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Masters Degrees (Applied Computing)

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If you've graduated from a non-computing subject and are looking to enhance your computer skills this could be the right course for you. Read more

Why Dundee

If you've graduated from a non-computing subject and are looking to enhance your computer skills this could be the right course for you. This MSc in Applied Computing course allows students to move forward from their previous studies and expand their knowledge into the world of computing.

With a strong focus on software development, this course is far more than just an introduction to the basics of computing. It will drive you deeper into the understanding of engineering computer programs and databases.

The course is based on practical, real-world assignments to provide great experience for your future career. As it is modelled on good practice within the industry, the MSc in Applied Computing ensures that students are kept up-to-date and instilled with a high level of employability.

You will have the opportunity to develop your projects by injecting your own personality into them, reflecting your own personal preferences within your practical work. The course also encourages a high degree of autonomy, functioning in a manner best described as 'assisted self-learning.'

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

The University maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Applied Computing is for students that have graduated from subjects other than computing, but have a keen interest in developing their computing knowledge and skills.

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from our University's research-active computing staff. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

Industrial collaboration is part of our ethos too, so we regularly include guest experts from industry.

- How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Coursework is often very practical, e.g. writing computer programs, designing interfaces, writing reports, constructing web sites, testing software, implementing databases, analysing problems or presenting solutions to clients.

What you will study

Over two semesters (between September and April) students will undertake 6 taught modules covering:

Internet and Computer Systems
Software Engineering
Software Development and Advanced Programming using C++
Graphical User Interfaces
Human-Computer Interaction
Database Systems
Detailed module guides are available online.

Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme. These joint classes offer a valuable opportunity to learn from, and discuss the material with, other groups of students with different backgrounds and perspectives.

Employability

Possible career paths include software development, website design, network support, database development and research, working as computer systems manager, data processing manager, software engineer, computer analyst & programmer, computer & IT consultant.

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The Higher Diploma in Applied Computing Technology is a CONVERSION COURSE open to graduates from non-computing disciplines. Read more
The Higher Diploma in Applied Computing Technology is a CONVERSION COURSE open to graduates from non-computing disciplines. The course provides you with an understanding of the principles of internet-based computer systems and will equip you with a range of core IT skills, including web design, web server configuration, managing and manipulating multimedia content, interfacing with databases and working with common office software.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cko08/

Course Details

The Higher Diploma is offered as a one year full-time or a two years part-time.

This is a CONVERSION COURSE and is intended for graduates who do not have Computer Science Degree and would like to attain skills in demand by the IT sector.

Format

A typical five credit module includes:
• two lecture hours
• one to two hours of practicals per week
• outside these regular hours, you are required to study independently

Full-Time Mode

Full-Time students take 60 credits as follows: 30 credits in teaching period 1 and 30 credits in period 2.

CS1117 Introduction to Programming (15 credits) - Dr. Jospeh Manning
CS5002 Web Development 1 (5 credits) - Dr. Frank Boehme
CS5007 Computer Applications with Visual Basic (5 credits) - Dr. James Doherty
CS5008 Internet Computing (5 credits) - Mr. Adrian O'Riordan
CS5009 Multimedia (5 credits) - Prof. James Bowen
CS5018 Web Development 2 (5 credits) - Dr. Derek Bridge
CS5019 Systems Organization I (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5020 Systems Organization II (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5021 Introduction to Relational Databases (5 credits) - Dr. Kieran Herley
CS5022 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr. Humprey Sorensen

Part-Time mode

Part-Time students take 30 credits in each of the two academic years as follows:

- Year 1 -

CS1117 Introduction to Programming (15 credits) - Dr. Joseph Manning
CS5002 Web Development 1 (5 credits) - Dr. Frank Boehme
CS5018 Web Development 2 (5 credits) - Dr. Derek Bridge
CS5021 Introduction to Relational Databases (5 credits) - Dr. Kieran Herley

- Year 2 -

CS5007 Computer Application with Visual Basic (5 credits) - Dr. James Doherty
CS5008 Internet Computing (5 credits) - Mr. Adrian O'Doherty
CS5009 Multimedia (5 credits) - Prof. James Bowen
CS5019 Systems Organization I (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5020 Systems Organization II (5 credits) - Prof. John Morrison
CS5022 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr. Humphrey Sorensen

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Diploma/Science/page14.html

Assessment

The Higher Diploma in Applied Computing Technology will be examined through a combination of end-of-year exams and module assignments.

