• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Executive Business School Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
"applied" AND "criminal" …×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Applied Criminal Justice)

  • "applied" AND "criminal" AND "justice" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 102
Order by 
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology
• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system
• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills
• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research
• Quantitative Methods
• Qualitative Methods
• Case Studies in Applied Social Research
• Data Visualisation
• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol
• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice
• Applied Criminal Justice
• Understanding Policing
• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice
• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales
• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children
• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”

Read less
Are you fascinated by criminology? Hoping to increase your suitability for higher level positions within the criminal justice sector? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of the contemporary issues and debates surrounding criminal justice institutions, crime and criminal punishment. Read more

Overview

Are you fascinated by criminology? Hoping to increase your suitability for higher level positions within the criminal justice sector? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of the contemporary issues and debates surrounding criminal justice institutions, crime and criminal punishment.

- The course is delivered by an experienced course team with established links to criminal justice agencies, private businesses and charities.
- The teaching team are active researchers and have contributed internationally renowned research projects.
- Students study contemporary and comparative criminology, criminal justice and essential human science research skills.
- Students can also tailor the degree to their own unique career ambitions, picking from optional units in penology, international policing, historic crime, drugs and terror security.
- Optional study trips are available throughout the year, including an unfunded visit to the USA.
- The course concludes with a final research project, where students will research and write a unique dissertation under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.
- Many students focus their dissertation on the area of criminology in which they would like to work, using it to demonstrate their knowledge to employers after graduation.
- Students benefit from small class sizes and regular one-to-one support.

The industry -

Whether you want to work in the social support and welfare sector, in the justice system or with relevant charities - your understanding of criminology and criminal justice will give you the opportunity to make a positive impact on people’s lives.

This is an essential degree for many careers in these sectors, but can also help with a range of roles in other industries. These include various applied and research-based roles that focus on helping people with social or personal issues and supporting the rehabilitation of offenders.

The programme -

Students on Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme study the core curriculum alongside a choice of two specialist units. This chance to specialise is important, helping students to orient their knowledge towards specific roles in the criminal justice sector.

This programme also encourages students to develop a range of transferable interpersonal and verbal communication skills through presentations, role-plays, debates, interviews and group work. These competencies are valued in a wide range of industries.

To find out more about the content of each specific unit, please see the ‘course content’ tab.
Enrichment activities and learning opportunities are available alongside the core curriculum, giving students the chance to learn from guest speakers, visit criminal justice organisations and network at industry events. These additional activities help to provide detailed insights into the criminal justice system and the careers it offers. Past speakers have come from the police, courts, prisons, probation services, youth justice services and cyber security firms.

The course team themselves have had extensive experience of the criminal justice system and its related disciplines, providing students with unique personal insights. The ties they have with the professional world have helped past students secure volunteer placements, temporary paid work, work shadowing weeks and internships.

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through lectures, group work and projects, and supervision for independent writing and research.

You will be allocated a personal tutor and a dissertation research supervisor.

Work experience -

Past students have completed a wide range of interesting and informative placements with:

- the Association of Chief Police Officers Criminal Records Office
- the criminal justice sector (paid work)
- witness and victim services
- probation services
- youth offending teams
- voluntary positions in the criminal justice field.

Assessment -

You will participate in group work, independent writing and research, group projects and discussions. You will be assessed via a number of 3,500-word assignments and individual and group presentations, in addition to a 20,000-word dissertation.
Study abroad
We run an optional ten-day study trip to the USA during the Christmas break, with visits to the FBI and New Jersey State Police.

There will be opportunities to attend lectures and share views and ideas with students at Ocean County College and Monmouth University. Please note this trip is not included in your tuition fees, and you’ll need to cover your travel and living costs.

Other study trip opportunities may also be available.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

With this internationally respected qualification, you’ll be well placed to pursue a variety of career opportunities.

Past graduates have pursued careers in police management, international law enforcement, the National Offender Management Service, financial security and academia.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Prison service
- Police
- Probation
- Courts
- Drugs services
- Security
- Public and private sector security and investigation
- Local government community safety

Links with industry -

We welcome regular guest lecturers who provide a detailed insight into working in the criminal justice sector and prospective career opportunities.

