• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
London School of Economics and Political Science Featured Masters Courses
"apprenticeships"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Apprenticeships)

We have 14 Masters Degrees (Apprenticeships)

  • "apprenticeships" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 14 of 14
Order by 
The central objective of this programme is to equip you with an array of methodological skills to function as an effective PhD student or as a professional researcher in psychology, with a particular emphasis on cognitive, clinical and clinical neuroscience research (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/centres/ccnr/). Read more
The central objective of this programme is to equip you with an array of methodological skills to function as an effective PhD student or as a professional researcher in psychology, with a particular emphasis on cognitive, clinical and clinical neuroscience research (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/centres/ccnr/). You will acquire the skills necessary to generate good research questions, establish plausible theoretical answers, and carry out high-quality empirical research in order to test your hypotheses. At the end of your training you will have completed a research project that makes a contribution to the discipline and you will have the necessary skills and confidence to be able to operate independently in the future.

The MSc can be applied for as a stand-alone degree or form the first year of a PhD. It forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council South West Doctoral Training Centre - a hub of world-class social science research(http://www.exeter.ac.uk/doctoralcollege/fundedcentres/swdtc/).

This programme consists of compulsory taught modules and a substantial research project. It will acquaint you with a wide range of data analysis techniques and research methods in the areas of clinical neuroscience, clinical and cognitive psychology, while enabling you to develop particular specialist skills and knowledge in selected areas.

You will be able to get involved with one or more of the research groups( http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/) in the School depending on your research interests.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of five compulsory modules. The list of modules may include the following; Advanced Statistics; Behavioural Science Research Skills; Research Apprenticeship; Current Research Issues in Psychological Research Methods; Methods in Cognitive and Clinical Psychology and Neuroscience
The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research Apprenticeship

A distinctive feature of all our taught Masters programmes is the Research Apprenticeship. The Apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills by working alongside experienced researchers or practitioners. You will also gain experience of writing up your research in the form of a dissertation.

Many students undertake their apprenticeship with researchers in the School, but apprenticeship opportunities may also be available outside the University. Current research partners of the group include Microsoft, IBM, Rentokil, the Ministry of Defence, the NHS, the Met Office, the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development and Lane4 consultancy. Previous apprenticeships include: National Health Service, Jockey Club, UK and the Mood Disorders Centre, University of Exeter (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/mooddisorders/)

Careers

On completion of your postgraduate degree you will have the scientific skills to enable progression into research or professional psychology, the communication skills required for marketing and business roles and the knowledge of people for progression into personnel or caring professions.

Read less
The MSc Social and Organisational Psychology is one of only a few Masters programmes in the UK which is provided by researchers working at the cutting-edge of both social psychology and organisational psychology. Read more
The MSc Social and Organisational Psychology is one of only a few Masters programmes in the UK which is provided by researchers working at the cutting-edge of both social psychology and organisational psychology. The programme is taught by a successful and dynamic group of social and organisational psychologists who, individually and collectively, enjoy a world-class reputation (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/groups/seorg/). You will not only benefit from the friendly and supportive atmosphere, but also from high quality teaching and supervision, an exciting and international seminar series and extra-curricular activities and workshops.

The Masters programme will equip you with an array of skills which will enable you to function as an effective PhD student or as a professional researcher or practitioner in social psychology and organisational psychology. The programme forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council South West Doctoral Training Centre - a hub of world-class social science research (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/doctoralcollege/fundedcentres/swdtc/).

Research Apprenticeship

The research apprenticeship is an important feature of the programme. It will help you develop your research skills by working alongside experienced researchers and/or practitioners and writing up the research in the form of a dissertation. Although teaming up with a researcher within the department is generally advised, it is occasionally possible to engage in research apprenticeships with organizations or people outside of the University provided suitable co-supervision is established. Some of our past/current research partners include Microsoft, IBM, Rentokil, the MoD, the NHS, the Met Office, the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development and Lane4 consultancy.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of five compulsory modules. The list of modules may include the following; Advanced Statistics; Behavioural Science Research Skills; Advances and Methods in Social and Organisational Psychology; Research Apprenticeship and Current Research Issues in Social and Organisational Psychology

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Read less
Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. Read more
Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. This benefits you by providing a strong background in a broad cross-section of research methods used by researchers studying human and animal behaviour, a strong training in statistical methods and multidisciplinary study environment. You will learn how to formulate and test relevant research questions, and critically evaluate the research carried out by others in the field.

