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Masters Degrees (Applicable Mathematics)

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The MSc Applicable Mathematics is an innovative programme, drawing together traditional and modern mathematical techniques in a variety of social science contexts. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Applicable Mathematics is an innovative programme, drawing together traditional and modern mathematical techniques in a variety of social science contexts. It is designed both for mathematicians who wish to make themselves more marketable by adding some social science aspects to their knowledge and skills base, and for non-mathematicians with strong quantitative backgrounds who wish to add to and improve their understanding of the mathematics behind much of social science.

The programme will provide you with an increased knowledge of mathematics, particularly in algorithms, game theory, discrete mathematics, probability and stochastics, and optimisation, in addition to training in appropriate computational methods. Reflecting the world's dependence on computation, students will learn the programming language Java, and how to use it to apply their knowledge to real-world problems.

The skills and knowledge gained over the programme will open up a wide range of potential careers, including finance, business, software development, and industry. It will also provide a solid base for further studies at research level.

Graduate destinations

This programme is ideal preparation for a range of careers in industry, finance, government and research. Graduates of the programme have found employment in companies such as Amazon; BlackRock; Credit Suisse; Facebook; Goldman Sachs; Google; KPMG; National Grid and RBS.

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This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. Read more
This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. The core philosophy of the programme is to equip students both with mathematics and its applications and with high-level scientific software and associated numerical skills. The Greenwich campus, near the financial district of Canary Wharf, enables the department to build ties with many modern engineering and applied mathematics practitioners enabling our students to become part of a wider group. The Leslie Comrie seminar series, inviting both academics and industrialists, allows you to interact with our external links creating an advantageous learning experience. We provide you the grounds for building a high profile of understanding of current research practices in the industry. Our classes contain interactive applications that enhance the learning experience by innovative teaching practices. Utilising research expertise within the department you will graduate with a strong understanding of numerical methods. You will also develop an understanding for further applicability in various fields of applied mathematics and engineering.

This programme is suitable both for fresh graduates and also for experienced professional practitioners who wish to further their skills. The programme core modules cover modern mathematical skills together with applications across different industries, and there are optional professional modules directly related to research expertise within the Faculty. This ensures that students have an advanced understanding of both theory and practice in their selected specialist areas. Students will gain knowledge of mathematical skills and applications, computational skills, and relevant professional experience, related to traditional engineering and science modelling, modern enterprise applications, finance, and service industries. They will gain an understanding of emerging applications. There will be hands-on training in various development tools and in the use of computational software related to their professional direction. Assessment takes the form of 100% coursework, based on applications of current market practices. A supervised thesis project takes place at the end of the last teaching term during the summer months. Projects are allocated in March and students are invited to undertake a project that provides genuine insight in an area of the research interests within the department. The programme is also available on a part-time basis.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/maths/appmaths

Mathematics

Postgraduate mathematics students benefit from award-winning teaching and great facilities. Our programmes are informed by world-renowned research and our links with industry ensure our students develop the academic and practical skills that will enhance their career prospects.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Option Set 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Option Set 2
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Principles and Practice of Evacuation Modelling (30 credits)
Principles and Practice of Fire Modelling (30 credits)

Option Set 3

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 45 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Students are also required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Enterprise Software Engineering Development (15 credits)
Software Tools and Techniques (15 credits)
Actuarial Mathematics and Risk Modelling (15 credits)
Financial Time Series (15 credits)
Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

100% coursework: a supervised thesis project (during the summer months).