Careers

Companies actively recruiting Computer Science graduates in 2014-15 include:

Accenture, Aer Lingus, Amazon, Apple, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Ireland, BT, Cisco, CiTi-Technology, Cloudreach, Dell, Digital Turbine Asia Pacific, EMC, Enterprise Ireland, Ericsson, First Derivatives, Guidewire, IBM, Intel, Open Text, Paddy Power, Pilz, PWC, SAP Galway Transverse Technologies, Trend Micro, Uniwink, Version 1 (Software).

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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Got a love for computing and technology? Hoping to build on the skills you learnt during your undergraduate studies? This essential applied computing masters is well suited to students from a business IT or computing background, helping you to build on existing skills and develop an advanced understanding. Read more

Got a love for computing and technology? Hoping to build on the skills you learnt during your undergraduate studies? This essential applied computing masters is well suited to students from a business IT or computing background, helping you to build on existing skills and develop an advanced understanding.

Southampton Solent University’s applied computing masters programme places a unique emphasis on graduate employability, focusing on developing the specific skills that industry employers are seeking.

One of the ways that the course team ensure the curriculum is achieving this goal is through regular consultations with an industry liaison panel. This panel advises the course team on the latest industry developments and the course content is changed accordingly.

These strong links with industry have provided previous School of Media Arts and Technology students with access to a range of work experience opportunities, case studies and guest lectures.

Computing students at Southampton Solent have the opportunity to use industry standard facilities throughout their studies. Our EC Council certified security and networking labs feature a wide variety of equipment from Cisco (including Cisco Packet Tracer), Fluke and HP, as well as high-fidelity simulation systems like the market-leading Opnet. Students also have free access to our devices lab, where they can test their web design projects on a variety of different computing devices.

Students are supported to develop a range of transferable skills throughout the course. These include project management, problem solving and analytical skills that empower students to work in a range of different industries after graduation. Students will also develop high-level academic skills, perfect for those who are hoping to pursue a PhD.

What does this course lead to?

Optional units provide students with the opportunity to specialise in particular areas of computing and business IT – laying the groundwork for a successful career in management, strategic planning or system development.

Who is this course for?

This master’s course is well-suited to those with a computing or business IT background, and who have either an undergraduate degree or extensive industrial experience in the area. The option choices within the course are ideal for those who wish to focus on a particular niche within computing.

What you will study

Year one

Core units

  • Research Methods
  • Professional Issues and Practice
  • Pilot Project
  • Research Project

Three optional units from:

  • Data Mining and Analytics
  • Application Development
  • Project Management
  • Enterprise Information Security
  • Usability and UX Design
  • Advanced IP Routing
  • Advanced IP Switched Networks

Please note: Not all optional units are guaranteed to run each year.

Facilities

During your studies you will learn to build information systems using a variety of professional-grade software packages. You will also have access to our state-of-the-art IT laboratories; depending on your choice of options you may have access to our specialised network security laboratory or usability lab with eye-tracking facilities.

You’ll have access to our devices lab, a special test area integrated with our existing software development spaces. The devices lab consists of a range of the latest mobile devices mounted on flexible tethers, allowing you to test your websites and apps on real equipment.

Your future

Suitable roles for graduates include:

  • Business Analyst
  • Project manager
  • Database manager
  • Digital marketer
  • Software developer
  • Web Developer
  • Application development
  • Project manager
  • Senior database analyst
  • Senior user experience analyst
  • Software architect
  • Network deployment specialist.

Industry links

Course content is developed with input from an industrial liaison panel, making sure that your studies include the latest technology and working practice from industry experts.

You’ll also have the chance to work directly with real-world companies on live briefs, events and projects, while regular BCS meetings hosted at the University are your chance to build professional connections and secure valuable work experience opportunities.



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This programme of study aims to train first-degree holders in computing-related areas into specialists in selected areas of IT and computing. Read more

Course outline

This programme of study aims to train first-degree holders in computing-related areas into specialists in selected areas of IT and computing. Based on the current expertise in the Department, the programme offers students opportunities for in-depth study in secure mobile and wireless communication systems, biometrics and authentication, data mining and knowledge discovery, and Software Project Management techniques and applications.

The programme is carefully designed to suit the varied needs of different students from different backgrounds and with different career objectives, in the IT fields.

On graduating from this programme, you will be able to:

- Understand a range of modern computing technologies
- Apply these technologies in practice
- Describe the roles that modern computing technologies have in many areas of application
- Demonstrate the value of state-of-the-art development in one specific technology and its applications

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Duration

The programme lasts for 18-month over 6 terms. It consists of 8 taught modules and an individual project totalling 195 units of credit. You can start the course in September, January or April each year.

Teaching methods

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

After your degree

The increasing specialisation which is frequently required in the employment market is no longer provided by just an undergraduate degree. A postgraduate degree provides these advanced skills and, in today’s competitive employment market, is becoming increasingly important in order to stand out from the crowd.

