• Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Durham University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Executive Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
University of Pennsylvania Featured Masters Courses
"applied" AND "physics"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Applied Physics)

We have 456 Masters Degrees (Applied Physics)

  • "applied" AND "physics" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 456
Order by 
The Master's degree programme in Applied Physics offers an excellent combination of fundamental research on the one hand, and an open eye to possible industrial applications on the other. Read more
The Master's degree programme in Applied Physics offers an excellent combination of fundamental research on the one hand, and an open eye to possible industrial applications on the other.

The department accommodates excellent teaching and research facilities. Teaching and research are closely related. The research programme of the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Groningen is embedded in the Zernike Institute of Advanced Materials, which belongs to the Times Higher Education top 10 of best materials research institutes in the world. Most of the research is carried out in the same building that accommodates the teaching facilities.

The international environment of the programme, and especially within the research groups, is inspiring and challenging. The Master's degree programme in Applied Physics is open to students who already have a solid background in physics or applied physics, and who are eager to expand their knowledge and experience to obtain a Master's degree in a modern applied physics research environment. The programme focuses on material engineering and device physics.

Why in Groningen?

- Our Institute for Advanced Materials is ranked 5th in the THES world's top 10
- Physics field in Groningen has CHE Excellence Label

Job perspectives

The Master's degree programme in Applied Physics is primarily meant for students who want to become researchers and developers in an industrial environment. However, many graduates continue on to a PhD project after obtaining their Master's degree, either in Groningen or elsewhere.

During the Master's degree, teamwork, communication and presentation are important qualities to be developed. In many cases considerable IT skills are developed as well. These general competences, together with the analytical skills typical of researchers, for example problem-solving abilities, guarantee that graduates are widely employable. Most applied physicists find jobs in an entrepreneurial environment where a strong background in physics is necessary.

Job examples

- R&D in an industrial or entrepreneurial environment
- PhD Research Project

Read less
This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering. You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including. Read more

Why this course?

This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering.

You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including:
- high-power microwave technology
- laser-based particle acceleration and enabled applications
- physics and the life sciences
- materials and solid state physics
- photonics
- quantum optics and quantum information technology

You‘ll put the knowledge gained in the taught classes to use on a research project. You can design the project to fit in with your interests and career plans.

The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master a wide range of applied physics skills. It teaches you transferable, problem-solving and numeracy skills that are widely sought after across the commercial sector.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/appliedphysics/

You’ll study

You’ll have two semesters of taught classes made up of compulsory and optional modules. This is followed by a three-month research project.

Facilities

This course is run by our Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:
- cutting-edge high-power laser and particle acceleration research with SCAPA, enabling generation of radiation from the terahertz to - the X-ray region, and biomedical applications
- the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
- a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
- access to top-of-the-range high-performance and parallel computer facilities
- state-of-the-art high-power microwave research facility in the Technology & Innovation Centre
- advanced quantum optics and quantum information labs
- several labs researching optical spectroscopy and sensing

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments and research projects.

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in examinations, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral exam.

What kind of jobs do Strathclyde Physics graduates get?

To answer this question we contacted some of our Physics graduates from all courses to find out what jobs they have. They are working across the world in a number of different roles including:
- Medical Physicist
- Senior Engineer
- Professor
- Systems Engineer
- Treasury Analyst
- Patent Attorney
- Software Engineer
- Teacher
- Spacecraft Project Manager
- Defence Scientist
- Procurement Manager
- Oscar winner

- Success story: Iain Neil
Iain Neil graduated from Strathclyde in Applied Physics in 1977 and is an optical consultant, specialising in the design of zoom lenses for the film industry. He has received a record 12 Scientific and Technical Academy Awards, the most for any living person.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

Read less
What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena. Read more
What are the laws of nature governing the universe from elementary particles to the formation and evolution of the solar system, stars, and galaxies? In the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, you will focus on gaining a quantitative understanding of these phenomena.

With the expertise in basic research that you will gain in the programme, you can pursue a career in research. You will also acquire proficiency in the use of mathematical methods, IT tools and/or experimental equipment, as well as strong problem-solving and logical deduction skills. These will qualify you for a wide range of positions in the private sector.

After completing the programme, you will:
-Have wide-ranging knowledge of particle physics and/or astrophysical phenomena.
-Have good analytical, deductive and computational skills.
-Be able to apply theoretical, computational and/or experimental methods to the analysis and understanding of various phenomena.
-Be able to generalize your knowledge of particle physics and astrophysical phenomena as well as identify their interconnections.
-Be able to formulate hypotheses and test them based your knowledge.

