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Masters Degrees (Applied Human Rights)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Environmental changes, ageing populations, the media and new technologies, asylum and migration, intergenerational justice, complex multilevel governance arrangements, the impact of trade and investment, poverty and inequalities, the rise of identity politics and the changing nature of the personal sphere are contemporary global challenges facing human rights calling into question the fundamental tenets of human rights law both in terms of its formulation and implementation through policy development and law-making.

Differentiated from existing LLMs, the LLM Human Rights explicitly focuses on these contemporary challenges and how best to respond to them though law, policy and practice. The Human Rights programme draws on the research strengths in the College of Law and Criminology, but also from other colleges, in its teaching; and, exploits strong relationships with external partners to integrate a distinctive applied focus to the Human Rights programme.

Key Features

Students pursuing the LLM Human Rights will benefit from a programme designed around high calibre research and impact in human rights. Human Rights students will also benefit from academics' strong relationships with external partners working in the field of human rights, giving the programme a distinctive approach centred on the implementation and application of human rights.

The focus on implementation and practice in human rights is complemented by a multidisciplinary approach. Human rights policy and practice often do not recognise disciplinary divides. The Human Rights programme allows students to experience teaching from other disciplines to enhance their knowledge and understanding of human rights as an integrated project (e.g. politics and international development).

Uniquely the Human Rights programme addresses diverse challenges in human rights faced by law and policy, and by practitioners at the global, regional, State and sub-State levels. The approach focuses on how these challenges might be effectively managed through law and policy. The Human Rights programme offers:

- The opportunity and choice to address a range of human rights topics and challenges across a number of thematic areas, with teaching by expert researchers in the field.
- A multidisciplinary approach reflecting the reality of human rights in practice.
- A practical and practice focused philosophy.

Modules

The LLM Human Rights is a modular programme, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts:

Part I consists of 3 taught modules, each 20 credits. Students will be required to undertake 2 compulsory modules, these are: International Human Rights Law and Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention. Students are also required to select 1 further optional 20 credit taught module from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Part II gives students a choice of 3 optional modules, each 20 credits, from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Students of LLM in Human Rights are also required to undertake a dissertation, which contributes 60 credits.

The following are examples of modules offered to Human Rights students (modules available for selection will be dependent on contingencies, e.g. whether a module leader is in study leave).

Human Rights and Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability
Trade, Investment and Human Rights
Human Rights and the Media
Human Rights and Family Law
Human Rights and Identities
Accountability for Human Rights Implementation
Impact Assessment and Human Rights
Children’s Human Rights
Human Rights and Poverty
Human Rights, Migration and Human Trafficking
Human Rights and Criminal Justice
Human Rights and Terrorism on-line
Human Rights and Medical Law
Human Rights and Employment

Extra-curricular Activities

Throughout their studies Human Rights students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities to enhance their practical understanding of human rights. These include:

Guest lectures by expert practitioners in human rights.

Workplace learning through voluntary work and/or placement.
Involvement in collaborative research projects with research partners.
Engagement with the College’s projects focussed on practical implementation and impact from research (e.g. Cyberterrorism Project, Wales Observatory, Centre for Environment, and the Sex Work Consortium).

Careers and Employability

The LLM Human Rights will open the door to a range of careers, including:

- Human rights institutions: increasingly international and regional human rights institutions are seeking to support, monitor and influence State policy and social arrangements. Potential graduate destinations include: the United Nations and the Council of Europe as well as other regional institutions.
- The public sector, including government at all levels. Potential graduate destinations include: civil service, regional, national and sub-national government, local authorities and other public bodies, and, political and policy advice work.
- The private sector: human rights are increasingly the concern of the private sector in the realm of socially responsible capitalism. Potential graduate destinations include: global business (including institutions such as the World Bank); the business sector (from large scale business such as the banking sector, to smaller concerns seeking to appeal to the ethical consumer).
- The NGO sector: non-governmental agencies are well-established stakeholders in human rights. Potential graduate destinations include: international NGOS (e.g. UNICEF); regional or local level NGOS.
- Research and academia: research on human rights is a well-established concern for academia.

The LLM Human Rights enhances student employability as:

- The Human Rights programme ranges across a broad spectrum of human rights topics relevant to law, policy and practice and encourages a practical approach in these areas.
- Students will have the opportunity to engage with projects providing opportunity for hands-on experience of human rights research as well as dissemination to support practical application.
- The Human Rights programme offers a range of work place learning opportunities.
- Entrepreneurial skills will be developed by encouraging students to contribute ideas to project work and project activities.

