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Masters Degrees (Applied Criminology)

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The MSt in Applied Criminology and Police Management is designed to provide training for senior police officers in the study of crime and harm-reduction issues, with a strong emphasis on evidence-based policy and practice. Read more
The MSt in Applied Criminology and Police Management is designed to provide training for senior police officers in the study of crime and harm-reduction issues, with a strong emphasis on evidence-based policy and practice.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-applied-criminology-and-police-management

Course detail

Aims:

- To offer an up-to-date and high-quality course, introducing senior police officers and suitably qualified others to some of the most important theory and research in applied criminology and policing management.
- To develop the skills necessary to locate, interpret and analyse research and other relevant source materials.
- To develop the conceptual understanding necessary to evaluate research methods and findings.
- To facilitate course members in communicating the results of their ideas, research and its conclusions in a written form, as well as orally.
- To enhance the capacity of course members to apply current research in applied criminology and police management to aspects of their work.

Format

The programme is a part-time course that takes place over two years starting in the spring. There are normally three two-week residential teaching blocks in the first year: Block A (March/April), Block B (July) and Block C (September).

The residential teaching blocks incorporate four key modules:

- Criminological Theory
- Evidence Based Policing
- Leadership and Management
- Research Methods

The modules cover a range of topics and use a range of delivery styles including seminars, lectures, symposia, practical exercises and project work. Reading lists are provided for each session, giving required and suggested further reading.

- Lectures, seminars and classes: 47 hours per term (first year)
- Small group teaching: 2 hours per term
- Supervision: 1-2 hours per week (during residential blocks, both years)
- Practical sessions: as required - optional research methods surgeries and workshops for attendance depending on research methods being used.

Supervision and learning support

Students are allocated a Personal Supervisor with whom they can discuss any aspect of the course (essay choice, thesis topic, time management, sources of information, academic development and support) on a one-to-one basis.

Independent study time is incorporated into the teaching blocks. Students have access to college library facilities as well as the Radzinowicz (Institute of Criminology), Squire (Faculty of Law), Cambridge Judge Business School and University Libraries.

In the second year, supervision may pass to another member of staff who is better suited to supervise the thesis topic and in some cases a separate subject specific thesis advisor may also be allocated to work alongside the supervisor. Student support materials are also available via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Assessment

- Dissertation: 18,000 words maximum (including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography). The dissertation requires a literature review.
- Four essays: 3,000 words maximum each
- research proposal: 4,000 words maximum
- An assessed oral presentation on the thesis in progress

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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The MSt in Applied Criminology, Penology and Management has traditionally been intended for prison and probation practitioners. In addition to such applicants, we now also welcome candidates working elsewhere in the Criminal Justice System, both in the UK and overseas. Read more
The MSt in Applied Criminology, Penology and Management has traditionally been intended for prison and probation practitioners. In addition to such applicants, we now also welcome candidates working elsewhere in the Criminal Justice System, both in the UK and overseas. In recent years, in addition to large cohorts of staff from the prison and probation services, we have welcomed onto the course immigration officals, magistrates and lawyers.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-applied-criminology-penology-and-management

Course detail

Course aims:

- To offer an up-to-date high-quality course which introduces senior persons working within the field of criminal justice as well as others with relevant experience and interests (e.g. senior personnel working with public sector organisations concerned with penology related operations) to some of the most important theory and research in applied criminology, penology and management.
- To develop the skills necessary to locate, read, interpret and analyse relevant research and other source materials.
- To develop the conceptual understanding necessary to evaluate research methods and findings.
- To facilitate course members in communicating the results of their ideas, research and its conclusions in a written form, as well as orally.
- To enhance the capacity of course members to apply up-to-date research in applied criminology, penology and management to aspects of their work.

Format

The programme is a part-time course that takes place over two years starting in the spring. There are normally three two-week residential teaching blocks in the first year: Block A (March/April), Block B (June/July) and Block C (September).

