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Masters Degrees (Animal Health And Welfare)

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About this course. This course covers the scientific theory and practice relating to animal health and welfare. It combines advanced research and academic skills with applied science skills. Read more

About this course

This course covers the scientific theory and practice relating to animal health and welfare. It combines advanced research and academic skills with applied science skills.

There is an emphasis on examining the biology of health and welfare science, while adopting a multidisciplinary approach to the wider subject area. You'll discover how to apply your knowledge to real world situations, such as enhancing agricultural production utilising animals for educational and therapeutic purposes, or effectively maximising welfare within a rescue environment.

You'll study the current issues and insights at the forefront of animal health and welfare, and the philosophical, welfare and ethical issues related to these. You'll explore general patterns in human and animal cognition, behaviour, and psychological functioning, and appreciate how these relate to the application of health and welfare science. The course also critically examines and assesses the biological and social basis of human-animal interactions, with the aim of improving our understanding and the overall quality of these interactions.

On this course you will also evaluate the rigour and validity of published research, and assess its relevance to new situations within the discipline. You'll gain an insight into recent advances n animal science - therefore, attending a relevant scientific conference is strongly advised as an integral part of the course.

How do you study?

You'll be taught using a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical sessions. you will also have opportunities to present your work to peers and academic staff.

Independent learning is required and you will undertake high-quality research. You will research your chosen topic in depth, then design and implement a relevant research project and communicate the findings to an informed audience in a scientific report.

Teaching is supported by our modern Animal Unit which houses over 150 animals of 40 different species. The collection consists of domesticated and exotic species, in settings that are as natural as possible. There are specialist teaching rooms within the Animal Unit which contain various research equipment and essential resources to enhance your learning experience. You'll also benefit from our veterinary and equestrian facilities, as well as the working farm which includes sheep and a herd of Lincoln red beef cattle, and the newly built poultry unit.

Find out more about our Brackenhurst Campus on our website.

Visit us

Want to find out more about studying with us? Find out more at one of our upcoming open days. Reserve your place.

More information

For more information on our MRes Animal Health and Welfare course, please visit our website.



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About this course. This course covers the scientific theory and practice relating to animal health and welfare. It combines advanced research and academic skills with applied science skills. Read more

About this course

This course covers the scientific theory and practice relating to animal health and welfare. It combines advanced research and academic skills with applied science skills.

There is an emphasis on examining the biology of health and welfare science, while adopting a multidisciplinary approach to the wider subject area. You'll discover how to apply your knowledge to real world situations, such as enhancing agricultural production utilising animals for educational and therapeutic purposes, or effectively maximising welfare within a rescue environment.

You'll study the current issues and insights at the forefront of animal health and welfare, and the philosophical, welfare and ethical issues related to these. You'll explore general patterns in human and animal cognition, behaviour, and psychological functioning, and appreciate how these relate to the application of health and welfare science. The course also critically examines and assesses the biological and social basis of human-animal interactions, with the aim of improving our understanding and the overall quality of these interactions.

On this course you will also evaluate the rigour and validity of published research, and assess its relevance to new situations within the discipline. You'll gain an insight into recent advances n animal science - therefore, attending a relevant scientific conference is strongly advised as an integral part of the course.

How do you study?

You'll be taught using a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical sessions. you will also have opportunities to present your work to peers and academic staff.

Independent learning is required and you will undertake high-quality research. You will research your chosen topic in depth, then design and implement a relevant research project and communicate the findings to an informed audience in a scientific report.

Teaching is supported by our modern Animal Unit which houses over 150 animals of 40 different species. The collection consists of domesticated and exotic species, in settings that are as natural as possible. There are specialist teaching rooms within the Animal Unit which contain various research equipment and essential resources to enhance your learning experience. You'll also benefit from our veterinary and equestrian facilities, as well as the working farm which includes sheep and a herd of Lincoln red beef cattle, and the newly built poultry unit.

Find out more about our Brackenhurst Campus on our website.

Visit us

Want to find out more about studying with us? Find out more at one of our upcoming open days. Reserve your place.

More information

For more information on our courses, please visit our website.



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The overall objective of this online distance learning programme is to provide knowledge and an understanding of animal welfare science, with a focus on the international issues arising from animal use in all its forms. Read more

The overall objective of this online distance learning programme is to provide knowledge and an understanding of animal welfare science, with a focus on the international issues arising from animal use in all its forms.