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. Read more
This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. It also offers international human rights practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge and further develop intellectual and critical skills.

Key features of the course include opportunities to:
-Develop a multidisciplinary understanding of human rights and social justice as they exist today in theory, policy and practice.
-Develop an understanding of how human rights organisations work in theory and practice.
-Engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Cluster and the Department of Law and Criminology.
-Complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights.
-Learn from experienced practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations.

The MA Applied Human Rights combines a robust academic and intellectual learning environment covering law, politics, criminology and and social science with first-hand opportunity of experiencing how human rights organisations work in theory and practice. This course addresses the implications of global changes for human rights practitioners.

During the course you investigate contemporary local and global human rights topics, including:
-Gender violence.
-Children as soldiers.
-Radicalisation and counter-terrorism.
-Deaths in custody.
-Refugees and asylum seekers.
-Global security.
-Torture.
-Poverty.

You also gain the experience and skills needed to carry out in-depth case studies on key contemporary challenges to the human rights regime.

A unique opportunity available on this course is being able to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects, public events, case reviews, seminars and workshops.

Throughout your studies you develop a range of intellectual, conceptual and practical skills by analysing complex material and communicating the findings in clear, concise and accessible language. These transferable skills help you develop knowledge of human rights in an applied context. This gives you a sound basis for a career in many areas of human rights policy and practice.

You also learn through guest speakers (previous guest speakers include Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips) how human rights principles are applied in practical situations, to inform responses to a particular social problem. In addition, we have experts working on various human rights projects (such those for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Council, United Nations, Amnesty and Clarion Global) providing real world case studies to provide a strong applied flavour to the course.

You can complete a dissertation which can be based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest, or can choose to plan and take part in a project on human rights.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/ma-applied-human-rights

Course structure

Full time – 1 year. Part time – 2 years. Starts September.

Modules
-Human rights in the 21st century
-Advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice
-Principles of human rights and social justice
-Researching human rights
-Project management for human rights
-Dissertation

Assessment: essays, reports, case studies, dissertation.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS 6.5 score with a minimum of 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other skill areas or equivalent. If your English language skill is currently below IELTS 6.5 we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English score.

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The course is aimed at law graduates wanting to work in the field of human rights as legal practitioners, policy or development work or as human rights advocates. Read more
The course is aimed at law graduates wanting to work in the field of human rights as legal practitioners, policy or development work or as human rights advocates. It provides students with the legal human rights attributes to work locally or internationally.

During the course you cover:
-Human rights law
-Conventions
-Policy and theory
-Principles of human rights and social justice
-Advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice
-Legal scholarship in human rights
-Project management for human rights (optional)

You gain skills in:
-Legal application and understanding of human rights principles and law.
-Critical appraisal of human rights legalisation in the UK and internationally.
-Problem solving.
-Practical application and realisation of human rights in practice.

Key features of the course include opportunities to:
-Develop a comprehensive understanding of the relevant legal, policy and social contexts in which human rights legislation operates.
-Develop an understanding of how human rights organisations ensure legal practice.
-Engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice, and Social-Legal Research Clusters and the Department of Law and Criminology.
-Complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights.
-Learn from experienced lawyers, practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations.

You also benefit from:
-The unique opportunity to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects/event, case reviews, seminars and workshops.
-High profile guest speakers who work in the real world of human rights principles, with past speakers including Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips.
-Input from leading human rights organisations allow you to meet leading human rights practitioners and defenders and to find out about their work.
-Opportunities to organise human rights events.
-Real world case studies and application.
-The opportunity to undertake in-depth work with a human rights organisation and obtain real world experience.
-Links to international partners and projects.

You can also complete a dissertation based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/llm-applied-human-rights

Course structure

Full time – 1 year. Starts September.