Recent speakers have included:

- serving and former police detectives in the Metropolitan and Hampshire Police
- serving chief officers from Hampshire and Dorset Police
- judges and magistrates
- staff from the National Crime Agency, the Association of Chief Police Officers, the National Offender Management Service and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Transferable skills -

You will gain a detailed understanding of criminological issues, which can be applied to many different careers. You will also develop your research and critical analysis skills and gain experience in communication, teamwork and leadership.

Further study -

The MSc provides a solid foundation for subsequent research at MPhil and PhD level.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £5,665

International full-time fees: £12,380

UK and EU part-time fees, year one: £1,895

UK and EU part-time fees, year two: £3,790

International part-time fees: £6,190 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Would you like to improve your career prospects within the criminal justice sector? With an expert teaching team, strong links with industry and a curriculum, tailored to suit your ambitions, Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme could be the ideal next step towards your dream career.

Read less
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

In the Department of Criminal Justice, undergraduate and graduate programs are designed to meet the constant demand for law enforcement and criminal justice professionals. Our programs also provide an excellent pathway toward the study of law.

Our core curriculum thoroughly explores the theory and practice of the criminal justice system. But you will customize your study through elective courses that focus on a particular area of interest. Our full-time faculty is an internationally renowned group of academic professionals, and our adjunct professors are working criminal justice professionals, including attorneys, judges and law enforcement officials.

The LIU Post Department of Criminal Justice was one of the first on the East Coast to establish an internship program. All criminal justice majors intern in the field, and have access to an extraordinary network of criminal justice professionals, making it possible to be offered positions upon graduation.

Criminal Justice students may have the opportunity to spend a semester in Washington, D.C., participating in the Justice Semester at American University, or studying Forensic Psychology at George Washington University.

M.S. in Criminal Justice

The 36-credit Master of Science in Criminal Justice offers an in-depth, 21st century curriculum geared toward forensics, law and society, criminal behavior, cyber crime, terrorism and criminological theory. In addition to our core curriculum, electives are available but not limited to areas such as terrorism, law, high technology, forensics, security, and fraud. The program prepares students for modern-day careers in criminal justice, including cyberspace crime detection, law enforcement management systems and homeland security.

Courses are taught by a distinguished faculty that includes published authors, researchers and widely-consulted authorities on the American and world criminal justice systems. Adjunct faculty members are working professionals in the field and include attorneys, judges and law enforcements officials. Our professors will engage and inspire you to exceed your expectations.

Alumni of our program are employed in a wide variety of professional positions: law enforcement officers, federal agents, security officers, prosecutors, corrections counselors, judges, attorneys, private security professionals, homeland security agents, forensic technologists, crime lab technicians, emergency managers, FBI agents and social service representatives.

Forensic Psychology Semester: George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

The Department of Criminal Justice is proud to announce an articulation agreement with George Washington University concerning Forensic Psychology. Eligible criminal justice graduate students may take forensic psychology courses in Washington, D.C. for a semester. Completed credits will be applied towards the student’s plan of study. To find out more about the George Washington University Program contact the Department of Criminal Justice.

Read less
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

Read less
This programme draws upon Birmingham Law School’s long standing research strengths in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice. Read more
This programme draws upon Birmingham Law School’s long standing research strengths in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice. Criminal Law is concerned with the most potentially invasive assertion of authority by the state: if you fail to comply with the law you will be punished. This programme provides a holistic analysis of the criminal process through an analysis of the law, its philosophical underpinnings and its operation in practice.

Students can study to attain a broad overview of criminal justice processes or specialise in particular aspects as diverse as underpinning theories, policing, health aspects of criminal justice or indeed international aspects of law enforcement co-operation. Many modules have been created and are taught by leading scholars of the particular field and students benefit from close contact with researchers.

For those wishing to gain in-depth understanding of criminal law and criminal justice, this course offers the opportunity for broader or deeply specialised study within an innovative research-led teaching environment which benefits from BLS’s longstanding stature in this field and our staff’s dedication to ensuring it lives on; also in our LLM graduates.

At Birmingham Law School we research into topics as diverse as the ever widening net of criminalisation and (at least quasi-) criminal justice processes, to money saving tactics and their effect on the very philosophy which underpins our criminal law and justice system, the justice which emerges from it and effects.