Any successful career choice in the market place will be dependent on a number of factors. Your academic qualification, while important, may not be the deciding factor. Your attitude, skills and experience matter too. Whatever your motivation in taking a postgraduate course, you should think about the transferable skills an employer is seeking, and taking advantage of every opportunity for self-development to improve your chances of success in your future career. The Careers Service has the resources to help you with this process.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/appliedcomputing.

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This course is designed for non-computing graduates who need to apply information technology to their current career, or want to change career direction. Read more
This course is designed for non-computing graduates who need to apply information technology to their current career, or want to change career direction.

It covers a wide range of topics including programming, databases, security, project management and computer networking, giving you both the underpinning theory and the ability to apply it to complex real-world problems, as well as an awareness of emerging technologies and developments.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

There are six entry points through the year. This allows you to start when it is most suitable. The entry points are:

• September
• November
• January
• March
• June
• July

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/applied-computing-and-information-technology#about

Course detail

• Study key areas of information technology including applications of web technologies, information systems strategy and emerging technologies
• Explore creative and innovative applications of technology to real-world problems
• Develop your analytical, evaluative and problem-solving skills in relation to IT-based solutions
• Gain a thorough understanding of the social and legal aspects of the Information Technology field (e.g. British Computer Society Code of Conduct and Data Protection)
• Benefit from valuable experience of working on projects for real business, opening up new career opportunities in management, supervision or as a practitioner (eg database/IT developer or system designer/analyst) in industries which make substantial use of computers and information technology.

Modules

• Programming for Applications
• Computer Networks and Security
• Data Modelling, Management and Governance
• Research Methodologies and Project Management
• MSc Project – Applied Computing and Information Technology

Assessment

The majority of units are assessed through coursework, group and individual projects, portfolios, essays, presentations or exams. Presentations are usually given and assessed in a group seminar. You will also produce artefacts in the area of your specialism.

Constant feedback and advice from a supervisory or unit team will be provided to support you in your work.

You will progress from well-defined briefs to more open-ended and challenging assessments, which culminate in your major project – the MSc Project – where you will be given freedom to choose your area of work.

Careers

You will gain valuable skills for a career within computing and IT in particular but is also relevant for a much wider range of applications such as computer science or wider system engineering.

The unit 'Research Methodologies and Project Management' requires you to work in a team so as to apply a current project management methodology that embraces all of these knowledge areas in an integrated way while going through the stages of planning, execution and project control. You will work as part of a team, take responsibility and make autonomous decisions that impact on the project team performance.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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This course is designed for non-computing graduates who need to apply information technology to their current career, or want to change career direction. Read more
This course is designed for non-computing graduates who need to apply information technology to their current career, or want to change career direction.

It covers a wide range of topics including programming, databases, security, project management and computer networking, giving you both the underpinning theory and the ability to apply it to complex real-world problems, as well as an awareness of emerging technologies and developments.

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

This course is offered via block delivery. There are two entry points (October and November). This allows you to start when it is most suitable.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/applied-computing-and-information-technology-15-m

Course detail

• Study key areas of information technology including applications of web technologies, information systems strategy and emerging technologies
• Explore creative and innovative applications of technology to real-world problems
• Develop your analytical, evaluative and problem-solving skills in relation to IT-based solutions
• Gain a thorough understanding of the social and legal aspects of the Information Technology field (e.g. British Computer Society Code of Conduct and Data Protection)
• Benefit from valuable experience of working on projects for real business, opening up new career opportunities in management, supervision or as a practitioner (eg database/IT developer or system designer/analyst) in industries which make substantial use of computers and information technology.

Modules

• Programming for Applications
• Computer Networks and Security
• Data Modelling, Management and Governance
• Research Methodologies and Project Management
• MSc Project – Applied Computing and Information Technology

Assessment

You are assessed in a variety of ways. The majority of units are assessed through coursework, group and individual projects, portfolios, essays, presentations or exams. Presentations are usually given and assessed in the context of a group seminar. You will also produce artefacts in the area of your specialism. Constant feedback and advice from a supervisory or unit team will be provided to support you in your work.

You will progress from well-defined briefs to more open-ended and challenging assessments, which culminate in your major project the MSc Project where you will be given freedom to choose your area of work.

Careers

You will gain valuable skills for a career within computing and IT in particular but is also relevant for a much wider range of applications such as computer science or wider system engineering.