The residential teaching blocks incorporate key modules:

- Management in Criminal Justice
- Prisons and Imprisonment
- Criminological Theory and Criminological Research
- Criminal Justice and Community Justice
- Sentencing, the Legal Context and Court Issues

The modules cover a range of topics and use a range of delivery styles including seminars, lectures, symposia, practical exercises and project work. Reading lists are provided for each session, giving required and suggested further reading.

- Lectures, seminars and classes: 47 hours per term (first year)
- Small group teaching: 3 hours per term
- Supervision: 3 hours per week during residential blocks (both years)
- Practical sessions: as required - optional research methods surgeries and workshops for attendance depending on research methods being used.

Supervision and learning support

Students are allocated a Personal Supervisor with whom they can discuss any aspect of the course (essay choice, thesis topic, time management, sources of information, academic development and support) on a one-to-one basis.

Independent study time is incorporated into the teaching blocks. Students have access to college library facilities as well as the Radzinowicz (Institute of Criminology), Squire (Faculty of Law), Cambridge Judge Business School and University Libraries.

In the second year, supervision may pass to another member of staff who is better suited to supervise the thesis topic and in some cases a separate subject specific thesis advisor may also be allocated to work alongside the supervisor. Student support materials are also available via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Assessment

- Dissertation: 18,000 words maximum (including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography). The dissertation requires a literature review.
- Four essays: 3,000 words maximum each
- A research proposal: 4,000 words maximum

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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COURSE OVERVIEW. Research cutting-edge methods and techniques. Opportunity to gain experience in a work placement. Prepare for a career in policing, forensic psychology or security . Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Research cutting-edge methods and techniques
  • Opportunity to gain experience in a work placement
  • Prepare for a career in policing, forensic psychology or security 

Can you eliminate the impossible to find the truth, however improbable? Whether you’re pursuing a career as a consulting detective or a more conventional route into the world of criminology, Applied Criminology at Winchester equips you with the skills and knowledge to enter your chosen profession. 

Explore the fascinating and complex world of crime, deviance, security and insecurity as they relate to careers in crime prevention, detection and security. Develop your understanding of criminological concepts and methods and how they’re used in professional contexts, with opportunities to gain direct experience through a work placement or internship. Complete advanced training in criminological research methods relevant to applied settings, in keeping with our ethos of active and engaged learning. 

In core modules including Applied Criminology and Applied Criminological Research you consider and discuss the impact of criminology on a range of professions – which can be as wide-ranging as counter-terrorism, criminal and social justice issues, and global security. Optional modules such as Foundations of Forensic Psychology Practice, Cybercrime and Cybersecurity, and The Criminal Justice System and the Legal Framework provide you with opportunities to develop your particular specialist interests. You complete a professionally focused extended research project on a relevant topic, which can be informed by your work placement. Part-time students who are employed in a relevant profession can complete a work-based learning module. 

The course leader, Johannes P Oosthuizen, is a former UK police officer with 14 years’ experience, having conducted attachments with the FBI (2008 and 2013) and Dutch Police (2007 to 2011). He has experience and research interests in counter-terrorism, neighbourhood policing and private sector partnership strategies. 

The Applied Criminology MSc equips your to pursue a career in policing, forensic psychology, or security.

Careers

The programme is designed to prepare students for a range of criminological careers, specifically focused around three professional pathways: forensic psychology, policing and security.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

The programme offers a work-based learning module for those students employed in a relevant professional sector for which they receive credit, and an internship opportunity for full-time students. All students complete a professionally focused extended research project.

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Teaching takes place: Daytime

The programme is taught through a variety of methods including lectures, seminars, workshops, external visits, work-based learning and independent research. Contact with industry experts is a key feature of the course and students meet with regular guest speakers from a number of external organisations concerned with crime, deviance and security. Students have the opportunity to explore these organisations through field visits and work placements.