These specialisations flow into the modules on this LLM which will allow you to study the five separate objectives used in enforcement of Criminal Law; retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, rehabilitation and restitution taught. All of these are subjects of great debate and controversy across all jurisdictions and students benefit from debating these informed by and in exchange with our broad range of experts.

About the Birmingham Law School

Birmingham Law School has a long tradition of producing cutting-edge research that has real-world impact and informs the challenging and exciting learning environment our students experience. As a community of world-leading scholars, teachers and students, Birmingham Law School continues to make an important contribution to our understanding, teaching, and practice of law. In 2016 it was named as one of the world’s Top 100 law schools in the QS World Rankings.
We provide an expansive range of programmes, for both undergraduate and postgraduate studies and employ a range of approaches in our teaching and our research, from the theoretical and doctrinal to the empirical and applied. Our research is recognised on a global stage, and our academics are frequent participants in legal debates and contribute to the policy-making process.
We provide students with more than just a degree, and enable them to develop the skills required to enhance their employability. Our Centre for Professional Legal Education and Research (CEPLER) presents our students with opportunities to increase their knowledge of law in action through Pro Bono and Mooting as well as the 50+ legal specific career events CEPLER organises annually. CEPLERs work is one of the many things that have led to Birmingham being recognised as the University of the Year for Graduate Employability in the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk


Read less
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Read more
This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. Students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Students also undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules:
Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)
-Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
-Theory and practice of criminal justice
-Analysis of contemporary politics
-Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Introduction to social scientific research
-Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
-Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)
-Formulating research questions
-Ethical review procedures
-Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
-Conversational analysis in practice
-Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)
-A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules:
Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years. Choose modules to the value of 60 credits, listed below (60 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Cybercrime and cybersecurity: (30 credits)
-Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field . Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of their choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Following a specialisation in International Criminal Justice enables you to develop a critical understanding of the operation of international and transnational criminal justice, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You learn about the main legal instruments and institutions that provide for international co-operation and prosecution of international, transnational and national crime and the impact of human rights and combine this with critical reflection of the broader context and of the effectiveness of law.

There is co-operation with the MA in Criminology, run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. In addition to available law options, you may choose one module from the MA in Criminology. This includes modules on terrorism and sociological theories of violence and gender and crime in a globalised world.

You are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the Kent Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL).

International Criminal Justice will be of particular interest to those who work, intend to work, or have an interest in the fields of international and transnational criminal justice, criminal justice and human rights more broadly.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation is designed for people who already work, or intend to work, within the criminal justice system, whether for the police, probation service, prison service or other organisations, or those with an interest in such matters. It covers criminal law and procedure in the UK, internationally and comparatively. It examines criminal justice systems from a range of perspectives, including the management of organisations, human rights, the psychological and sociological causes of criminal behaviour and social and economic perspectives.

There is close co-operation with the MA in Criminology run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. Students on the LLM and MA can take modules from both programmes. Criminology has specialists in many areas including criminological theory, research methods, youth crime, gender, cultural criminology and terrorism.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/114/criminal-justice

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in Law in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW871 Policing

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You are lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible.

A key feature of the MA Criminology is its involvement in a Common Study Programme. The Common Study Programme is a biannual student-centred conference at which students are invited to present papers, meet students and staff from other countries and exchange ideas.

The School has international links with colleagues and institutions and our current Visiting Professor of Criminology, Jeff Ferrell is an example of this extended network. Professor Ferrell is based at the Texas Christian University, USA where he is Professor of Sociology. He is a leading proponent of cultural criminology and has conducted research on urban culture, graffiti and media.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/173/criminology

Course structure

The programme involves:

- the sociological study of crime and its application to criminal justice and social policy

- the study of issues at the cutting edge of current criminological debate with a strong emphasis on the cultural context of crime

- advanced criminological theory and research methods as applied to crime and criminal justice.

It also offers opportunities for you to develop your career in the areas of criminal justice, policy development and academic research.