The programme is delivered by researchers and teachers from both the Jeanne Marchig International Centre for Animal Welfare Education (within the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies) and the Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) with a series of guest lecturers from around the world.

The programme offers courses in a variety of areas, including:

  • history, culture and concepts of animal welfare
  • animal behaviour
  • animal welfare assessment
  • animal ethics
  • recommendations and policy
  • legislation, regulation and enforcement
  • science communication
  • applied animal welfare - production, companion and captive wild animals

Learn more about why you should study with us:

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy:

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

A blend of online learning methods are utilised, such as discussion forums, podcasts and live tutorials. The programme is modular, allowing us to offer a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied.

Students may choose to study to certificate, diploma or masters level.

Students can take up to 6 years to complete the full MSc programme and there is also the option to graduate with either an International Animal Welfare, Ethics and Law postgraduate certificate or diploma.

Year 1: certificate

You will take two compulsory courses - International Animal Welfare Science and Animal Ethics, Policy and Law - plus an optional course.

Year 2: diploma

You can choose up to 60 credits of optional courses, which include:

  • Production Animal Welfare
  • Cat and Dog Welfare
  • Captive and Free-ranging Wild Animal Welfare
  • Animals in Research, Testing and Education
  • Clinical Animal Behaviour
  • Equine Behaviour and Welfare
  • Equitation Science
  • Anthrozoology (new for 2017)

Year 3: masters

You complete a dissertation of between 10,000-15,000 words which can be a research project or an extended systematic review of the literature in a topic of Animal Welfare Science, Ethics or Law.

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Career opportunities

Graduates can use their qualification to enhance their career prospects in academia, research, governmental and non-governmental organisations and consultancies.



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COURSE OVERVIEW . Examine and communicate the importance of animal welfare to academic and other audiences. Programme partly based on the theoretical syllabus required for the European and US animal welfare qualifications for veterinarians. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW 

  • Examine and communicate the importance of animal welfare to academic and other audiences
  • Programme partly based on the theoretical syllabus required for the European and US animal welfare qualifications for veterinarians
  • Learn from highly qualified, enthusiastic and internationally renowned teachers 

Animal Welfare Science, Ethics and Law at Winchester critically reflects upon contemporary uses of animals, and provides the academic skills and expertise needed to protect animals and advance their welfare. Winchester is a world leader in terms of the values held and discussed, such as compassion and social justice, which are central to the ethos of this course. 

You consider animal rights and the ethics around using animals for food, sport, and scientific research. How should society reflect those rights and ethics in our law-making and public policies? We scrutinise the many forms of animal use in different settings, such as farming, transportation and slaughter, laboratories, homes, zoos and various other entertainment locales, and about free-ranging animals in natural environments. As you progress through the programme, you master the skills and knowledge involved in assessing and ensuring the welfare of animals using a range of data and sound scientific processes.

The course is different from other comparable programmes in part because of the range of animals covered, including wild, free-ranging animals, invertebrates, pest animals, and the welfare problems associated with them. You are encouraged to develop communication skills in a range of styles, including posters, blogs, and multimedia presentations, and to share ideas about animal welfare outside of the academic setting. 

Modules include Animals and Society, Animal Interests, Capacities and Ethical Considerations, Animal Behaviour and Psychological States, and a 15,000-word dissertation on your chosen topic. Classes are taught using the online virtual learning platform, in the form of core notes with additional readings, videos and lecture notes, making this course accessible to students anywhere in the world. 

Graduates work as animal behaviourists, within animal welfare and advocacy organisations, zoos, sanctuaries and other organisations requiring knowledge of animal management and welfare, with governmental departments working on animal issues, with agencies aiming to uphold welfare standards, and with commercial organisations seeking to introduce such standards to their agricultural suppliers.

Accreditation

For any veterinarians pursuing specialist qualifications in animal welfare, this programme is partly based on the theoretical syllabus required for the European and US qualifications.

