• University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Bradford Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
"animal" AND "health"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Animal Health)

  • "animal" AND "health" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 173
Order by 
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

Read less
Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. The course aims to develop an appreciation of the theoretical and practical application of health and welfare knowledge in a wide range of contexts. These include the use of animals in a global society, agricultural production and welfare implications, companion animal biology and the more generic roles and uses of animals in society.

Why study Animal Health and Welfare at NTU?

• Staff expertise and experience in the field of animal health and welfare science across a range of species.
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus which offers 200-hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience.
• You will have access to our modern Animal Unit on campus which houses over 200 animals.
• Benefit from a new £2.5 million campus eco-library offering IT resources 24-7.
• Benefit from excellent links to partner organisations, conservation projects and academic institutions across the world.
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Quantitative and qualitative welfare assessment of zoo housed giraffe involved in visitor feed experiences. Dr Sam Ward.
• An analysis of the health and welfare implications of canine sporting disciplines. Dr Jacqueline Boyd.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. The course aims to develop an appreciation of the theoretical and practical application of health and welfare knowledge in a wide range of contexts. These include the use of animals in a global society, agricultural production and welfare implications, companion animal biology and the more generic roles and uses of animals in society.

Why study Animal Health and Welfare at NTU?

• Staff expertise and experience in the field of animal health and welfare science across a range of species.
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus which offers 200-hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience.
• You will have access to our modern Animal Unit on campus which houses over 200 animals.
• Benefit from a new £2.5 million campus eco-library offering IT resources 24-7.
• Benefit from excellent links to partner organisations, conservation projects and academic institutions across the world.
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere.

Read less
Livestock are vital to the lives of millions of people, but endemic and epidemic diseases that affect livestock limit productivity and exacerbate poverty. Read more

Programme description

Livestock are vital to the lives of millions of people, but endemic and epidemic diseases that affect livestock limit productivity and exacerbate poverty.

The diseases that can be transmitted between animals and people also threaten the health of livestock keepers, their families and their communities. In many developing regions farmers and animal health workers are often ill equipped to deal with this risk.

This programme draws together expertise from across the University to deliver first-class teaching and research to tackle these issues.

Building on a solid foundation of biological, immunological, pathological and epidemiological principles, this online MSc will equip you with the skills needed to identify, control and manage animal diseases and the expertise to tackle the international animal health challenges of the 21st Century.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Students may study to certificate, diploma or masters level.

Year 1: certificate
Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance
Host Responses to Infection
Pathogen Strategies for Transmission and Survival

Year 2: diploma
You will undertake the following compulsory course:

Zoonotic disease

Choose one one of the following two courses:

Surveillance and control of transboundary diseases affecting international trade
An introduction to transboundary diseases and their impact on trade and wildlife populations

Then choose from the following electives (up to 60 credits):

Control of economically important parasites
Environmental and nutritional diseases of livestock of international importance
New developments in epidemiology and the control of vector borne disease
Veterinary vaccinology
Wildlife animal health and environment
Technology advances in veterinary diagnostics
Animal disease survey design and analysis
Project planning and decision support for animal disease control
Animal healthcare systems in the post-privatisation era
Introduction to health and production of aquatic species
Introduction to GIS and spatial data analysis
Advanced GIS and spatial epidemiology and modelling
An Introduction of Project Cycle Management
Globalisation and health
The Modern Zoo
The Use of Artificial Reproductive Technologies in Threatened Species
Pastoralism and herd health
Zoonotic diseases in a global setting
Socioeconomic Principles for One Health

Year 3: masters
For a masters, you will choose either to conduct a written reflective element of 10–15,000 words or to take Project Cycle Management and Funding Application Preparation.

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to enhance your career in animal management throughout the world with first-rate expertise and a highly regarded qualification.

Read less
The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife. Read more

MSc Animal Sciences

The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife.

The focus is to deliver skilled professional animal scientists who are well equipped to tackle problems related to sustainable livestock development as well as to the management of livestock and companion animals. The animal-human interaction plays an important role in this study programme. Themes like animal nutrition, animal health, animal welfare, levels of management, genetic diversity and socio-economic factors are all widely discussed.