We are constantly developing the modules available to you in line with current issues and staff expertise. Each year we announce new choices, for example we are currently working on developing a module convened by Dr David Redmon which looks at documentary film-making from a social science perspective.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. You will be required to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO869 - Theories of Crime (20 credits)
SO870 - Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
SO875 - Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
SO881 - Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
SO882 - Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)
SO885 - Social Suffering (20 credits)
SO940 - Prisons and Penal Policy (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
SO824 - Sociology of Violence (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO830 - Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SO868 - Critical Criminology (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by six coursework essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a post-graduate programme in criminology of the highest standard with teaching that is informed by internationally recognised research and scholarship

- give you a comprehensive overview and understanding of contemporary debates in criminology and criminal justice including those around diversity and inequality

- involve you in a critical analysis of crime and punishment in relation to developments in social theory, sociology and social policy

- provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions

- focus on the relevance of social science for the analysis and assessment of crime and criminal justice policy

- provide you with an advanced understanding of the ways in which quantitative and qualitative research methodologies may be used to study crime and criminal justice

- give you a critical awareness of the political and populist influences on criminal justice policy

- enable you to understand the emergence of social problems (including crime) and the responses of welfare and criminal justice institutions, including analysis of the theoretical, political and economic underpinnings of these responses

- build on the University’s close European ties by providing the potential for students to participate in the European Common Study programme in Criminology.

Research areas

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research.

- Crime, Culture and Control:

The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Our unique emphasis on research methodology will sharpen your ability to think in a logical and informed manner about criminological problems, and to design, conduct and manage effective research and evaluation. Read more
Our unique emphasis on research methodology will sharpen your ability to think in a logical and informed manner about criminological problems, and to design, conduct and manage effective research and evaluation.

We’ve combined modules in academic criminology and the criminal justice system with training in qualitative and quantitative research methods.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The combination of analytic criminological knowledge and applied research skills on this programme will equip you with a sophisticated understanding of the key challenges and perspectives in contemporary criminology.

The Masters in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research is aimed at graduates and practitioners with an appropriate first degree who seek advanced knowledge about issues connected with crime, deviance, control, the criminal justice system and social research.

It will also suit graduates and practitioners considering a PhD in this area; and practitioners in the criminal justice system and related government and voluntary agencies who wish to develop their understanding of the wider issues connected to crime.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Field Methods
-Data Analysis
-Criminological Theories
-Research: From Design to Dissemination
-Criminal Justice System
-Law, Society and Social Control
-Crime and Offending
-Evidence Based Practice in Crime and Criminal Justice
-Dissertation

Students are encouraged to take up opportunities for experiential learning in workplace settings, providing extended opportunities for work experience and career development in professional research settings.

The department supports students in finding three-to-four week research placements during Spring and Summer vacation periods, and this approach has recently been supplemented to include strategies of support for students seeking a wider range of opportunities for professional development in the first-hand experience of research organisation – including such activities as part-time internships over longer periods, workplace visits, or shadowing research professionals.

This introduces further flexibility in a student-led process of professional development in light of increasing external pressures on students’ commitments and responsibilities. All, however, involve opportunities to consider issues in career development and professional skills.

The support process involves the Department working closely with students on a one-to-one basis toward their goals and requirements, in association with the University’s Careers Service, to offer pastoral advice and support.

Organisations the department has worked with in the past have included the Office of National Statistics, Cabinet Office, HM Inspectorate of Prisons, Sussex Youth Offending team and Surrey Police.

In some cases the work experience may also be with projects in academic contexts. Students seek experiential learning opportunities with the support of the Department’s Senior Placement Tutor, and assistance from the Faculty Placement Office.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MSc in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research (CCJSR) provides a thorough grounding in the discipline of criminology combined with advanced training in the full range of qualitative and quantitative methods of social research.

It is designed to meet the needs of students graduating from a first degree who have an interest in crime and the criminal justice system, people who are currently employed and wish to apply a knowledge of criminological research within their present job, or those who wish to move into a criminological research career.

The degree provides an ideal foundation to undertake a part-time or full-time PhD.

The degree is suitable for a wide range of students in terms of age, professional background, and current occupation and circumstances.

Because of this diversity of experience, students on the degree learn a great deal from each other, including at the residential Weekend Conference in the middle of the first semester, and the Day Conference at the end of the first semester.

The full-time MSc is taught over 12 months and the part-time course over 24 months. Students who do not wish to undertake the Masters dissertation can obtain the Postgraduate Certificate in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research after gaining 60 credits, or the Postgraduate Diploma after gaining 120 credits.

Students studying for the MSc in full-time mode are required to submit their dissertation during the academic year in which they commenced registration.

