• University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
University of Worcester Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"animal" AND "rescue"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Animal Rescue)

  • "animal" AND "rescue" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 4 of 4
Order by 
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS). Read more
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS).

All ResM students are supervised by college staff based in Cornwall on the Stoke Climsland or Newquay campuses and co-supervised by Plymouth University staff. The ResM culminates in the examination of a thesis based on a period of extended research, preceded by two taught modules that equip the student for research.

The ResM programme at Duchy is tailored to individual needs and commonly involves working with an industry partner. There are full-time and part-time routes.

Full and partial fees bursaries may be available, please contract Dr Peter McGregor for more information and eligibility criteria.

Indicative project titles for Biological Sciences:
• Infrared thermography as a tool in welfare assessments in animal rescue centres
• Seasonal variations of microplastic contamination in the estuaries
• Impacts of invasive species on native biodiversity
• Indicator species and conservation grazing

Student case study: "I am currently studying towards my ResM in Biological Sciences, having completed my BSc Applied Zoology. I very much enjoy studying here - the location is amazing and there are some great spots to study, especially the beach. My most memorable experiences so far are being involved in a group meeting with our local MP to discuss biodiversity, and presenting my work at a conference at Edinburgh Zoo. My tips for future students would be work hard, have fun and seek advice from your tutors. They want the best for you". Hayley Jones (ResM Biological Sciences).

Read less
This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure. Read more

Overview

This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure.

Course Modules

The MSc programme is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis during two teaching blocks (semesters one and two) and a period of supervised and independent study (summer). It may also be completed over a two-year period on a part-time basis. The first two semesters (15 weeks each) include 4 taught modules. The dissertation is studied during the subsequent 20 week period in the summer. Each taught module is worth 15 credits whilst the dissertation is 60 credits.

Programme

Semester One (September to January)
Animal Physiology / Comparative Animal Nutrition / Wildlife Resources / Research Methods
60 Credits

Semester Two (January to May)
Animal Ethics and Welfare / Animal Protection and Habitat Conservation / Behaviour / Current Issues in Animal Science
60 Credits

Summer (May to September)
MSc Dissertation
60 Credits

The full MSc degree course consists of 120 compulsory taught credits plus 60 core credits from the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) can be awarded with 120 taught credits. Whilst a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) can be awarded on the successful completion of any 60 taught credits. Credits obtained from the dissertation can also be used when considering whether a postgraduate diploma can be awarded. Before progressing onto the Masters dissertation from the Diploma, students would need to complete the Research Methods module or its equivalent as a prerequisite.

Entry Requirements

Applicants will normally hold a good BSc Honours degree (2.2 or above) from a recognised university in a related science subject such as animal science, agriculture, biological sciences, zoology, veterinary or bioveterinary science or other appropriate life-science degree. Applicants with a BSc (Hons) 3rd class pass, with extensive industrial experience may also be considered for the Masters programme. Applications from non-UK students are particularly welcome. All applications received will be reviewed and decisions for admission to the programme will be made on individual merit. Applicants may be interviewed if there is some doubt over the extent of academic qualification or linguistic skills.

Applicants for whom English is a second language are required to demonstrate a level of competence that enables them to study at a postgraduate level. A test score of 6.5 is required in the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) tests.

Learning & Teaching Methods

The teaching methods are a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, visits and student managed learning. The self-guided study takes place under the supervision of experienced staff from the Centre of Equine and Animal Science at Writtle University College. Students are assessed using a number of methods, for example written examination, reports, essays, seminars, debates, oral presentations, case studies and project dissertation.

The research project is an essential part of the MSc programme and provides the opportunity to carry out an independent piece research, critically analyse data and write a dissertation. The project will normally include hands-on practical experimentation to teach students how to gather and process data and problem solve. The project is supervised by an academic member of staff and takes place over an extended period during the spring and summer. The project can be based either at Writtle University College or other suitable external institution.

Potential areas for dissertation projects

Investigation of keeper-animal relationships in zoos
Animal behaviour and welfare research in collaboration with Colchester Zoo
Assessment of prevalence and risk factors for obesity in companion animals
Lameness detection and measurement in dairy cows
Estimation endangered wild animal population densities
Use of molecular biology techniques in conservation genetics of captive wild animals
Incidence of small mammals in agricultural landscapes
Diet selection and nutrient intakes in captive animals
Behavioural indicators of welfare and performance using different castration methods in lambs

Careers

Graduates are likely to use their award to secure management-level jobs and/or to improve their promotion prospects if they are already employed both in international and national organisations. Many opportunities exist in either government services or related agencies services: for example senior positions in DEFRA as quarantine officers or animal health inspectors. There are also numerous career opportunities in companies specialising in farm animal nutrition and pet food manufacturing, breeding and reproduction, veterinary medicines and pharmaceuticals. There also opportunities in charities engaged in animal welfare such as the RSPCA, zoos, animal rescue centres and safari parks. Also, independent wildlife agencies such as the RSPB, Scottish Natural Heritage, Natural England, and the Countryside Council for Wales would be interested in Animal Welfare and Conservation graduates. Some graduates may take up lecturing positions in universities and colleges or proceed to do further postgraduate study e.g. PhD.