Career options

Our graduates are equipped with the tools to involve in many engineering applications and computational engineering sectors such as reliability engineering, risk management, complex engineering systems, fire safety and finance. Our expert seminar series gives you the opportunity to interact with leading figures from industry and academia and undertake projects of current industry practice. A postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and a milestone in your specialised career path leading to a professional career. The Department also offers a PhD programme which trains highly skilled candidates towards research careers in academia and industry. Our current collaborations for our PhD candidates lie with the STRIKE project for mathematical and computational applications.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The Masters in Mathematics/Applied Mathematics offers courses, taught by experts, across a wide range. Mathematics is highly developed yet continually growing, providing new insights and applications. Read more
The Masters in Mathematics/Applied Mathematics offers courses, taught by experts, across a wide range. Mathematics is highly developed yet continually growing, providing new insights and applications. It is the medium for expressing knowledge about many physical phenomena and is concerned with patterns, systems, and structures unrestricted by any specific application, but also allows for applications across many disciplines.

Why this programme

◾Mathematics at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School has a strong international reputation in pure and applied mathematics research and our PGT programmes in Mathematics offer a large range of courses ranging from pure algebra and analysis to courses on mathematical biology and fluids.
◾You will be taught by experts across a wide range of pure and applied mathematics and you will develop a mature understanding of fundamental theories and analytical skills applicable to many situations.
◾You will participate in an extensive and varied seminar programme, are taught by internationally renowned lecturers and experience a wide variety of projects.
◾Our students graduate with a varied skill set, including core professional skills, and a portfolio of substantive applied and practical work.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the Masters in Mathematics/Applied Mathematics include lectures, laboratory classes, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in project work.

If you are studying for the MSc you will take a total of 120 credits from a mixture of Level-4 Honours courses, Level-M courses and courses delivered by the Scottish Mathematical Sciences Training Centre (SMSTC).

You will take courses worth a minimum of 90 credits from Level-M courses and those delivered by the SMSTC. The remaining 30 credits may be chosen from final-year Level-H courses. The Level-M courses offered in a particular session will depend on student demand. Below are courses currently offered at these levels, but the options may vary from year to year.

Level-H courses (10 or 20 credits)
◾Algebraic & geometric topology
◾Continuum mechanics & elasticity
◾Differential geometry
◾Fluid mechanics
◾Functional analysis
◾Further complex analysis
◾Galois theory
◾Mathematical biology
◾Mathematical physics
◾Numerical methods
◾Number theory
◾Partial differential equations
◾Topics in algebra.

Level-M courses (20 credits)
◾Advanced algebraic & geometric topology
◾Advanced differential geometry & topology
◾Advanced functional analysis
◾Advanced methods in differential equations
◾Advanced numerical methods
◾Biological & physiological fluid mechanics
◾Commutative algebra & algebraic geometry
◾Elasticity
◾Further topics in group theory
◾Lie groups, lie algebras & their representations
◾Magnetohydrodynamics
◾Operator algebras
◾Solitons
◾Special relativity & classical field theory.

SMSTC courses (20 credits)
◾Advanced Functional Analysis
◾Advanced Mathematical Methods

The project titles are offered each year by academic staff and so change annually.

Career prospects

Career opportunities are diverse and varied and include academia, teaching, industry and finance.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to positions such as:
Maths Tutor at a university.

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This programme offers you the chance to study a range of modules in pure and applicable mathematics, giving you the opportunity to increase your knowledge and abilities in these areas. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of modules in pure and applicable mathematics, giving you the opportunity to increase your knowledge and abilities in these areas. Depending on your choices, you will take either 7 or 8 modules, allowing you to study several different topics in depth, and to focus on the areas that interest you most. Over 2 years you will also learn the methods of mathematical research: how to read mathematical papers and how to communicate mathematics, both in written form for your project dissertation, and orally when you give presentations about your project.

You will acquire the skills to pursue your interest in the subject, either formally with a research degree, or informally with independent reading. You will come to us as someone with a mathematics degree; you will graduate as a mathematician.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Offers modules in group theory, graph theory, combinatorics and applicable mathematics such as coding theory and cryptography.
Specially designed for part-time students: delivered via high-quality, face-to-face teaching in the evenings, so that you can fit study around daytime commitments.
You complete a project in your chosen area of mathematics, with guidance from an expert supervisor.
Birkbeck's mathematicians are all active researchers, mostly in the areas of algebra and combinatorics. We've developed this exciting course around those research strengths.
Birkbeck has a library and several workstation rooms. You can also use several local university libraries, including the collection of the London Mathematical Society, a 5-minute walk from Birkbeck's main building.