Modules
-Human rights in the 21st century
-Principles of human rights and social justice
-Advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice
-Legal scholarship for human rights
-Dissertation
-Project management for human rights

Assessment: case studies; reports; essay; presentation; dissertation.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Extended MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of Extended MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Development and Human Rights is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Development and Human Rights is the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Human Rights in the College of Law at the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). The Department of Political Science was established in 1915 and is the only Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) Center of Excellence in Political Science in the Philippines. The College of Law admitted its first students in 1911 and a century after it was founded, the College of Law can point to its alumni in the highest positions of the government: Four became President of the Philippines and thirteen served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The University of the Philippines is the country’s national university, with UPD its biggest campus and the physical seat of its Administration. UPD occupies 493 hectares of prime land in Quezon City, it has in excess of 25,000 students and the library resources are the largest in the country.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The full-time Development and Human Rights course structure is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in (part one) and then a dissertation over the summer (part two).

Development and Human Rights students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of their choosing.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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This course examines the human rights actors, activities and mechanisms used to define and protect human rights. A key concept is the role of practitioners/activists in the field. Read more
This course examines the human rights actors, activities and mechanisms used to define and protect human rights. A key concept is the role of practitioners/activists in the field. The course deals with political developments in the UK, in Europe and internationally, and explores the extent to which human rights are enshrined in and supported by deeper politics and culture, and by institutions, structures, movements and values.

Key features
You will benefit from exceptional teaching by enthusiastic human rights specialists and will acquire essential practical skills required in the field, eg advanced research training, campaign design and impact evaluation. You will also be supported in preparing your dissertation, in which you will research an area of interest in depth.

You will have the opportunity to arrange a placement in a human rights organisation, increasing your employability in the field.
Lively discussion is encouraged, with visiting speakers, leading academics and figures from human rights and international organisations contributing to the debate.

What will you study?

You will look at the actors and activities involved in the protection of human rights. Integral to your study are explorations of who these actors are (campaigning movements, pressure groups, nation states, international and transnational organisations) and what their contributions can be to the development and securing of human rights.

You will analyse current international situations and relations between states and non-state actors where conflicts have resulted in considerable violations of rights, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of international human rights mechanisms.

You will investigate the challenges and demands that arise from the continual and growing movements of peoples, refugees, asylum seekers and migrants as they flee conflicts and disasters, seeking realisation of their fundamental rights.

Assessment

Essays, reports, project work, presentations, dissertation or applied research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Dissertation
-Human Rights: Architectures, Actors, Activism
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal
-Strategies for Achieving Human Rights

Optional modules
-Conflict Theory and Resolution
-Contemporary Issues and Case Studies in Security and Conflict
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-From State to Global Politics
-Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations
-Working within the Human Rights Movement

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The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. Read more
The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. It meets the increasing demand for a postgraduate qualification in Children's Rights, explicitly focused on interdisciplinary research and child rights-based research methods, delivered flexibly through a blended format of online and face-to-face learning.

The aim of the MSc Children's Rights is to provide high-level knowledge and skills in children's rights law and practice of value to those working with and for children, including public officials and NGOs as well as educators, social workers and health care providers.

The programme is linked to the Centre for Children’s Rights, an innovative inter-disciplinary centre with an international reputation for advancing understanding of children’s rights, promoting children’s participation and developing children’s rights-based research methods. This new and unique MSc incorportates the Centre's expertise and will develop students’ knowledge and skills in two distinct but interconnected areas:

- Children’s Rights - using the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international standards to evaluate the laws, policies and practices which affect children.
- Research with Children - evaluating the best methods of conducting research into children’s lives with a particular focus on approaches which involve children actively in the research process. The CCR has a particular expertise in relation to children’s rights-based research.

The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide students with a thorough grounding in these two areas and the opportunity to explore a range of contexts in which these perspectives can be used to better understand children’s lives and secure improved outcomes for children. Professionals will have the opportunity to improve aspects of their practice and career development.

The Centre for Children’s Rights has extensive links with Northern Ireland charities and NGOs and can provide some opportunities for students to undertake relevant research. This may be of particular interest to students seeking to gain experience in the children’s sector, perhaps to secure a job or to change position. The Centre has a vibrant community of students undertaking PhD research in a range of issues and in several countries. The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide a good foundation for students wishing to pursue their own research through doctoral study.

Why Choose Children's Rights at Queen's?