The unit Research Methodologies and Project Management requires you to work in a team so as to apply a current project management methodology that embraces all of these knowledge areas in an integrated way while going through the stages of planning, execution and project control. You will work as part of a team, take responsibility and make autonomous decisions that impact on the project team performance.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The programme is designed to provide in-depth knowledge and skills within the field of computing. The course is aimed at students who already have a first degree in computing, have some existing software engineering skills, and wish to deepen their knowledge. Read more
The programme is designed to provide in-depth knowledge and skills within the field of computing. The course is aimed at students who already have a first degree in computing, have some existing software engineering skills, and wish to deepen their knowledge. This programme will have a strong focus on how data can be exploited within an organisation and will emphasise the communication of that data to a target audience.

Graduates would undertake a range of tasks associated with IT in organisations, and develop sophisticated solutions to IT problems.

Course Overview

The main themes of the programme are:
-Web based application development
-Database development, deployment and integration
-Project and team management in the computing sector

This programme will equip students with those skills at a high academic level and also crucially enable them to practically implement their knowledge because of the ‘hands-on’ emphasis of the programme.

Each of these themed areas is itself an area of significant international strategic importance and will enable students to gain important and valuable skills.

The Web based application development theme reviews current trends and technologies. Complex challenges faced by web developers are investigated in detail.

The Database development, deployment and integration theme covers the important areas of Data Warehousing and Data Analysis both of which are cited as important skills that are in great demand by businesses.

The final theme, Project and team management will concentrate on developing the skills of project management and systems analysis, both of which are in great demand by employers.

Modules

Part 1:
-Data Warehousing (20 credits)
-Distributed Web Apps (20 credits)
-Leadership and Management (20 credits)
-Managing Information Systems and Projects (20 credits)
-Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 credits)
-Web Technologies for e-Commerce (20 credits)

Part 2:
-Major Project (60 credits)

Key Features

This MSc provides significant technical content which will inform the management decision making process. In this context major organisations such as Tesco, Sainsbury and Amazon have been making significant investment into data warehousing and data mining technologies.

To effectively use this technology requires a large number of people to apply and manage the technology. The price of the technology has reduced significantly since the inception of data warehousing with Microsoft and Oracle supplying the appropriate add-on tools to their database management system products. These factors allow smaller organisations to gain a competitive advantage by utilising the large pool of transactional data that in some cases has been stored for many years.

In an industrial context, students may be required to manage teams of developers in small to large scale projects. To efficiently manage such projects, they will require a significant technical understanding of the issues arising to be able to appreciate the complexity of the tasks to be undertaken.

Indeed, in an SME this role is often fulfilled by a senior member of the development staff with both development and management duties. As either a developer or manager, the graduate would be expected to demonstrate their initiative and be able to use their research skills to rapidly adapt to the demands of new technology.

Assessment

Student works are assessed through combination of course works, lab based practical exams and written exam. The final mark for some modules may include one or more pieces of course work set and completed during the module. Project work is assessed by a written report and oral presentation. Part 2 of the MSc programme requires the student to research and prepare an individual project/dissertation of a substantial nature.

University students who are unable to successfully complete all aspects of the Part 1 may be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits).

Career Opportunities

Students on this programme develop a broad range of technical skills and will study a number of topics related to information systems. The programme covers the three themes of Web based application development, Database development, deployment and integration, and Project and Team management in the computing sector.

A significant emphasis is placed on database management and the implementation of applications for manipulating information including both database systems and web applications. Additionally, graduates would be able to lead teams and manage projects.

It is expected that graduates would seek positions such as:
-Project manager (within the Computing field)
-Data analyst
-Database administrator
-Application developer
-Web developer

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This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Read more
This degree programme aims to give students a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of research methods to enable them to operate effectively in the application of computing in industry, commerce or research. Students with an interest in topics covered by our research teams will find this is an excellent opportunity to get involved in progressive research.

Why study MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The MSc Computing Research degree is designed for graduates with a good degree in Computing or a related subject who wish to gain deep knowledge of research methods and experience of working in an active research environment.

The School of Computing provides a distinctive, balanced and enjoyable learning environment, matched to the future needs of both society and the computing field. Its research has strong foundations in mathematical and logical techniques, and in probabilistic and machine learning algorithms that are applied in its work on computer vision and multi-agent systems. In its applied research, the multi-disciplinary School has an international reputation in computer support for older and disabled people, healthcare computing, space systems and interaction design. All these areas of research have been developed through strong, long-term relationships with other leading academic institutions worldwide, and in collaboration with professional and industrial partners. The School is also active in commercialising its research, with several recent spin out companies fostering an entrepreneurial atmosphere.

The School of Computing has four major research groups:
Assistive and Healthcare Systems
Computational Systems
Interactive Systems Design
Space Technology Centre

What's so good about MSc Computing Research at Dundee?