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Taught at our Thornton Science Park near Chester, this course focuses on applied and computational Mathematics, which is our team’s research specialism and a skill set valued by employers. Read more
Taught at our Thornton Science Park near Chester, this course focuses on applied and computational Mathematics, which is our team’s research specialism and a skill set valued by employers. During the course you will have the opportunity to develop both subject-specific skills (applicable in, for example, the biosciences, finance sector and engineering) and key transferable skills (including IT, problem solving, and written and oral communication).

We have put together a course to cater for the needs of both Single Honours Mathematics graduates and graduates who have studied Mathematics as part of a degree – for example, you may have studied Mathematics as part of a joint honours course or as part of a physics-related degree.

You will have the opportunity to work on projects directly linked to the programme team’s own research, which includes work of both a theoretical and practical nature. You will also have access to specialist mathematics computing facilities and a well-stocked library, including electronic resources.

We have a number of resources in place to facilitate part-time study, and we welcome enquiries from people who wish to pursue their academic studies while remaining in employment. We also invite you to contact us if you are someone who would ordinarily find it difficult to attend timetabled lectures at Thornton.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science, run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Computer Science. Read more

The MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science, run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Computer Science, focuses on the interface between pure mathematics and theoretical computer science. 

The mathematical side concentrates on areas where computers are used, or which are relevant to computer science, namely algebra, general topology, number theory, combinatorics and logic. Examples from the computing side include computational complexity, concurrency, and quantum computing. Students take a minimum of five options and write a dissertation.

The course is suitable for those who wish to pursue research in pure mathematics (especially algebra, number theory, combinatorics, general topology and their computational aspects), mathematical logic, or theoretical computer science. It is also suitable for students wishing to enter industry with an understanding of the mathematical and logical design and concurrency.

The course will consist of examined lecture courses and a written dissertation. The lecture courses will be divided into two sections:

  • Section A: Mathematical Foundations
  • Section B: Applicable Theories

Each section shall be divided into schedule I (basic) and schedule II (advanced). Students will be required to satisfy the examiners in at least two courses taken from section B and in at least two courses taken from schedule II. The majority of these courses should be given in the first two terms. 

During Trinity term and over the summer students should complete a dissertation on an agreed topic. The dissertation must bear regard to course material from section A or section B, and it must demonstrate relevance to some area of science, engineering, industry or commerce.

It is intended that a major feature of this course is that candidates should show a broad knowledge and understanding over a wide range of material. Consequently, each lecture course taken will receive an assessment upon its completion by means of a test based on written work. Students will be required to pass five courses, that include two courses from section B and two at the schedule II level - these need not be distinct - and the dissertation.

The course runs from the beginning of October through to the end of September, including the dissertation.



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This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications. Read more
This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications.

You will explore the mathematical techniques that are commonly used to solve problems in the real world, in particular in communication theory and in physics. As part of the course you will carry out an independent research investigation under the supervision of a member of staff. Popular dissertation topics chosen by students include projects in the areas of communication theory, mathematical physics, and financial mathematics.

The transferable skills gained on this course will open you up to a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsforapplications.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications, preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography. The academics who teach on this course include several leading researchers in these areas.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses and complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed, as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- knowledge and understanding of: the principles of communication through noisy channels using coding theory; the principles of cryptography as a tool for securing data; and the role and limitations of mathematics in the solution of problems arising in the real world

- a high level of ability in subject-specific skills, such as algebra and number theory

- developed the capacity to synthesise information from a number of sources with critical awareness

- critically analysed the strengths and weaknesses of solutions to problems in applications of mathematics

- the ability to clearly formulate problems and express technical content and conclusions in written form

- personal skills of time management, self-motivation, flexibility and adaptability.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security Manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Programme description. The rapid transformation in the nature of drug discovery means that knowledge of related disciplines, and the technologies used, is essential for those considering a career in commercial or academic research. Read more

Programme description

The rapid transformation in the nature of drug discovery means that knowledge of related disciplines, and the technologies used, is essential for those considering a career in commercial or academic research.