It is expected that students studying part-time will have obtained a minimum of 60 credits by the end of the first 12 months of registration in order to proceed into the second year.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completing the MSc, students will have:
-Gained experience in conducting an extended piece of criminological research of a high calibre
-Obtained a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of the discipline of criminology
-Developed and demonstrated extensive knowledge about the core debates in academic criminology and the central issues in criminal justice policy
-Understood how the concerns of criminology and the criminal justice system connect to and interact with wider social issues
-Acquired and utilised practical knowledge of a range of different traditions and methods relevant to conducting criminological research, from survey research to field methods
-Planned, manage and execute research as part of a team
-Developed the analytic skills and substantive knowledge to enable them to pursue a successful career in academe, research institutes, or relevant government departments

Knowledge and understanding
-Show critical awareness and understanding of the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of the discipline of criminology
-Show systematic knowledge of basic principles of research design and strategy
-Understand the use and value of a wide range of different research approaches across the quantitative and qualitative spectra
-Appreciate the epistemological and ontological questions that underpin social research
-Recognise the significance of social/political contexts and uses of research developed competence about the core debates in academic criminology and the central issues in criminal justice policy
-Show engagement with innovations and developments in social research
-Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of research ethics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Understood how the concerns of criminology and the criminal justice system connect to and interact with wider social issues
-Acquired and utilised practical knowledge of a range of different traditions and methods relevant to conducting criminological research, from survey research to field methods
-Systematically formulate researchable problems
-Analyse qualitative and quantitative data drawn both from ‘real world’ and ‘virtual world’ environments, using basic and more advanced techniques, and draw warranted conclusions
-Critically evaluate the range of approaches to research

Professional practical skills
-Use the range of research techniques commonly employed in criminological research
-Generate both quantitative and qualitative data through an array of techniques, and select techniques of data generation on appropriate methodological base
-Employ a quantitative (SPSS) and qualitative software package to manage and analyse data

Key / transferable skills
-Work to deadlines and within work schedules
-Apply computing skills for research instrument design, data analysis, and report writing and presentation
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means

PLACEMENTS

A distinctive component of the MSc is the opportunity to undertake a placement at a criminal justice agency or research institute for four weeks during the spring break. The practical experience and insights gained reinforce formal learning.

CONFERENCES

A residential weekend conference is attended by all programme members, PhD students and teaching staff in November. This provides a less formal atmosphere for discussions concerning criminology, research and related themes; it includes lectures from eminent guest speakers and members of staff, seminars and small group discussions. The Department also organises a day conference for MSc students at the University, with student presentations and guest speakers.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy. Read more
The MSc offers innovative and applied training in a number of specialisms including a named degree in civil society and public affairs; criminal justice; applied psychology; or global social work and social policy.

About the programme

The MSc provides you with applied and transferable social science research skills to better understand the complexities of society, the role of multiple organisations (‘actors’) in governance systems, and disciplinespecific expertise.

The programme is interdisciplinary and employability is a major theme of the MSc subject pathways so as to equip you with key applied skills for the graduate job market. Intensive workshops are delivered primarily by academic experts, with input from practitioners and non-academic specialists.

You can study for the MSc in Applied Social Science, by choosing optional modules across pathways, or opt for a specialist named degree, as follows:

- Applied Psychology:
Gives you the skills to research and examine human behaviour in various social settings i.e. education, healthcare and the workplace.

- Civil Society and Public Affairs:
Provides you with an advanced understanding of the relationship between civil society, the institutions of multi-level governance and the policymaking environment.

- Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
Gain the skills and understanding of criminal justice and youth violence to research and navigate the causes of crime and strategies for tackling criminal activity.

- Global Social Work and Social Policy:
Provides social workers, community workers and voluntary sector workers with opportunities to engage with the most innovative social work and social policy throughout the world.