The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing research. We currently have 23 academics and 35 researchers working alongside our 27 PhD students. Since January 2008 our school of computing has generated 313 publications and counting. In this time, we've produced 129 projects totalling more than £12.3 million in funding making Dundee a great place to come to engage in computing research.

We encourage a professional, inter-disciplinary and user-centred approach to computer systems design and production, and will enable you to develop the skills so that you can undertake independent research and participate in proposal development and innovation.

Our facilities

You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

Postgraduate culture

The School of Computing maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students - you're far more than just a matriculation number to us. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

How you will be taught

We know how important it is to be at the leading edge of computing and so you will learn from research-active staff in the School of Computing. Leading researchers teach you and small class sizes mean that they really get to know you, making for an informal and supportive community.

What you will study

You study three taught modules, during the period January-March, making your module selections with your advisor, as follows:
Computing Research Frontiers
One of: Designing Innovative Research OR Research Methods
One of: Human Computer Interaction OR Multi-agent Systems and Grid Computing

Subject to examination performance, you then progress to the individual research project which runs from May to December. You will be based with one of the research groups within the School of Computing:

Assistive & healthcare technologies
Computational systems
Interactive systems design
Space technology centre

How you will be assessed

The taught modules are assessed by continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in March/April. The project is assessed by dissertation.

Careers

Our students are highly employable:
They develop the expertise that employers want from computing graduates - our Industrial Advisory Board includes experts from a range of industries including Amazon, Scottish Enterprise Tayside, NCR, Chevron and Microsoft
They are prepared for a wide range of good career prospects in computing - the UK faces a massive shortage of graduates qualified to fill the 120,000 new jobs in computing and IT every year

Graduates may also choose to continue to a PhD in the School of Computing or elsewhere.

Computing at the University of Dundee is ranked 21st in the UK according to most recent Times Good University Guide and 12th in the UK according to the Guardian University League Table 2009. The University of Dundee has powered its way to a position as one of Scotland's leading universities with an international reputation for excellence across a range of activities. With over 18,000 students, it is growing fast in both size and reputation. It has performed extremely well in both teaching and research assessment exercises, has spawned a range of spin-out companies to exploit its research and has a model wider-access programme.

Dundee has been described as the largest village in Scotland which gives an indication of how friendly and compact it is. With a population of 150,000 it is not too large but has virtually all the cultural and leisure activities you would expect in a much larger city. It is situated beside a broad estuary of the river Tay, surrounded by hills and farmland, and for lovers of the great outdoors it is hard to imagine another UK location that offers so much all year round on land and water. The University is situated in the centre of Dundee, and everything needed is on the one-stop campus: study facilities, help, advice, leisure activities... yet the attractions of the city centre and the cultural quarter are just a stroll away.

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The academic staff in the Applied Computing Department (ACD) are all engaged in research and publications. Considering its modest size, ACD has successfully attracted research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU, including industry, research councils, HEA and EU framework projects such as FP6. Read more

Research programme

The academic staff in the Applied Computing Department (ACD) are all engaged in research and publications. Considering its modest size, ACD has successfully attracted research funding from various sources in the UK and the EU, including industry, research councils, HEA and EU framework projects such as FP6. Furthermore, ACD has been working and collaborating with many European research institutions.

For the academic year 2012-2013, 2 DPhil and 6 MSc students (1 in Mathematics) have graduated, four of whom graduated with Distinction. The 2 DPhil students have made it for the March graduation and we expect to have 3 or 4 more completing their DPhil research programmes for the next graduation. One of our new MPhil/DPhil students in Computing joined the Department last October, and 3 other MPhil/DPhil students have joined us since. Over the last few years, the number of research students in ACD has grown steadily to (currently) 29 PhD and 2 Master’s research students.

We have had over 20 refereed conference and journal papers published during the last 12 months, and two of the papers have been awarded best paper awards.

ACD supports diverse research topics addressing varied applied computing technologies such as:

- Image processing and pattern recognition with applications in biometric-based person identification, image super-resolution, digital watermarking and steganography, content-based image / video indexing and retrieval, biomedical image analysis.
- Multi-factor authentication and security algorithms.
- Wireless networks technologies (Multi-frequency Software-Defined / Cognitive Radios, convergence and integration of different wireless technologies and standards such as WiFi and WiMax, IPv4 and IPv6, wireless mesh technologies, intrusion detection and prevention, efficiency and stability of ad hoc networks).
- Hybrid navigation and localisation integrations for mobile handsets, including using Cellular and WiFi in conjunction with GPS and Glonass for seamless positioning indoors, Multiplexed receive chain of GPS/Glonass with on-board handset Bluetooth/WiFi, GNSS signals multiplexing for real time simulation.
- Cloud computing, including the readiness of mobile operating systems for cloud services and focusing on techniques for fast computing handovers, efficient virtualisation and optimised security algorithms.
- Data mining techniques, including database systems, the application of data mining techniques in image and biological data, human-computer interaction and visual languages.
- Research and development of Apps for mobile devices and smart TVs, particularly for application in the areas of education and healthcare.
- Differential geometry – Einstein metrics, quasi-Einstein metrics, Ricci solitons, numerical methods in differential geometry.