◦As a prestigious Russell Group University, Queen’s is ranked 8th within the UK in relation to research intensity;
◦Education at Queen’s has been ranked 4th within the UK in relation to research intensity with 87% of the research undertaken within the School assessed as ‘internationally excellent or world leading’ (REF, 2014);
◦The programme features input from leading international children’s rights scholars;
◦There will be some opportunities available to develop advanced workplace skills by collaborating with community organisations to undertake research to help them improve their services for children and young people;
◦The programme incorporates the Centre for Children's Rights expertise in interdisciplinary work and rights-based approaches to research methods. This will empower students to undertake research with children and young people in a range of contexts;
◦The programme is part of an innovative university wide initiative ‘Improving Children’s Lives’ which will give students access to interdisciplinary research and education which aim to improve the quality of life for children in Northern Ireland and beyond;
◦The interdisciplinary nature of the programme reflects the real-life practices of many child-related services;
◦If you don’t want, or need, to study for the research dissertation, flexible exit awards are available (PG Diploma/ PG Certificate);
◦You may also undertake individual course modules without completing a full degree.

“The best thing about studying children’s rights at Queen’s is that it provides you with the opportunity to reflect on your professional practice with academics who are leaders in their field. This has equipped me to return to my workplace and be a better informed and more analytical practitioner. I have taken the learning from this course and applied it directly into my professional practice with positive outcomes for service users and colleagues. It is the sort of training that has given me the confidence and skills to go further and make a real difference." Gerry Marshall (Children’s Services Inspector)

Programme Content

The award of MSc requires the accumulation of 120 credit points from the taught modules and a 15,000-20,000 word dissertation, equivalent to 60 credit points. Modules include:

Core modules

Childhood and Youth Research in Practice
Children's Rights
Children's Rights-Based Research Methods
Perspectives on Childhood and Youth
Research Methods

Optional modules

Childhood Adversity
Children's Rights and Disability
Children's Rights and Education
Children's Rights and Health
Children's Rights and Social Care
Children's Rights; Philosophical Approaches
Qualitative Research in Childhood and Youth
Quantitative Research in Childhood and Youth

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods eg multiple choice exam, essays, project reports, and contributions to an online forum. Students will have the option of undertaking research work for external organisations to submit as part of their dissertation.

Opportunities for Careers

There is increasing demand for postgraduates with high-level skills in interdisciplinary research, participatory research methods and knowledge of children's rights.

Professionals within children/human rights-focused NGOs, public officials, educators, social workers and health professionals who work with children should find this degree beneficial.

Special Features

Flexibility: this programme is designed to meet the needs of local and international professionals and is delivered via blended and online learning.

Choice: there are several entry and exit points to this programme, please see School website.

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The programme takes a multidisciplinary approach to human rights and values, drawing on political theory, law, philosophy, theology, international relations and ethics. Read more
The programme takes a multidisciplinary approach to human rights and values, drawing on political theory, law, philosophy, theology, international relations and ethics.

It allows you to approach the issue from a broad perspective and in the context of global ethics.

The programme provides solid research training and contributes to the professional development of NGO personnel and those working in the public and private sector. It is also suitable if you are a graduate or if you want to go onto further research, such as a PhD, in this area.

Taught by experts – You will study alongside some of the finest minds in Philosophy. We are ranked second among all Philosophy departments in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.

Placement module – gain hands on experience by exploring the practice of global ethics by undertaking a placement in an organisation of your choice, such as a Non-Government Organisation (NGO) or policy-making organisation. Previous students have enjoyed placements with Oxfam, development NGOs in Tanzania and UK-based Human Rights and activist organisations.

Friendly and relaxed atmosphere – staff within the Department of Philosophy know students by name and are always happy to talk through work and provide additional feedback on academic performance.

Small classes – teaching on the masters-level modules involve mainly small-group seminars allowing you to really get to grips with the learning material.

Be a part of an active postgraduate community – you will join a lively and stimulating Department where you can contribute to on-going research activities, including research seminars and events such as our weekly speaker series and various workshops, reading groups and conferences throughout the year.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation enables you to examine human rights protection at the national, regional and international levels. It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments. It is also suited to those who want to develop a human rights practice in a domestic law context.

Students studying human rights are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL) at Kent. These include workshops, trips to international courts and tribunals, and guest lecture series.

