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Masters Degrees (Applied Research)

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This multidisciplinary programme is aimed at professionals already working in child or adult services in health, education or social care in the UK and overseas who have an interest in developing research expertise and who have a motivation to carry out research in their workplace or a linked setting. Read more
This multidisciplinary programme is aimed at professionals already working in child or adult services in health, education or social care in the UK and overseas who have an interest in developing research expertise and who have a motivation to carry out research in their workplace or a linked setting.

Degree information

Students will gain knowledge and skills in applied research related to the client groups with whom they work. Key topic areas include qualitative and quantitative methods related to communication disorders research, and planning, implementing and managing research. Students undertaking the MRes will conduct a supervised research project in their area of professional interest.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Both the MRes and the PG Cert include three compulsory (core) modules (45 credits) and one optional module (15 credits). The MRes also includes a research project (120 credits).

On the Postgraduate Certificate students take four modules (60 credits). This can be full-time over 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years.

Core modules:
-Research Evidence and Design I
-Research Evidence and Design II
-Research in Practice

Optional module
-Students may choose any 15-credit module from Language Sciences or from the Institute of Health Informatics.

Dissertation/report
MRes students undertake a research project in the area of human communication disorders, which culminates in a dissertation of 8-10,000 words, a research impact plan and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme takes a strong experiential learning approach through the demonstration, exploration and application of new skills. The programme also utilises significant online learning resources which allow learning outside normal classroom hours. These are combined with lectures, and small-group working. Assessment is through written reports, presentations, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Now, more than ever before, continuing professional development (CPD) is linked to career progression. Gaining a PG Cert or an MRes in Applied Research in Human Communication Disorders will undoubtedly enhance your career opportunities within child and adult support services, and could act as a springboard to further research including study at doctoral level. In the long term, skills gained on this programme will place you in an exceptionally strong position to engage with research including contributing directly to research evidence.

Employability
Evidence of continuing professional development (CPD) is of major importance for professionals working with vulnerable populations, and this programme is likely to enhance employability. For example, on completion you will be able to demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and a range of skills that relate directly to your professional career, including how to source appropriate literature, evaluate research conducted by others, select and conduct appropriate research designs, analyse data, and write a research report.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching. Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create a vibrant and interactive environment, taking advantage of first-class resources.

Academic staff in the division have a wide range of expertise in research methods and the management of people with communication disorders. Areas of expertise include:
-Acquired Aphasia
-Acquired Apraxia of Speech
-Augmentative and Alternative Communication
-Autism Spectrum Disorder
-Children with Complex Special Needs
-Deafness/Cochlear Implant
-Dysphagia
-Dyslexia
-Developmental Language Disorders
-Progressive Neurological Conditions
-Speech Disorders in Children
-Specific Language Impairment
-Stammering
-Written Language Difficulties

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In the framework of widening the possibilities of research and production in IAAC, and the further implementation of our platform of development between… Read more
In the framework of widening the possibilities of research and production in IAAC, and the further implementation of our platform of development between academy and the real-world application, research and the industry, focusing and developing the potentiality towards a marketable product, IAAC proposes the next steps in its field of applied research from Open Thesis fabrication to IAAC BUILDs – building innovation, design & logistics.

AIM AND GOAL

The aim of the program, in line with the opportunity of making a difference, is to develop research to be applied through patents or products for marketing. This will be obtained through the common goal of researching of different fabrication techniques, materials and form, towards the implementation of a large-scale prototype, understanding the potentials of digital fabrication together with new needs of current society and the market.

FORMAT

All the IAAC BUILDs researchers will be working together in 1 group towards a collective goal and project, in turn subdivided into different specialized research teams each focusing on a specific aspect of the project’s development. Hence the implementation of a 1:1 scale prototype allowing to test techniques and materials on real scale.

Some of the research themes are:

‌•Design
‌•Materials and Materiality
‌•Software and Hardware
‌•Structure
‌•Fabrication
‌•Assembly
‌•User interfaces

Request More Information

If you have any questions about the program, or would like to request more information please get in touch here: https://iaac.net/iaac/contact/

PARTNERS AND COLLABORATORS

IAAC BUILDs follows in the footsteps of OTF developing the applied research in partnership companies, whose involvement will vary according to project focus. These companies consist in Ceràmica Cumella, ASCAMM, Santa&Cole, Roca, ABB, Breinco, Cricursa, Fupicsa.