As well as researching the chosen subject, our students engage in delivering seminars weekly, attending conferences and workshops, attending online webinars and discussion forums, attending training and focused group studies, supervising tutorial and laboratory sessions for undergraduate students, peer reviews and final year project supervision, among a host of technical and networking activities to enhance their skills and techniques.

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.
Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/computingresearch.

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Application period/deadline. November 1, 2017 - January 24, 2018. Research-oriented degree provides an exciting opportunity to study in a leading-edge research environment. Read more

Application period/deadline: November 1, 2017 - January 24, 2018

• Research-oriented degree provides an exciting opportunity to study in a leading-edge research environment

• The studies combine both theoretical and practical approach

• Specializations in Applied Computing, Artificial Intelligence, and Computer Egineering

The International Master’s Degree Programme in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) is a two-year research-oriented programme concentrating on intelligent digital solutions to real world problems. During the past decades, Computer Science and Engineering has had a significant impact into our daily lives. The development continues and soon computers will not be used as separate devices anymore. Instead they will blend into our living environments and offer us rich sets of services through natural and intuitive user interfaces. The graduates from Computer Science and Engineering will play a key role in this development.

The two-year programme has three specialisation options:

• Applied Computing

• Artificial Intelligence

• Computer Engineering

Applied Computing focuses on the next generation of interactive systems that place humans at the focus of the technological development. Adopting a multidisciplinary real-world approach, students have to spend a substantial amount of time working in group projects to develop a variety of systems ranging from interactive online services to games and mobile applications, with a strong focus on innovation and design.

Artificial Intelligence focuses in various fields of AI, such as machine learning, machine vision, and data mining. This specialisation provides students with a solid theoretical understanding and practical skills on processing and analyzing digital data and the ability to create intelligent solutions to real world problems with modern AI techniques.

Computer Engineering focuses on both hardware and software aspects of computing with emphasis on embedded system development. In this specialisation, students also study signal processing and its applications, and work with projects on modern signal processors and embedded computers. The specialisation gives the students a good basis to work with Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

In addition to the core specialization options, students can take optional courses to widen their specialization expertise into:

• Biomedical signal analysis

• Machine learning

• Machine vision

• Signal processing

• Embedded systems

• Ubiquitous computing

This Master’s programme is provided by the Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, and students are strongly encouraged to work closely with research groups in the faculty that are international leaders in their fields. The Center for Machine Vision and Signal Analysis (CMVS) is renowned world-wide for its 35 years of expertise in computer vision research. The Center for Ubiquitous Computing (UBICOMP) has created a unique research environment for Ubiquitous Computing including multitouch wall-sized displays, smartphone sensing middleware and sensor networks. Biomimetics and Intelligent Systems Group (BISG) is a fusion of expertise from the fields of computer science and biology. During the studies the research groups provide students trainee and master’s thesis positions, with the possibility to continue as a doctoral student, and even as a post-doctoral researcher.

The programme will provide the graduates with sufficient skills to work in a wide variety of positions offered by research institutes and companies mainly operating in the field of information and communications technology (ICT). The graduates are most likely to be employed in research and development related positions, but also management positions and entrepreneurship fit into the profile.

Possible titles include:

• Research Scientist

• Software Engineer

• System Designer

• Project Manager

• Specialist

Students applying for the programme must possess an applicable B.Sc. degree in computer science, electrical engineering or relevant fields such as physics or applied mathematics.

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The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Read more

The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Expertise in the group encompasses a broad range of topics, including Continuum Mechanics, Analysis & Dynamical Systems, Industrial & Applied Mathematics, Inverse Problems, Mathematical Finance, and Numerical Analysis & Scientific Computing. The group has a strongly interdisciplinary research ethos, which it pursues in areas such as Mathematics in the Life Sciences, Uncertainty Quantification & Data Science, and within the Manchester Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics.