Careers

Graduates may enter careers within animal advocacy, welfare and conservation organisations; zoos, sanctuaries and other organisations requiring knowledge of animal management and welfare; governmental departments working on animal issues; assurance, inspection and enforcement agencies; and commercial organisations seeking to implement and monitor the animal welfare standards of their agricultural suppliers.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Modules are taught using online core notes with additional readings, videos and lecture notes provided. Students may participate in online seminars, and are guided in the creation of communication media such as academic and popular publications, Powerpoint and poster presentations, and online blogs.

The academics involved in this programme possess specialist skills and knowledge in each of the realms of animal welfare science, animal ethics and animal law. Strengths include significant experience in examining and critiquing contemporary social uses of animals, through both academic and popular media, and in working within both Non-Governmental Organisations and professional realms such as veterinary and legal practice, to advance animal welfare within wider society. Tutorials and other support is offered by these highly qualified, enthusiastic and internationally renowned scholars.

Location

This programme is distance learning only.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

Assessments include written assignments, Powerpoint and poster presentations, online blogs, participation in discussions, and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of interest to the student, chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.



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Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. Read more

Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. It aims to improve our knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs, which is required to provide a high standard of care to the whole range of animals kept in captivity.

Why this programme

  • Top 100 University.
  • This animal welfare degree programme is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining ecology and evolution with more applied problems in animal health.
  • When studying animal welfare you will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in understanding and responding to animal welfare-related issues, legislation related to use of animals, and both theoretical and applied ethics.
  • In addition, you will have opportunities to develop skills in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, conservation biology, epidemiology and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity.
  • A unique strength of the Animal Welfare MSc at the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.
  • The IBAHCM also offers an MSc in Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology. This degree is more focused on ecology and evolutionary biology and provides the opportunity for you to gain key quantitative skills that are not often a focus of welfare-based programmes.
  • You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbrae (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or research laboratories, whenever possible.
  • You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, government agencies, officers of animal welfare, protection, or wildlife crime, veterinary nursing and aquaculture.
  • We have many links with animal welfare-related organisations through them coming to us to teach their expertise to our Animal Welfare degree and the class going to visit their organisation to obtain a first-hand view of what working is like at these organisations. Many of them also provide the students with opportunities to carry out their independent research project within their company. Students will also be able to capitalise on the strong ties between the veterinarians and ecologists at the IBAHCM. This allows us to directly link fundamental and applied research and offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both theory and praxis.
  • We have currently the following partners involved in this programme
  • Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA)
  • Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie
  • Blair Drummond Safari Park
  • Chester Zoo
  • The Aspinall Foundation (Howletts & Port Lympne)
  • National Museum Scotland

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in

  • ethics, legislative policy and welfare science – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.
  • monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
  • quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation.

A total of 180 credits are required, with 40 flexible credits in the 2nd term. See the accompanying detailed course descriptions found in the IBAHCM Masters Programme Overview. When selecting options, please email the relevant course coordinator as well as registering using MyCampus.

Animal welfare is a very broad and applied field and the programme aims to provide coverage of all the different aspects of the topic which are often treated separately. Science is an essential skill in order to have a good understanding of welfare but we appreciate that applicants may come from diverse backgrounds and therefore the course includes a rigorous training in science communication, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. The programme also includes teaching by practitioners and visits to organisations with first-hand experience of applied welfare problems. The programme also attempts to cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare, including zoos, farms, laboratory animals and wildlife.

Career prospects

Students are exposed to potential work places and can make valuable contacts with professionals in the welfare community. Where possible this is a two-way exchange in which communities are offered help with any issues they have and for which assistance may be provided in finding a solution (e.g. through independent research projects, supervised by university staff). This is also an option open to other courses and could benefit the students in the long-term as well as give the university valuable connections with the wider community.



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The MSc programme in Parasitology and Pathogen Biology is designed for students seeking training in parasite-borne infectious diseases that severely undermine. Read more
The MSc programme in Parasitology and Pathogen Biology is designed for students seeking training in parasite-borne infectious diseases that severely undermine: human health in the developing world and tropics; agri-food production systems globally (including plant health and animal health and welfare).

Students taking the course will develop expertise directly applicable to human, plant and animal health and welfare, food security and the future sustainability of food production, particularly within livestock and plant/crop production systems.

The course will be run entirely by research active and will offer students the opportunity to gain experience in internationally competitive laboratories.

