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A Masters in Architecture from the University of East London, taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology the pioneer of sustainability practice. Read more

Masters in Sustainable Architecture

A Masters in Architecture from the University of East London, taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology the pioneer of sustainability practice. Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. It replaces the ARB Part II validated course, the Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies, which has been successfully running since 2009

Surrounded by mountains and forest, this location fosters a unique learning experience, in a truly sustainable environment.
CAT’s 40 years of sustainable education experience has led to the development of courses that not only tackle environmental issues, but focus on sustainability at the core of every aspect of learning. Teaching is delivered in the WISE building - itself an example of recent developments in sustainable construction - and includes a mix of studio- based design work, lectures, seminars and practicals. The annual Summer School enables students to design, detail and build a structure at CAT using the local materials available.

Students are introduced to a range of skills that are increasingly in demand within the building industry. The focus is on designing buildings in their context, to allow for adaptation to the effects of climate change and to create healthy environments for all.

Masters Aims

The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture is aimed at the architecture student who understands that the world is in a time of transition and that building design plays an important role in environmental impact. Therefore there is great potential within the profession for environmental change and this is pivotal to the entire sustainability debate.
• Aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in architecture and wish to attain a highly credited Part II degree (note: the new M.Arch is currently seeking ARB Part II validation).
• Graduates of this course will understand built environment design in the context of adaptation to sustainability issues.
• Monthly intensive residential study weeks immerse students in their projects.
• Collaboration with external designers, architects and community projects add valuable practical experience to the students' resumes.
• Intensive twenty-two month course allows graduates to respond to the urgent need for a greater understanding of sustainability issues in the built environment.

Programme Content

The following modules are delivered via a lively mixture of practical workshops, studio-based design work, site visits, seminars and lectures.

Integrated Design Project 1
Integrated Design Project 2
Design & build Project
Final Design Project
Technical Report
Architectural Analysis through Writing 1
Architectural Analysis through Writing 2
Dissertation
Professional Studies

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Masters of Architecture (M.Arch) by the University of East London *subject to validation.

Methods of assessment

Students are continuously assessed via essays, reports, presentations and project design work.
There is a final exhibition of students’ designs exhibited in the prestigious WISE building and assessed by external examiners.

The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture is currently seeking prescription by the Architects Registration Board (ARB). The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture updates CAT’s existing Part II validated course, the Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies, which has been successfully running since 2008 . On prescription by ARB it will offer a masters level Part II architecture course and will be subject to periodic reviews, for the purposes of entry onto the United Kingdom Register of Architects. Prescription is normally granted on a four-yearly basis subject to ARB being satisfied that standard requirements have been met.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector.

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Practical building and knowledge sharing

Alongside their design and academic work, students of the Master in Architecture also participate in a variety of building projects. This allows them to get practical experience and understanding of the complexities of what happens once their designs leave the architectural studio. During these projects architecture students work alongside MSc students who will go into complimentary building professions allowing for networking and a wealth of transferable knowledge.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Creating high standards of Sustainable Architecture

We pride ourselves on the high standard of work that our graduates continue to produce. To see for yourself, have a look at some of the projects our students produce: https://www.flickr.com/photos/catimages/sets/72157649961496950/

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to find out more come to our open day on the 14th July. To find out more go to https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/open-day or email Shereen Soliman to book on the open day:

Find out more about the course: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/march-sustainable-architecture

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/gis/architecture/. At a time of significant transition in the profession, RIT's architecture program allows for full incorporation of the skills and knowledge critical to the 21st century architect. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/gis/architecture/

At a time of significant transition in the profession, RIT's architecture program allows for full incorporation of the skills and knowledge critical to the 21st century architect. The program produces broad-thinking architects well grounded in the principles and practices of sustainability who can apply their knowledge and talents to the architectural problems posed by the modern city.

Plan of study

Students are required to complete 105 credit hours. Designed as a full-time program, courses are offered on campus, primarily during the day. Much of the course work is studio-based and includes technical courses, sustainability courses, and electives. In addition to three required sustainability courses, students will take one sustainability elective. All students prepare a thesis during their final year of study. Students take four graduate electives, drawn from courses offered by the colleges of Applied Science and Technology, Business, Engineering, Imaging Arts and Sciences, and Liberal Arts. In addition to course work, students must fulfill one co-op experience and one global experience.