The Applied Mathematics group offers the MSc in Applied Mathematics as an entry point to graduate study. The MSc has two pathways, reflecting the existing strengths within the group in numerical analysis and in industrial mathematics. The MSc consists of five core modules (total 75 credits) covering the main areas of mathematical techniques, modelling and computing skills necessary to become a modern applied mathematician. Students then choose three options, chosen from specific pathways in numerical analysis and industrial modelling (total 45 credits). Finally, a dissertation (60 credits) is undertaken with supervision from a member of staff in the applied mathematics group with the possibility of co-supervision with an industrial sponsor. 

Aims

The course aims to develop core skills in applied mathematics and allows students to specialise in industrial modelling or numerical analysis, in preparation for study towards a PhD or a career using mathematics within industry. An important element is the course regarding transferable skills which will link with academics and employers to deliver important skills for a successful transition to a research career or the industrial workplace.

Special features

The course features a transferable skills module, with guest lectures from industrial partners. Some dissertation projects and short internships will also be available with industry.

Teaching and learning

Students take eight taught modules and write a dissertation. The taught modules feature a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, coursework, and computing and modelling projects (both individually and in groups). The modules on Scientific Computing and Transferable Skills particularly involve significant project work. Modules are examined through both coursework and examinations.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment comprises course work, exams in January and May, followed by a dissertation carried out and written up between June and September. The dissertation counts for 60 credits of the 180 credits and is chosen from a range of available projects, including projects suggested by industrial partners.

Course unit details

Course unit details

 CORE (75 credits)

 * Introduction to Uncertainty Quantification

 * Mathematical Methods

 * Partial Differential Equations

 * Scientific Computing

 * Transferable Skills for Applied Mathematicians

 OPTIONAL (3 modules, 45 credits)

 * Applied Dynamical Systems (IM)

 * Continuum Mechanics (IM)

 * Stability theory (IM)

 * Transport Phenomena and Conservation Laws (IM)

 * Advanced Uncertainty Quantification (IM,NA)

 * Approximation Theory and Finite Element Analysis (NA)

 * Numerical Linear Algebra (NA)

 * Numerical Optimization and Inverse Problems (NA)

Students registered on the Numerical Analysis pathway must select modules marked NA, and those registered on the Industrial Modelling pathway must select modules marked IM.

Syllabuses for the modules Introduction to Uncertainty Quantification and Advanced Uncertainty Quantification are currently being finalized and details will be added here as soon as possible.

Facilities

Modern computing facilities are available to support the course.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a career in research (via entry into a PhD programme) or direct entry into industry. Possible subsequent PhD programmes would be those in mathematics, computer science, or one of the many science and engineering disciplines where applied mathematics is crucial. The programme develops many computational, analytical, and modelling skills, which are valued by a wide range of employers. Specialist skills in scientific computing are valued in the science, engineering, and financial sector.



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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Cloud computing is revolutionising the way that large, and often complex, datasets are stored and analysed. Our course aims to produce experts in cloud computing and big data required by academia and industry. Read more

Cloud computing is revolutionising the way that large, and often complex, datasets are stored and analysed. Our course aims to produce experts in cloud computing and big data required by academia and industry.

The MRes can only be applied for as part of the four-year (MRes plus PhD) EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data. The programme is suitable for students from both computing and mathematical backgrounds. It is very skills-focussed and also offers a high degree of research training.

Our course focuses on both theory and practice so that you can understand and implement cloud computing applications. You will cover key subjects such as advanced object-oriented programming, data mining and big data analytics.

All academic staff involved in teaching cloud computing modules have international reputations for their contributions to the field and some have extensive experience as practitioners in industry.

Delivery

During the MRes you will undertake advanced Masters’ level training in cloud computing and data analytics. The training will begin with a module in either computing science for mathematicians (for those with a statistics background) or statistics for computing scientists (for those from a computer science background).

All students will then be taught topics including statistics for big data, programming for big data, cloud computing, machine learning, big data analytics and time series analysis. The taught component will finish with a substantial group project, where you will have the opportunity to work with students from different backgrounds on a practical industry-focused data analysis problem.

Following this in years 2-4, you will carry out PhD research, guided by PhD supervisors from within the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data, and typically additional advisors from industry.

Facilities

You will have access to free cloud computing resources to manage your research, a purpose-built Decision Theatre and 3D visualisation facility and a 3D printing learning lab.

You will be based in The Core building, where you will have the opportunity to work alongside experts in key areas of computing science, as well as access to industrial partners. You will also receive funding to attend selected conferences in emerging areas of your research discipline. We also offer funding for equipment and software to support your research.



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This course runs in Germany. This course covers a range of essential topics related to distributed computing systems. Yet these modules are not isolated; each one takes its place in the field in relation to others. Read more

About the course

This course runs in Germany.

This course covers a range of essential topics related to distributed computing systems. Yet these modules are not isolated; each one takes its place in the field in relation to others.