Programme summary

Humans interact with animals in many different ways, ranging from raising livestock for food to keeping pets for companion. Animal husbandry and livestock development are not only constrained by technical factors, such as feed supply, animal health, management and genetics, but also by infrastructural and socio-economic factors. Consequently, today’s animal scientists need in-depth scientific training combined with a critical attitude towards all factors that limit the sustainable development of animal husbandry. Our individually tailored programme trains students to become expert animal scientists, well-equipped to tackle relevant issues of livestock and animal management.

Specialisations

Within the MSc Animal Sciences you can choose from various specialisations. Each of the specialisations trains you to become an expert in the field. The specialisations in MSc Animal Sciences are:

Animal Breeding and Genetics
Understanding how genetic differences work and how they can be used in a sustainable manner in a wide range of species plays a central role in this specialisation. Students learn how breeding and genetics can contribute to safe and healthy food from animal origin and how it contributes to the health and welfare of animals.

Animal Nutrition
This specialisation deals with the interaction between animals and their nutrition. Students learn about the way animals digest and convert food by studying the nutrient flows and the physiology of the animals in relation to the composition of feeds. They also learn about the effect of feed in relation to health, welfare and behaviour of the animal.

Applied Zoology
Understanding the relationship between structure and function of all systems within the body is the main focus of this specialisation. Students look at organ structures, hormones, bone structure or the immune system of animals and learn how these systems respond to external influences.

Animal Health and Behaviour
Knowledge of the adaptive capacity of animals is required to be able to determine how to keep an animal healthy and how changes affect the animal. Students learn to study behaviour, stress or immune parameters or energy metabolism to determine e.g. which housing system or feed regime is best for animal health and welfare.

Animal Health Management
How can the risk of transmission of infectious diseases be quantified between and within groups of animals? And which factors are of influence on this process? In this specialisation, students learn to combine animal health management at population level with socioeconomic aspects by studying aspects of veterinary epidemiology.

Animal Production Systems
In this specialisation, students will look at animal production systems in relation to the environment worldwide. Students learn about human and animal interaction. They will also study the environmental, economical and social impact that animal production has on the world.

Professional Tracks and International Programmes
In addition to a specialisation, students can choose a professional track that leads to a specific type of career. You can focus on Research, Education, Communication & Policy, or Business & Management. We also offer international programmes that lead to a double master degree, i.e. in Animal Breeding & Genetics, Sustainable Animal Nutrition & Feeding, European Animal Management, or Animal Welfare Assessment.

Your future career

Our graduates work as nutritionists, policymakers, breeding specialists, advisors, managers, researchers or PhD students. They work for feed manufacturing companies, pharmaceutical companies or breeding organisations but also within regional and national governmental organisations, non-governmental organisations or research institutes and universities.

Alumna Linda van Zutphen.
"I work as a Communication Officer for the Research & Development and Quality Affairs department of Nutreco. This company is a global leader in animal nutrition and fish feed. I am involved in marketing and group communication about innovations, quality and sustainability. During my MSc Animal Sciences, I did my internship at Nutreco’s research facility in Spain. The MSc programme provided me with multidisciplinary knowledge on animal production and the skills to apply this. My job gives me the opportunity to combine my scientific background with my passion for communicating about the applications of our research in products for animal health."

Related programmes:
MSc Biology
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Biosystems Engineering
MSc Organic Agriculture.

Read less
■ Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees. ■ Excellent completion rates for higher degrees. Read more
■ Choice of one year (MRes), two year (MPhil) or three year (PhD) research degrees
■ Excellent completion rates for higher degrees
■ Good job prospects for PhD candidates in industry, government organisations and academia
■ Accessible academic staff
■ Rural location and collegiate atmosphere
■ Unique facilities
■ Fortnightly research seminar programme

PhD and MPhil research at the University has been developed over the last 20 years to its current position of national and international recognition in a number of areas. There are strong links with agri-business which give postgraduates the chance to develop close contacts with industry and this has led to more than 90 per cent of our PhD graduates getting jobs in their areas of interest.

The MRes is a new, shorter research degree, developed in response to increasing demand.

