Building History draws on expertise in both the academic and the professional sphere.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-building-history

Course detail

The course, devised in collaboration with English Heritage, is unique in combining British architectural history with practical tuition in interpreting building fabric.

It provides an overview of architectural evolution and an awareness of the principal approaches to the exploration of architectural evidence. It also sets out to train students in the rigorous and effective use of primary sources, preparing them for careers in historic building research, recording, assessment and curation, or in suitable cases for progression to doctoral-level research

Format

The course is heavily taught in the first year by invited speakers from a mixture of academic and professional backgrounds. Lectures are matched to field trips. The emphasis is on learning to evaluate architectural and documentary evidence and to formulate informed and accurate assessments.

The second year is divided between a professional placement and a personal research project which constitutes the dissertation.

- Lectures: c.100 hours (first year)
- Seminars and classes: c.60 hours (guided site visits; first year)
- Practicals: c.40 hours (first year)
- Supervision: 3 hours per year

Assessment

- Dissertation: 20,000-25,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography and appendices).
- Two essays: 3,500 words maximum each.
- One recording project: 3,000-5,000 words, plus drawings and photographs.
- One research proposal: 2,000-3,000 words.
- Log-book/portfolio and report (3,000 words maximum) from professional placement.
- Field test of one hour's duration.
- A non-assessed (formative) essay is required during the first term of Year 1.

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews. Students are expected to undertake 'Crit' sessions on the recording project and dissertation proposals. Feedback is given in supervisions, supervisors' reports and throughout the course on request.

Continuation

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired the type of research training required to carry on to the PhD, or if conceived as a standalone degree, will have acquired the skills to specialise and enhance their professional prospects.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

- The Building History Bursary fund -

Candidates who anticipate difficulty in funding their studies are invited to apply for a bursary. Applications are assessed competitively and it is expected that the bursaries offered will not normally exceed £2,000 per year, with a minimum value of £500 per year.

To be eligible to apply for a bursary you must already have submitted an application to study on the course, and be a citizen of the EU.

Find out more: http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/courses/mst-building-history-1/Bursary

- Other sources of funding -

Sources of government funding and financial support including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The British Art pathway

If you select the British Art pathway you could choose options from different periods spanning from the Anglo Saxon to the contemporary. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in British Art. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in British Art, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (British Art) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Background

We welcome students who have previously studied history of art, but also those from other backgrounds.

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The MA in English Building History is a collaborative programme delivered by Lifelong Learning and the Department of Archaeology. Read more
The MA in English Building History is a collaborative programme delivered by Lifelong Learning and the Department of Archaeology.

Over the course of study, we broadly cover England’s architectural history from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. A range of significant buildings and sites from vernacular dwellings to the Country House are considered, and thus the difference between vernacular and polite styles of building. As well as engaging with key themes and debates, students will be trained in the practical skills of analysis. You will learn how to recognise archetypal styles, and how these were shaped by technological, social, economic, geographic and cultural forces; different methods of investigation; and the relevance of such buildings today, drawing on examples from across the country.

The programme starts in late September/early October, concurrent with each new academic year – places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions.

This is a three-year, part-time, MA programme delivered online in a fully-supported learning environment, with blended learning support for the final year Independent Study Module. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma if their circumstances change.

Overview

-Demonstrate detailed knowledge and expertise of English building history and of key buildings c.1000-1950
-Demonstrate understanding of buildings as manifestations of complex social, cultural, economic, and political influences characteristic of a particular historical era and an awareness of the associated scholarly themes and debates
-Apply a range of specialised skills required for analysing, understanding, and interpreting English built history
Assimilate material from a variety of sources and contextualise information in relation to the history of buildings in various forms
-Identify a range of historic buildings’ developments and analyse their phases, date, materials, style, and function
-Identify, select, and employ appropriate media for communicating ideas clearly on English building history to specialist and non-specialist audiences
-Research and develop a critical argument using resources from a broad spectrum of intellectual fields
-Apply contemporary interpretive and theoretical approaches to the form, function, and meaning of a range of historic building types
-Complete a dissertation that is a substantial piece of independent research and present an assessed lecture
-Apply research skills in the field of English Building History.

Structure

This part-time three-year programme will initially comprise six 20-credit modules:
-An Introduction to the Built Environment
-The Medieval Era
-Early Modern Buildings
-The Neo-Classical Tradition
-The Modern Era
-Approaches to Historic Buildings Research

Students will then undertake a 60-credit Independent Study Module (ISM) facilitated by the Department of Archaeology in the third year, which will operate under their usual regulations for ISMs. The ISM includes an assessed lecture assessment. The dates of these will be made available in a timely fashion to allow for travel and accommodation to be arranged. An alternative assessment via Skype (or its equivalent) will be arranged in the event the student is unable to attend campus.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Medieval Art and Medievalisms pathway

If you select the Medieval Art and Medievalisms pathway you can work on a wide range of media, from stained glass to manuscripts and architecture. In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Medieval Art and Medievalisms. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Medieval Art and Medievalisms, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Medieval Art and Medievalisms) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Read less
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Sculpture Studies pathway

If you select the Sculpture Studies pathway you could choose options which take different approaches to a range of three dimensional objects across different periods, spanning from the Anglo Saxon period to contemporary explorations of the idea of ‘sculpture’, which during the twentieth century underwent a dramatic series of changes, ranging from early twentieth century notions of ‘direct carving’ and ‘truth to materials’ in the work of Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, to the found, ‘readymade’ objects of the Dadaists and surrealists in Europe, to a wide range of other kinds of three-dimensional objects made from unusual, non-art materials, installation art and other kinds of ‘mixed media’ works from the 1950s in internationally diverse geographic locales.

In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Sculpture Studies. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Sculpture Studies, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Sculpture Studies) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Read less
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Modern and Contemporary Art pathway

If you select the Modern and Contemporary Art pathway you could choose options focusing on a wide range of works ranging from painting, sculpture and architecture, to photography, installation, performance and contemporary works engaging with new media and the digital. You will study works of art from geographically diverse regions, from the international rise of ‘pop art’ across the globe from the 1960s, to the arts of the Americas, and art from west and east Europe from the early twentieth century to the present day. As well you will be introduced to a range of formal, methodological and theoretical ways of thinking, writing and talking about the work of art in this period.

In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Modern and Contemporary Art. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Modern and Contemporary Art, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Modern and Contemporary Art) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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