The program also counts on the collaboration of experts in various fields such as engineering and structures, materials, technical components, and much more, allowing the development of a full scale and fully functioning prototype. IAAC BUILDs, applying research to our urban environment towards building innovation.

Please follow this link to apply: https://iaac.net/iaac/apply/

Skype

Would you like to talk to our admissions specialist on Skype? Skype ID iaac.admissions.

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The Master of Music (Applied Research in Music Performance) may be undertaken over two years full-time or four years part-time and offers candidates broad opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the Conservatorium in the areas of music performance, including psychology of music, music perception and acoustics. Read more
The Master of Music (Applied Research in Music Performance) may be undertaken over two years full-time or four years part-time and offers candidates broad opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the Conservatorium in the areas of music performance, including psychology of music, music perception and acoustics.

The aim is to provide training and supervision to students undertaking research into physiological, psychological, sociological, organisational, economic, industrial, perceptual, acoustic or other interdisciplinary aspects of music performance. The Sydney Conservatorium of Music encourages interdisciplinary approaches to research into music performance and, where appropriate, fosters links with the music profession and arts industry with the aim of promoting excellence in music performance.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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This Master’s programme is designed for those who want to pursue a postgraduate route in psychology that will develop their professional and psychological research skills and knowledge. Read more
This Master’s programme is designed for those who want to pursue a postgraduate route in psychology that will develop their professional and psychological research skills and knowledge.

Modules in health and social psychology will explore how we apply psychology to real-world issues such as health promotion, environmental behaviour and prejudice.

Course Overview

This new MSc in Applied Social and Health Psychology aims to develop the student into a professional and employable psychological researcher. Through a novel and exciting mix of hands-on workshops (Applied Research, Ethics and Analysis), lecture and seminar debate (Psychology and Health, Applying Social Psychology), exploration of up-to-the minute issues (Society and Psychology) and working with academic staff in a research team (Professional Research Skills) the ability to develop postgraduate-level skills is built into this course.

The research opportunities offered to students by the programme team within this Master’s programme involve a focus on tackling important research areas of relevance to today’s environmental, political and social world, at a local and global level, providing our graduates with the skills and knowledge to go into further study (e.g., PhD) or into employment.

Modules

Indicative modules and content include:
-Society and Psychology
-Professional Research Skills
-Psychology and Health
-Applying Social Psychology
-Applied Research, Ethics & Analysis
-Applied Research Dissertation

Key Features

The Masters in Applied Social and Health Psychology will provide graduate students or those with relevant experience the opportunity to develop a range of higher-level research, evaluation, and professional skills which can be applied to a broad range of specialisms within and beyond Psychology.

Students will pursue specialist modules in the areas of health psychology and social psychology, and have the opportunity to complete a research dissertation in a specialist area of applied psychology. A particular strength of this course is the opportunity to work closely with academic members of staff on real research projects through the Professional Research Skills module and to receive mentoring in the development of applied research and professional skills.

The ultimate aim of this programme is to develop a well-rounded and competent psychological researcher who has developed a critical understanding of a wide range of applied research techniques, and who is able to apply this knowledge and associated skills discerningly to appropriate applied psychology questions of relevance to the wider social and health agendas.

The programme is structured around the coherent development of a diverse range of applied research skills and knowledge in Psychology, clearly building upon the existing practical skills base and academic expertise within the Psychology team.

Assessment

Assessments for this programme have been specifically designed to enable students to demonstrate a broad range of academic, research and professional skills. There are no exams for this programme, with students being assessed through a variety of different formats including class-based practical research skills assessments, written essays, a portfolio of professional competencies, research proposals and oral presentations. For part two of the Master’s programme students will complete their own research dissertation and submit a written thesis alongside a professional presentation of their research.

Career Opportunities

Psychology graduates are valued by a range of sectors due to the strong set of transferable and critical thinking skills developed through psychology programmes. As such, the higher level academic and professional skills developed through the addition of a Master’s level qualification will clearly produce a highly attractive graduate to both psychology fields and other sectors. These will include the ability to:
-Exercise initiative and personal responsibility in the production and management of workload
-Engage in teamwork and to reflect upon this process
-Present work to both academic and lay audiences in an appropriate manner
-Engage in independent learning required for continuing professional development
-Present work appropriately through different media to a high standard

Graduates from this programme will be in a strong position to pursue further academic research pathways in the form of PhD study or academic research assistantship roles. Additionally, the skill set developed from this Master’s programme will also make them highly attractive candidates for employment and professional career opportunities in non-academic organisations such as government agencies, voluntary sector organisations, the NHS, or in a range of private sector businesses involving project management and evaluation skills.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Linguistics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of English Language and Literature welcomes applications from students wishing to pursue graduate level research at MA level in Applied Linguistics, particularly topics in second language acquisition, bilingualism, vocabulary learning, corpus linguistics and discourse analysis.