The programme will give you an insight into the varied means of performing animal behaviour research in a wide array of locations with wild and (semi-)captive animals – in the wild, laboratory, zoo or under human management. As part of the taught component you will be exposed to lectures and seminar discussions, research talks and discussions with speakers, boost and consolidate your knowledge and skills in statistical data analysis, participate in a one-week residential field course (during the Easter break) and in research skill training sessions. During the course you will continuously develop your abilities in critical analysis of the literature and of scientific evidence, project development, communication and scientific writing.

You will be part of the lively, internationally-recognised Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/centres/crab/) and will have the opportunity to work alongside our experienced researchers on a research apprenticeship which is a central component of the course. The apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills further and write up the research in the form of a journal article for potential publication. Apprenticeships can also be undertaken under the supervision of researchers at various institutions with whom we have developed long-term relationships.

On successful completion of the MSc you will have the skills to pursue a PhD, work as a research assistant and project manager or follow a career working in zoos, research centres, nature reserves, wildlife and other animal-related offices, education, scientific media and the expanding field of eco-tourism.

Research Apprenticeship

A distinctive feature of all our taught Masters programmes is the Research Apprenticeship. The Apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills by working alongside experienced researchers or practitioners. You will also gain experience of writing up your research in the form of a dissertation.

Many students undertake their apprenticeship with researchers in the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour in our School, both in the labs and in the field around the campus, Devon and abroad. Students work on a wide range of topics and with different animals, for example:
• Social behaviour, animal welfare and enrichment, zoo research, animal cognition, navigation, sensory ecology, behavioural ecology, ecotoxicology
• Fish (guppies, sticklebacks, killifish), mammals (primates, squirrels, whales, donkeys, dogs, meerkats, coyotes), birds (pigeons, chickens, pheasants, magpies, flamingoes, wood and sea birds), invertebrates (crabs, honeybees, bumblebees, desert ants, wood ants)

Programme structure

The programme is made up of compulsory modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Advanced Statistics; Behavioural Science Research Skills; Advances and Methods in Animal Behaviour; Research Apprenticeship; Current Research Issues in Animal Behaviour;

Read less
Swansea University Medical School's Graduate Entry Medicine Programme (MBBCh) is unique in Wales, and one of a small group of similar programmes of medical study in the UK. Read more
Swansea University Medical School's Graduate Entry Medicine Programme (MBBCh) is unique in Wales, and one of a small group of similar programmes of medical study in the UK. Our MBBCh degree is an innovative, 4-year accelerated medical degree open to graduates of any discipline.

The curriculum has been structured to reflect the way in which clinicians approach patients and how patients present to doctors.

Key Features of Graduate Entry Medicine Programme

The Graduate Entry Medicine Programme is a fully independent four-year programme based primarily in Swansea and west Wales, although students may undergo placements in other parts of Wales if they wish. We have designed an integrated medical curriculum, where the basic biomedical sciences are learnt in the context of clinical medicine, public health, pathology, therapeutics, ethics and psycho-social issues in patient management. This, together with a high emphasis on clinical and communication skills, will provide you with everything you'll need to practise medicine competently and confidently.

The curriculum of the Graduate Entry Medicine programme, with its learning weeks and clinical placements, is intentionally not structured in a conventional ‘body systems’ approach but is designed to reflect the way in which clinicians approach patients and how patients present to doctors.

This innovative approach will help you to develop a way of thinking and of engaging with information that mimics that used in clinical practice. As you work your way through learning weeks, clinical placements and practical sessions, you will acquire knowledge and build up your repertoire of clinical understanding and skills. Themes and strands, which run longitudinally throughout the Graduate Entry Medicine Programme, will help you make links with other aspects you are learning, and with things you have previously considered as well as how all this relates to clinical practice.