The teaching in particle physics and astrophysical sciences is largely based on the basic research. Basic research conducted at the University of Helsinki has received top ratings in international university rankings. The in-depth learning offered by international research groups will form a solid foundation for your lifelong learning.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The understanding of the microscopic structure of matter, astronomical phenomena and the dynamics of the universe is at the forefront of basic research today. The advancement of such research in the future will require increasingly sophisticated theoretical, computational and experimental methods.

The study track in elementary particle physics and cosmology focuses on experimental or theoretical particle physics or cosmology. The theories that form our current understanding of these issues must be continuously re-evaluated in the light of new experimental results. In addition to analytical computation skills, this requires thorough mastery of numerical analysis methods. In experimental particle physics, the main challenges pertain to the management and processing of continuously increasing amount of data.

The study track in astrophysical sciences focuses on observational or theoretical astronomy or space physics. Our understanding of space, ranging from near Earth space all the way to structure of the universe, is being continuously redefined because of improved experimental equipment located both in space and on the Earth’s surface. Several probes are also carrying out direct measurements of planets, moons and interplanetary plasma in our solar system. Another key discipline is theoretical astrophysics which, with the help of increasingly efficient supercomputers, enables us to create in-depth models of various phenomena in the universe in general and the field of space physics in particular. Finally, plasma physics is an important tool in both space physics and astronomy research.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme includes two study tracks:
-Particle physics and cosmology
-Astrophysical sciences

Courses in the programme have been compiled into modules. Both study tracks contain a mandatory core module that includes a research seminar. The study tracks are divided into specialisations that focus on astronomy, space physics, particle physics or cosmology. Courses typically include lectures, exercises, group work and research literature and end in examinations and/or final assignments. In addition, some studies can be completed as book examinations.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s programme is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be completed in two years. The degree consists of:
-90 credits of Master’s studies, including a Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-30 credits of other studies from the Master’s programme or other degree programmes.

In addition, your studies include a personal study plan as well as career orientation and planning. You might also take part in a traineeship, elective studies offered by the Master’s Programme in Particle Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, or studies offered by other degree programmes.

Career Prospects

A Master’s degree in elementary particle physics or astrophysical sciences provides you with excellent qualifications for postgraduate education in research or for a career in diverse positions both in Finland and abroad. As a Master’s graduate you could begin a career in research and development in industry as well as in universities and other research institutes that enable you to conduct independent research on a topic that interests you.

Potential employers and career opportunities include:
-Research institutes in Finland and abroad (basic scientific research).
-Universities and universities of applied sciences (teaching).
-Industry, particularly high technology companies (applied research and development, managerial duties).
-Software production, e.g., the game sector.
-Diverse planning and consulting positions.

Master’s graduates from equivalent study tracks under the previous degree system have embarked on careers in:
-Research and teaching positions in Finnish universities and research institutes.
-Research and teaching positions abroad, for example at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research), ESA (the European Space Agency), ESO (the European Southern Observatory), and NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration).
-Administrative positions, for example at the Academy of Finland or the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation (Tekes).
-The business sector.

The strong theoretical and analytical skills you will acquire in the programme are in great demand in fields such as:
-Data analysis (industry, media companies, game companies, financing).
-Industrial research, development and consulting (at, e.g., Nokia, Ericsson, Apple, Sanoma, Spinverse, Supercell, Nielsen, Valo -Research and Trading, Planmeca, Reaktor, Comptel, and Goldman Sachs).

Internationalization

Our multilingual Master’s programme is highly international. The Department hosts a large number of international students and staff members. In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science provide many opportunities for international engagement:
-Student exchange at one of the destinations available through the Faculty or the University.
-International traineeships.
-English-language teaching offered by the Faculty.
-Master’s thesis project as a member of one of the international research groups operating under the programme.
-Cooperation with international students enrolled in the programme.
-International duties in subject-specific student organisations or the Student Union of the University of Helsinki.
-Language courses organised by the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

The Faculty of Science is a top research institute in its fields among European universities. Its partners include many leading international research institutes, such as the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

As a student at the Faculty of Science, you will have the opportunity to complete a research traineeship period at, for example, CERN in Geneva. By completing a traineeship at one of the internationally active research groups on campus you will be able to acquaint yourself and network with the international scientific community during your Master’s studies. The international student exchange programmes available at the University provide numerous opportunities to complete part of your degree at a university abroad.