PROGRAMME CONTENT
The MSc programme in Parasitology and Pathogen Biology is designed for students seeking training in parasite-borne infectious diseases that severely undermine: human health in the developing world and tropics; agri-food production systems globally (including plant health and animal health and welfare). Students taking the course will develop expertise directly applicable to human, plant and animal health and welfare, food security and the future sustainability of food production, particularly within livestock and plant/crop production systems.

Students undertaking this MSc course will study the folling modules:

- Foundation for Research in the Biosciences 20CATS
- Fundamental Parasitology & Advanced Skills 20CATS
- Advanced Parasitology I 20CATS
- Advanced Parasitology II 20CATS
- Bio-Entrepreneurship & Advanced Skills 20CATS
- Literature Review 20CATS
- Research Project 60CATS

CAREER PROSPECTS
It is anticipated that the skills set and knowledge acquired will equip participants with a comprehensive academic and methodological repertoire to undertake careers in agriculture, plant science, animal and human health, pharmaceutica, academia and food security, underpinning the transdisciplinary nature of the programme.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

WHY QUEEN'S?
The MSc programme embraces the One Health approach to these infectious diseases, with strong recognition of the interplay between health and disease at the dynamic interface between humans, animals and the environment.

In addition to embedded generic skills training, students will have the opportunity to acquire subject-specific skills training, e.g. molecular biology techniques, diagnostics, epidemiology (human, animal and plant diseases), drug/vaccine development, pathogen management/control, host-parasite interaction, immunobiology, drug resistance and the potential impact of climate change on parasites and their vectors.

In addition to the taught elements of the course, MSc students will undertake a research project working in research active laboratories (academic or industrial), or in the field, e.g. the impact of helminth infections on animal welfare, the economic impact of parasites on agriculture, the role of vectors in emerging diseases, the ecology of zoonotic diseases, the molecular basis of anthelmintic resistance, emerging technologies for drug discovery, the pathology of infection, parasite immunomodulation of the host.

The transferrable skill set and knowledge base acquired from the programme will equip students with a highly desirable qualification that is suited to those wishing to pursue careers in human health/infectious disease, animal health, veterinary medicine, animal/plant biology, pharmaceutical sciences and food security.

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This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure. Read more

Overview

This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure.

Course Modules

The MSc programme is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis during two teaching blocks (semesters one and two) and a period of supervised and independent study (summer). It may also be completed over a two-year period on a part-time basis. The first two semesters (15 weeks each) include 4 taught modules. The dissertation is studied during the subsequent 20 week period in the summer. Each taught module is worth 15 credits whilst the dissertation is 60 credits.

Programme

Semester One (September to January)
Animal Physiology / Comparative Animal Nutrition / Wildlife Resources / Research Methods
60 Credits

Semester Two (January to May)
Animal Ethics and Welfare / Animal Protection and Habitat Conservation / Behaviour / Current Issues in Animal Science
60 Credits

Summer (May to September)
MSc Dissertation
60 Credits

The full MSc degree course consists of 120 compulsory taught credits plus 60 core credits from the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) can be awarded with 120 taught credits. Whilst a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) can be awarded on the successful completion of any 60 taught credits. Credits obtained from the dissertation can also be used when considering whether a postgraduate diploma can be awarded. Before progressing onto the Masters dissertation from the Diploma, students would need to complete the Research Methods module or its equivalent as a prerequisite.

Entry Requirements

Applicants will normally hold a good BSc Honours degree (2.2 or above) from a recognised university in a related science subject such as animal science, agriculture, biological sciences, zoology, veterinary or bioveterinary science or other appropriate life-science degree. Applicants with a BSc (Hons) 3rd class pass, with extensive industrial experience may also be considered for the Masters programme. Applications from non-UK students are particularly welcome. All applications received will be reviewed and decisions for admission to the programme will be made on individual merit. Applicants may be interviewed if there is some doubt over the extent of academic qualification or linguistic skills.

Applicants for whom English is a second language are required to demonstrate a level of competence that enables them to study at a postgraduate level. A test score of 6.5 is required in the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) tests.

Learning & Teaching Methods

The teaching methods are a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, visits and student managed learning. The self-guided study takes place under the supervision of experienced staff from the Centre of Equine and Animal Science at Writtle University College. Students are assessed using a number of methods, for example written examination, reports, essays, seminars, debates, oral presentations, case studies and project dissertation.