Course Structure

The Graduate Entry Medicine Programme consists of Phase I (Years 1 + 2) and Phase II (Years 3 + 4). Each year is mapped onto GMC Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009 (TD09), where 3 Modules – Scholar and Scientist, Practitioner and Professional, reflect the TD09 outcome areas.

The Graduate Entry Medicine programme involves a spiral, integrated curriculum structured around 6 body system ‘Themes’ - Behaviour, Defence, Development, Movement, Nutrition and Transport - with 96 clinical cases presented in 70 ‘learning weeks’ (65 in Phase I and 5 in Phase II).

There is a high level of clinical contact:

- 39 weeks Clinical Apprenticeships
- 35 weeks Specialty Attachments
- 11 weeks Community Based Learning
- 6 weeks Elective, 6 weeks Shadowing

GAMSAT

GAMSAT is a professionally designed and marked selection test for medical schools offering graduate-entry programmes open to graduates of any discipline. You will need to sit GAMSAT if you intend to apply for entry to the GEM Programme here in Swansea. There are no exemptions from the GAMSAT test.

GAMSAT evaluates the nature and extent of abilities and skills gained through prior experience and learning, including the mastery and use of concepts in basic science, as well as the acquisition of more general skills in problem solving, critical thinking and writing.

How we decide

Applicants, who meet the minimum entry requirements are ranked based upon their GAMSAT scores. The applicants who have scored most highly are then invited to attend the Selection Centre at the Medical School in the Spring. Please note that all candidates must attend in person and that we do not have the capacity to offer remote interviews, for example via Skype.

We will attempt to inform all applicants whether they have been successful. All candidates who are successful in gaining an interview will also be invited to attend a Visit Day at the University's Singleton Campus.

Format of the Selection Centre

After an introduction and a “setting the scene” session, you will be asked to sit a written assessment of 30 minutes duration. This situational judgement test is not designed to assess your academic ability, but to try and identify those applicants whose personal and academic qualities are suitable to a career in medicine.

Following the written assessment, you will have a tour of the university. You will learn more about the course and see life here at Swansea through the eyes of a medical student. It is not just about Swansea deciding if you are right for our course, but also the opportunity for you to see if Swansea is right for YOU.

After lunch, you will then be invited to attend two separate interviews, each of 20 minutes duration. They are conducted by pairs of trained interviewers taken from our highly trained panel of clinicians, academics, medical students and members of the public (lay) interviewers. Your personal statement will be considered and discussed during your interview.

The interview process is designed to take account of the personal and academic qualities needed as a doctor, as set out in ‘Good Medical Practice’, and the capacity to meet the outcomes of ‘Tomorrows Doctors’. In summary these are:

Communication Skills
Problem solving skills
Coping with pressure
Insight and Integrity
Passion for medicine/resilience to succeed

Once the interviews are completed, we will assess the overall performance of each candidate. Due to the very competitive nature of the selection process, it is only those candidates who score highest who will be offered a place at Swansea.

Are you fit to practice?

All medical students during their training, and all doctors once qualified, remain subject to scrutiny regarding fitness to practise throughout their professional lives. This ensures that they are fit to continue in their chosen career.

For your safety, as well as the safety of your future patients, you will be required to undergo an Occupational Health Assessment, which includes a Fitness to Practice assessment, as well as a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check prior to beginning your studies on the Graduate Entry Medicine Programme. The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) offer an update service which lets applicants keep their DBS certificates up to date online and allows employers to check a certificate online.

Read less
Placed 6th worldwide in the 2016 Financial Times Master in Management rankings, the ESCP Europe MIM is a life-changing option for any career-focused student searching for both a European Identity and a Global Perspective. Read more

Placed 6th worldwide in the 2016 Financial Times Master in Management rankings, the ESCP Europe MIM is a life-changing option for any career-focused student searching for both a European Identity and a Global Perspective.