Students taking this specialisation can choose to spend one term at our Canterbury campus and one at our Brussels centre (returning to their primary location to complete the dissertation) under our split-site option for this programme. The split site option is charged at a different rate. Please see under Fees below for more information.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/117/human-rights-law

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW871 Policing

LW843 International Criminal Law

LW922 Labour Rights in a Global Economy

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

LW925 Cultural Heritage Law

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme draws upon Birmingham Law School's research strengths in International Law, International Humanitarian Law, Criminal Law and Justice, and Human Rights, enabling students to develop expertise in a wide range of relevant International law subjects. Read more
This programme draws upon Birmingham Law School's research strengths in International Law, International Humanitarian Law, Criminal Law and Justice, and Human Rights, enabling students to develop expertise in a wide range of relevant International law subjects.

Students can study modules in international, transnational and European criminal law and justice alongside more nationally rooted specialisms and a breadth of human rights modules. Through our long-standing dedicated counter-terrorism modules, and those focusing upon specific theoretical or practical criminal justice issues (ranging from restorative justice to mentally disordered offenders) as well as our specialist human rights modules, we offer our students a unique opportunity for broad study and in-depth specialisation.

For those seeking a deeper understanding of the increasingly global structures which govern criminal justice as well as the finer issues challenging criminal justice structures, this course offers a unique learning opportunity and is an excellent choice for those seeking legal opportunities around the world.

In our research at Birmingham Law School we increasingly encounter the challenges of internationalised legal problems, regionalised or globalised criminal justice intervention and enforcement and the severe challenges posed to human rights by them. In developing this course we set out to encourage students to explore these with us.

Alongside the intellectual challenge, we also recognise a distinct increase in employment opportunities arising beyond the traditional jurisdictions of lawyers, let alone criminal justice professionals. By undertaking a combination of the modules available on this programme, our students will become uniquely knowledgeable of dynamic, vital and growing aspects of international law theory and practice.

About the Birmingham Law School

Birmingham Law School has a long tradition of producing cutting-edge research that has real-world impact and informs the challenging and exciting learning environment our students experience. As a community of world-leading scholars, teachers and students, Birmingham Law School continues to make an important contribution to our understanding, teaching, and practice of law. In 2016 it was named as one of the world’s Top 100 law schools in the QS World Rankings.

We provide an expansive range of programmes, for both undergraduate and postgraduate studies and employ a range of approaches in our teaching and our research, from the theoretical and doctrinal to the empirical and applied. Our research is recognised on a global stage, and our academics are frequent participants in legal debates and contribute to the policy-making process.

We provide students with more than just a degree, and enable them to develop the skills required to enhance their employability. Our Centre for Professional Legal Education and Research (CEPLER) presents our students with opportunities to increase their knowledge of law in action through Pro Bono and Mooting as well as the 50+ legal specific career events CEPLER organises annually. CEPLERs work is one of the many things that have led to Birmingham being recognised as the University of the Year for Graduate Employability in the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk


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The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy. Read more
The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy.

About the programme

The MSc provides you with applied and transferable social science research skills to better understand the complexities of society, the role of multiple organisations (‘actors’) in governance systems, and disciplinespecific expertise.

The programme is interdisciplinary and employability is a major theme of the MSc subject pathways so as to equip you with key applied skills for the graduate job market. Intensive workshops are delivered primarily by academic experts, with input from practitioners and non-academic specialists.

You can study for the MSc in Applied Social Science, by choosing optional modules across pathways, or opt for a specialist named degree, as follows:

- Applied Psychology:
Gives you the skills to research and examine human behaviour in various social settings i.e. education, healthcare and the workplace.

- Civil Society and Public Affairs:
Provides you with an advanced understanding of the relationship between civil society, the institutions of multi-level governance and the policymaking environment.

- Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
Gain the skills and understanding of criminal justice and youth violence to research and navigate the causes of crime and strategies for tackling criminal activity.

- Global Social Work and Social Policy:
Provides social workers, community workers and voluntary sector workers with opportunities to engage with the most innovative social work and social policy throughout the world.

Your learning

You will study core and specialist modules. Core modules include:
• Social Research Today
• Contemporary Social Issues
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

Students of the generic Applied Social Science course can also study three specialist electives.
For students studying for the various named degrees, specialist modules offered include:

Applied Psychology:
• Psychology Applied to Public Health
• Psychology in the Workplace
• Psychology Applied to Education

Civil Society and Public Affairs:
• Theories of State and Civil Society
• Politics, Power and Civil Society
• Policy and Practice

Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
• Philosophy of Crime and Justice
• Policing; Youth Violence
• Policy and Practice

Global Social Work and Social Policy:
• Comparative Social Policy
• Social Work in a Global Context; Migration and Human Rights
• Policy and Practice

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates find careers in various specialist roles particularly related to research, campaigning and advocacy across public, private, voluntary and charity sectors. Part-time students may already be working in roles related to the specialist study areas and use the MSc for career advancement.