MA by Research in Applied Linguistics

The MA by Research in Applied Linguistics would suit those wanting the freedom to explore a topic of their choosing under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes; an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered; the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset. Research proposals are invited on any topic in Applied Linguistics for which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying.

Key Features of Applied Linguistics MA by Research

An MA by Research in Applied Linguistics gives you the chance to pursue a project inspired entirely by your own particular interests in Applied Linguistics. The qualification would be a good preparation for proceeding to doctoral work. Alternatively, the proven ability to conduct independent research in Applied Linguistics will boost employment prospects in the area of English language teaching, but also outside academia (for example, in the media, publishing, the Civil Service, or education).

As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will be closely supervised by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time. All research students in Applied Linguistics are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. MA by Research in Applied Linguistics typically last from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

Postgraduate Research

About 70 of the postgraduates currently studying at Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature [ELL] are researchers working on an MA, MPhil or PhD thesis. Each is supervised by two members of staff, 60% of whose own research publications were rated ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world-leading’ in the 2008 REF exercise. We supervise interdisciplinary projects as well as traditional areas of the discipline - in language studies, creative writing, literature (from medieval to the present) and critical and cultural theory. If you have an idea for a research project in Applied Linguistics, do get in touch and discuss it with us informally before applying.

Postgraduates often join a research centre, e.g. the Centre for Research into Gender and Culture (GENCAS) or the Centre for Research into Welsh Writing in English (CREW) where they work alongside other students and staff in dedicated research rooms. As a student of the Applied Linguistics programme you will present your work in the friendly environment of our Research Institute’s annual postgraduate conference, ELL’s fortnightly research seminars, and the monthly workshop of the Creative Writing Programme. Our research environment was judged 100% ‘internationally excellent’ by the 2008 REF, and research students help staff organise a lively programme of conferences, readings and performances on campus and in the city’s arts centres. As well as being inducted into academic research and dissemination, doctoral students have the opportunity to undertake undergraduate teaching to prepare them for an academic career. We provide study stations with computers and postgraduate common-rooms, research training and the services of a research officer and subject librarian.

REF 2014

What the Research Excellence Framework 2014 had to say about Postgraduate research in the Swansea Department of English Language and Literature …

The environment in the Department is conducive to producing research of mostly at least internationally excellent and at its best world-leading quality’…

‘Arrangements for postgraduates were deemed of world-leading quality’

‘There is clear evidence of the development of a research culture into which research students are fully integrated’

‘Recruitment is strong’

‘There are excellent arrangements for support, training and employability’.

Summing up: ‘The unit makes an outstanding contribution to the health of the discipline’.



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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi- disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues, allied with subject specific supervision, allowing you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/social-and-applied-sciences-research.aspx

Course detail

This exciting course “develops innovative training provision which cuts across disciplines and works at the boundaries with other scientific traditions”. It explicitly recognises the need to “offer high-quality integrated core provision in research skills and research methods training as well as subject-specific training” while using “flexible and imaginative methods of training provision and delivery”. (ESRC 2009).

It offers you the opportunity to complete an MSc in your chosen subject area over the course of one year (two years if part time). Beginning in early September, the course combines 60 credits of taught modules in the first (Michaelmas) term with 120 credits of research during the remainder of the year. The taught component of the course will be multi-disciplinary in nature with lectures and seminars led by experts from across the range of subjects in the Faculty.

Suitability

This course is suitable for students who wish to continue their studies beyond undergraduate level.

The course is ideal if you:
• may want to continue to doctoral level;
• wish to enhance your qualifications for career reasons;
• would like to undertake a research-based, rather than taught Masters;
• recognise the need for research training in your chosen career;
• wish to learn in a multi-disciplinary environment.

Content

You’ll follow a course of advanced study and research under the guidance of academic tutors and supervisors. This MSc aims to develop researchers who are conceptually aware, who can utilise a range of skills and methods, and who, in a multi-disciplinary environment, can practice and develop their own research capabilities, and disseminate that research in a meaningful way.

It offers you a wide range of specifically named pathways located within research subject areas.