This two-year, full-time general management Master programme provides the opportunity to study in up to four countries, with options ranging from ESCP Europe's own six European campuses to our 70 partners worldwide. Designed for students with Bachelor degrees (or equivalent) in any field of study (Master programme) or those without who have previously completed at least two years of university education (Pre-Master programme in preparation for the two-year MIM), it features more than 35 specialisations in Finance, International Business, Marketing, Entrepreneurship and many more.

The integrated programme curriculum, taught across our six ESCP Europe campuses, offers the possibility to obtain up to four national degrees in ESCP Europe campus countries (Germany, UK, Spain, France, Italy and Poland) - plus the option of dual degrees with our academic partners across the globe.

Because we value practical experience as an essential asset, Master in Management graduates leave with a minimum of 40 weeks of professional experience. This ensures that you leave the programme with not only a world-class academic qualification, but also the invaluable intercultural practical experience top recruiters are looking for.

In addition to the study-internship structure, we also offer the possibility of following an apprenticeship study track, allowing for systematic structured periods at the School whilst also working in a firm for an extended learning experience.

If you are looking for international exposure, professional experience and a curriculum recognised as one of the best in the world, look no further than ESCP Europe's Master in Management.

The MIM Programme Objectives

As a Master in Management student, you will:

-Develop an in-depth knowledge of state-of-the-art techniques in management and the business world.

-Build and enhance your career plans through specialised course options and in-company experience.

-Strengthen your ability to live and work in a highly multicultural and international environment through studying in up to four different countries and cultures.

-Broaden your horizon by studying alongside students from a vast range of backgrounds, such as business management, economics, engineering and social sciences.

-Get practical experience and create your own network through case studies, field projects and internships.

-Prepare to take on major responsibilities in tomorrow's economic environment by developing a European identity with a global perspective on today's economy.

Key Features

-A two-year, full-time intercultural general management programme

-Ranked 1st in the 2016 Financial Times Master in Management league table in Germany, the UK, Spain, Italy and Poland and 3rd in France.

-An integrated intercultural programme curriculum taught across the six ESCP Europe campuses

-The opportunity to study in a minimum of two, and a maximum of four different countries

-120 partner universities worldwide, more than 20 of which offer double-degree options

-Designed for students with Bachelor degrees (or equivalent) in any field of study

-One-year pre-master option for students without a Bachelor degree (having previously completed at least two years of university education) in preparation for the Master programme

-Supported by ESCP Europe's extensive Alumni Association network (50,000 members and counting) and close ties with the business world

-Five seminars, including [email protected] which is held at the European Parliament

-At least two integrated internships

-The option of gap years or apprenticeships

-Excellent employment rates, with 74% of the most recent graduating class employed before even completing their studies



Read less
This course allows you to understand important areas of clinical psychology. You learn through expert-led clinical, health and forensic psychology, cultural and historical perspectives on mental health issues, and research apprenticeships. Read more
This course allows you to understand important areas of clinical psychology. You learn through expert-led clinical, health and forensic psychology, cultural and historical perspectives on mental health issues, and research apprenticeships. Colleagues in the NHS provide an introductory course in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) through distance learning.

The Foundations in Clinical Psychology MSc is aimed at students who have had little exposure to clinical psychology in their first degree and for intercalating MBBS students. It provides you with the knowledge, understanding and skills required for careers in the clinical psychology sectors.

The course provides you with a sound basis to apply for an assistant psychologist post. It will also provide the necessary academic and research skills for you to apply for further training, if you have the relevant work experience. This might include vocational training eg doctoral training in Clinical Psychology, training as a Forensic Psychologist or Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programmes.

You also benefit from this course if you are a Psychology graduate who is keen to pursue a research career in the clinical aspects of psychology, including clinically-oriented PhDs.

As a student on this course you will gain knowledge and understanding of:
-Theories, research methods, history, culture of clinical psychology
-Assessing and synthesising information and formulating arguments
-Professional contexts in which clinical psychologists work
-Ethical issues and legislation
-Conditions, aetiology, maintaining factors, interventions and therapies associated with clinical psychology
-The link between stress, health and illness

Facilities

The School of Psychology provides high quality facilities to all our students, researchers and staff. We are located in the Ridley Building where you will have access to a postgraduate resources room with networked computers and printer.