All MPhil/PhD research students have their own office space and a dedicated personal computer. You will be encouraged to participate in seminars and conferences appropriate to your research

Read less
Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Read more

Program Description

Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to a One Health approach to sectoral and multidisciplinary integrative mechanism to enable research aimed at sustainably reducing the burden of zoonoses. RUSVM’s geographical location in the Caribbean, its existing research focus on One Health, its experienced faculty and its global partnerships will allow students to gain a hands-on educational experience on one of the most topical global issues.

Zoonoses and other diseases affecting livestock production and health have serious impacts on the economic growth, health and food security and alleviation of poverty in tropical and resource constrained countries. Students will have the opportunity to explore the complex interplay of altered environments and infectious diseases as an increasing threat to agriculture, public health and endangered/threatened species, on a global basis.

The MSc One Health degree program requires 41 credits ( based on guidelines from the United States Department of Education), obtained through coursework and a project, leading to the submission of a thesis. Students are required to undertake specified core courses amounting to 23 credits. The MSc program is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis as well as part-time over 2 or 3 years.

Course Structure

• Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics (5 cr.)
• Public Policy Formulation & Implementation (3 cr.)
• Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3 cr.)
• Research project design (1 cr.)
• Conservation medicine/ecosystem health (5 cr.)
• Zoonoses (intersection between human and animal health) (3 cr.)
• Surveillance and diagnostic methods (3 cr.)

The program also includes a research project/Mini Dissertation (15 cr.) and a 1-week residential in St Kitts (1cr.) as well as electives (dependent on availability) such as animal health program management (2 cr.), safety of foods of animal origin (2 cr.), disaster management (2 cr.).

Learning Outcomes

The MSc One Health degree program is designed to provide the skills and preparation needed for careers in a broad range of environments. The flexible program of study has particular strengths in:
• Tropical animal health and diseases
• The intersection of animal health and human health
• Epidemiology
• Conservation medicine
• Food safety
• Policy Formulation
• Leadership
• research and diagnostic methods
• the interface between domestic animals and wildlife

On completion of the degree program the student will have gained knowledge, research skills and research experience in topics relevant to the broad field of One Health. The program provides graduates the background and experience to assess, investigate and manage animal health and zoonotic disease risks, to design and execute targeted research in animal health, and to manage veterinary intervention in the prevention and control of animal disease. Within the program the student will have had the opportunity to focus on an area of interest, such as area disease control, vector borne diseases, zoonotic infections or conservation medicine.

Students will acquire and enhance intellectual skills in scientific assessment and research methodology, as well as practical skills in communication, organization and scientific writing.

Delivery

The taught component will be instructed by distance learning via eCollege®, our virtual learning environment. You will be taught by our faculty and specialist modules may be delivered by our partner institutions.
The research project may be carried out in St. Kitts and Nevis or in other locations, as appropriate, under the supervision of a RUSVM faculty member. The research component may be desk-based, lab-based or through fieldwork and will result in the submission of a thesis. A short residential component will allow the student cohort to share their perspective and dissertation work to the RUSVM research community.

Assessment

Assessment will be conducted through traditional and novel methods suited to an online delivery mode and will include, for example, essays, critical review of peer-reviewed articles, online tests and quizzes, blog writing, research proposal writing, research/fieldwork journal development, group discussions, group project work and social media interactions. The degree is based on certified completion of research training plus other designated projects and the completion of a thesis.

Read less
This is a joint programme provided by the School and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC). There is a shortage of trained veterinary epidemiologists and there are excellent career opportunities for graduates. Read more
This is a joint programme provided by the School and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC). There is a shortage of trained veterinary epidemiologists and there are excellent career opportunities for graduates. This course provides training in essential methodological skills for the design, conduct, analysis, interpretation and communication of epidemiological studies; and surveillance and disease control in animal and human populations.

This course is also available as a Postgraduate Diploma

Graduates from this course hold positions in a variety of organisations including: Ministries of Agriculture & Food; Veterinary Investigation Laboratories; Animal Disease Research Institutes; Animal Health Trusts; Veterinary Faculties in Universities and International Organisations concerned with global health (DFID, FAO, WHO, OIE, etc).