See website for a list of named pathways.

Format

You will work closely with a supervisor on a research topic(s) leading to research output(s). The choice of topic will depend on your subject area, your expertise and that of your supervisor. In some instances you will have a research topic identified in advance by your supervisor, working on a specific project within existing research clusters in the Faculty.

Your MSc will be awarded based on grades obtained for the 40 credits of taught modules and 140 credits for a dissertation or other research-based outputs. The 40 credits taught component of the course is comprised of two modules:
• Research Praxis
• Research Methods

In the first week of your studies you will meet with your supervisor and familiarise yourself with your research topic.

The second week of the course will be an intensive week of lectures and practicals spread across the two modules. The following six weeks will include a range of optional sessions in both modules, or some specific sessions identified for students in specific subject areas.

After the second week all lectures, seminars and practicals will be held on Wednesday afternoons.

Assessment

Assessment will take many forms including traditional essays, team assignments, reflective logs, oral presentations, etc. All assessments will be completed before the end of the first term. You must pass all modules (40 credits) to progress to the research stage of the course. If any module is failed you’ll have one opportunity to resubmit prior to continuing with the research component of the module.

The largest part of the assessment will be based on your research output(s). Working with your Supervisor, you will have to decide what format the research output(s) will take. It may be a dissertation of approximately 16,000-20,000 word equivalent or a couple of research reports or research papers each of approximately 8,000 words in length. It may be possible that the research output could take some different form, e.g. an invention or patent, but a written component would still be required. The research output(s) will be assessed by an external examiner and you must pass this component of the module to receive the award of MSc. The Research Output(s) must be submitted by August 31, 2016.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Our MSc is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the research training guidelines for undertaking a PhD in Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work or Socio-legal Studies, as well as preparing you for an ESRC-recognised interdisciplinary PhD in Families, Relationships and Demographic Change and Social Care. A course on Applied Social Research (Criminology) is also available.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January See
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin social scientific research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative social research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Social Research comprises six compulsory taught core modules, and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: The Nature of Social Enquiry; Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Comparative Social Research; Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research.
These modules comprise a series of reading groups in which a number of central ideas are debated.

In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original social science research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- A Study of High Risk Behaviour
- Young People and National Identity
- Substance Use Prevalence and Looked-after Young People in Scotland
- Women’s Decisions about Returning to Work After Childbirth

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of the research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was ‘Internationally Excellent’ with the top 10 percent of that judged to be ‘World-leading’.

Career opportunities

Over the past five years, over half of our graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, for example, a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation.
In general, one in ten graduates have enhanced their practice in current posts by undertaking studies in Applied Social Research, with support from their employer. Over one third of our graduates continue with academic study and undertake a PhD.

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The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Read more
The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This programme aims to provide students with a sound background in social research design and the most up-to-date training in methods of data collection and analysis. The combination of core modules and short courses on more advanced topics provides maximum flexibility for taught postgraduate and research students throughout their study.

The core elements of the programme are delivered by staff across the entire College, many of whom are engaged in cutting-edge research in their own fields. Students will benefit by undertaking the modules with others from different departments within the School of Government and Society, eg, Political Science and International Studies; the Centre for Russian and East European Studies; the Institute for Applied Social Studies; and within the wider College. Students will also receive training on more discipline-specific research elements, as well as dissertation supervision, provided by individual departments. On completion of this MA, many students continue their PhD studies or pursue a career in research in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Programme content
Term 1:

Introduction to Social Research (20)
Research Design (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Information Skills for Social Sciences
University Programme of Skills Training (as necessary)
Dissertation-related preparation
Term 2:

Social Research Methods I (20)
Social Research Methods II (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Summer Term:

Four Short courses (10)
Dissertation (60)
All students registered on the MA in Social Research will take:

1) Four core modules:

Introduction to Social Science Research (20 credits)
Research Design (20 credits)
Social Research Methods I (20 credits)
Social Research Methods II (20 credits)


2) Four elective modules (10 credits each) from the short course programme below
3) A 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits)

Short courses
All short courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These short courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These short courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to to so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Short course programmes
From Multiple linear to Logistic regression
Narrative Research
Analyzing Hierarchical and Panel Data
Visual Research Methods
Linguistic Ethnography
Documentary Research in Education, History and the Social Sciences
Researching Disability
Approaches to Research on Discourse
Policy Evaluation
Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis (using NVivo)
Secondary Research Data Analysis in Social Research
Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Social Science
Overseas Research
Q Methodology – A Systematic Approach for Interpretive Research Design
Activity Theory and its research applications
Some courses have pre-requisites, eg, to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis and Narrative Research; you will need to have passed Data Analysis (20 credits module) or equivalent. For the latter, you will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

Please be aware that some of these courses run on the same dates. Make sure you have not picked courses that clash with each other. For further details or to sign up for these short courses, please email the course names, your name, student ID and your programme to |.