Read less
Why Surrey?. Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

Programme overview

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

Why not discover more about our programme in our video?

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project. Part-time studemts study the same content over 2 academic years.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that all modules are compulsory, there are no optional modules, and may be subject to change.

Facilities, equipment and academic support

Common room

A student common room is available for the use of all Physics students.

Computers

The University has an extensive range of PC and UNIX machines, full internet access and email. The University has invested in resources to allow students to develop their IT skills. It also has an online learning environment, SurreyLearn. Computers are located in dedicated computer rooms. Access to these rooms is available 24 hours per day.

Prizes

Hounsfield Prize

A prize of £200 is awarded annually for the best dissertation on the Medical Physics programme. Sir Hounsfield was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1979 for his work on Computed Tomography.

Mayneord Prize

A prize of £200 in memory of Professor Valentine Mayneord will be awarded to the student with the best overall performance on the Medical Physics course. Professor Mayneord was one of the pioneers of medical physics, who had a long association with the Department and encouraged the growth of teaching and research in the field.

Knoll Prize

A prize of £300 in memory of Professor Glenn Knoll is awarded annually to the student with outstanding performance in Radiation Physics and Radiation Measurement on any of the department's MSc programmes. Professor Knoll was a world-leading authority in radiation detection, with a long association with the department

IPEM Student Prize (MSc Medical Physics)

A prize of £250 is awarded annually to a student with outstanding performance in their dissertation.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and related industries. The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context. This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

Global opportunities

We give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities and through our international research collaboration. Hence, it may be possible to carry out the dissertation project abroad.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science

• Medical Imaging

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging

• Radiation Protection

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Research Methods

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• Specialist Radiotherapy

• Advanced Radiation Safety

• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.

The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Medical Radiation Physics course builds on the highly successful research partnerships between the College of Medicine and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) Health Board, including the Institute of Life Science and Centre for NanoHealth initiatives, and ongoing work in Monte Carlo-based radiotherapy modelling and dosimeter development, body composition, tissue characterisation and novel modes of the detection of disease with state-of-the-art CT and MRI facilities.

Key Features of the MSc in Medical Radiation Physics

On the Medical Radiation Physics MSc, you will gain the necessary knowledge and understanding of fundamental aspects of the use of radiation in medicine, in order that you are conversant in medical terms, human physiology and radiation mechanisms.

A direct link to clinical practice is provided through hands-on instruction with equipment used routinely in the hospital setting, which will prepare you for research in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer-based modelling, research methodology and the ethical dimensions associated with medical research.

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Medical Radiation Physics scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Medical Radiation Physics programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the Medical Radiation Physics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

• Introduction to the Practice of Medical Physicists and Clinical Engineers

• Nanoscale Simulation

• Physics of the Body

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology

• Research Methods

• Radiation Protection

• Radiation Physics

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Medical Imaging

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• MSc Research Project

Accreditation

The Medical Radiation Physics course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). IPEM is the professional body that works with physical science, engineering and clinical professionals in academia, healthcare services and industry in the UK and supports clinical scientists and technologists in their practice through the provision and assessment of education and training.

Links with industry

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London, as well Velindre NHS Trust (a strongly academic cancer treatment centre), offers the opportunity for collaborative research through student placements.

The academic staff of this discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations, which are the destination of our medical engineering graduates. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

Careers

The Medical Radiation Physics course will prepare you for research and clinical practise in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer modelling, human engineering and the medico-legal issues they imply. It will enable you to develop the potential to become leaders, defining and influencing medical practise.

For a medical physicist career path, the role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, offering a uniquely diverse career. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.



Read less
Physics forms the basis of many other sciences as well as of innovative technical and industrial developments. Read more

Physics forms the basis of many other sciences as well as of innovative technical and industrial developments. In the NAWI Graz master's degree programme Technical Physics, students build on the knowledge acquired in the bachelor's degree programme and extend their skills in solving physics problems and mathematical problems so that they can work on research related and application oriented questions. Numerous career options are open to students after graduation, both in Austria and abroad. They can choose to continue researching fundamental aspects of physics or work developing new materials, technologies and processes for industry.

Dean of Studies Roland Würschum:

"As a special bonus, the NAWI Graz cooperation offers a chance for internationalisation and to attend a broader range of courses. The theoretical course contents have been optimally adapted to match the practical courses, such as research laboratories and computer-assisted simulations, through the modern modularisation of the curriculum."