The research project is an essential part of the MSc programme and provides the opportunity to carry out an independent piece research, critically analyse data and write a dissertation. The project will normally include hands-on practical experimentation to teach students how to gather and process data and problem solve. The project is supervised by an academic member of staff and takes place over an extended period during the spring and summer. The project can be based either at Writtle University College or other suitable external institution.

Potential areas for dissertation projects

Investigation of keeper-animal relationships in zoos
Animal behaviour and welfare research in collaboration with Colchester Zoo
Assessment of prevalence and risk factors for obesity in companion animals
Lameness detection and measurement in dairy cows
Estimation endangered wild animal population densities
Use of molecular biology techniques in conservation genetics of captive wild animals
Incidence of small mammals in agricultural landscapes
Diet selection and nutrient intakes in captive animals
Behavioural indicators of welfare and performance using different castration methods in lambs

Careers

Graduates are likely to use their award to secure management-level jobs and/or to improve their promotion prospects if they are already employed both in international and national organisations. Many opportunities exist in either government services or related agencies services: for example senior positions in DEFRA as quarantine officers or animal health inspectors. There are also numerous career opportunities in companies specialising in farm animal nutrition and pet food manufacturing, breeding and reproduction, veterinary medicines and pharmaceuticals. There also opportunities in charities engaged in animal welfare such as the RSPCA, zoos, animal rescue centres and safari parks. Also, independent wildlife agencies such as the RSPB, Scottish Natural Heritage, Natural England, and the Countryside Council for Wales would be interested in Animal Welfare and Conservation graduates. Some graduates may take up lecturing positions in universities and colleges or proceed to do further postgraduate study e.g. PhD.

Fees and Financial Support

Part-time student fees for each semester will be charged on a pro-rata basis. There are limited bursaries for part-payment of fees (for UK students only) from the Alice Noakes Memorial Trust. Applications for these bursaries can only be made via the course manager on admission to the course.

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Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare. Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Read more
Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare.

Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Emerging veterinary infectious diseases and human diseases, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, emphasise the threat posed by these issues.

The One Health approach recognises the relationship between health and disease at the human, animal and environment interfaces and has become an important focus in both medical and veterinary science. It promotes a “whole of society” treatment of health hazards and a systemic change of perspective in the management of risk.

Under the microscope

If you are interested in One Health and the control of infectious disease (particularly in the developing world), then this unique course could be for you. We welcome applications from individuals with a background in public health, veterinary sciences, animal or biological sciences, social and environmental sciences, ecology and wildlife health. If you are interested in this field, but do not have the relevant background, please speak with the course directors who can consider such cases on an individual basis.

The course is delivered jointly by the RVC, University of London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

The course

The MSc consists of eight modules of 15 credits each, plus a compulsory research project (MSc only) of 60 credits -15 credits for integration of One Health principles learnt through development of and writing a research proposal and 45 credits for the empirical or trans-disciplinary innovative study.

The MSc consists of the following modules:
- Foundations of One Health
- Introduction to disease agents for One Health
- Infectious disease emergence core module
- Introduction to One Health epidemiology and surveillance
- Economics of One Health
- One Health skills development
- Medical anthropology and public health
- Optional module choice from; vector biology and vector parasite interactions, environmental epidemiology, epidemiology and control of communicable diseases, and globalisation and health
- Research project (MSc only)

How will I learn?

The MSc may be completed full-time in one year or part-time over two to three years, and consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

The PGDiploma is shorter (eight modules with no research project component) and may be completed in two terms.

The course starts in September each year and you will split your time between the RVC and LSHTM. Students studying the MSc will then undertake a four-month research project in an area and country of their choice.