This MSc will help you explore the latest methods of developing drugs and therapeutic compounds for humans and animals and disease control agents for plants.

You will learn about marketing, licensing and regulations, which are all part of the development process. Our multidisciplinary approach links structural biology, bioinformatics, chemistry and pharmacology.

You will investigate the fundamental scientific problems and techniques of drug discovery and design, alongside the challenges of developing principles for new therapeutic strategies.

You will have hands-on experience of crystallographic computer programming and computation for bioinformatics.

You will consider the moral and ethical aspects of the agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries through case studies, seminars and discussions.

Programme structure

This programme consists of two semesters of taught courses followed by a research project, leading to a dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • Applicable Mathematics
  • Molecular Modelling and Database Mining
  • Quantitating Drug Binding
  • Protein Structure Determination
  • Commercial Aspects of Drug Discovery
  • Project Proposal and Literature Review
  • Preparative Methods for Structural Biology
  • Drug Discovery

Option courses:

  • Biochemistry A & B
  • Bioinformatics 1
  • Chemical Medicine
  • Functional Genomic Technologies
  • Biophysical Chemistry for MSc Biochemistry
  • Introduction to Scientific Programming
  • Practical Skills in Biochemistry A & B
  • Introduction to Website and Database Design for Drug Discovery;
  • Detailed Characterisation of Drug or Ligand Interactions Using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR);
  • Bioinformatics Programming & System Management
  • Bioinformatics Algorithms
  • Information Processing in Biological Cells
  • Bioinformatics 2
  • Protein Molecular Modelling Practical Skills
  • Tools for Synthetic Biology

Career opportunities

This MSc is designed to help you pursue a career in the pharmaceutical industry or relevant government agencies, and it will provide a good background for managerial or technical roles in research, design and development. It is also a solid basis from which to continue your studies to PhD level.



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Birkbeck's MSc in Mathematics and Financial Modelling is a part-time programme that combines the study of mathematics at postgraduate level with a strong component of financial mathematics and modelling. Read more
Birkbeck's MSc in Mathematics and Financial Modelling is a part-time programme that combines the study of mathematics at postgraduate level with a strong component of financial mathematics and modelling. The programme offers you the chance to study a range of modules in pure and applicable mathematics, as well as financial mathematics, thus giving you the opportunity to increase your knowledge and abilities in these areas. Depending on your choices, you will take between 6 and 8 modules, allowing you to study several different topics in depth, and to focus on the areas that interest you most.

You will also learn key mathematical research skills and methods, including how to conduct a literature search, how to read mathematical papers, and how to communicate your ideas and findings, both in writing and orally. The second year of the programme includes a dissertation that allows you to engage in a sustained investigation of an area that interests you within statistics and/or finance, implementing what you have learned from the taught modules on the programme and combining this knowledge with new research and analysis.

Over 2 years, you will also acquire the skills to pursue your interests in mathematics and financial modelling to a higher level and beyond the classroom, whether for a formal MPhil/PhD research degree, for your career, or simply because you have a passion for the subject.

The programme's distinct mode of part-time evening study means that this is one of the very few taught MSc programmes in mathematics and financial modelling that can be taken by busy people who are balancing study with work and other personal and family commitments.