The program is designed for students with a broad range of interests and backgrounds who are interested in studying architecture at the graduate level, whose undergraduate degrees were obtained in fields either inside or outside of architecture. The curriculum has been shaped by the global emphasis of sustainability, factors that impact urbanism, and the application of the principles of design and craft; along with a focus around building technology, materials, construction, and systems.

Sustainability

With a global need for a more sustainable world, including buildings and their impact on energy consumption and carbon footprints, the focus of many courses reflect the conditions of sustainable design and practice.

Technology

Design exploration is enhanced through the understanding of the implication of technology on both design process and product. The program enables students to focus and collaborate in many specialized areas of technology, including engineering, computer science, imaging science, materials and construction, and products and remanufacturing.

Urbanism

Because a degraded urban environment has grave implications for social, economic, cultural, and environmental health, the program pays particular attention to urban settings and urban principles. The complexity of the urban environment requires an interdisciplinary approach to architecture education – one that references economics, public policy, sociology, and regional culture. The program focuses on the practices and principles of preservation and adaptive reuse. The city of Rochester, New York, serves as an active learning environment for students.

Integrated learning/integrated practice

Like all strong design programs, the program’s core education will take place in the studio. However, our studio curriculum integrates construction technologies, material science, and mechanics into design. From the outset, students will approach design problems within teams, learning to value and leverage collective intelligence. The integrated learning model prepares students for the increasingly integrated practice of architecture, where integrated project delivery is fast becoming the dominant model, and architects are orchestrating teams of professionals from a variety of fields, including engineering, management, science, and computer science.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the M.Arch. program in architecture, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (B.Arch., BS, BA, or BFA) from an accredited institution,

- Have an undergraduate cumulative GPA of B (3.0) or higher,

- Successfully complete at least one semester each of college-level math (e.g. algebra, pre-calc, calculus) and science (e.g. physics, earth science, chemistry, etc.).

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit a one page personal statement and a 90 second video (maximum length) explaining your interest in studying architecture at the graduate level.

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

- Submit three letters of recommendation (one from a current or former teacher or academic adviser; one from a current or former supervisor; and one from someone familiar with your creative abilities).

- Submit a PDF digital portfolio (see portfolio guidelines) of creative work, which may include sketches, constructions, graphics, and/or photographs. (While student portfolios do not require examples of architectural drawing/design, evidence of creative talent will be important in determining admission).

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) and 100 (Internet-based) are required.

Applicants who exceed the general admission requirements may be considered for conditional acceptance before GRE scores are available.

- Portfolio Guidelines

All applications must be accompanied by a PDF digital portfolio. Print or bound portfolios or digital portfolios in formats other than PDF will not be accepted or reviewed. Please note, all PDF portfolios should be less than 6.0mb. Files larger than this will not be accepted or reviewed. In the event the review committee requires additional information or higher resolution images, the applicant will be notified.

Guidelines for portfolio preparation:

- Image quality: A medium quality image setting on a digital camera is sufficient. No images should be pixelated.
- File size: The total size must be 8.5"x11" format and cannot exceed 6.0mb. Alternatively students may use the PDF portfolio feature (found under FILE, in more recent versions of Adobe Acrobat) to create a portfolio.
- Orientation: Landscape orientation is preferred.
- Cropping: Crop out unnecessary objects from the images so that there are no distractions from work presented.
- Image enhancement: If the image files of your work are not accurate after photographing, image-editing software is allowed to correct the appearance of the files submitted. Please use caution. It is important to maintain the integrity of the original artwork.
- File name: Only one PDF portfolio file is allowed. It should be labeled using the following format: UARC_XX_LASTNAME.PDF, (XX is equal to the code for the academic year to which you are applying, ex: 2013 would be 13, 2014 would be 14, etc.) Enter last name in all capital letters in place of LASTNAME. Do not enter given names or middle names in this field.
- Submission: All PDF portfolio files must be submitted via email to . Students should include their name in the subject line of the email. Files delivered on CD/ROM or USB drives will not be reviewed or accepted.