Location

King Alfred or West Downs, University of Winchester

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



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This course examines Criminology and criminal justice in their widest sense to include consideration of issues such as human rights, politics, international relations and social policy. Read more
This course examines Criminology and criminal justice in their widest sense to include consideration of issues such as human rights, politics, international relations and social policy. It gives students the opportunity to explore both theoretical and applied criminology, and to engage critically in considering the relationships between theory, research, policy and practice.

About the Course

Criminology employs a multi disciplinary approach, informed by a range of different disciplines which include: applied medico-legal science, psychiatry, psychology, sociology, law, political science, history, geography. As a result of these competing viewpoints your research of Criminology will be a very challenging and rewarding area of postgraduate study.

Assessment details

You will be assessed through coursework which includes essays, reports, case studies, presentations and a final dissertation.

Features and benefits of the course

-Teaching staff have national and international reputations within the discipline and are actively engaged in research, publication, academic enterprise as well as being involved in government consultation, policy development and evaluation. This feeds into teaching and, as a result, you can expect to be exposed to the very latest developments and emerging knowledge in this field.
-The degree caters for students whose aims and interests are purely academic alongside those who want to develop a more practice-related focus.

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Our Youth Justice, Community Safety and Applied Criminology Masters fills a two-fold gap in current academic provision. It provides experienced practitioners with the opportunity to apply academic knowledge to, and critically analyse and assess, the context in which they work. Read more
Our Youth Justice, Community Safety and Applied Criminology Masters fills a two-fold gap in current academic provision. It provides experienced practitioners with the opportunity to apply academic knowledge to, and critically analyse and assess, the context in which they work.

If you have a limited knowledge of criminal justice, the course offers a detailed understanding of the agencies in the criminal justice system, their functions and responsibilities. You can take up to a third of the course as an internship within a criminal justice agency.

The flexibility of the course also allows you to complete up to a third of the course through work based learning.

We expand your awareness of the social and political context of working with offenders.In-depth analysis includes 'what works' and the concept of risk assessment; key criminological theories including cultures of punishment; the legal and organisational context of crime; mediation and reparation schemes; victims and victimology; community safety; mental health issues; the history and development of youth justice; the problem of youth and youth as a problem; and drug misuse and drug-related crime.

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Develop a deep insight into crime and criminal behaviour by studying this uniquely practical and applied course in criminology and forensic psychology. Read more
Develop a deep insight into crime and criminal behaviour by studying this uniquely practical and applied course in criminology and forensic psychology.

Studying applied criminology and forensic psychology at postgraduate level will allow you to develop a range of analytical and practical skills benefitting you as a practitioner or researcher.

You’ll have the opportunity of a work placement alongside specialised modules covering mediation, international criminology, assessment of offenders, child protection and advanced quantitative and qualitative research methods. These modules will give you a valuable set of skills for both employment and further research.

Your tutors will be research-active staff who are experts in their field. You’ll also benefit from external practitioners who bring their practical skills and experience to the course.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Applied-Criminology-and-Forensic-Psychology-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

You’ll develop a critical awareness of topics at the forefront of criminology and forensic psychology, and the contexts and theories that influence practice in these areas.

The applied focus of this course provides an excellent foundation in risk assessment of offenders, methods of rehabilitation, use of forensic interviewing strategies, mediation skills and facial composite construction.

Alongside these skills you’ll also learn directly from leading experts about current research and debates in criminology and forensic psychology which directly affect people at all points in the legal system.

Additionally you'll acquire excellent transferable research skills in both quantitative and qualitative methods which will enable you to carry out high quality research in a variety of contexts and with ethical integrity.

This is a one year full-time course delivered over three trimesters. You’ll learn by a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, laboratory sessions and independent study.