Content

  • You increase your knowledge of physics and maths.
  • You acquire specialist knowledge in the following areas:
  • Statistical and Computational Physics
  • Advanced Quantum Mechanics and Atom Physics
  • Advanced Solid State Physics and Radiation Physics
  • You acquire knowledge in Business and Entrepreneurship.
  • You apply physics methods in experiments, in theory and using computers.
  • You analyse complex procedures using modern computer simulation processes.
  • You learn to think logically and systematically and to acquaint yourself with new physical and technical problem areas.
  • You work on interdisciplinary problems, e.g. in mathemathics, chemistry, medicine and environmental systems sciences.
  • You improve your specialist English vocabulary.

Specialisation Areas

You can specialise in three of the following areas:

  • Applied Materials Physics
  • Computational Condensed Matter Physics
  • Laboratory Technology and Instrumentation
  • Microscopy and Nanoanalysis
  • Modelling of Materials
  • Nano and Laser Optics
  • Nanoscience
  • Quantum Many-Body Physics
  • Quantum Optics and Molecular Physics
  • Radiation and Plasma Physics
  • Semiconductor Devices
  • Surface Science
  • Theoretical Solid State Physics

Further options for specialised modules are offered as part of a stay abroad.

Career Options

Technical physicists are regarded as the universal problem solvers in innovative industries. They work as highly-qualified experts in scientific and technological areas of industry, business and science both in Austria and abroad.

Technical physicists primarily work in the following industrial sectors:

  • Universities and other educational and research institutions
  • Data processing
  • Electronics and electrical engineering
  • Precision mechanics and optics
  • Mechanical engineering and vehicle construction
  • Health care and public services
  • The services sector and company services


Read less
This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Read more
This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of scientific principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

Degree information

Students study the physics theory and practice that underpins modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical science. The programme covers the applications of both ionising and non-ionising radiation to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and disorder, and includes research project, workplace skills development and computational skills needed to apply this theory into practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of eight modules (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Clinical Practice
-Medical Imaging (Ionising)
-Ultrasound in Medicine
-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Biomedical Optics
-Research Project
-Professional Skills module
-Treatment with Ionising Radiation
-Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions & Dosimetry

Optional modules
-Biomedical Engineering
-Computing in Medicine
-Programme Foundations for Medical Image Analysis

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of Physics and Engineering in Medicine which culminates in a report up to 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework and assignments, a research dissertation and an oral examination.

Careers

A large percentage of graduates from the MSc continue on to PhD study, often in one of the nine research groups within the department, as a reult of the skills and knowledge they acquire on the programme. Other graduates commence or resume training or employment within the heaalthcare sector in hospitals or industry, both within the UK and abroad.

Employability
Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students on this programme receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer. The department is also a collaborator in the nearby London Proton Therapy Centre, currently under construction.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development.

Read less
The objective of this programme of study is to prepare professionals able to deal with complex systems using sophisticated mathematical tools, yet with an engineering attitude. Read more

Mission and goals

The objective of this programme of study is to prepare professionals able to deal with complex systems using sophisticated mathematical tools, yet with an engineering attitude. It harmonises a solid scientific background with a command of advanced methodologies and technologies. The programme is characterised by a continuous synergy between Applied Mathematics and Engineering disciplines- The students may choose among three specialisations:
- Computational Science and Engineering
- Applied Statistics
- Quantitative Finance

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

Career opportunities

The professional opportunities offered by this course are rather ample and varied: engineering consultancy companies that deal with complex computational problems; manufacturing or civil engineering companies where analyses based on the use of advanced mathematical tools are needed; banks, insurance companies and financial institutions making use of quantitative finance for risk analysis or forecast; companies that require statistical interpretation and the processing of complex data, or the simulation of different scenarios; public and private research institutes and laboratories.

Eligible students

Students holding a Bachelor degree in Mathematical Engineering, or in a related area with a solid background in the core disciplines of the programme, i.e. Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Applied Physics or other Engineering disciplines are eligible for application. In particular, eligible students' past studies must include courses in different areas of Engineering (among Informatics, Economics & Business Organization, Electrotechnics, Automation, Electronics, Applied Physics, Civil Engineering) for at least 25% of the overall courses, as well as courses in different areas of Mathematics (Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Geometry, Probability, Statistics, Numerical Analysis, Optimization) for at least 33% of the overall courses.
The following tracks are available:
1. Computational Science and Engineering
2. Applied Statistics
3. Quantitative Finance