The emphasis in the course is to build the connections between topics, enabling software engineers to achieve co-operation between distinct autonomous systems under constraints of cost and performance requirements.

The course is suitable for:

Recent graduates in Electrical or Electronic Engineering or Computer Science, who wish to develop their skills in the field of distributed computing systems.
Practicing engineers and computer professionals who wish to develop their knowledge in this area.
People with suitable mathematical, scientific or other engineering qualifications, usually with some relevant experience, who wish to enter this field.

Aims

The past few years have witnessed that Grid computing is evolving as a promising large-scale distributed computing infrastructure for scientists and engineers around the world to share various resources on the Internet including computers, software, data, instruments.

Many countries around the world have invested heavily on the development of the Grid computing infrastructure. Many IT companies have been actively involved in Grid development. Grid computing has been applied in a variety of areas such as particle physics, bio-informatics, finance, social science and manufacturing. The IT industry has seen the Grid computing infrastructure as the next generation of the Internet.

The aim of the programme is to equip high quality and ambitious graduates with the necessary advanced technical and professional skills for an enhanced career either in industry or leading edge research in the area of distributed computing systems.

Specifically, the main objectives of the programme are:

To critically appraise advanced technologies for developing distributed systems;
To practically examine the development of large scale distributed systems;
To critically investigate the problems and pitfalls of distributed systems in business, commerce, and industry.

Course Content

Compulsory Modules:

Computer Networks
Network Security and Encryption
Distributed Systems Architecture
Project and Personal Management
High Performance Computing and Big Data
Software Engineering
Embedded Systems Engineering
Intelligent Systems
Dissertation

Special Features

Electronic and Computer Engineering is one of the largest disciplines in the University, with a portfolio of research contracts totalling £7.5 million, and has strong links with industry.

The laboratories are well equipped with an excellent range of facilities to support the research work and courses. We have comprehensive computing resources in addition to those offered centrally by the University. The discipline is particularly fortunate in having extensive gifts of software and hardware to enable it to undertake far-reaching design projects.

We have a wide range of research groups, each with a complement of academics and research staff and students. The groups are:

Media Communications
Wireless Networks and Communications
Power Systems
Electronic Systems
Sensors and Instrumentation.

Women in Engineering and Computing Programme

Brunel’s Women in Engineering and Computing mentoring scheme provides our female students with invaluable help and support from their industry mentors.

Accreditation

Distributed Computing Systems Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

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This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from any non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in Computing. Read more

Course outline

This programme of study is intended primarily for graduates from any non-computing background to obtain fundamental knowledge and understanding of a range of core subjects in Computing. The overall aim of education is to either equip the graduates who want to develop their careers in their own areas of speciality with additional understanding, awareness and skills of IT and Computing, or help those who want to change their careers into IT and Computing. The programme can also serve as a pre-requisite for advanced master programmes in Applied Computing at Buckingham.

Graduates who successfully complete the programmes are eligible for entry into the MSc in Innovative Computing degree programme.

The Graduate Diploma programme consists of 7 taught modules and an individual project. On completing the programmes, you will be able to understand:

- the role that computers and networked systems play in the modern world.
- the essential knowledge and skills in programming together with relevant structures and concepts to create such systems.
- fundamental concepts and principles of databases, networking, object-oriented programming, web design and human-computer interaction.
- advanced applications including data mining, multimedia, interactive computer graphics, and security systems.
- ethical, professional, social and legal issues in exploiting computing technology in practice.

The programme will also help you to develop skills in:

- Computing and web application
- Web design
- Programming and problem-solving for large scale or mobile applications
- Database and software development
- Developing usable GUIs
- Computer graphics
- Computer network issues

Find out more about our Department of Applied Computing on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/appliedcomputing.

Teaching methods

Our modules include a mixture of formal lectures, tutorial classes and practical classes. At the start of each module you will be given an up-to-date module outline and reading list. Most modules will provide two or three hours of lectures each week to introduce you to the basic concepts and techniques. These will be supported by lecture notes or handouts.

Lectures are supported by weekly tutorial classes, usually one hour in length, which are held in small groups so that all students can benefit from individual attention. You will be expected to prepare for these classes, for example by attempting a set of exercises or by reading a case study.

Many of our modules have supervised practical classes in the computer laboratories in which you can apply and practise the techniques you have learnt in the lectures. These practical sessions are usually two or three hours long.

You will also be expected to study on your own, using the library for reading research and the computer laboratories to improve your practical skills.

Course material is also available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Study options

Students may take the diploma over 9 (April start) or 12 (January start) months. The course is also available on a part-time basis over two years (starting in January).

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