Skills and attributes gained
Students will have acquired a solid foundation of a broad range of research methods that are widely used in the social sciences and will have developed:

A sound understanding of the methodological debates
An overview of the philosophy of social science and how this informs research design, methods chosen of data collection and analysis
An ability to use a range of research techniques appropriate to their subject area
Competence in the representation and presentation of information and data
An ability to communicate research findings effectively to a wider range of audiences
An appreciation of the potential use and impact of their research within and beyond academia
An ability to engage with relevant users at all points in the research process, from devising and shaping research questions through to enhancing practice
Learning and teaching
Students are expected to engage in high-level discussion during all sessions. Teaching will be delivered by a combination of lectures, seminars and computer workshops. Some fieldwork involving primary data collection is required where appropriate.

Careers
Many students go on to do a PhD after completing this MA. Others have followed a career in local authorities, government departments, health authorities, management consultancy, media, the voluntary sector and so on.

Assessment
All core modules are assessed by a 4000-word essay or report. On most short courses, a 3000-report is usually required. The dissertation length is 14,000 words and students are expected to utilise the knowledge and skills they learned from the taught elements in this programme.

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at one of our on-campus open days (Friday 13 November 2015 and Friday 4 March 2016). Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. Read more
Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. We provide high quality supervision and teaching, and you will benefit from the friendly and supportive atmosphere in the Department, as evidenced by student feedback available on our website.

This MSc course will equip you with knowledge of cutting-edge developments and issues in applied social psychology, as well as an array of analytical, methodological and communication skills, important for those progressing to a PhD as well as for those looking for jobs in applied settings in commercial and governmental organizations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/psychology/coursefinder/mscappliedsocialpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Our Department ranks among the best in the UK for research (rating in the top ten in the UK in the 2014 REF) and teaching (highest rating ‘excellent’ for teaching quality).

- You will develop an enhanced understanding of the subject area through an exciting mix of seminars, lectures and research conveyed by our friendly and accessible staff, who are all involved in cutting edge research.

- You will benefit from high quality lectures that combine theory, research, and application, providing you with insight into topical issues and the latest research in applied social psychology.

- Some of the lectures are delivered by applied psychologists in the field, providing you with insights into the real jobs that await our graduates.

- You will have the opportunity to complete an innovative research project under the supervision of a leading academic in the relevant field.

Department research and industry highlights

Example research projects of our academic staff:
- Wrath of God: Religious primes and punishment.
- Can values reduce prejudice against Muslims even when national identification is high?
- Monetary donations following humanitarian disasters.
- Recalling and recognizing faces of other-races: A behavioural and eye movement study.

Example relations with the industry:
- Laureus Sport for Good Foundation; developing an assessment tool on well-being of youth.
- Relations with care homes helping patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
- Hospitals for a clinical trial test and intervention to help people with back pain.

Course content and structure

You will study seven core units, including the Social Research Project:

Core course units:
Psychology in Applied Settings
In this unit you will:
- develop an enhanced understanding of the link between research and practice

- be equipped with research skills relevant to research in applied settings and implementation of research findings in the practice of psychologists

- participate in specialist seminars on applied psychology topics such as forensic and educational psychology

- take part in interactive discussions of all relevant issues guided by the tutor taking any given session.

- Multicultural Existence
This unit will introduce you to the social psychology of multicultural existence and familiarise you with existing theories and current research on this topic. You will be trained to apply your knowledge to the analysis of real-life examples of multicultural existence.

- Adjustment and Well-Being
This course will introduce you to theory, empirical findings, and applications regarding adjustment and well-being (happiness and self-fulfillment).

- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
You will explore many of the key research techniques that are used in social, health, and developmental research. You will develop an advanced understanding of current techniques within these areas and how to employ these techniques, and be able to evaluate and critique them.