Eligible students must clearly specify the track they are applying for in their motivation letter.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Mathematical_Engineering.pdf
The Master of Science in Mathematical Engineering (MSME) aims to form an innovative and flexible professional profile, endowed with a wide spectrum of basic scientific notions and engineering principles, together with a deep knowledge of modern pure and applied mathematical techniques. MSME is characterized by a continuous synergy between Mathematics and Engineering methods, oriented to the modelling, analysis and solution of complex planning, control and management problems, and provides the students with the possibility to face problems from various scientific, financial and/or technological areas. The MSME graduates can find employment in Engineering companies specialized in handling complex computational problems, requiring a multidisciplinary knowledge; in companies manufacturing industrial goods for which design analysis based on the use of advanced mathematical procedures are required; in service societies, banks, insurance companies, finance or consultant agencies for the statistical interpretation and the simulation of complex situations related to the analysis of large number of data (e.g. management and optimization of services, data mining, information retrieval) or for handling financial products and risk management; in public and private institutions. The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

Three main tracks available:
1. Computational Science for Engineering
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; numerical and theoretical analysis for partial differential equations; fluid mechanics; computational fluid dynamics advanced programming techniques for scientific computing;

2. Statistics
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; stochastic dynamical models; applied statistics, model identification and data analysis; Bayesian statistics

3. Mathematical Finance
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; stochastic differential equations; mathematical finance; financial engineering; model identification and data analysis.

In the motivation letter the student must clearly specify the track he/she is applying for.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

Read less
The course is run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. Read more

The course is run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. It covers the following main areas:

  • quantum field theory, particle physics and string theory
  • theoretical condensed matter physics,
  • theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and physics of continuous media
  • mathematical foundations of theoretical physics

The course concentrates on the main areas of modern mathematical and theoretical physics: elementary-particle theory, including string theory, condensed matter theory (both quantum and soft matter), theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and the physics of continuous media (including fluid dynamics and related areas usually associated with courses in applied mathematics in the UK system). If you are a physics student with a strong interest in theoretical physics or a mathematics student keen to apply high-level mathematics to physical systems, this is a course for you.

The course offers considerable flexibility and choice; you will be able to choose a path reflecting your intellectual tastes or career choices. This arrangement caters to you if you prefer a broad theoretical education across subject areas or if you have already firmly set your sights on one of the subject areas, although you are encouraged to explore across sub-field boundaries.

You will have to attend at least ten units' worth of courses, with one unit corresponding to a 16-hour lecture course or equivalent. You can opt to offer a dissertation as part of your ten units. Your performance will be assessed by one or several of the following means: 

  • invigilated written exams
  • course work marked on a pass/fail basis
  • take-home exams
  • mini-projects due shortly after the end of the lecture course.

The modes of assessment for a given course are decided by the course lecturer and will be published at the beginning of each academic year. As a general rule, foundational courses will be offered with an invigilated exam while some of the more advanced courses will typically be relying on the other assessment methods mentioned above. In addition, you will be required to give an oral presentation towards the end of the academic year which will cover a more specialised and advanced topic related to one of the subject areas of the course. At least four of the ten units must be assessed by an invigilated exam and, therefore, have to be taken from lecture courses which provide this type of assessment. A further three units must be assessed by invigilated written exam, take-home exam or mini-project. Apart from these restrictions, you are free to choose from the available programme of lecture courses.

The course offers a substantial opportunity for independent study and research in the form of an optional dissertation (worth at least one unit). The dissertation is undertaken under the guidance of a member of staff and will typically involve investigating and write in a particular area of theoretical physics or mathematics, without the requirement (while not excluding the possibility) of obtaining original results.



Read less
Working at a frontier of mathematics that intersects with cutting edge research in physics. Mathematicians can benefit from discoveries in physics and conversely mathematics is essential to further excel in the field of physics. Read more
Working at a frontier of mathematics that intersects with cutting edge research in physics.

Mathematicians can benefit from discoveries in physics and conversely mathematics is essential to further excel in the field of physics. History shows us as much. Mathematical physics began with Christiaan Huygens, who is honoured at Radboud University by naming the main building of the Faculty of Science after him. By combining Euclidean geometry and preliminary versions of calculus, he brought major advances to these areas of mathematics as well as to mechanics and optics. The second and greatest mathematical physicist in history, Isaac Newton, invented both the calculus and what we now call Newtonian mechanics and, from his law of gravity, was the first to understand planetary motion on a mathematical basis.

Of course, in the Master’s specialisation in Mathematical Physics we look at modern mathematical physics. The specialisation combines expertise in areas like functional analysis, geometry, and representation theory with research in, for example, quantum physics and integrable systems. You’ll learn how the field is far more than creating mathematics in the service of physicists. It’s also about being inspired by physical phenomena and delving into pure mathematics.