Fees and Financial Support

Part-time student fees for each semester will be charged on a pro-rata basis. There are limited bursaries for part-payment of fees (for UK students only) from the Alice Noakes Memorial Trust. Applications for these bursaries can only be made via the course manager on admission to the course.

Read less
This innovative programme aims to give you the knowledge, skills and practical training needed to work with wildlife, with special emphasis on wildlife health and conservation at the global scale. Read more
This innovative programme aims to give you the knowledge, skills and practical training needed to work with wildlife, with special emphasis on wildlife health and conservation at the global scale.

Cutting-edge topics include animal capture and handling techniques; the assessment, stabilisation and transportation of injured animals; methods for improving the welfare of captive animals; concepts in behavioural ecology; endangered species breeding programmes; the reintroduction of captive populations to the wild; practical conservation strategies; and the management of protected areas. The curriculum also delivers a comprehensive introduction to wildlife disease ecology, surveillance and control.

The MSc is based at the School of Veterinary Sciences near the Mendip Hills in Somerset, providing convenient access to Exmoor National Park and the rich wildlife habitats of south-west England. A large number of lectures, small group workshops and practical sessions take place at Bristol Zoo, allowing you to gain hands-on experience of exotic animal care while working behind the scenes in a modern zoological garden.

A special feature of this MSc is the large number of specialist lectures, workshops and seminars that are delivered by leading researchers, conservationists and wildlife veterinarians from outside the University. These provide a valuable networking opportunity that will benefit your future career.

By the end of the course you will have gained the skills and knowledge to deal with a variety of practical situations that professional wildlife biologists face on a day-to-day basis.

Programme structure

The course is split into two elements. A taught element from September to April provides training in:
-First Aid for Injured Animals
-Wildlife Care and Rehabilitation
-Captive Wildlife Management
-The Re-release of Wildlife into the Field
-Wildlife Conservation
-Wildlife Diseases and Integrated Health
-Animal Behaviour and Welfare
-Research Skills

A research element from May to August provides an opportunity for you to carry out an applied project on a wildlife topic of interest to you. You will undertake a literature review, collect and analyse data, and present your results as a written report suitable for publication. In previous years many of these projects have been carried out at Bristol Zoo or in Australia.

Careers

This course has been carefully designed for those aspiring to a career in wildlife health, conservation and management. Potential employers include national parks, zoological gardens, animal rescue centres, wildlife hospitals, environmental NGOs, conservation charities and government agencies with statutory wildlife responsibilities, both in Britain and overseas.

Previous students have gone on to work for a range of employers, including the Environment Agency, Cheetah Conservation Botswana, Chester Zoo, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, the Sloth Institute of Costa Rica, the World Wide Fund for Nature, Frontier, Ecofieldtrips Singapore and Natural England. Our graduates are now spread across the world, working to achieve wildlife conservation from positions of influence in Europe, North America, South America, Asia and Africa.

Read less
Background. All current clinical practice should derive from advances in research. The overarching purpose of research activities within SVMS is to improve clinical practice and teaching. Read more
Background:

All current clinical practice should derive from advances in research. The overarching purpose of research activities within SVMS is to improve clinical practice and teaching. Clinical practice encompasses many aspects of animal health including diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis, production and welfare management. Thus, improved clinical practice is the outcome of full integration of research themes with the clinical requirement. The School has established relations with a number of Clinical Associate and Educational Partners who are fully integrated into the research and teaching environment of SVMS and their clinical requirements drive much of the research development.

Project Description:

This unique role consists of a four-year training post, based at one of the Educational Partners (Bransby Horses) and will combine preventive and reactive veterinary care based at the rescue and rehoming centre. It will involve training of clinical veterinary students and undertaking a research doctorate project leading to a DVet Med which will be supervised by academic members of staff based at SVMS. The area of research will be in equine parasitology using three large equine centres in the UK, including Bransby Horses.

Bransby Horses is an equine-based charity founded in 1968 by Mr Peter Hunt based in North Lincolnshire and is dedicated to improving the lives of horses, ponies, donkeys and mules. The team is committed to making positive differences to equines whenever possible, through rescue, rehabilitation, rehoming, education and by providing a safe haven. Currently, the centre has over 400 animals on site and, in 2016, the charity accepted some 200 new intakes.

This studentship is available from (August 2017) or as soon as possible thereafter for a period of four years and provides a tax free UK/EU postgraduate stipend £21,000. There are funding restrictions for non-EU students.

Further Information and Application:

Informal enquiries about the role may be addressed to the principal supervisor:
Candidates should apply online at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/how-to-apply/apply-online.aspx including a cover letter and CV. Queries regarding the application process should be addressed to Postgraduate Admissions Officer ().

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X