Modules

• Practical Forensic Psychology (assessing offenders and working with witnesses)
• Advanced Forensic Psychology (therapeutic jurisprudence and neuroethics)
• Criminal Justice in Practice
• Current Topics in Crime
• Comparative and International Criminology
• Advanced Research Skills
• Community Safety and Mediation
• Investigative Journalism
• Work Placement
• Dissertation

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

With a mix of subject specific knowledge, practical skills and technical abilities graduates will have the opportunity to develop a career in a range of occupations including:

• HM Prisons and secure units
• Probation service
• Police services
• Social work
• Court services
• Legal services
• Voluntary sector
• Community development
• Adult guidance
• Local and central government
• Academia and research
• Health services
• Forensic services
• Private practice

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology

• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system

• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills

• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

• Quantitative Methods

• Qualitative Methods

• Case Studies in Applied Social Research

• Data Visualisation

• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol

• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

• Applied Criminal Justice

• Understanding Policing

• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice

• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children

• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”



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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

The course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology, leading to careers in research, research management, and commissioning or using research.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

This MSc has been designed to run concurrently with the MSc Applied Social Research, a long-standing course in Applied Social Science that is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the standards of their Research Training Guidelines. The objectives are to:
- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Criminology) comprises six compulsory taught core modules and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-legal Studies; Criminological Perspectives; and Criminalisation, Social Control and Human Rights.
In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original criminological or socio-legal research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- Explaining Crime through Narrative
- Nurses Perceptions of Workplace Violence and Aggression within an A&E Department
- Policing a Democracy
- The Effect of Anti-Terror Legislation on Liberty

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was 'Internationally Excellent' with the top 10 percent of that judged to be 'World-leading'.

Career opportunities

90.5% of Stirling students are in employment or further study six months after graduation.

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The MSc Criminology will equip you with the substantive and methodological skills to understand contemporary crime and criminal justice policies and practices. Read more

The MSc Criminology will equip you with the substantive and methodological skills to understand contemporary crime and criminal justice policies and practices.

Introducing your course

Crime, deviance and criminal justice are endlessly fascinating. By studying Criminology at the University of Southampton, you will be engaging in a discipline that is one of the oldest in the Social Sciences, and with the topic of crime, a central feature of human behaviour. This fascinating course will help you establish a successful academic or professional career with the police, the prison service, the NHS or security companies. 

MSc Criminology is one of the most exciting postgraduate masters courses available. It will expose you to important international criminological research findings and help you develop the skills to analyse the complex social issues confronting a globalised world.

Overview

Core training in applied criminology, criminal justice studies; policing, penology and victimology is complemented by optional study in a range of disciplines allied to criminology at the University of Southampton.

Our ESRC validated methodological training ensures that you will produce a high quality research dissertation directly related to your career/professional interests.

You will be taught and supervised by internationally recognised criminologists whose research and policy analysis are sought by government departments, criminal justice agencies and the media.

This innovative applied criminology degree emphasises the connections between research and professional practice. It will prepare you for a wide range of professional careers as well as for PhD studies.

The programme aims to provide you with:

  • Thorough knowledge of the most important international criminological research findings
  • In-depth understanding of contemporary criminal justice policies and practices
  • The ability to analyse the key crime problems currently confronting 21st century societies
  • An in-depth understanding of innovative research methods and the ability to utilise them in different contexts
  • The skills required to undertake independent criminological research and analysis
  • The ability to design and complete a research dissertation in criminology, criminal justice or a related field
  • The capacity to develop and present ideas, arguments and research findings through different means of communication to different audiences

View the programme specification document for this course

Career Opportunities

  • Security Analyst 
  • Crime Analyst
  • Police Service
  • Prison and probation Service
  • Crime prevention and community safety
  • Courts service
  • Youth Justice and youth work
  • Research and Policy Development
  • Pressure groups and NGOs


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The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Read more
The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Core courses will enable you to develop an understanding of the concepts, theories, methods and principles central to criminology and the skills to apply these in the forensic and legal area. Optional courses build on this core grounding and enable you to develop an empirical insight in an area of your choice, culminating in a research project.