At Radboud University, we have such faith in a multidisciplinary approach between these fields that we created a joint research institute: Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP). This unique collaboration has lead to exciting new insights into, for example, quantum gravity and noncommutative geometry. Students thinking of enrolling in this specialisation should be excellent mathematicians as well as have a true passion for physics.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/physics

Why study Mathematical Physics at Radboud University?

- This specialisation is one of the few Master’s in the world that lies in the heart of where mathematics and physics intersect and that examines their cross-fertilization.
- You’ll benefit from the closely related Mathematics Master’s specialisations at Radboud University in Algebra and Topology (and, if you like, also from the one in Applied Stochastics).
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your thesis supervisor.
- You partake in the Mastermath programme, meaning you can follow the best mathematics courses, regardless of the university in the Netherlands that offers them. It also allows you to interact with fellow mathematic students all over the country.
- As a Master’s student you’ll get the opportunity to work closely with the mathematicians and physicists of the entire IMAPP research institute.
- More than 85% of our graduates find a job or a gain a PhD position within a few months of graduating. About half of our PhD’s continue their academic careers.

Career prospects

Mathematicians are needed in all industries, including the industrial, banking, technology and service industry and also within management, consultancy and education. A Master’s in Mathematics will show prospective employers that you have perseverance, patience and an eye for detail as well as a high level of analytical and problem-solving skills.

Job positions

The skills learned during your Master’s will help you find jobs even in areas where your specialised mathematical knowledge may initially not seem very relevant. This makes your job opportunities very broad indeed and is why many graduates of a Master’s in Mathematics find work very quickly.
Possible careers for mathematicians include:
- Researcher (at research centres or within corporations)
- Teacher (at all levels from middle school to university)
- Risk model validator
- Consultant
- ICT developer / software developer
- Policy maker
- Analyst

PhD positions

Radboud University annually has a few PhD positions for graduates of a Master’s in Mathematics. A substantial part of our students attain PhD positions, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our research in this field

The research of members of the Mathematical Physics Department, emphasise operator algebras and noncommutative geometry, Lie theory and representation theory, integrable systems, and quantum field theory. Below, a small sample of the research our members pursue.

Gert Heckman's research concerns algebraic geometry, group theory and symplectic geometry. His work in algebraic geometry and group theory concerns the study of particular ball quotients for complex hyperbolic reflection groups. Basic questions are an interpretation of these ball quotients as images of period maps on certain algebraic geometric moduli spaces. Partial steps have been taken towards a conjecture of Daniel Allcock, linking these ball quotients to certain finite almost simple groups, some even sporadic like the bimonster group.

Erik Koelink's research is focused on the theory of quantum groups, especially at the level of operator algebras, its representation theory and its connections with special functions and integrable systems. Many aspects of the representation theory of quantum groups are motivated by related questions and problems of a group representation theoretical nature.

Klaas Landsman's previous research programme in noncommutative geometry, groupoids, quantisation theory, and the foundations of quantum mechanics (supported from 2002-2008 by a Pioneer grant from NWO), led to two major new research lines:
1. The use of topos theory in clarifying the logical structure of quantum theory, with potential applications to quantum computation as well as to foundational questions.
2. Emergence with applications to the Higgs mechanism and to Schroedinger's Cat (aka as the measurement problem). A first paper in this direction with third year Honours student Robin Reuvers (2013) generated worldwide attention and led to a new collaboration with experimental physicists Andrew Briggs and Andrew Steane at Oxford and philosopher Hans Halvorson at Princeton.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/physics

Read less
The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. Read more

Mission and goals

The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. The educational programme, therefore, gives emphasis to topics referring to energy applications, i.e. fission and fusion plants, nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Topics applied also in non-energy applications are accounted for, as in medical and industrial applications of radiation, material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to the nuclear field.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Career opportunities

The graduates in Nuclear Engineering, thanks to the MSc multidisciplinary training, can easily be employed in the nuclear sector (e.g. industries operating in nuclear power plants design, construction and operation, in nuclear decommissioning and nuclear waste processing and disposal, in design and construction of radiation sources, in centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), as well as in other areas such as the energy industry, the medical sector, the health, safety and environment sector (e.g. engineering companies, hospitals, consultancy and risk analysis firms) and also research centers and universities.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Nuclear_Engineering.pdf
In this Course emphasis is given to energetic applications, e.g. those referring to fission and fusion plants, the nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Also nonenergetic applications are accounted for, i.e. medical and industrial applications of radiation; radiation detection and measurements; nuclear electronics for radiation detection; radiochemistry; radiation protection and material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to their impact in the nuclear field. Graduates in Nuclear Engineering can find employment not only in the nuclear sector (industries operating in electro-nuclear power generation, nuclear plant dismantling, nuclear waste processing and disposal, design and construction of radiation sources, institutes and centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), but also in other areas operating in the field of hightechnology, engineering companies, companies for industrial, medical and engineering advice, hospitals, companies for risk analysis, etc.