Read less
Overview. ScotGEM is a unique and innovative four-year graduate entry medical programme focused on enthusing graduates to become generalist practitioners (not necessarily GPs), with experience in rural health care and healthcare improvement. Read more

Overview

ScotGEM is a unique and innovative four-year graduate entry medical programme focused on enthusing graduates to become generalist practitioners (not necessarily GPs), with experience in rural health care and healthcare improvement. The programme will prepare students for any branch of medicine with appropriate further training.

ScotGEM uses the existing strengths of medical teaching in the Universities of St Andrews and Dundee and our local health boards in Fife and Tayside, in collaboration with NHS Highland, NHS Dumfries and Galloway and the University of Highlands and Islands. The first year will be based at the University of St Andrews and within Fife, components of the course in the second, third and potentially fourth years will include periods of living and studying in other regions of Scotland.

A bursary of £4,000 each year will be available to all students, those who accept the bursary will complete a return of service to NHS Scotland of one year for each year of bursary accepted. Return of service, sometimes known as bonding, will commence at the start of Foundation training.

First year

From week one, your learning will be focused around real patient scenarios using an approach known as Case Based Learning. Semester one will use cases to focus on foundational medical sciences to underpin subsequent more challenging scenarios. Consultation skills will be introduced early alongside topics such as biochemistry, pharmacology and anatomy and weekly clinical experience in the community. The course is designed as a spiral in which the complexity and challenge of the cases builds as you and your peers become more effective learners.

Semester two focuses on body systems so that related regional anatomy and examination skills can be learnt in parallel. You will be engaged in small group workplace-based learning for one day per week, supported in the community by dedicated Generalist Clinical Mentors (GCM) who are trained GP tutors.

Second year

Second year is largely structured around the lifecycle but will be delivered in different regions. You will be expected to spend some weeks away from Fife with opportunity to study in Tayside, the Highlands and Dumfries and Galloway. NHS Boards will provide accommodation when required. You will continue to work for a day each week with a GCM in their practice but also spend an additional half day in a specialist clinical environment. Second year closes by providing experience of unscheduled care (GP, Emergency department, ambulance etc.) and two periods of project work related to five underpinning Vertical Themes (Informatics, Quality Improvement, Prescribing and therapeutics, Public health and community engagement).

Throughout the course these five Vertical Themes will also develop expertise as ‘agents of change’ within the health service. For example, students might work with a group of general practices to research and analyse prescribing patterns before implementing an agreed improvement.

Third year

Third year is designed as a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship with students being immersed into a community for the duration of the year. You will be based in a general practice, seeing many patients each week and following a selection through their illness journey. This approach works especially well for graduates and has been shown to develop more patient-centred doctors with improved decision-making skills.

Fourth year

Fourth year offers you, as a now competent generalist student, the opportunity to be immersed in the hospital environment and prepare yourself for work as a junior doctor through two one-month Foundation Apprenticeships and other hospital based clinical attachments. You may choose areas of particular interest, perhaps a potential career choice, which you can experience in greater depth. You will also arrange an eight-week elective of your choice.

Upon successful completion of the ScotGEM programme, graduates will receive a primary medical qualification (PMQ), which allows them to apply for subsequent postgraduate training in any specialty through normal routes. It also entitles graduates to provisional registration with the General Medical Council.

Teaching

The ScotGEM course will be based on clinical cases from the outset. These will be supported by a set of learning objectives, lectures, practical classes, tutorials, simulated and ‘real’ clinical and consultation skills plus extensive supported independent and peer-peer learning.

Your learning will be underpinned by a sophisticated online Curriculum Management System (GEMonline), which will give access to a wide range of resources and enable progress to be monitored for all including the geographically dispersed class from second year.

Increasingly, especially in second year, learning will become more self-directed and you will be reliant upon yourself and your peers to explore, investigate and learn from the cases (guided by clear learning objectives with synchronised centrally organised teaching). This approach will set you up well for learning based on real patients in the clinical environment.

The Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship in third year will allow you to join a team and learn whilst becoming increasingly involved in patient care. You will select patients to follow through and study them, their conditions and their care in more detail. Where relevant you will attend specialist clinics, operations etc. as you follow these individuals’ journey through the healthcare system.

Finally, in fourth year, you will experience intensive hospital attachments that involve shadowing Foundation Doctors and other secondary care attachments.

Assessment

Each year will require you to pass assessments of knowledge, clinical skills and a portfolio demonstrating professional development.

  • In first and second year you will be assessed on your knowledge using a mix of online multiple choice questions and short answer written assessments. Third year will use online multiple choice questions aligned with the planned General Medical Council common exam (Medical Licencing Assessment).
  • In every year, there will be a portfolio assessment based on a mixture of engagement with learning, workplace-based performance and project work related to the Vertical Themes.
  • In every year, there will be an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.
  • The assessments will be selected specifically for the ScotGEM course but drawing heavily upon those available within both medical schools. Thus, your progress will be benchmarked against existing UK standards throughout.

Contact us

T: +44 (0)1334 463619

E:

W: http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/graduate-entry-medicine/



Read less
The key emphasis of the Jewellery & Metal programme in the first year is on establishing a personal creative mindset. This happens through set projects and seminars. Read more

First Year

The key emphasis of the Jewellery & Metal programme in the first year is on establishing a personal creative mindset. This happens through set projects and seminars. The ideas and work are supported by individual tutorials and progress is evaluated at set formal points. additional course components are designed to complement and underpin this work, developing and deepening students’ understanding of their chosen subject and strengthening their confidence in their own creative language.

During the first year there are set projects running alongside the Personal Projects that address and explore design methodologies, context, presentation skills, technical and digital inductions, introduction to emerging technologies, visits, seminars and group crits as well as visits and live projects.

Students are expected to explore and develop ideas for their Personal Project on an individual basis during the first year, using time between common elements and course project requirements. By the end of the year students should have developed a clear direction for their second-year Personal Project.

Second Year

During the second year students are expected to pursue their Personal Projects and produce work that will reflect the context of their anticipated professional practice.

The major part of the second year is devoted to the Personal Project. The student is responsible for progressing the work, according to a schedule of development that is subject to a timetable of deadlines for delivery and review throughout the second year. Completed work is presented in the RCA Show.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

Read less
Jewellery & Metal (J&M) forms part of the School of Material. Within this context we are committed to exploring the rich and diverse field of adornment and object culture. Read more

Jewellery & Metal (J&M) forms part of the School of Material. Within this context we are committed to exploring the rich and diverse field of adornment and object culture. We encourage an open-minded approach that in principle embraces all materials. But it is metal that constitutes the technological core of our subject and we believe that a deepening understanding of the metal elements is key in these developments; the Periodic Table is our reference in expanding our activity within the subjects of jewellery and metalwork.

The attitude of Jewellery & Metal has shifted from a purely object-centred focus to a wider scope, questioning and exploring issues centred on the human condition. We are responsive to the rapidly changing social and cultural landscape, and draw on history and technology in nurturing intellectual and creative skills directed at understanding and pushing forward jewellery and objects of human making. The rich and extensive bodies of knowledge associated with object-making and jewellery underpin an approach that is outward-looking, open to the wider discourse on commodity objects, connecting to contemporary life.

As applied artists, being in control of the making process either by using our hands or through digital technologies is very important, it is our way of making sense of the world. As individuals we are fascinated with the rich and diverse materials and resources the world has to offer, and through the individuality of our personal visions we make our contribution to the bigger picture.

Jewellery & Metal provides an environment for exploring, in practical and theoretical ways, what it means to be an applied artist today. We see our role as challenging norms and questioning conventions, interrogating the role and purpose of objects and adornment through the development of a personal approach to researching, experimenting, designing and making in the context of an increasingly complex object culture.

The growing importance and interdisciplinary character of our distinctive discipline within material culture gives the applied arts an added vibrancy and relevance. We believe the physical act of making has an essential role to play in an increasingly virtual world, but we also embrace digital technologies and the virtual and believe that creating a dialogue between these worlds provides the applied arts with one of its most fertile testing grounds at this time.



Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X