This approach provides you with knowledge of the changing nature of psychology, law and criminology, and professional applications. It will also develop your ability to relate theory to practice in a way that provides more informed solutions to problems, and opportunities in the workplace. There is a valuable research grounding and a broad coverage of criminological, forensic and psychological approaches to crime and criminality.

Please note that this programme does not provide British Psychological Society accreditation or recognition. This is because the programme is a criminology programme with a strand of specialist criminal / investigative / forensic psychology and is not a postgraduate psychology degree programme. The MSc Criminology & Criminal Psychology programme meets the British Criminology Society benchmarks for postgraduate taught courses.

From time-to-time we update our programmes to reflect changes in knowledge and industry standards, so the programme structure, mode and the courses and course structure can be subject to change from what is listed below. The availability of option courses also varies from year-to-year according to student preference, staff availability and may, for some courses, also depend on a student's academic performance. Until the academic term immediately prior to the academic term in which an option is listed to run, we are not able to guarantee that an option listed will be available. In addition, please note that some courses may only be open to certain students and may also involve an application process which may include successfully passing a selection process to take the course. For these reasons, the structure (i.e. the mode(s), the courses and the course structure) of the programme shown in this information is shown for illustrative purposes only.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/crim/crimpsych

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Career opportunities

This programme encompasses criminological, legal, forensic and psychological approaches. It will appeal to those with a broad interest in criminology and criminal psychological issues, including those whose future employment is likely to involve public, private and/ or non-governmental criminological or criminal justice work or applied criminal/legal/forensic psychological work in the UK or internationally. It is relevant to careers in local government, European and international institutions, and national and international nongovernmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wishing to prepare for a research degree in humanities and social sciences.

Teaching and assessment

The programme employs a range of innovative teaching and learning methods. Lectures and seminars are dynamic and interactive. Teaching and learning activities may include:

- Role play
- Real-world problem solving
- Speed debates
- Presentations
- Project supervision
- Work-based placements and tutorials.

Where possible and depending on the courses studied, one or more field trip (please note that any field trip will be a day-time trip only, not an overnight or multi-day trip).

Assessment of learning is usually based on a mixture of examination and coursework and can include presentations/group work, the submission of essays and the sitting of examinations.

Further information

If you would like more information on this programme, please contact us at .

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Study criminology at an advanced level and gain a relevant, in-depth and sophisticated understanding of contemporary criminological theory, as well as the necessary skills to strengthen your competence as a learner and practitioner. Read more
Study criminology at an advanced level and gain a relevant, in-depth and sophisticated understanding of contemporary criminological theory, as well as the necessary skills to strengthen your competence as a learner and practitioner. Benefit from a flexible approach to learning, studying the course where and when you want to. Explore and explain the causes of crime through theoretical approaches, in practice or via work-based learning, and open the door to a successful and fulfilling career.

You will engage with real world problems and issues. You will be inspired by renowned external speakers, student presenters and core lectures at our bespoke symposiums. You’ll also participate in contemporary and relevant applied criminological research through our strategic partnerships with regional, national or international criminal justice agencies and rights organisations. You will find career opportunities in a diverse range of settings.

Key features

-Engage with real world problems and issues - the MSc Criminology adopts a problem-based approach to learning.
-Be inspired by renowned external speakers, student presenters and core lectures at our bespoke symposiums.
-Learn from internationally recognised, research-active staff who ensure the programme is at the cutting edge of developments in criminological theory and criminal justice policy and practice.
-Benefit from a blended learning environment which provides supportive and flexible learning, suitable for traditional, distance and part-time learning.
-Participate in contemporary and relevant applied criminological research through our strategic partnerships with regional (police, youth justice, probation), national (Howard League for Penal Reform, Children’s Rights Alliance, Prison Reform Trust) or international (Amnesty International, United Nations High Commission on Human Rights) criminal justice agencies and rights organisations.
-Choose a career in the private, public or third sector – highly transferable skills mean you will find career opportunities in a diverse range of settings.