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The M ARCH. Read more

Introduction

The M ARCH: Architecture course is uniquely positioned at Central Saint Martins to draw on the dynamic design thinking and making skills from a range of art and design practices, as well as providing you with the second degree in the professional pathway toward registration as an architect – commonly referred to as Part 2 (the University is currently seeking recognition for this qualification from the Architects Registration Board).

Content

The course is offered in an extended full-time mode over two calendar years. This means that your learning is timetabled over 80 weeks across two years. You are expected to commit 30 hours per week to your studies, within which your taught input will normally be scheduled over two/three days. The course has been designed in this way to enable you to pursue your studies, whilst also undertaking part-time employment, internships or care responsibilities.

Structure

The course is comprised of four Units:

Unit 1: Methodologies for Architectural Engagement (60 Credits)

Unit Two: Innovating in Architectural Practice (120 credits)

Unit Three: Constructing in Detail (20 Credits)

Unit Four: Reflecting on Professional Practice (40 Credits)

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Recognised by the Architects Registration Board and RIBA for exemption from Part II examination, the course is stage two of students' professional development programme to become an architect. Read more

Summary

Recognised by the Architects Registration Board and RIBA for exemption from Part II examination, the course is stage two of students' professional development programme to become an architect.

Students will develop their critical ability, skills and creativity. Study is based in a design studio-led research environment and students will be able to create architectural designs that meet necessary technical requirements while still having aesthetic appeal.

A unique collaborative 'Teaching Practice' programme means each cross-level studio unit is aligned with a leading professional practice in the region where students can visit on selected days for supporting tutorials.

This course is divided into three trimesters to allow students to work towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or a Master's qualification.

Modules

PgCert: Critical Urbanism; Co.Lab; Research and Theory.

PgDip: Architectural Synergies; Management Practice and Law: Theory.

Master's Project: Architectural Speculations Part 1; Architectural Speculations Part 2; Architectural Speculations: Tectonics; Management Practice and Law: Applied; Dissertation or Special Study.

Assessment

Students will be assessed through a mix of reviews, reports, exams and essays. Students will undertake a major dissertation or special study (to follow on from the Co.Lab live project or another opportunity) on a theme related to the course. The dissertation and special study themes are negotiated with the course tutor.

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The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation. Read more
The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation.

The “construction” of the “sites” of our interventions in the public sphere includes involvement with other institutions, governmental agencies and other actors at a local, regional, national, and global level.

Where are the options?

What is at stake?

Are there really options?

How should we choose?

The MArch at AUB program is structured around the idea of architectural intervention, interrogated in relationship to its duration and effects in and around the community where it takes place – indeed, in its potential to create community.

The notion that there is any singular definition of the architectural profession is, at least on the margins, continuously questioned. But the ‘middle’ is strong, and the very fact that a multiplicity of ‘other’ agendas and their attendant methodologies are marginalised attests to this strength.

So looking for something different and fresh in your route to becoming an architect in a changing world. The new MArch at AUB (RIBA*/ARB Part2) aims to produce: performative, projective enablers and architecture, cutting into societies deepest darkest myths; building interventions in the utopias and distopias past, present and future; and launching architectural careers and journey’s via its laboratory practice, where the body and somatic practice is at the fore.

Travel with MArch at AUB and @inspiredAUB, the arts campus and its cross disciplinary docks, on the ride of a lifetime with your new highly decorative AUB baggage. Join the eclectic global and local, MArch student body, be ready to catch a big one from the Portland Stone cliffs or disappear into the Mirkwood to live like a hobbit. The AUB MArch has the arts centre in Sway by the architect, Tony Fretton as a part of its portfolio of spaces AUB to the main campus and its multiple workshops, studios and laboratories. Although the course is new there is a fascinating history of drawing and representation. In former lives architects Michael Hopkins and Peter Cook were educated in Bournemouth with bright lights and late night inflatables on the beach. The emerging, social, political, and architectural in its many frightening forms, are being professionally dissected, compressed, crafted and beaten, by brave bodies in the embryonic laboratory practice ‘ROOM 101’, based in the Enterprise Pavilion.

From the first graduating cohort there many fascinating stories – ecological strategies from Haiti, Delhi and Wessex. They are now working and researching from the local practice and making/fabricating to teaching (on the BA Hons), to developing the ‘fablab’ in AUB’s workshop. They all came from different schools and found AUB & the MArch very welcoming and encouraging. The [email protected] broadens the architect’s range of activities, and empowers its community through its members’ ability to actually make a difference.