- Social Research Project
You will be provided with the possibility to carry out an original piece of research on a topic of your interest within the broad area of applied and social psychology. You will be given the necessary support during the conception, conduct and writing up of your research

- Topics in Psychological Science
The aim of the unit is to stimulate an interest in topical research findings from a wide range of research areas relevant to psychology. You will develop the skills of presentation, evaluation, interpretation and discussion of original research findings.

- Statistics for Research
You will be provided with an overview and basic understanding of advanced statistical methods used in psychology and neuroscience research, including hands-on experience applying these methods to specific problems. The unit will provide a methodological foundation if you wish to pursue research in disciplines allied to the MSc course.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of social psychology and its application
- strong research skills in social and applied psychology
- experience in transferable skills that are highly sought after in the job market, such as oral presentations, oral and written communication, and project planning.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, different types of presentations, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different psychology-related areas, including careers in human relations and organizational psychology. Our graduates are currently working for organizations such as community associations, NGO’s, organizational psychology firms, and consultancy firms. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Do you want to become a leader in clinical research? The MClinRes covers the whole research process from initial question generation through to designing, managing and undertaking research and the dissemination and implementation of findings. Read more
Do you want to become a leader in clinical research? The MClinRes covers the whole research process from initial question generation through to designing, managing and undertaking research and the dissemination and implementation of findings. Learn from a team of experts in clinical research, drawn from a wide range of disciplines including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, optometry, dietetics and medicine as well as representatives from patient and public support groups.

Key features

-Progress your career and become a leader in clinical research with a programme that provides both theoretical and first hand practical experience of the whole research process from developing a clinically relevant question through to implementation of research in clinical practice.
-Aligns with key Health Education England and NIHR objectives to develop clinical academics and increase research capacity in nurses, midwives, allied healthcare professionals and healthcare scientists.
-Learn from nurses, midwives, allied healthcare professionals and healthcare scientists actively involved in the management and delivery of relevant clinical research, with national and international reputations in their specialist areas.
-Experts drawn from across Plymouth University, other higher education institutes, the Research Design Service, the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (NIHR CLAHRC) and the Peninsula Clinical Trials Unit.
-Strong input from patient and public support groups, NHS staff, managers and commissioners in developing and running the programme so that its content reflects the current needs of the NHS.
-You’ll be encouraged to join the Institute of Health and Community, and will be mentored and supervised by experienced clinical academics on your own research project. Specific research supervisors relevant to your profession and area of interest are allocated within two weeks of the start of the programme.
-The MClinRes is specifically designed to help you gain future funding to further your clinical academic career. The programme specifically aims to progress you along the new NIHR clinical academic training programme for registered non-medical/dental healthcare professionals.
-An additional module on research management and mentorship, provided at the end of the programme, supports you in publishing and disseminating your research findings, presenting at national and international locations and applying for NIHR internships and fellowships.
-Make the most of our blended learning approach, which combines short study blocks and distance learning technologies with face-to-face teaching, enhancing the learning process by allowing time for reflection.
-Benefit from an enriched student experience – you will share core and optional modules with health and social care students studying across faculty MSc pathways. Students and alumni have been involved in the programme management, design and recruitment.
-Choose from three award pathways – PgCert, PgDip, MClinRes. A range of assessments are used across modules designed to link your knowledge and skills to your area of practice.

Course details

The MClinRes will be delivered by blended learning, in one year full time or on a part time basis.

Pathways in this programme will include four core modules: applying evidence to practice, project design for research, applied qualitative research methods and applied quantitative research methods, as well as the research dissertation. Choose a 20 credit optional module from the diverse array on offer in the Faculty of Health and Human Sciences. The core modules build on each other providing skills in literature searching and implementing findings to the workplace; designing research protocols; understanding applied qualitative and quantitative methods and undertaking a clinically-relevant research project.

To gain a postgraduate certificate, you’ll need to earn 60 credits by studying three core modules worth 20 credits each. To gain a postgraduate diploma you will need to earn 120 credits by studying the four core modules, the optional module and an additional module from the MSc Advanced Professional Practice. To be awarded the full MClinRes masters, you’ll need to earn a total of 180 credits - you’ll study the same modules as the postgraduate diploma, with the extra 80 credits coming from your research dissertation.