Learning outcomes

The course will provide you with:

- A comprehensive foundation on the principles of diseases in the context of socio-ecological systems, global health and food safety
- Knowledge and skills in relation to One Health methodologies, transdisciplinary interactions and in using a systems approach

At the end of the course you will be able to:

- Understand the One Health concept and approach problem solving using a trans-disciplinary methodology
- Understand the origin, context and drivers of infectious disease at the human, animal and environment interface
- Evaluate impacts of multi-host infections on human, animal and ecosystem health and economics directly, or indirectly, via food, disease vectors or the environment.
- Develop a One Health systems approach to complex disease issues in monitoring, surveillance, diagnosis, prevention and control
- Critically review published literature
- Design a research project (MSc students only)

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One Health is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the complex interactions between human health, animal health and ecosystem health. Read more

One Health is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the complex interactions between human health, animal health and ecosystem health. Its original emergence was largely driven by the threat of global pandemics of disease, in particular highly pathogenic avian influenza and SARS. There was a recognition that the complex health challenges faced in the 21st century required a new interdisciplinary approach that included both the natural and social sciences.

Launched in 2014, this programme utilises the many strengths of the University of Edinburgh across multiple disciplines to provide the key training and skills required for a successful career in this emerging field.

The One Health programme is part of the Global Health Academy and we share many elective courses with other programmes in the Academy. This provides a great deal of flexibility allowing you to personalise your studies to reflect your professional interests and career aspirations. As well as learning from our expert tutors you will join with students from around the world on a number of different master’s programmes to share experiences and knowledge.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Year 1: Courses for the Certificate

The Certificate comprises four compulsory courses. These four courses are:

  • Introduction to One Health (20 credits)
  • Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance (20 credits)
  • One Health Policy (10 credits)
  • Ecosystem Health (10 credits)

Year 2: Courses for the Diploma

For the diploma a selection of courses totalling 60 credits must be made from the following courses. Each 20-credit course is taught over a period of ten weeks, whilst the 10-credit courses are taught over a five-week period.

  • Socio-economic Principles of One Health
  • Zoonotic Diseases
  • Zoonotic Diseases in a Global Setting
  • Emerging Infectious Diseases
  • Communication and Public Engagement of Conservation
  • Introduction to GIS and Spatial Data Analysis
  • Wildlife Disease Management
  • Ex-Situ Wildlife Management
  • Environmental Law
  • Water and Sanitation
  • An Introduction to Transboundary Diseases and their Impact on Trade and Wildlife Populations
  • Captive and Free-ranging Wild Animal Welfare
  • Surveillance and Control of Transboundary Diseases Affecting International Trade
  • Pastoralism and Herd Health
  • Animal Disease Survey Design and Analysis
  • Ecosystem Resilience & Extreme Events
  • Connecting Environment & Society

Please note that although all courses are offered, we cannot guarantee that places will be available on all elective courses to all students, each year (it will be at the discretion of the Programme Director to assign places on courses and this will depend on demand).

Year 3: Completion of the MSc programme in One Health

The written reflective element is an assignment of 10-15,000 words (60 credits). This may take the form of one of the following:

  • a written dissertation
  • a casebook (relating to relevant professional experience)
  • a personal portfolio of reflective and practical activity
  • a research project

Students will be required to submit a proposal that demonstrates an appropriate level of critical analysis, academic knowledge and reflection, or one health practice depending on the choice made, prior to being admitted to the masters year. The University of Edinburgh’s common marking scheme will be applied.

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Career opportunities

A qualification from our programme will enhance your career prospects in academia, research, government departments, non-governmental organisations, international development and the private sector.

Despite being a relatively new field, One Health is rapidly gaining global recognition and current students have already reported improvements in career development through studying on the programme.



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This programme is designed for veterinarians, animal health specialists and livestock farmers. It addresses contemporary issues of livestock production using innovative and interactive teaching methods. Read more

Under the microscope

This programme is designed for veterinarians, animal health specialists and livestock farmers. It addresses contemporary issues of livestock production using innovative and interactive teaching methods. It has a worldwide relevance and reputation and offers options that are suitable for people from a range of professional backgrounds.

The course aims to provide you with:

- Knowledge on agents of animal diseases and how animals respond to them
- Advanced knowledge in animal nutrition, breeding and management to optimise animal health and production
- Farming systems approach to animal production and an understanding of how to appraise and monitor livestock production systems through development and execution

Modules

Students are required to study three compulsory modules:
- Animal disease
- Developing and monitoring livestock production systems
- Principles of livestock productions

PLUS four further optional modules selected from:
- Animal welfare
- Economics for livestock development and policy
- Epidemiology and animal health economics
- Management of infectious disease outbreaks in animal populations
- Reproduction and fertility: a species approach
- Research design, management and grant application writing
- Research project in livestock health and production
- Sustainable livestock farming in the environment
- Veterinary public health

How will I learn?

