• Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
London Metropolitan University Featured Masters Courses
Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University at Shrivenham Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Bath Featured Masters Courses
"archaeological" AND "che…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Archaeological Chemistry)

We have 10 Masters Degrees (Archaeological Chemistry)

  • "archaeological" AND "chemistry" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 10 of 10
Order by 
The School of Chemistry is one of the largest in the UK and an internationally recognised centre of teaching and research. Currently there are over 250 postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers, from many different countries, working with more than 60 academic staff on a wide range of research themes. Read more
The School of Chemistry is one of the largest in the UK and an internationally recognised centre of teaching and research. Currently there are over 250 postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers, from many different countries, working with more than 60 academic staff on a wide range of research themes. Extensive collaborations with science-based industries and leading international academic centres ensure that research in Bristol remains at the frontier of science.

The School of Chemistry is housed in spacious, modern laboratories, which are well equipped with state-of-the-art facilities. There is a comprehensive graduate programme to ensure you have the opportunity to build a wide range of skills, both in chemistry and other transferable skills.

The School of Chemistry hosts or participates in a number of Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs) and Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTPs). Training opportunities in these national flagship centres are available in the following disciplines:
-Chemical synthesis
-Functional nanomaterials
-Catalysis
-Theory and modelling in chemical sciences
-Science and technology of diamond
-Synthetic biology
-Advanced composites
-Earth and environmental sciences
-Quantum engineering
-Future autonomous and robotic systems
-Bioscience
-Condensed matter physics

Research groups

The School of Chemistry maintains a traditional managerial structure with three sections, namely Inorganic and Materials, Organic and Biological, and Physical and Theoretical. However, the school’s research profile is defined according to nine themes, each with a critical mass of researchers. Further information on the school's research profile can be found at Explore Bristol Research (http://research-information.bristol.ac.uk/).

-Atmospheric and Global Change Chemistry
-Biological and Archaeological Chemistry
-Catalysis
-Computational and Theoretical Chemistry
-Materials for Energy
-Soft Matter, Colloids and Materials
-Spectroscopy and Dynamics
-Supramolecular and Mechanistic Chemistry
-Synthesis

Researchers in the School of Chemistry are engaged in a number of collaborative centres and research institutes, with broader engagement from researchers across the Faculty of Science, the University and beyond.

Careers

Many of our PhD graduates are successful in securing postdoctoral positions at universities in the UK and abroad. A PhD in chemistry is valued in many employment sectors worldwide, including pharmaceutical sciences, polymers, coatings, agrochemicals, instrumentation manufacturers and management consultancy. Your skills will be in high demand from the chemical and allied industries, as well as the public sector.

Read less
We provide a unique Master’s education in Materials Chemistry, offering the opportunity to carry out a 12-month research project from a selection that covers all aspects of Materials Chemistry. Read more

We provide a unique Master’s education in Materials Chemistry, offering the opportunity to carry out a 12-month research project from a selection that covers all aspects of Materials Chemistry.

Optional modules enable you to gain specialist knowledge of core areas such as:

  • supramolecular and nanochemistry
  • polymer chemistry
  • inorganic materials chemistry

Both synthesis and characterisation are integral to the teaching around these areas.

Materials Chemistry is a key multidisciplinary area, and a growth area for both academic and industrial research. Employment prospects in this area are excellent - the programme will prepare you for a career in industrial or academic research and development, or in production or manufacturing roles.

Professional accreditation

We will be seeking accreditation from the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC).

Rankings

Ranked 18th in the UK for Chemistry in the Guardian University League Tables 2017.

What you will study

The MSc in Materials Chemistry qualification comprises of 180 credits. These are divided into modules, the smallest being 20 credits (20 credits are equivalent to 200 student learning hours).

In semester one the programme consists of two core compulsory modules (40 credits) to provide the appropriate framework and a compulsory module (20 credits) to develop your research skills, professional development and commercial awareness.

Semester two also consists of two core compulsory modules (40 credits) to provide the appropriate framework and a compulsory module (20 credits) to develop your research project design skills. Students will be introduced to the concept of peer-review, and will provide feedback on a project proposal from one of their peers.

Students will be guided on how to:

  • strategically plan experimental work
  • carry out all appropriate COSHH assessments involved in practical work
  • source and access relevant published work

In support of this, students will be required to meet with their supervisor regularly to discuss interim reports and to propose the next steps in the planning of a project. Instruction will be given by library staff in critical reading of the scientific literature. A presentation of the work achieved will be given in the form of a poster presentation.