Core modules
-MCR702 Applied Quantitative Research Methods
-ADV702 Applying Evidence to Practice
-MCR704 Research Management and Mentorship
-ADV715 Project Design for Research
-MCR701 Applied Qualitative Research Methods
-MCR703 Research Dissertation
-MCR706 Systematic Review

Optional modules
-ADV710 Pathomechanics and Rehabilitation of Gait and Balance
-ADV703 Occupation as the Focus of Contemporary Practice
-ADV712 Supported Independent Study
-ADV739 Rehabilitation: Cognition, Perception and Behaviour
-ADV737 Neurological Rehabilitation: Sensorimotor Disorders
-ADV708 Injection Therapy for Health Professionals (Botulinum Toxin)
-ADV709 Injection Therapy for Health Professionals (Corticosteroid)
-ADV735 Advancing the Management of Long Term Conditions

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

This MSc has been designed to run concurrently with the MSc Applied Social Research, a long-standing course in Applied Social Science that is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the standards of their Research Training Guidelines. The objectives are to:
- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Criminology) comprises six compulsory taught core modules and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-legal Studies; Criminological Perspectives; and Criminalisation, Social Control and Human Rights.
In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original criminological or socio-legal research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- Explaining Crime through Narrative
- Nurses Perceptions of Workplace Violence and Aggression within an A&E Department
- Policing a Democracy
- The Effect of Anti-Terror Legislation on Liberty

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was 'Internationally Excellent' with the top 10 percent of that judged to be 'World-leading'.

Career opportunities

90.5% of Stirling students are in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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Summary. This programme will equip and motivate you to undertake high-quality research in psychology, providing advanced training and structured support. Read more

Summary

This programme will equip and motivate you to undertake high-quality research in psychology, providing advanced training and structured support. You will be encouraged to apply newly acquired concepts, methods and skills to address research questions relevant to your particular area of interest. You will become fully immersed in active psychology research programmes, gaining practical, hands-on experience in conducting research.

Modules

Core modules: Applied Research Methods: Psychological Research Design; Applied Research Methods: Correlational Methods in Psychology; Applied Research Methods: Qualitative Psychology; Applied Research Methods: Group Comparisons; Concepts and Skills; Advanced Statistical Methods Compulsory modules: Research Apprenticeship in Psychology; Statistical Programming in R

Visit our website for further information.



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A University of Hertfordshire Masters research degree is an internationally recognised degree signifying achievement in research. Read more
A University of Hertfordshire Masters research degree is an internationally recognised degree signifying achievement in research. While an MA/MSc is a taught, modular programme, a Masters by Research is a programme of research and skills development negotiated with your supervisors and based on your own research proposal.

About the course

The Masters by Research degree may be undertaken in full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 year) modes in any creative arts discipline that the School engages with and for which we have appropriately qualified supervisory staff. In the School of Creative Arts we have a wide range of expertise in historical and theoretical research, as well as in practice-led/practice-based research, relating to fine and applied arts, film, media and TV studies, interior and architectural design, music and the music industry.

During the period of study for the Masters by Research degree you will develop a greater depth of subject expertise and independent research skills. You will undertake a focused research project for the duration of the degree, under the supervision and guidance of two or more academic members of staff who are your supervisors. In addition you will engage with a negotiated programme of selected generic skills development and careers workshops provided by the University of Hertfordshire Doctoral College.

Your Masters by Research project project may be purely theoretical or contain elements of your own practice. If there is a practice element, one of your supervisors would be a practitioner in an appropriate discipline, and appropriate studio space and/or workshop facilities would be made available if necessary. The School has a wide range of outstanding facilities for researchers in the broad area of creative arts, and the University library has an excellent range of relevant and up-to-date resources to support research in this area.

During the course of the degree, you would typically be given opportunities present your research at seminars and conferences, and to exhibit your practical work if it is part of the research project. Some opportunities in this regard may be provided by the School or the University.

Why choose this course?

-An internationally recognised research qualification
-Develop subject expertise at postgraduate level
-Develop research skills through practice and research experience
-Employers are looking for high calibre graduates with advanced skills who can demonstrate independent creative thinking and problem-solving through research

Careers

Graduates with this degree will be able to demonstrate to employers a highly-valued ability to work independently on an original project and to maintain that focus over an extended period, and will have developed much sought after research skills. Research students also benefit from the School’s networks of international partners in the creative and cultural industries, which may offer valuable opportunities for career development, as well as from career development workshops and events.

The skills, knowledge and experience gained will also provide a valuable grounding if you wish to study at Doctoral level at some point after you have completed your MA by Research.

Teaching methods

Research degrees are not taught programmes, however, programmes of supporting studies are a key element.

The School of Creative Arts has a lively research community staffed by supervisors whose research is world leading, Supervisory teams provide guidance in helping you to formulate and develop your research during the course of the programme.