Subjects

1st year subjects
Fission reactor physics, nuclear measurements and instrumentation, nuclear plants, nuclear and industrial electronics, reliability safety and risk analysis, solid state physics.

2nd year subjects (subjects differentiated by three specializations)
- Nuclear plants
Nuclear technology and design, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear Material Physics. Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport, Statistical Physics.

- Nuclear Technology
Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear technology and design, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

- Physics for Nuclear Systems
Subjects: Nuclear technology and design, Nuclear Material Physics, Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

Read less
Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects. Read more
Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects .

Would you rather specialise in pure physics or discover the interface between physics and astronomy, mathematics, chemistry or biology? The choice is yours. At Radboud University, you can choose from six specialisations and within each specialisation you’ll have plenty of room to customise your programme. We guarantee the highest quality for all specialisation programmes, resulting in number one rates by the Dutch ‘Keuzegids Masters’ for three years running.

In your internship(s), you can dive into theoretical physics or perform your own experiments: discover new material properties in Europe’s highest magnetic fields or with unique free electron lasers, study space objects with the telescopes on top of the Huygens Building or unravel brain activity with MRIs. It’s all possible on the Radboud campus. That’s why many international physicists come here to perform their experiments. Take Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, who revealed the amazing properties of graphene in our High Field Magnet Laboratory. In 2010, they received the Nobel Prize in Physics for those discoveries.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

Specialisations of Physics and Astronomy

- Particle and Astrophysics
In this Master’s specialisation you’ll unravel questions like: What are the most elementary particles that the universe consists of? What did our universe look like in the earliest stages of its existence? And how will it evolve? One of the topics is the Higgs particle, which is partially a Nijmegen discovery.

- Physics of Molecules and Materials
This specialisation focuses on the structure and properties of materials. You’ll work at the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum and classical physics, which is of great importance for designing next-generation materials and devices.

- Neuroscience
In this specialisation you’ll use your physics background to understand the communication between neurons in the brain. This fundamental knowledge can be applied in all kinds of devices, including hearing aids or Google glasses.

- Science in Society
This specialisation will equip you with the tools and skills to become a professional intermediary between science and society. You’ll learn to analyse (governmental) science communication and connect scientific knowledge with divergent perspectives and interests of various stakeholders.

- Science, Management and Innovation
This specialisation will teach you what is happening in the world of business and public administration, how innovation is managed in company strategies, how government designs policy and how that interacts with societal challenges.

- Science and Education (in Dutch)
Do you want to become a secondary school teacher in the Netherlands? In this Dutch-taught specialisation you’ll get the necessary didactic background and extensive experience in the classroom.

Why study Physics and Astronomy at Radboud University?

- It’s the best Master’s programme of its kind in the Netherlands, according to the Keuzegids Masters.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your internship supervisor.
- We have a multidisciplinary approach: you not only can specialise in Physics, but also in astrophysics, biophysics, mathematical physics, chemical physics or materials science.
- You’ll spend one year on research, and thus get an extensive experience in scientific methods.
- Radboud University hosts multiple state-of-the-art research facilities, such as the High Field Magnet Laboratory , FELIX laser laboratory, Nanolab and neuroimaging facilities (MRI, MEG, EEG, TMS). We also participate in the LHC particle accelerator in Geneva, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina and various other large-scale research projects.
- On average, our graduates find a job within 2 months after graduating. A majority of these jobs are PhD positions at universities in the Netherlands and abroad.

Quality label

For the third time in a row, this programme was rated number one in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

All specialisations of this Master’s programme are an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university, at an institute or at a company. However, many of our students end up in other business or government positions as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Think in an abstract way
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments

PhD positions

If you would like to have a career in science, it’s possible to apply for a PhD position at Radboud University. Of course, you can also apply at any other university anywhere in the world.