Ed Frith, Architect, MArch Course Leader & Prof Oren Liebermann, Dean of the Faculty of Art & Design

If you would like to discuss any aspect of this course, or details on the application process, please contact Astrid MacKellar on: or 01202 363384.

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Often a stepping-stone toward PhD studies, this course allows students considerable freedom in designing an independent course of study under the direction of a supervisor. Read more
Often a stepping-stone toward PhD studies, this course allows students considerable freedom in designing an independent course of study under the direction of a supervisor. Applicants will normally have already assembled an appropriate data set and questions for their dissertation at the time of application. The MPhil provides training in archaeological research methods and associated transferable skills, and the opportunity to complete a research thesis under academic guidance. This thesis and its topic are normally considered as a vehicle for working out detailed plans for pursuing a PhD, but may also be taken as a stand-alone one-year MPhil degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmparr

Course detail

The MPhil in Archaeological Research consists of three components, structured around independent study:

1. A Research Paper (6000 words)
2. A Research Skills module
3. The Dissertation (25,000 words).

This course is for students who have a substantial and appropriate background in Archaeology (at the first degree level and in fieldwork) accompanied by considerable maturity in the development of their research topic. Training in specific research skills (archaeological computing, quantitative methods, GIS and/or laboratory-based techniques) are arranged as appropriate to the student's needs.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 70% of the student’s final mark.

A Research Paper of up to 6000 words will account for 25% of the final mark for the degree, and will be developed under guidance from the student’s supervisor. The Research Paper is an important milestone which helps students progress towards the dissertation.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and International students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHSS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Read more
The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Area option courses examine the archaeology of a particular region of the world (such as South Asia or Europe) in detail. Students are encouraged to choose a third module from the range of MPhil options on offer in the Division of Archaeology to complement their specific interests (e.g., heritage, science, material culture, etc). All module choices must have the approval of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Archaeology Coordinator.

Students may choose to specialise in any of the following options:

- Archaeological Heritage and Museums
- Archaeological Science
- Archaeology of the Americas
- Egyptian Archaeology
- European Prehistory
- Medieval Archaeology
- Mesopotamian Archaeology
- Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology
- South Asian Archaeology

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpmar

Course detail

Students electing the Archaeological Heritage option will take three taught modules:
1. The Socio-politics of the Past
2. Museums: History, Theory, and Practice
3. Management of the Archaeological Heritage. This course concentrates on issues of differentiation of interpretation.

The topics are all of academic importance and the teaching focuses on a theoretical understanding of the issues involved, with practical examples used as case studies. The aim is to educate you within this expanding field and to activate further research.

Students choosing the Archaeological Science option will take:
1. Archaeological Science
2. Practical Application of Scientific Methods modules
3. One other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (chosen in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil Coordinator).

This course covers a broad range of scientific archaeological approaches with geo- and bioarchaeological foci, from theoretical, methodological and practical points of view. A series of recurrent case studies is used to introduce the questions, techniques and ideas applicable in each archaeological situation. In addition, this MPhil equips students with analytical skills in archaeological science.

Format

All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). Students choosing Archaeology of the Americas, Archaeology of Egypt, European Archaeology, Medieval Archaeology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology, or South Asian Archaeology take:

1. the Core Archaeology course
2. the appropriate area option course
3. any other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil coordinator).

The assessed components of the three selected modules each represent 15% of the final mark. The assessed components of Research Skills module represents 5%, while the dissertation counts for 50% of the final mark.

Assessment

- The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee. The dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are usually required to produce between 3 and 6 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are required to sit written examinations for some modules.

- Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MPhil caters both for beginners in Akkadian and those with some previous knowledge of the language. A demanding course, this MPhil delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. Read more
This MPhil caters both for beginners in Akkadian and those with some previous knowledge of the language. A demanding course, this MPhil delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Assyriology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. The student's first choice must be a language course. The student's second and third modules can be chosen from the modules listed below, and with the consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Assyriology Coordinator one of these may be any other appropriate MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology. Modules typically offered include:

- Akkadian (Akkadian language and texts or Advanced Akkadian language and texts)
- Sumerian language and texts (Sumerian is only available to those with some previous knowledge of Akkadian).
- Mesopotamian culture (Mesopotamian literature or Mesopotamian scholarship & religion)
- Archaeology of Mesopotamia (Archaeology of Mesopotamia: Early period to 2000 BC or Archaeology of Mesopotamia: Late period, 2000-539 BC)
- Topics in Mesopotamian history and archaeology
- Any other appropriate MPhil module taught in the Division of Archaeology, consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Assyriology Coordinator.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpass

Course detail

The MPhil in Assyriology delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Assyriology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn Akkadian at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Assyriology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Assyriology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

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This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. Read more
This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. The student may choose either an archaeological or a linguistic emphasis. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills module and write a dissertation (maximum 15,000 words). In addition, students taking the MPhil in Egyptology select three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpegy

Course detail

Modules on offer include:

- Introduction to Egyptian Language;
- Advanced Egyptian Language;
- Coptic;
- Demotic;
- Landscapes, Built Environment, and Material Culture of Ancient Egypt;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt I;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt II;
- Topics in Egyptology;

or any other MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology (with consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Egyptology Coordinator).

Format

The MPhil in Egyptology delivers competence in language and a detailed knowledge of the cultures of ancient Egypt, emphasizing historical archaeology, landscape and the built environment, art, and the language and/or literature of ancient Egypt. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Egyptology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn an Ancient Egyptian language at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Students receive written feedback on all assessed essays and reports from internal markers via the Graduate Administrator. Coursework and exam marks are communicated to students following the first examiners meeting at the end of Easter Term. Feedback on dissertations are available to students on request following the second examiners meeting in September.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Successful completion of this RIBA validated course provides exemption from Part 2 of the ARB prescribed Examination in Architecture. Read more
Successful completion of this RIBA validated course provides exemption from Part 2 of the ARB prescribed Examination in Architecture.

As part of the process of becoming a professionally-qualified Architect in the UK, graduates are required to complete a period of supervised ‘practical training', 12 months of which (commonly referred-to as the ‘Year Out') is normally undertaken before commencing full-time academic study at Master's level. This period of practical training constitutes Year 1 of the University of Huddersfield M.Arch course.

Therefore, students who have not previously completed a satisfactory period of practical training should join the course in Year 1. Students who have already completed a satisfactory period of practical training should join the course in Year 2.

Years 2 and Year 3 of the course are design-centred and intended to enable you to explore issues of critical regionalism and tectonic expression in relation to establishing your own theoretical position, through which you will be expected to develop a high degree of sensitivity to the context within which design work is undertaken in geographical, cultural, social and technical terms.

All design projects explore applications of sustainability and encourage a wide and plural outlook appropriate for both developed and developing countries. In this global worldview, understanding of progressive theories of design and the application of advanced construction methods co-exist with concern for the implementation of sustainable technologies, awareness of regional development issues and respect for craft-based building practices.

The rationale and definition of ‘International' both builds upon the studies undertaken as part of the Architecture (International) BA(Hons) degree awarded by the University of Huddersfield and acknowledges the reality of rapidly changing architectural practice in a fast moving, global context. Our course will aim to prepare you for new and emerging forms of practice through the development of your personal learning skills and a deep understanding of the need for flexibility, adaptability, innovation and enterprise in your career.

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You can personalise your studies for the MA in Architecture (MA/Arch) with a number of specialisms. These include history and theory of architecture, architecture and the visual arts, digital techniques in architecture and design, and sustainable design. Read more
You can personalise your studies for the MA in Architecture (MA/Arch) with a number of specialisms. These include history and theory of architecture, architecture and the visual arts, digital techniques in architecture and design, and sustainable design.

We've designed the programme for graduates wishing to specialise in architecture and for architects in practice wishing to develop their skills. You'll study a range of academic, research-based topics in specific areas that reflect your experience and interests.

This 12-month full-time programme comprises four core modules (total 60 credits), up to four optional modules (total 60 credits) and a research-based dissertation/thesis (total 60 credits) which you'll complete over the summer.

Please note, this programme is designed for those wishing to undertake postgraduate study in Architecture, but who do not require British Architectural accreditation status. This programme does not carry RIBA/ARB accreditation.

Why School of Architecture?