Course details

During this year you will study core modules in criminological theory and research design, covering the advanced study of critical and theoretical perspectives within criminology and criminal justice and preparing you for writing a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to choose from a wide range of modules which reflect key areas of interest within criminology, including anti-social behaviour, comparative victimology, crime and the city, women crime and criminal justice, and innovations in global justice. Gain a relevant, advanced and sophisticated understanding of contemporary criminology, and the skills necessary to strengthen your competencies as both a learner and practitioner.

Core modules
-CRIM715 Criminology Research
-CRIM714 Criminology Theory
-CRIM732 MSc Criminology Dissertation
-CRIM739 Crime, Culture, and Global Society
-CRIM740 Governance, Policing, Penality
-CRIM741 Vulnerability, Criminalisation, Inequality

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond. Read more

The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond.

What is the Master of Criminology all about?

The programme is characterised by a strong link between education and research, an explicitly international orientation, and a comparative approach, with special attention to the cross-border character of criminality. 

General subjects include criminological theories and models of law enforcement, psychology, law and criminal justice, youth criminology and juvenile justice, and research methods. The programme also offers cutting-edge courses on international police and judicial cooperation, political crimes and transitional justice, restorative justice, terrorism, and organised and corporate crime – research fields in which our Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) professors are internationally renowned experts.

LINC is the most recent institutional incarnation (2007) of the criminological tradition in Leuven, which began with the establishment of the School for Criminology in 1929. Excellence in criminology continues today, combining solid research with a deep commitment to society structured within ten research lines. LINC is composed of 11 professors and more than 70 assistants and fellows involved in criminological research and education. 

Is this the right programme for me?

 Prospective students should possess:

  • a critical-reflective attitude towards law (as a normative behavioural regulating framework), community and crime;
  • genuine interest in (inter)personal and social interactions;
  • theoretical knowledge of applied psychology, sociology and anthropology within the field of crime and the treatment of crime;
  • extensive knowledge of basic research methodology
  • familiarity with specific criminological sources as well as legal, psychological and sociological sources
  • the ability to formulate research questions from existing literature
  • basic knowledge concerning (quantitative and qualitative) data collection
  • the ability to independently carry out analysis and report results
  • basic skills of oral and written reporting, especially in a criminology context;
  • an ability to apply criminological theory in practice (for instance, in an internship, case study, etc.);
  • basic knowledge of English, that is, the ability to read and understand English texts and comprehend seminars and lectures taught in English

Objectives

Goals

  • the criminological program provides an appealing specialized, European and internationally oriented and research-based study of crime and the way of dealing with it as well as the study of the processes of (de)criminalization
  • to optimize methodological skills and attitudes in order to make autonomous constructive and high standing contributions to the field as well as further research possible
  • an international and comparative approach has been highlighted in the Master program, bearing in mind however the characteristic Belgian situation

Final terms

Knowledge: The graduates need 1) to obtain specialized and more in-depth theoretical insights into the criminology; 2) to know facts concerning the developments and (the possible solutions for) problems in policy and practice of institutions that are involved in dealing with criminality. 3) to have specialized knowledge of recent developments in the field of methodology that allows to examine the problems from a point of legal and empirical-criminological view.

Skills: The graduates must be able to make an autonomous contribution in the development in the search to solutions for complex social and individual questions on the field of crime and the treatment of crime. More specifically: to be able to formulate relevant challenges for further criminological research; to observe, detect and analyze the large variables and indicators; to collect information independently; to comment and report in a methodically founded statement; can possibly function in (multidisciplinary) surroundings with eye for its own input and the guarantee of its quality.