Your learning

You will study core and specialist modules. Core modules include:
• Social Research Today
• Contemporary Social Issues
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

Students of the generic Applied Social Science course can also study three specialist electives.
For students studying for the various named degrees, specialist modules offered include:

Applied Psychology:
• Psychology Applied to Public Health
• Psychology in the Workplace
• Psychology Applied to Education

Civil Society and Public Affairs:
• Theories of State and Civil Society
• Politics, Power and Civil Society
• Policy and Practice

Criminal Justice and Community Practice:
• Philosophy of Crime and Justice
• Policing; Youth Violence
• Policy and Practice

Global Social Work and Social Policy:
• Comparative Social Policy
• Social Work in a Global Context; Migration and Human Rights
• Policy and Practice

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates find careers in various specialist roles particularly related to research, campaigning and advocacy across public, private, voluntary and charity sectors. Part-time students may already be working in roles related to the specialist study areas and use the MSc for career advancement.

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

Note: This named degree will only run in 2016 if MSc Policy Analysis and Global Governance is not validated for 2016 entry.

Read less
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

Read less
The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation. Read more
The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation.

This innovative, interdisciplinary course is taught by experts from sociological, legal and psychological backgrounds with real-world experience. You will benefit from research-led teaching as well as strong links to wider criminal justice professions and industry.
Whether you are a recent graduate, or a practitioner or professional already working in the criminal justice field, this course will enable you to gain a critical understanding of contemporary criminological and socio-legal issues and engage with a diverse range of methods used to research them.

Aims

Aims of the course:
-Develop students' intellectual, critical and analytic skills in the academic areas of criminology and criminal justice.
-Produce graduates who have a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.
-Provide students with the opportunity to explore, through a range of optional courses, particular areas of study that are either professionally relevant or of academic interest.
-Provide students quantitative and qualitative research method skills in a way that is consistent with the demands of the discipline and the professional market.
-Develop in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary studies as the only way to confront the complexity of our object of study, an interest in the applied dimension of scientific knowledge and the awareness of the ethical implications of the scientific criminological project.
-Enhance students' transferable skills including proficiency in oral and written communication; the capacity for independent learning; the ability to reflect about the ethical and ideological components of their work; and the capacity for working co-operatively with others to produce professional outputs in a timely fashion.
-Develop criminological knowledge and research skills for the writing of a Masters-level dissertation.

Special features

On successful completion of the course, students will have:
-Demonstrated a critical awareness of the functioning and goals of the different institutions and agencies that comprise the criminal justice field in the English criminal justice system, the existing research on what works and the interrelationship between different forms of social control;
-Demonstrated a conceptual grasp of the different theoretical perspectives on crime, deviance and criminal justice, as well as specific areas of criminological research (e.g., interpersonal violence), and the capacity to critically evaluate theoretical developments in these areas;
-Developed an appreciation for the ethical and ideological dimensions of crime control and criminological research and the links between crime control and public policy;
-Recognised the methodological problems involved in the design and conduct of research and will have demonstrated knowledge of the main measurement strategies and data sources relevant to criminology and criminal justice studies;
-Understood the assumptions and practical implications built into criminal justice and criminological positions and how they affect policy formation and research methodologies;
-Demonstrated a critical awareness of research issues and methodologies related to the fields of criminology and/or criminal justice, combined with a knowledge of corresponding skills in undertaking a piece of research commensurate with Masters'-level study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Career opportunities

This master's offers you the specialists knowledge attractive for a range of criminal justice careers in areas such as local/central government, criminal justice agencies e.g. as a criminal intelligence analyst within the police, probation services, the voluntary sector and NGOs, pressure groups and think-tanks.

It also allows you to develop skills applicable to jobs in social research, management, third sector services, social work, and teaching.

Read less
The Postgraduate Diploma in Criminology allows you to gain an in depth understanding of the interactions between politics, criminology and criminal justice. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Criminology allows you to gain an in depth understanding of the interactions between politics, criminology and criminal justice.

It affords you all the specialist knowledge of the full MA, but does not include the dissertation and so provides a shorter and cheaper alternative.

This course will be of particular interest if you are looking to develop a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.

Whether you are a recent graduate, or a practitioner or professional already working in the criminal justice field, this course will enable you to gain a critical understanding of contemporary criminological and socio-legal issues and engage with a diverse range of methods used to research them.