Highly rated research

Liverpool was the UK’s first Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) accredited University School of Architecture. Research lies at the core of our activities and we have highly rated international research in the fields of History and Theory and Environment and Process.

The activities of the research groups within these two fields provide the knowledge and expertise required by the professional discipline that the School serves, but also reach out into related areas in the visual arts, urban design, conservation and innovative technologies.

Career prospects

Students who successfully complete a Higher Degree go on to interesting and rewarding careers in architecture, the wider construction industry, management, higher education, the arts and conservation and many other specialisms to be found in the arts, architecture and the built environment.

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Learn how architecture also supports the cultural, ecological, economic, political and social life of those who make and inhabit that architecture. Read more
Learn how architecture also supports the cultural, ecological, economic, political and social life of those who make and inhabit that architecture.

We believe in an architecture that is responsive to:
-People (including considerations of culture, history, society and how and why people inhabit buildings and spaces)
-Place (including considerations of climate, ecology and the man-made and natural landscape)
-Tectonics (including considerations of conservation, and the craft of making)

Architecture with Plymouth University builds on a well-established tradition of teaching and research grounded in these concerns.

This one year MA Architecture programme aims to support you in developing proficiency in architectural design, in the process of developing both an urban design and a detailed building / spatial design. Your study will be set in an exploration of new urban forms which are being generated in response to the changing nature of cities, notably increasing regional and global connectivity, and shifting cultural, economic, ecological, political, social and physical conditions and demands.

Key features

-Get creative with our amazing facilities and resources. You’ll be based in our eye-catching Faculty of Arts building in the heart of the campus, with students and staff from other art courses to bounce ideas off and collaborate with. And, you’ll have 2.0 square metres of desk to call your own.
-Interact with the public domain with architecture that’s responsive to people, places and tectonics. Work with local communities and institutions, including city councils, business organisations and non-governmental organisations.
-Work on live studio-based projects, both in the UK and abroad. Previous overseas projects have been based in China, Spain, Portugal, Latvia and Poland.
-Benefit from our future-facing programme that features a strong urban and sustainability dimension.
-Learn from tutors with industry experience and interdisciplinary research interests. Our school was described as ‘charged’ by Architects’ Journal.

Course details

You’ll undertake design studio projects set around live urban regeneration projects. Supporting your work in the design studio, you’ll study core subjects – urban theories and methodologies, connecting sustainable practices and integrated technology. You’ll generate a dissertation, through detailed design development of a selected aspect of your design studio work. Support is provided in the design studio through weekly tutorials, workshops and seminars. The MA Architecture builds on the strength of the successful RIBA-validated M Arch programme. You’ll work alongside students on the M Architecture programme through common coursework and projects, and sharing studio space.

Core modules
-ARCH772 Building Design
-ARCH773 Integrated Technology
-ARCH775 Advanced Connecting Sustainable Practices
-ARCH777 Emerging Architectural Research
-ARCH771 Urban Design
-ARCH776 Dissertation by Design

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MSc in Economics and Business Administration - Finance is a general university education in finance. It provides students with thorough knowledge of and competence in finance. Read more
MSc in Economics and Business Administration - Finance is a general university education in finance. It provides students with thorough knowledge of and competence in finance. Upon graduation, our students are expected to begin careers in financial institutions, regulatory bodies, consulting businesses or finance departments in non-financial companies.

The programme has a clearly defined structure with a focus on global finance so the programme is relevant for all international students. The global financial markets are highly developed and integrated and as a consequence of this complexity and sophistication, there is an increasing demand for graduates with degrees in finance at the highest level. Therefore the programme is perfect for students seeking a career in finance in a global setting.

The ultimate ambition of the programme is to prepare our students for making the right decisions at the right time; this ability requires excellent analytical skills and a talent for embracing all relevant data, as well as cultural issues.

Finance and other advanced research areas are based on statistical and mathematical models. Therefore it is an advantage for students to be familiar with these areas before the programme begins. The models are integrated into the courses so that the students study the models in relation to their application. It is our experience that the learning outcome is much higher when the models are part of the various courses.

The latest research in finance is integrated into the programme and many of the professors are internationally well-known teachers and researchers. Our programme also uses external lecturers from local financial institutions as well as visiting faculty members from internationally acclaimed universities.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

PREREQUISITE COURSES

In the first term you follow three prerequisite courses that form the methodological and academic basis for the further study programme.