We offer a range of subject specific research training throughout various research group seminars. Our research students are strongly encouraged to participate in modules in our taught Masters programmes, and the University also has an extensive Researcher Development Programme, which is provided by the UH Doctoral College and offers generic research training.

The Masters by Research has two main assessment points after enrolment: Initial Registration for the degree after 3 months for both full-time and part-time students, and the final examination. Your research will be examined on the basis of the final submission which may include a combination of both written and non-textual material that must be "defended" in a viva and contain a thesis (a position that can be defended by substantiated argument).

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The aims of the course are to provide an understanding of key contemporary research problems in a range of disciplines in either the humanities and social sciences or physical sciences relating to the Arctic and Antarctica, and for students to undertake original research on a topic selected in consultation with members of staff. Read more
The aims of the course are to provide an understanding of key contemporary research problems in a range of disciplines in either the humanities and social sciences or physical sciences relating to the Arctic and Antarctica, and for students to undertake original research on a topic selected in consultation with members of staff.

Taught material is presented in the Michaelmas Term, usually in the form of seminars. The material is organized in two strands, suitable for students interested in the humanities and social sciences or in the natural sciences. It is examined through the submission of three essays, which can take the form of research papers. In the Lent and Easter terms students carry out research towards their dissertations. Dissertation topics are agreed with supervisors and are closely integrated with the ongoing research activities of the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI). Students are expected to participate in internal and external research seminars, and a research forum.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmps

Course detail

The outcomes of the course are achieved both through focused study of specialised aspects of research on the Arctic and Antarctic, either in terms of Arts and Humanities or the Sciences, and through the development of research skills and methods. The following outcomes of student learning are sought:

Knowledge of ideas: Students gain familiarity with an appropriate range of intellectual and methodological traditions relevant to the study of the Arctic and Antarctic. For the humanities and social science strand, students draw on material from Geography, Anthropology, Political Science and other social sciences, and understand the significance of different epistemological positions that provide the context for research. For the physical sciences strand, students will become familiar with theories and empirical work from, amongst other areas, the fields of glaciology, oceanography and atmospheric science. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the field-based, remote sensing and modelling techniques used in polar science research. The teaching is provided via lectures and seminars, research supervision via bi-weekly meetings between students and their supervisor and sessions concerning research skills. Students also attend the research seminars held in their research groups. This allows exchange of ideas and debate with more experienced academic researchers and their peers;

Critical skills: Students become skilled and critical readers of Arctic and/or Antarctic publications and data sets. This is achieved through structured reading associated with each module, as well as via supervision on the essays and dissertation;

Substantive knowledge of ideas: Students gain in-depth knowledge of substantive areas of Arctic and/or Antarctic research. This knowledge is gained in the modules on The Emerging Arctic, Northern Peoples, Polar Remote Sensing, Glacier and Ice Sheet Dynamics: Present and Past. Students gain an in-depth knowledge either of underlying patterns of development, conservation and cultural transformation in the Arctic and/or Antarctic regions, or of the physical processes at work in these regions, how these have changed in the past and are changing currently, and the methods and techniques for investigating them;

Research design skills: Students develop their capacity to frame research questions, to derive appropriate research designs, and develop awareness of different epistemological approaches. This is achieved through the ‘Research Training’ sections of course;

Practical research skills: Students gain a competence and confidence in using a range of qualitative and/or quantitative methods for gathering, analysing and interpreting data. This is achieved through the ‘Research Training’ sections of course and the dissertation;

Presentation skills: Students gain skills in the presentation of research-based evidence and argument. Students are expected to take an active role in the research seminars of the research groups to which they belong and to contribute actively to seminar discussions. They are also expected to present their dissertation aims, methods, preliminary results, and plans for future work at a student forum held part way through their dissertation research period;

Management and other transferable skills: Students gain skills in managing a research project, and its execution (including, where appropriate, elements of data management, understanding ethics and codes of good practice in cross-cultural research, understanding uncertainty, disseminating research). Several of these elements are taught in the ‘Research Training’ sections of course, and then are extended and applied via the dissertation research, which has individual supervision from an experienced researcher.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation that, at the discretion of the examiners, can include an oral examination on the thesis and the essays and on the general field of knowledge.
- Three essays or other exercises of up to 4,000 words each.

Continuing

70% overall in MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

AHRC for Arts and History topics approved by the AHRC DTP at University of Cambridge.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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