In semester three students are expected to devote a significant period of time to an individual and original piece of research. The student is required to work independently on their project, and to seek advice or practical help when appropriate, with regular communication with their project supervisor(s). The students’ supervisor will provide guidance on data collection, data analysis, discussion, summarising of findings and writing up of the final dissertation and associated research paper.

Modules

Core

Option

Learning and assessment

A variety of teaching methods appropriate to the learning outcomes of the individual modules are employed throughout the programme. The learning activities include lectures, workshops and directed study.

Core modules are dedicated to developing generic key skills, specialism practice and project management experience. The specialist modules relating to materials chemistry include lectures, workshops and use of specialist software packages under the instruction of a team of interdisciplinary specialists in the area.

The modules are assessed through course work (problem solving exercises, project plan, training plan), oral presentations and formal exams.

These progressively focus on student-centred approaches to learning and will reflect increasing reliance on independent responsibility for learning. In this way you will develop the attributes needed for life-long learning and continued professional development.

Facilities

Postgraduate students at the University of Bradford learn in a high-quality environment with teaching by academics from around the world, many engaged in ground-breaking research.

You will join a growing community of more than 2,700 students who choose to continue their higher education here each year, whether it's on a taught course such as an MSc in Cancer Pharmacology, or a research degree such as a PhD in Archaeological Sciences.

When you join the University of Bradford as a postgraduate student you gain access to our world-class facilities designed to give you the best possible environment in which to learn and undertake research.

Career prospects

Materials Chemists work in a diverse range of areas including: medical devices; electronic devices; sustainable energy generation; nanomaterials; surface coatings; controlled delivery of drugs and agrochemicals and many other areas.

Transferable skills are also a key component and graduating students will be equipped for careers in both academia and industry.

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Study support

Our comprehensive support services will help you to achieve your full potential – both academically and personally. 

We provide all you need to make the very best of your time with us, and successfully progress through your studies and on into the world of graduate employment. 

Our support services include: 

  • Personal tutors 
  • Disability services 
  • Counselling services 
  • MyBradford student support centres 
  • The Students’ Union 
  • Chaplaincy and faith advisers 
  • An on-campus nursery 
  • Halls wardens 

We have well-stocked libraries and excellent IT facilities across campus. These facilities are open 24 hours a day during term time, meaning you’ll always find a place to get things done on campus. 

Our Academic Skills Advice Service will work with you to develop your academic, interpersonal and transferable skills. 

Research

Research in Chemistry is broadly themed into Molecular Science and Materials Chemistry, comprising the development of synthetic, analytical and computational methods.



Read less
This is a 2 year (full-time) or 3 year (part-time) course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more

This is a 2 year (full-time) or 3 year (part-time) course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. This course is particularly appropriate for those seeking a career in conservation research.

It is intended for those who wish to become conservation scientists or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range of disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules

  • Conservation Theory
  • Conservation Skills
  • Artefact Studies
  • Care of Collections
  • Conservation Practice
  • Dissertation.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as a dissertation. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for you to implement and develop your skills, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allows you to continue your learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The dissertation allows you to develop advanced research skills in an aspect of conservation or artefact studies.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares you for work or further study once you have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking your learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year you will typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as you develop your abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of your work and reflections.

The emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in the first year of the course is continued through the dissertation, which marks out the researcher route. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom you will typically have ten one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which you are strongly encouraged to attend.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



Read less
This is a 2 year (full-time) or 3 year (part-time) course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more

This is a 2 year (full-time) or 3 year (part-time) course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects.

It is intended for those who wish to become practising artefact conservators, or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range on disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules

  • Conservation Theory
  • Conservation Skills
  • Artefact Studies
  • Care of Collections
  • Conservation Practice
  • Professional Practice.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as an industrial placement. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for you to implement and develop your skills, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allow you to continue your learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The industrial placement forms a major part of the contact time in the programme for Professional Practitioners, allowing you to gain direct experience of practical and applied skills in Conservation. Industrial partners include the Museum of London, National Museum of Wales and Victoria & Albert Museum. 

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares you for work or further study once you have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking your learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year you will typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as you develop your abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of your work and reflections.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and acting in the role of professional conservator continues in the final year, where you will have a placement in a working conservation lab for 9 months. You will gain experience of working with a wide range of material and develop further your practical skills, within a real-life working environment. A focus is placed upon problem solving and organisational and managerial skills, under the supervision of a professional conservator.

The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



Read less
The full-time Analytical Sciences MSc and Postgraduate Diploma is a research-focused degree. You’ll develop the experience and techniques required to be an independent practitioner of modern analytical science, with the skills required for research and by industry. Read more

The full-time Analytical Sciences MSc and Postgraduate Diploma is a research-focused degree.