The modules are designed for self-study using materials provided and with full support from RVC academic experts. Everything you require will be mailed to you, including textbooks and reading material. A Virtual Learning Environment and an on-line library are also available.

You will receive a Study Pack at the start of the course, consisting of a study guide, reader and textbooks/CDs, and our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) allows studies to be portable by offering on-line access to the student handbook, study guide, student discussion board, occasional academic tutorials, as well as past exam papers/examiners reports (for the previous 2 years). A tutorial calendar will be released at the beginning of the academic year and students are advised to plan for these sessions, as academic queries will be answered during tutorials only.

Although non-compulsory, indicative study calendars are available and provide an indication of the time to spend on each section.

Examinations take place annually in October, however, the flexibility of the programme allow exams to be deferred, if necessary.

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, graduates are able to:
- Improve the health and production of livestock
- Understand the interaction of livestock with people and the environment
- Gain an overview of the factors that influence livestock production (including components on nutrition, reproduction, disease, welfare and the environment)
- Implement control strategies by integrating this knowledge with the principles of epidemiology, economics and disease control within the context of management and infrastructure
- Address the interaction between livestock and the public, in terms of zoonotic disease and clean food production
- Communicate effectively on the health of animal and human populations to a range of audiences, including the general public, farmers, politicians and other key policy makers
- Comprehensive appreciation of welfare and ethical issues connected with farm animal practice
- Formulate a hypothesis and undertake a research project, analyze and present data and how to develop a grant application.

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The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife. Read more

The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife. The language of instruction is English. The focus is to deliver skilled professional animal scientists who are well equipped to tackle problems related to sustainable livestock development as well as to the management of livestock and companion animals. The animal-human interaction plays an important role in this study programme. Themes like animal nutrition, animal health, animal welfare, levels of management, genetic diversity and socio-economic factors are all widely discussed.

Study programme

Today’s specialists in livestock and companion animals need a fundamental scientific training, combined with a critical attitude towards all aspects constraining sustainable development of animal husbandry. The master Animal Sciences, which is unique for the Netherlands, offers the multidisciplinary training necessary for a future career in this field.

On the Programme of Animal Sciences page you can find the general outline of the programme and more detailed information about courses, theses and internships.

Specialisations

Within the master programme you can choose one of the following Specialisations to meet your personal interests.

  • Genetics and Biodiversity
  • Nutrition and Metabolism
  • Global and Sustainable Production
  • Adaptation, Health and Welfare
  • Molecule, Cell and Organ Functioning
  • Animal Ecology

Professional tracks

Next to your specialisation, you can also choose a Professional track. These tracks prepare you for a specific type of career.

Your future career

Now that you have read all the information about the MSc programme Animal Sciences, you can find at this page what kind of work you can do after you graduate from this programme. Animal scientists find work primarily at universities or in the business sector, such as in the feed and pharmaceutical (veterinary medicines) industries.

Read more about career perspectives and opportunities after finishing the programme.

Related programmes:

MSc Biology 

MSc Forest and Nature Conservation 

MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management

MSc Biosystems Engineering

MSc Organic Agriculture



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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical animal science has become an area of global importance as world trade continues to expand and the challenge of future research is to develop better methods for improving production in all livestock species within tropical regions.
Tropical animal science covers the field of animal nutrition, welfare, and production with the aim of improving productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Master of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of tropical animal science and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Demonstrate an integrated understanding of tropical animal science and its application to improve human quality of life by means of increased and cost effective food production in tropical regions
*Evaluate and apply established and evolving evidence and concepts to reflect critically on theory and professional practice
*Design, plan and ethically execute a research project related to tropical animal science
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Prepare a dissertation on a topic related to tropical animal science and compare and contrast the results obtained with those reported in the literature
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through selection and integration of available subjects in tropical animal science
*Interpret and justify theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills.

Award title

Master of Tropical Animal Science (MTropAnimSc)

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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IDOH (Infectious Diseases and One Health) is a partnership of some of Europe's leading research-intensive universities in the field of infectious diseases and the "one health" concept. Read more

IDOH (Infectious Diseases and One Health) is a partnership of some of Europe's leading research-intensive universities in the field of infectious diseases and the "one health" concept. The three founding partners are Université de Tours, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the University of Edinburgh.