Aims

-Develop students' intellectual, critical and analytic skills in the academic areas of criminology and criminal justice.
-Produce graduates who have a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.
-Provide students with the opportunity to explore, through a range of optional courses, particular areas of study that are either professionally relevant or of academic interest.
-Provide students quantitative and qualitative research method skills in a way that is consistent with the demands of the discipline and the professional market.
-Develop in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary studies as the only way to confront the complexity of our object of study, an interest in the applied dimension of scientific knowledge and the awareness of the ethical implications of the scientific criminological project.
-Enhance students' transferable skills including proficiency in oral and written communication; the capacity for independent learning; the ability to reflect about the ethical and ideological components of their work; and the capacity for working co-operatively with others to produce professional outputs in a timely fashion.

Special features

On successful completion of the course, students will have:
-Demonstrated a critical awareness of the functioning and goals of the different institutions and agencies that comprise the criminal justice field in the English criminal justice system, the existing research on what works and the interrelationship between different forms of social control
-Demonstrated a conceptual grasp of the different theoretical perspectives on crime, deviance and criminal justice, as well as specific areas of criminological research (e.g., interpersonal violence), and the capacity to critically evaluate theoretical developments in these areas
-Developed an appreciation for the ethical and ideological dimensions of crime control and criminological research and the links between crime control and public policy
-Recognised the methodological problems involved in the design and conduct of research and will have demonstrated knowledge of the main measurement strategies and data sources relevant to criminology and criminal justice studies
-Understood the assumptions and practical implications built into criminal justice and criminological positions and how they affect policy formation and research methodologies

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team of experts using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Career opportunities

The degree is designed to appeal to recent graduates looking to work for local/central government, the criminal justice agencies e.g. as a criminal intelligence analyst within the police; probation, voluntary sector and NGOs, pressure groups and think-tanks -such as The Howard League Reform Trust, as well as for a private sector.

Read less
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You are lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications and the semester you spend abroad further enriches your experience and widens your networks.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible.

A key feature of the MA Criminology is its involvement in a Common Study Programme. The Common Study Programme is a biannual student-centred conference at which students are invited to present papers, meet students and staff from other countries and exchange ideas.

The School has international links with colleagues and institutions and our current Visiting Professor of Criminology, Jeff Ferrell is an example of this extended network. Professor Ferrell is based at the Texas Christian University, USA where he is Professor of Sociology. He is a leading proponent of cultural criminology and has conducted research on urban culture, graffiti and media.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/175/criminology-with-semester-abroad

Course structure

The programme involves:

- the sociological study of crime and its application to criminal justice and social policy

- the study of issues at the cutting edge of current criminological debate with a strong emphasis on the cultural context of crime

- advanced criminological theory and research methods as applied to crime and criminal justice.

It also offers opportunities for you to develop your career in the areas of criminal justice, policy and government. We are constantly developing the modules available to you in line with current issues and staff expertise. Each year we announce new choices, for example we are currently working on developing a module convened by Dr David Redmon which looks at documentary film-making from a social science perspective.

You have the opportunity to spend a semester (spring or summer) at one of our European partner universities. Our partner universities include Erasmus University, Rotterdam, University of Hamburg, University of Ghent, ELTE University in Budapest and Utrecht University.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO869 - Theories of Crime (20 credits)
SO870 - Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
SO875 - Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
SO881 - Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
SO882 - Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)
SO940 - Prisons and Penal Policy (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
SO824 - Sociology of Violence (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by six coursework essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a postgraduate programme in criminology of the highest standard with teaching that is informed by internationally recognised research and scholarship

- give you a comprehensive overview and understanding of contemporary debates in criminology and criminal justice including those around diversity and inequality

- involve you in a critical analysis of crime and punishment in relation to developments in social theory, sociology and social policy

- provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions

- focus on the relevance of social science for the analysis and assessment of crime and criminal justice policy

- provide you with an advanced understanding of the ways in which quantitative and qualitative research methodologies may be used to study crime and criminal justice

- give you a critical awareness of the political and populist influences on criminal justice policy

- enable you to understand the emergence of social problems (including crime) and the responses of welfare and criminal justice institutions, including analysis of the theoretical, political and economic underpinnings of these responses

- build on the University’s close European ties by providing the potential for students to participate in the European Common Study programme in Criminology

- enable mobility to a partner university in another European country to give you a new perspective on criminology and criminal justice policy in a different learning environment

- provide the experience of a different way of life in another European country, enhance the appreciation of diversity and intercultural dialogue, promote personal development, and build the skills, flexibility and outlook for both organised and independent mobility in future training, education and employment.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X