Positions in business or governmental organisations

To get an idea the various career opportunities, a sample of jobs performed by our alumni:
- Actuarial trainee at Talent & Pro
- Consultant at Accenture
- ECO Operations Manager at Ofgem
- Scientist at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research
- Technology strategy Manager at Accenture
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

Read less
Do you already have an academic bachelor’s degree in another scientific field and do you want to pursue your academic career in the field of Computer Science?… Read more
Do you already have an academic bachelor’s degree in another scientific field and do you want to pursue your academic career in the field of Computer Science? Then the master’s in Applied Computer Sciences is the programme you’re looking for! It is organised in such a way to accommodate your scientific background and future-oriented academic interests – developing the necessary Computer Science skills by complementing your primary field of expertise. Above all that, we offer a wide variety of highly specialised elective courses.

Approach

The first year of the programme focuses on developing knowledge of computer science concepts and techniques, with respect to the earlier studies. Lectures address both hardware and software. Elective courses in the second year allow applying the skills established in the first year, in a specialization, such as software development, telecommunications, multimedia, numeric engineering, bioinformatics, or robotics, as well as many other possibilities. Practical sessions and a master's thesis are also built into the study program.

 All areas of computer science are covered
The programme offers lectures in all traditional areas of the computer science and also in more specialized fields like software engineering, embedded systems, web design, telecommunications, multimedia, bioinformatics, robotics and many other subjects.

 Adaptable to your background and field of interest
Since Computer Science has become a diffuse area, we decided to organize this programme in a way that it can be adapted to the background and the field of interest of the student. Students start with a number of courses (depending on their background) summarizing the basic concepts in order to gain enough knowledge to be able to take elective courses and to make a master thesis in their field of interest. All this happens in an academic environment where research is done in all topics with great interaction among the researchers and large involvement of the students.

Joint organisation of two departments provides wide range of research topics
Two departments, the Department of Computer Science in the Faculty of Science and the Department of Electronics and Informatics in the Faculty of Engineering, jointly organise the Master programmes. Together, they have more than 200 researchers who cover a wide range of research topics.

Learning outcomes

During the two master years students are able to continue to build on the broad ranging basic scientific knowledge acquired as part of their Bachelor programme, complemented with the Information Technology profile, combining a multidisciplinary engineering training with an in-depth specialisation in Applied Computer Science.

The Master of Science in Applied Sciences and Engineering : Applied Computer Science programme is designed to train young people who are capable of making an effective contribution to the conception, realisation and coaching of projects of scientific and/or technological scope for the benefit of the fast-changing world we live in.

Curriculum

Available on http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/applied-sciences-and-engineering-applied-computer-science/programme

Admission requirements

Applicants should have at least a bachelor degree in one of the following areas:
- Engineering
- Mathematics
- Geography/Geology
- Biology/ Biochemistry/ Biotechnology/ Chemsitry
- Economics
- Physics
Students holding a Bachelor’s or Master's degree in another field of the exact sciences or engineering can also apply.

Read less
The Physics department at the University of Groningen has a long-standing tradition of high-level research, with the highlight the Nobel Prize awarded to Frits Zernike in 1953. Read more
The Physics department at the University of Groningen has a long-standing tradition of high-level research, with the highlight the Nobel Prize awarded to Frits Zernike in 1953.

The Physics department offers a Master's degree programme which is open to (foreign) students who already have a solid background in physics and are eager to expand their knowledge and experience in an environment of modern physics research. The goal of the Master's degree programme in Physics is to train excellent researchers in the field of materials science, subatomic physics, isotope physics or theoretical physics.

The programme offers the following specialisations:
* Quantum Universe
* Advanced Materials

In the second year of your training you conduct a major research project matching the field of your specialisation.

Why in Groningen?

- Wide spectrum of high-level research in Physics and related sciences
- Physics field in Groningen has CHE Excellence Label
- Our Materials Science Research ranks 4th in the THES world's Top 10 institutes in material science

Job perspectives

The Master's programme in Physics is primarily meant for students who want to become researchers. Most graduates will proceed with a PhD research project after their Master's programme, either in Groningen or elsewhere. Nevertheless, many physicists who have trained as researchers will find jobs that are less explicitly oriented towards research. This is because training as a researcher in physics also develops general competences that make graduates highly versatile.

During the Master's degree programme, teamwork, communication and presentation are important qualities. In many cases considerable IT skills are developed. In practice, physics graduates can be found in consultancy firms, in process management, in commercial positions, in financial jobs or as teachers.

Job examples

- PhD research position
- Consultant
- Process manager
- Teacher
- Financial jobs

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X