Infectious diseases represent a major threat to public health. Fighting emerging, or re-emerging, infections requires that both animal and human health be treated as "One Health". This will enhance biomedical research discoveries, to the great benefit of both humans and animals.

The objective of the programme is to provide students from all over the world with education in One Health concepts, host pathogen interactions, immunology, zoonotic and emerging infections, translational animal models and management of infectious diseases.

This programme will allow students to study at three of Europe's leading research-intensive universities in the field of infectious diseases and complete an internships at one of the three academic partners or any of 35 associated partners (academic and industrial) located worldwide.

Programme structure

The programme will take place over two academic years and students will spend a semester at each of the three academic partners before completing a fourth semester as an internship either at one of the academic partners or one of the 35 associated partners (academic and industrial) located worldwide.

Year 1

Semester 1: Université de Tours

  • Introductory course in Immunology
  • Public Health
  • Immunology and Immunity of Mucosal Surfaces
  • Host Pathogen Interactions
  • Virulence and Resistance
  • Biodrugs, Bioinformatics and Development
  • French Language

Semester 2: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

  • One Health and Major and Endemic Zoonoses
  • One Health and Emergent Diseases in Special Situations
  • One Health in Food Safety and Security
  • Biosafety and Biosecurity
  • Spanish Language

Year 2

Semester 3: University of Edinburgh

  • Comparative Animal Models for Infectious Diseases and One Health
  • Laboratory Tools for Infectious Diseases and One Health
  • Analysis of Biological Data
  • Principles of Animal Welfare and Bioethics

Semester 4:

  • Internship leading to Dissertation in Infectious Diseases and One Health

Summer school

There is also a week long summer school between semesters 2 and 3 focused on generic transferable skills.

Learning outcomes

The programme will provide core competencies in skills identified as being required by industry and academia. Therefore, the purpose of this programme is to:

  • Provide students with a detailed knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases, immunology and modes of transmission.
  • Provide students with practical experience in a range of animal science techniques.
  • Develop an increased understanding and awareness of the application of scientific principles to the study of infectious and non-infectious causes of disease in animals and humans.
  • Develop the ability to apply scientific knowledge and technical skills in research.
  • Establish the ability to utilise effective and modern methods for interpreting, analysing and describing scientific data.
  • Enhance the ability to communicate, in writing and verbally, scientific results and information in research.
  • Ensure an understanding of the principles of “One Health, One Biology, One Medicine”, to enable the undertaking of independent research.

Throughout the programme, lectures, tutorials, interactive sessions, the “flipped classroom” approach and practicals will be the main teaching format, with the balance varying depending on the partner institution. The small class size allows for extensive participation and interaction among students and between students and academics.

Assessment items reflect the practice of science and are integrated into the course, for example with students presenting the results of a literature review to the class (peer teaching). Concepts from lectures are developed in laboratory sessions and through assessment items. Students are encouraged to question the validity of information provided and critically appraise information sourced through the literature and other resources.

Independent learning is encouraged throughout the programme, particularly during the research project, but also during preparation of assessment items and classroom work. Group work and cooperation is encouraged and enhances the learning process. Formal class contact is supported by regular meetings with course organisers and tutors. A feature of the University of Edinburgh component of the programme is the intensive hands on approach to learning. Students will participate in a wide range of laboratory activities both at The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and the Roslin Institute.

Career opportunities

On completion of the degree, graduates will have a wide range of skills in the area of infectious disease biology, interactions between disease, environment and host, modern animal science and laboratory techniques.

You will also have obtained valuable generic skills in producing and presenting scientific material, communicating with people from a wide range of geographies and cultures and hypothesis development and testing. This will give you a unique background for progressing to further study (PhD or professional qualifications) or going straight into employment.

You could work in developing countries where the burden of infectious disease on both humans and livestock is significant, and thus will help improve food sustainability and the transition from poverty in these countries. In developed countries infectious diseases also cause major losses in productivity of humans and animals, and this will increase as globalisation increases. Depending on your initial background (medical, veterinary, scientific, therapeutic) graduates will find employment that exploits their new knowledge to reduce the impact of infectious disease



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