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The course introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are. - to examine the theoretical frameworks used in the study of education and its constituent disciplines;. Read more
The course introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to examine the theoretical frameworks used in the study of education and its constituent disciplines;
- provide training in research methods appropriate to education;
- advance students’ capacity for professional reflection and judgment;
- cater for a range of specialists interested within the field of education or one of its constituent disciplines.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmpemm

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The Mathematics Masters modules are taught by means of a combination of lectures, seminars, reading groups, workshops and student presentations. Self-directed study includes pre-session readings, preparation for presentations, and practical research activities.

All students also attend educational research methods sessions as part of Educational Research route.

Each term, written work is submitted and formative feedback is provided. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions (three times a term). At the end of each term, supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student online.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The course introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are. - to examine the theoretical frameworks used in the study of education and its constituent disciplines;. Read more
The course introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to examine the theoretical frameworks used in the study of education and its constituent disciplines;
- provide training in research methods appropriate to education;
- advance students’ capacity for professional reflection and judgment;
- cater for a range of specialists interested within the field of education or one of its constituent disciplines.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeemm

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Mathematics Education' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Each term, written work is submitted and formative feedback is provided. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions (three times a term). At the end of each term, supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student online.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts. Read more

This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts.

The MSc programme is a core part of the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, which has been created to mark the start of a new era in theoretical physics research, following the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. You will take part in the centre’s activities, including weekly seminars, colloquia and workshops involving physicists from around the world, and you will be involved in research-level projects as part of your dissertation.

The partnership between mathematics and physics is an essential one. In theoretical physics we attempt to build abstract constructs that rationalise, explain and predict physical phenomena. To do this we need mathematics: the language of physics. The underlying structure of the physical world can be understood in great detail using mathematics; this is a never-ending source of fascination to theoretical physicists.

Programme structure

Taught courses

You will take two compulsory courses plus a selection of courses that will bring you to an advanced level in subjects such as general relativity, cosmology, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, quantum field theory and the standard model of particle physics. You may also take courses drawn from a wider pool including specialist courses in mathematics, computing and climate science. For the MSc in Mathematical Physics, mathematics courses can account for up to half of the taught course element.

Dissertation

Following the taught component of the programme, you will undertake a three-month research project, which leads to a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

By engaging with and completing the MSc in Mathematical Physics, graduates will acquire core knowledge of theoretical physics subjects and the research methodologies of modern theoretical and mathematical physics.

The programme aims to develop research skills and problem solving skills, especially in mathematics. It also aims to develop an attitude of mind conductive to critical questioning and creative thinking and the capacity to formulate ideas mathematically.

Career opportunities

These degrees are designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable to a wide range of research areas and sectors including academia, industry, education and finance.



Read less
This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts. Read more

This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts.

The MSc programme is a core part of the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, which has been created to mark the start of a new era in theoretical physics research, following the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. You will take part in the centre’s activities, including weekly seminars, colloquia and workshops involving physicists from around the world, and you will be involved in research-level projects as part of your dissertation.

The partnership between mathematics and physics is an essential one. In theoretical physics we attempt to build abstract constructs that rationalise, explain and predict physical phenomena. To do this we need mathematics: the language of physics. The underlying structure of the physical world can be understood in great detail using mathematics; this is a never-ending source of fascination to theoretical physicists.

Programme structure

Taught courses

You will take two compulsory courses plus a selection of courses that will bring you to an advanced level in subjects such as general relativity, cosmology, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, quantum field theory and the standard model of particle physics. You may also take courses drawn from a wider pool including specialist courses in mathematics, computing and climate science.

Dissertation

Following the taught component of the programme, you will undertake a three-month research project, which leads to a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

By engaging with and completing the MSc in Theoretical Physics, graduates will acquire core knowledge of theoretical physics subjects and the research methodologies of modern theoretical and mathematical physics. The programme aims to develop research skills and problem solving skills, especially in mathematics. It also aims to develop an attitude of mind conductive to critical questioning and creative thinking and the capacity to formulate ideas mathematically.

Career opportunities

These degrees are designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable to a wide range of research areas and sectors including academia, industry, education and finance.



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