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/vet_epi_programme_specification.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msve.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students will be able to:

- design and implement epidemiological studies and surveillance systems

- analyse and interpret data from epidemiological studies

- undertake risk analysis and apply this to animal health economics

- apply epidemiological principles to disease control within animal and human populations

- give pragmatic advice on animal health linked to welfare, production and public health

- communicate effectively on the health of animal and human populations to a range of audiences, including the general public, farmers, researchers, politicians and other key policy makers

Structure

Term 1:
All students take the compulsory modules and usually take the recommended modules.

Compulsory modules:

Extended Epidemiology
Epidemiological Aspects of Laboratory Investigation
Surveillance of Animal Health & Production
Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health
Data Management for Epidemiological Studies
Communication Skills in Epidemiology

Recommended:
Public Health Lecture Series

Optional:
Epidemiology in Context
Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Introduction to Computing

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five compulsory study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.).

Slot 1: Animal Health Economics

Slot 2: Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

Slot 3: Modelling and the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases

Slot 4: Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases

Slot 5: Applied Veterinary Epidemiology

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tvet.html

Project Report (MSc only):
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project on a topic in veterinary epidemiology, for submission by early September.

Intercalating this course

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msve.html#sixth

Read less
The Master of Veterinary Public Health is a distance education course using interactive online classrooms to ensure collaboration with peers in the field, support of student learning and weekly interaction with teachers. Read more
The Master of Veterinary Public Health is a distance education course using interactive online classrooms to ensure collaboration with peers in the field, support of student learning and weekly interaction with teachers. Designed for students who are working full-time, the course provides you with the opportunity to interact with other animal health professionals working in many parts of the world on a range of relevant issues.

The Master of Veterinary Public Health is offered in conjunction with the School of Public Health at Sydney and covers scientific disciplines relevant to the prevention of animal disease outbreaks and the management of animal health, including: veterinary epidemiology, biostatistics, hazards to human and animal health, animal health economics, animal health policy development, data management and data analysis.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

Read less
The MSc programme in Parasitology and Pathogen Biology is designed for students seeking training in parasite-borne infectious diseases that severely undermine. Read more
The MSc programme in Parasitology and Pathogen Biology is designed for students seeking training in parasite-borne infectious diseases that severely undermine: human health in the developing world and tropics; agri-food production systems globally (including plant health and animal health and welfare).

Students taking the course will develop expertise directly applicable to human, plant and animal health and welfare, food security and the future sustainability of food production, particularly within livestock and plant/crop production systems.

The course will be run entirely by research active and will offer students the opportunity to gain experience in internationally competitive laboratories.

PROGRAMME CONTENT
The MSc programme in Parasitology and Pathogen Biology is designed for students seeking training in parasite-borne infectious diseases that severely undermine: human health in the developing world and tropics; agri-food production systems globally (including plant health and animal health and welfare). Students taking the course will develop expertise directly applicable to human, plant and animal health and welfare, food security and the future sustainability of food production, particularly within livestock and plant/crop production systems.

Students undertaking this MSc course will study the folling modules:

- Foundation for Research in the Biosciences 20CATS
- Fundamental Parasitology & Advanced Skills 20CATS
- Advanced Parasitology I 20CATS
- Advanced Parasitology II 20CATS
- Bio-Entrepreneurship & Advanced Skills 20CATS
- Literature Review 20CATS
- Research Project 60CATS

CAREER PROSPECTS
It is anticipated that the skills set and knowledge acquired will equip participants with a comprehensive academic and methodological repertoire to undertake careers in agriculture, plant science, animal and human health, pharmaceutica, academia and food security, underpinning the transdisciplinary nature of the programme.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

WHY QUEEN'S?
The MSc programme embraces the One Health approach to these infectious diseases, with strong recognition of the interplay between health and disease at the dynamic interface between humans, animals and the environment.

In addition to embedded generic skills training, students will have the opportunity to acquire subject-specific skills training, e.g. molecular biology techniques, diagnostics, epidemiology (human, animal and plant diseases), drug/vaccine development, pathogen management/control, host-parasite interaction, immunobiology, drug resistance and the potential impact of climate change on parasites and their vectors.