You’ll develop the experience and techniques required to be an independent practitioner of modern analytical science, with the skills required for research and by industry.

It delivers core teaching in advanced aspects of analytical chemistry, and enables you to explore areas of specialist knowledge through optional modules.

You’ll apply a wide range of analytical techniques and gain invaluable research experience through an extended research project.

Having developed the fundamentals of the analytical sciences, these core techniques are applied to a disciplines including:

  • Spectroscopy
  • Archaeometry
  • Materials characterisation
  • Separation science and mass spectrometry

Rankings

Ranked 18th in the UK for Chemistry in the Guardian University League Tables 2017

What you will study

The taught content of this programme is strongly research-led in line with university and faculty strategy, and academic staff who will teach on the programme are active researchers who publish in high quality, international scientific journals. The programme is designed to build from formal learning approaches to provide a good grounding in the topics, and to then progress to student–led study for individual or group projects.

The MSc comprises 180 credits, while the Postgraduate Diploma comprises 120 credits.

Modules

Core

Option

Learning and assessment

Learning activities include lectures, laboratories, workshops and directed study.

Core modules are dedicated to developing generic analytical key skills, specialism practice and project management experience.

The specialist modules relating to the analytical instruments include lectures, workshops, hands-on laboratory and instrument sessions with relevant samples under the instruction of a team of interdisciplinary specialists in the area.

The modules are assessed through course work (problem solving exercises, laboratory reports, project plan, training plan), oral presentations and formal exams.

This research intensive masters emphasises early engagement in hands-on laboratory and analytical work with the output of MSc thesis plus research paper draft.

These progressively focus on student-centred approaches to learning and will reflect increasing reliance on independent responsibility for learning. In this way you will develop the attributes needed for life-long learning and continued professional development.

Facilities

You’ll be based at the Centre for Chemical and Structural Analysis, which houses the major capital equipment of the University and is the focus for our academic and commercial contract research in analysis.

Our experienced and highly skilled staff ensure that the instrumentation is maintained to industry standards through service contracts, controlled access and a quality management system.

We offer an array of analytical techniques and services to industrial clients including contract research, routine analysis and training courses.

Career prospects

Graduates of the MSc in Analytical Sciences have forged successful careers in a wide range of settings.

These include:

  • PhD study
  • analytical chemistry (analyst, quality specialist, NMR technician, experimental officer, laboratory supervisor, section and facilities manager etc.)
  • teaching

Recent graduates have taken up analytical scientist managerial roles in a number of international companies.

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Study support

A comprehensive support network is here for you to ensure you reach your academic potential and go on to further success in the future.

You’ll benefit from a range of support services, including:

  • personal academic tutor
  • student support / administration team
  • Academic Skills Advice service
  • Career and Employability Services
  • award-winning Disability Service
  • well stocked libraries and excellent IT facilities

Research

The programme is research led, with module and lecture content revised to respond to newly published research.

The teaching team are all research active (many also engage in commercial work) and keep students informed of cutting-edge research and new debates as they are happening.



Read less
Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners. Read more
Research students in Forensic Science have the opportunity to work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the School of Life Sciences, and can benefit from strong links with industry practitioners.

You have the opportunity to engage in the work of the Forensic Analysis Research Group, to develop innovative methods and techniques to assist in solving crime and casework-related issues. The team are currently engaged in high-profile studies including collaborative projects with the Centre for Applied Science and Technology at the UK Home Office.

You have access to a range of training programmes to support you in your independent investigations and an experienced supervisory team are on hand to offer advice and direction. Ongoing research projects in the School include Chemical Analysis of Legal Highs and GHB, DNA Analysis in Forensic and Archaeological Contexts, and Microcrystalline Testing for Drugs.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Main research areas:
-Drug analysis
-Ignitable liquid and fuel analysis
-Explosives analysis
-DNA fingerprinting
-Fingerprinting science
-Dye and pigment analysis
-Forensic anthropology
-Spectroscopic techniques (including Raman) and separation science
-Surface analysis
-Mechanical properties of biological materials.

Recent research projects include:
-Chemical analysis of fingerprints
-Analysis of legal highs and GHB
-Analysis of fuel markers and detection of fuel adulteration
-Development of sensors for forensic applications
-Microcrystalline testing for drugs
-Analysis of smoke for fire investigation
-Enhancement of DNA at crime scenes
-Development of colloids and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)
-DNA analysis in forensic and archaeological contexts
-Molecular typing of skin micro-organisms in forensic identification
-Forensic analysis of the mechanical properties of biological materials.