In Corporate Finance I the general aim of the course to provide the participants with profound knowledge about financial decision making in corporations. It is important to underline that although the course is focused on the managerial problems, decisions must be based on a solid theoretical framework.

In Corporate Finance II the aim of the course to extend the knowledge about financial decision making in corporations provided by the preceding course, Corporate Finance I, with a special focus on real options and risk management.

In Portfolio Theory and Investment Analysis the course focuses on theories and empirical methods for analysing equity markets.

In Fixed Income Securities the course focuses on theories and methods for analysing fixed income markets.

In Applied Econometric Methods I the purpose of the course is to introduce the students to the most widely used quantitative and empirical methods in econometrics, including in particular financial econometrics.

In Applied Econometric Methods II the course extends the time series analysis from Applied Econometrics Methods I with special emphasis on relevant financial models and applications. For forecast purposes, models of financial time series and econometrics will obviously be of major relevance.

SPECIALISATION COURSES

Bank Management focuses on the financial system and the role of banks in the capital market. Also the financial regulation of markets and institutions is integrated into the course. The main aim of the course is to provide students with insight into the management tasks that banks and mortgage credit institutions face.

Securities Market covers the parts of the financial curriculum that are related to trading in markets for financial instruments. As such it complements the standard courses in asset pricing, corporate finance, bank management and financial institutions with issues from the field of market microstructure.

Financial Engineering
Financial derivatives such as forward, futures, swaps, and options are increasingly important instruments applied by agents of financial markets. The course focuses on describing and understanding these instruments, and on the underlying markets such as money markets, bond markets, stock, currency, and commodity markets.

Empirical Finance
Financial economics is nowadays quite often based on empirical investigation. This course provides you with many different methods to analyse financial data. Among the many models are event studies, models to analyse the term structure of interest rates as well as ARCH and GARCH models.

In the third semester you can choose elective courses within your areas of interest. The courses can either be taken at Aarhus BSS during the semester, at the AU Summer University or at one of our more than 300 partner universities abroad. You can also participate in internship programmes either in Denmark or abroad.

The fourth semester is devoted to the final thesis. You may choose the topic of the thesis freely and in this way get a chance to concentrate on and specialise in a specific field of interest. The thesis may be written in collaboration with another student or it may be the result of your individual effort. When the thesis has been submitted, it is defended before the academic advisor as well as an external examiner.

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Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. Read more
Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. The­se ques­ti­ons form the star­ting point of our in­ter­na­tio­nal, in­ter- and trans­di­sci­pli­na­ry re­se­arch-ori­en­ted, and sustaina­bi­li­ty-pro­blem-fo­cu­sed Mas­ter's Pro­gram in Global Sustainability Science.

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This one-year Master’s programme is aimed at graduates from the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and city planning who are specifically concerned with design issues of the public realm and the effects these have on social life and human behaviour. Read more
This one-year Master’s programme is aimed at graduates from the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and city planning who are specifically concerned with design issues of the public realm and the effects these have on social life and human behaviour. Our focus is to deepen theoretical and design knowledge, changing the mindset of professionals regarding the importance and value of the public realm in the design of our cities.

The rationale behind Urbanism Studies is for professionals to understand and work in interdisciplinary design and planning teams, coupled with the growing desire for cities to establish different, new forms of urban living. As the goal of this programme is to move design thinking from objects to places, our core Urban Studios differ from traditional studios in several ways.

Our approach involves in-depth explorations of urban design issues by combining five topic-based modules situated within the three studio courses. Ongoing seminar reading series and urban film studies are included in the studios. The integrated final project builds upon the previous three studios, leading to a thesis portfolio that reflects the main achievements and thinking of each student as an outcome and product of their intense, focused learning throughout the year.

Furthermore, students are offered the opportunity to collaborate with some of the leading Built Environment (Urbanism) programmes in the world: ETH Zürich, CED at UC Berkeley, UCL Bartlett in London and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Boston. This affords students fantastic global collaborative opportunities on a wide range of real world cases. Urbanism Studies is externally supported and financed by Ax:son Johnson Foundation, as well as by KTH – Royal Institute of Technology.

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