In addition to the taught elements of the course, MSc students will undertake a research project working in research active laboratories (academic or industrial), or in the field, e.g. the impact of helminth infections on animal welfare, the economic impact of parasites on agriculture, the role of vectors in emerging diseases, the ecology of zoonotic diseases, the molecular basis of anthelmintic resistance, emerging technologies for drug discovery, the pathology of infection, parasite immunomodulation of the host.

The transferrable skill set and knowledge base acquired from the programme will equip students with a highly desirable qualification that is suited to those wishing to pursue careers in human health/infectious disease, animal health, veterinary medicine, animal/plant biology, pharmaceutical sciences and food security.

Read less
In a world where global transport links allow rapid movement of people and animals, disease can spread more quickly than before and is harder to control than ever. Read more
In a world where global transport links allow rapid movement of people and animals, disease can spread more quickly than before and is harder to control than ever. In such a world there is a growing need for trained epidemiologists at the front line of disease surveillance.

The UK leads the way in providing this training and, in order to meet the demand for skilled professionals, the RVC has developed a unique postgraduate veterinary epidemiology course, delivered jointly with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

Under the microscope

This demanding masters in veterinary epidemiology programme is led by veterinary epidemiologists and supported by policy makers from the forefront of UK government and you will gain a fascinating insight into the work of the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA, formerly AHVLA). Your areas of study will combine LSHTM’s strengths in epidemiological principles and communicable disease epidemiology, with the RVC’s expertise in veterinary epidemiology, animal health and production.

The course

All students are required to study the core units and usually the recommended units. Students are advised to take at most one optional unit unless they are very familiar with the content of several core or recommended units.

Term one core units:
- Extended epidemiology
- Statistics for EPH
- Epidemiological aspects of laboratory investigation
- Surveillance of animal health and production
- Data management using epi-data
- Communication skills in epidemiology

Recommended unit: Public health
Optional units: Epidemiology in context, Introduction to computing

Term two core units:
- Animal health economics
- Epidemiology and control of communicable diseases
- Statistical methods in epidemiology
- Applied risk assessment and management

Term three core unit:
- Advanced statistical methods in veterinary epidemiology

Recommended units: Modelling and dynamics of infectious diseases, Methods of vector control


Projects - you will spend the second part of the year working full-time on an individual project with the guidance of a supervisor. If you have been sponsored by an employer, you may undertake a project related to your work.

Assessment - you will be assessed by two written exams in June, six in-course assessments throughout the year, and a project report with oral examination in September.

How will I learn?

You can choose to complete the Veterinary Epidemiology post-graduate course over one year full-time study, or part time over two years.

All participants begin the course in September. Over three terms, you will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and tutorials. Both MSc and Diploma students complete the Term One foundation module. MSc students then complete a further five compulsory modules over Terms Two and Three, while Diploma students complete a further four modules, with some module choice available.

Students on both courses sit written examination papers in June, after which the veterinary epidemiology MSc students will work on a research project from June to August, culminating in an oral examination in September.

Part-time students attend the course full-time from October to December in year one, followed by classes two to three days a week from January to May. You will usually study the remainder of the course in year two, including the summer research project (MSc students only).

We recognise the need for flexibility, however, and are happy to tailor your part-time study to meet your specific requirements (subject to agreement with the course director).

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course you will be able to:

- Demonstrate and understand the key concepts underpinning the discipline of veterinary and medical epidemiology
- Select an appropriate study design when confronted with an epidemiological research question and develop a detailed study protocol capable of answering the research question
- Analyse and interpret epidemiological data derived from cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies
- Review critically the published epidemiological literature
- Apply epidemiological principles to surveillance, and infection and disease control, within animal and human populations
- Communicate effectively with researchers from different disciplinary backgrounds
- Communicate effectively with other people with an interest in human and animal health, including the general public and key policy makers.