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors to assess progress and guide research methodologies, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Career and Personal Development

These postgraduate research programmes allow you the opportunity to expand your knowledge and expertise in the specialist field of forensic science. They provide the chance to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers in forensic science-related industries.

Read less
MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to enable graduate students to develop skills in a variety of areas, which concern the processing, analysis and identification of human remains. Read more

MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to enable graduate students to develop skills in a variety of areas, which concern the processing, analysis and identification of human remains. This postgraduate course provides intensive training in developmental anatomy and osteology, forensic anthropology methods and theory, forensic taphonomy in theory and practice, crime scene investigation and the law, research methods and expert witness and presentation skills. The course has a focus on both domestic forensic anthropology work (e.g. UK and US) and forensic anthropology in the context of international humanitarian work and international criminal investigation.

UCLan’s postgraduate Forensic Anthropology course is the only forensic anthropology/osteology MSc in the UK to be based within a dedicated forensics department with state-of-the-art Crime Scene Investigation practical labs as well as excellent resources in Forensic Biology and Chemistry.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

We have a dedicated MSc Forensic Anthropology laboratory and radiography facilities with the full range of teaching casts as well as an extensive collection of experimentally induced projectile, blunt and sharp force trauma. We have an archaeological skeletal collection consisting of some 120 individuals from two sites, one late Medieval and one Victorian. UCLan’s TRACES facility for decomposition and taphonomic experimentation is located nearby and many students choose to conduct MSc dissertation research projects as part of the long term research agenda into estimating time since death. Staff members teaching the course are also active in research and consultancy.

Assessment is based on a combination of coursework and examination and includes an MSc dissertation project. Students are encouraged to present their research findings at international meetings.

OPPORTUNITIES

Graduating from this course, you will be well placed to undertake further research at the doctoral level, take up jobs in forensic anthropology laboratories, or to participate in human remains excavations.



Read less
Research profile. The MSc by Research in Archaeology is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Archaeology is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

We welcome applications from anyone keen to work in fields that overlap with or complement our academic staff interests. These include human osteoarchaeology, forensic anthropology and archaeology, isotopes and science-based methods of investigation, geographical information systems, early civilisations and urban societies in the Mediterranean and Europe, Egyptology, Roman archaeology, the Byzantine world and late antiquity, hunter-gatherers and the spread of farming in Europe, megalithic monuments, later European prehistory and the archaeology of Scotland. As part of your application, you must submit a viable research proposal which sets out your aims and plans, while demonstrating your knowledge of the chosen field: this will be scrutinised as part of our admissions process. Two supervisors will be appointed to work with you on the project. It is a good idea to consult with prospective supervisors in advance of an application.

The School of History, Classics & Archaeology, and our relationships with other subject areas and external organisations, such as the National Museums of Scotland and Historic Environment Scotland, allow us to arrange interdisciplinary study and supervision.

Programme structure

A long dissertation is the sole form of assessment, but you will also attend a prescribed training course and are encouraged to take other relevant courses.

Facilities

Our building offers you exceptional, modern facilities, resources and study spaces, in a stunning location.

Our postgraduate students have access to:

  • A dedicated study and computing lab with printing, copying and scanning facilities, overlooking the Meadows, one of the city’s best-loved green spaces.
  • Two research rooms, shared with undergraduates, housing some of our impressive book collections and a small selection of computing facilities.
  • A large common room overlooking the Meadows, shared by students and staff.
  • Our PhD study room. Subject to available desk space, you may apply after semester one of your first year.
  • A number of small-scale teaching rooms, well-equipped with facilities such as data projection and smart boards.
  • Exhibition areas, filled with artefacts and artwork from our collections.

All of our facilities are in addition to the multiple libraries and computer labs provided across the University’s estate. Many of our rooms overlook the Meadows.

Our location, right in the heart of Edinburgh, means you will be based close to the city’s cultural attractions and facilities, including a wealth of libraries, archives, museums and galleries, which provide uniquely rich support for the disciplines we teach.

Archaeology students benefit from our laboratories for artefact analysis, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, bone chemistry and computing (with a wide range of software applications). There is an extensive reference collection of archaeological materials, such as pottery, metal, stone and glass artefacts, in the V Gordon Childe teaching collection. Students can also benefit from the facilities, archives, collections and expertise of a range of heritage agencies and commercial archaeology units based in the city of Edinburgh.

Career opportunities

Archaeology graduates can follow a variety of career options. The programme equips you to go on to advanced study, and also provides a solid foundation for a career. You will gain practical as well as academic experience, teamworking and analytical skills, and will be able to work in a variety of contexts. Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police. An archaeology degree does not restrict you to a career in archaeology.



Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X