Attitude: the graduates need to develop a discerning mind and recognize the importance of theoretical, methodological and moral reflection, both to guarantee the quality of policymaking as the quality of the own vocational practice. From an ethical notion the students develop further sensitivity for the tensions which occur at the treatment of crime and (in)security, at the individual, institutional and social level on the one hand and between these levels on the other hand.

Career perspectives

The programme is intended to prepare students for research and professional employment in national and international policy and operational agencies in the fields of criminal justice and victim assistance.

Graduates find employment in the domains of:

  • safety, police, justice
  • youth care
  • execution of sentences and penal measures
  • forensic mental healthcare
  • private security and safety
  • the civil service
  • the non-profit sectors at the national, European and international level


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The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of the key challenges and perspectives in contemporary criminology. Read more

The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of the key challenges and perspectives in contemporary criminology.

The Masters in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research is aimed at graduates and practitioners with an appropriate first degree who seek advanced knowledge about issues connected with crime, deviance, control, the criminal justice system and social research.

It will also suit graduates and practitioners considering a PhD in this area; and practitioners in the criminal justice system and related government and voluntary agencies who wish to develop their understanding of the wider issues connected to crime.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Students are encouraged to take up opportunities for experiential learning in workplace settings, providing extended opportunities for work experience and career development in professional research settings.

The department supports students in finding three-to-four week research placements during Spring and Summer vacation periods, and this approach has recently been supplemented to include strategies of support for students seeking a wider range of opportunities for professional development in the first-hand experience of research organisation – including such activities as part-time internships over longer periods, workplace visits, or shadowing research professionals.

This introduces further flexibility in a student-led process of professional development in light of increasing external pressures on students’ commitments and responsibilities. All, however, involve opportunities to consider issues in career development and professional skills.

The support process involves the Department working closely with students on a one-to-one basis toward their goals and requirements, in association with the University’s Careers Service, to offer pastoral advice and support.

Organisations the department has worked with in the past have included the Office of National Statistics, Cabinet Office, HM Inspectorate of Prisons, Sussex Youth Offending team and Surrey Police.

In some cases the work experience may also be with projects in academic contexts. Students seek experiential learning opportunities with the support of the Department’s Senior Placement Tutor, and assistance from the Faculty Placement Office.

Educational aims of the programme

The MSc in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research (CCJSR) provides a thorough grounding in the discipline of criminology combined with advanced training in the full range of qualitative and quantitative methods of social research.

It is designed to meet the needs of students graduating from a first degree who have an interest in crime and the criminal justice system, people who are currently employed and wish to apply a knowledge of criminological research within their present job, or those who wish to move into a criminological research career.

The degree provides an ideal foundation to undertake a part-time or full-time PhD.

The degree is suitable for a wide range of students in terms of age, professional background, and current occupation and circumstances.

Because of this diversity of experience, students on the degree learn a great deal from each other, including at the residential Weekend Conference in the middle of the first semester, and the Day Conference at the end of the first semester.

The full-time MSc is taught over 12 months and the part-time course over 24 months. Students who do not wish to undertake the Masters dissertation can obtain the Postgraduate Certificate in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research after gaining 60 credits, or the Postgraduate Diploma after gaining 120 credits.

Students studying for the MSc in full-time mode are required to submit their dissertation during the academic year in which they commenced registration.

It is expected that students studying part-time will have obtained a minimum of 60 credits by the end of the first 12 months of registration in order to proceed into the second year.

Placements

A distinctive component of the MSc is the opportunity to undertake a placement at a criminal justice agency or research institute for four weeks during the spring break. The practical experience and insights gained reinforce formal learning.

Conferences

A residential weekend conference is attended by all programme members, PhD students and teaching staff in November.

This provides a less formal atmosphere for discussions concerning criminology, research and related themes; it includes lectures from eminent guest speakers and members of staff, seminars and small group discussions.

The Department also organises a day conference for MSc students at the University, with student presentations and guest speakers.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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