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

Note: This named degree will only run in 2016 if MSc Policy Analysis and Global Governance is not validated for 2016 entry.

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The Master Governance and Human Rights empowers students in their critical understanding and the tools required to assess and apply legal and political governance theories and human rights norms and standards. Read more
The Master Governance and Human Rights empowers students in their critical understanding and the tools required to assess and apply legal and political governance theories and human rights norms and standards. Students will apply good governance tools in order to establish, implement and protect human rights through applied project learning.
The Master program is a 2 years distance-learning program with 3 classroom sessions for 2 weeks each in Berlin and Lüneburg. Students will be supported by an online tutor who will answer academic questions, support the students during the learning process and will try to stimulate and moderate online discussions.

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Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology. Read more
Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology.

You gain an interdisciplinary understanding of the origins and functions of human behaviour and can select from a range of advanced topics such as evolutionary anthropology, primatology, human behaviour, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and intergroup relationships.

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad fields and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication-ready journal article. The MSc in Evolution and Human Behaviour is a perfect foundation for PhD research: it provides theoretical background, discipline specific knowledge and advanced, quantitative research methods.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/190/evolution-and-human-behaviour

Why study with us?

- A unique, interdisciplinary, combination of Evolutionary Anthropology and Psychology.

- Taught by expert, active researchers in evolutionary approaches to understanding behaviour.

- Select from a range of advanced topics such as Evolutionary Anthropology, Primatology, Human Behaviour, Developmental Psychology & Cognitive Neuroscience.

- Perfect foundation for future PhD research: theoretical background, discipline-specific knowledge and advanced research methods.

- For students with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology or a related discipline.

- A research component that results in a publication-ready journal article.

Course structure

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad field and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication ready journal article.

Modules

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

SE992 - Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Anthropology (15 credits)
SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SE993 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (15 credits)
SE994 - Advanced Topics in HUman Behaviour (15 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP856 - Groups and Teams in Organisations (15 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)
SE855 - Research Project (Evolution & Human Behaviour) (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by computing tests, unseen examinations, coursework and a project report.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for advanced study of human behaviour from an evolutionary perspective, combining approaches from both evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary psychology

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as an evolutionary scientist

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course aims to provide an understanding of the forces of global politics and to develop the skills needed to actively engage in the academic and professional discussions that are shaping the contemporary international agenda. Read more
This course aims to provide an understanding of the forces of global politics and to develop the skills needed to actively engage in the academic and professional discussions that are shaping the contemporary international agenda. With a particular focus on human rights and international conflict, it strikes a careful balance between the theoretical and practical elements of the study of international relations.

Key features
-The course draws extensively on the highly acclaimed academics and experts of human rights and international conflict teaching from within the University.
-You can specialise in the subfields of international political economy, conflict or security and human rights. The wide choice of option modules enables you to tailor the course to your interests.
-Our year-long (30-credit) modules provide increased contact time with academic staff. In addition, you will be fully supported in developing postgraduate academic skills and preparing your dissertation, which allows you to research an area of interest in depth.
-Lively discussion is encouraged, with visiting speakers, leading academics and figures from human rights and international organisations.

What will you study?

You will explore the development of international relations and the key ideas that have shaped our understanding of the modern system. You will learn about actors and institutions such as the United Nations, the United States and the European Union, and you will study theoretical and policy debates concerning globalisation and underdevelopment.

You will investigate a country's financial flows, trade and investment, and will have the opportunity to take an in-depth look at issues of human rights and international conflict. Your dissertation will enable you to study an area of interest in depth. Alternatively, you can pursue an applied research project based on your work placement.

Assessment

Seminar presentation, essay or equivalent study, and dissertation/applied research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Dissertation
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations

Optional modules
-Conflict Theory and Resolution
-Contemporary Issues and Case Studies in Security and Conflict
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-From State to Global Politics
-Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
-Human Rights: Architectures, Actors, Activism
-International Political Economy: Capitalism, Imperialism and the State
-Strategies for Achieving Human Rights
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights

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