Read less
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

Read less
The One Health concept recognises the interconnectedness of human, animal and ecosystem health. A One Health approach involves applying a coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral approach to address potential or existing risks that originate at the animal-human-ecosystems interface. Read more
The One Health concept recognises the interconnectedness of human, animal and ecosystem health. A One Health approach involves applying a coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral approach to address potential or existing risks that originate at the animal-human-ecosystems interface. The overarching aim of One Health is to achieve optimal health for humans, animals and the ecosystem. This Masters in One Health aims to offer online, specialist teaching to students to acquire knowledge and skills required to work within a One Health framework. The programme seeks to explore an integrative approach to human, veterinary and ecological health, recognising the importance of interdisciplinary collaborations and the interconnectedness of public health, environmental issues, veterinary and human medicine. The programme also raises awareness of cultural and societal factors that influence how One Health approaches are translated into practice.

Why this programme

◾The flexible, online delivery of this programme by world researchers and clinicians allows you to study from anywhere across the globe.
◾Glasgow employs some of the most prominent UK researchers in the One Health framework, giving you access to up-to-date expertise.
◾Our teaching is research-led. The courses have been developed to reflect the latest academic research and up-to-date challenges of One Health.
◾During a course, from week to week you will interact with your teachers and fellow students using online discussion boards. Your teachers will direct and observe the discussion and respond to student questions about the course content.
◾You will have the opportunity to collaborate on a research project under the supervision of a member of academic staff or an external supervisor.
◾The One Health concept is gaining momentum worldwide and an early adoption thereof is putting the University of Glasgow at the forefront of teaching and learning within the One Health framework.

Programme structure

This programme is modular in structure, offering a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied and the number of credits obtained. There is a set of core courses and optional courses that can be undertaken to complete a certificate (60 credits), diploma (120 credits) or masters (180 credits).

We place emphasis upon community building and creating a sense of presence within the online learning environment using a range of educational technology tools, such as asynchronous and synchronous discussions, virtual classrooms, wikis, interactive quizzes, audio and video resources, to create a sense of students being at and part of the University

The first year of study will explore the One Health framework and examine the value thereof, and provide foundations in epidemiology. The first year also introduces zoonoses and infectious diseases, a core area of One Health. During the second year of study, students will be able to choose courses in an area of special interest from a range of subject areas from human and veterinary medicine and public health. Students planning to continue on to Masters level are required to study research methods, a course that will provide the necessary skills to plan, research and write a dissertation. The third year of study will allow students to gain in depth knowledge in their area of special interest by undertaking a research project. The research project is a written dissertation. The format of the dissertation output is flexible and may include a research paper, a grant application or a briefing paper for a company / policy maker.

Core courses

◾Introduction to One Health
◾Zoonoses and infectious disease
◾Introduction to epidemiology
◾Research methods (MSc students only)
◾Dissertation (MSc students only)

Optional courses

◾Global veterinary medicine
◾Globalisation of public health
◾Veterinary epidemiology: methods in surveillance and field investigation
◾Veterinary public health and service delivery
◾Infectious disease control
◾Wildlife and livestock management
◾Ecological Principles
◾Health economics
◾Health promotion: principles and practice
◾Health technology assessment in a global context

Studying online - http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/onehealth/#/studyingonline

Career prospects

Graduates of the One Health programme may establish careers for front line healthcare providers, for example as developers and implementers of prevention and treatment programs. Graduates may be employed by international health organisations (ie WHO, FAO OIE), local agencies, government agencies (ie DFID, public health sector) or non-governmental organisations. Graduates may also establish careers in the academic sector, specialising in a One Health subject (for example zoonotic diseases).

Read less
Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare. Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Read more
Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare.

Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Emerging veterinary infectious diseases and human diseases, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, emphasise the threat posed by these issues.

The One Health approach recognises the relationship between health and disease at the human, animal and environment interfaces and has become an important focus in both medical and veterinary science. It promotes a “whole of society” treatment of health hazards and a systemic change of perspective in the management of risk.

Under the microscope

If you are interested in One Health and the control of infectious disease (particularly in the developing world), then this unique course could be for you. We welcome applications from individuals with a background in public health, veterinary sciences, animal or biological sciences, social and environmental sciences, ecology and wildlife health. If you are interested in this field, but do not have the relevant background, please speak with the course directors who can consider such cases on an individual basis.

The course is delivered jointly by the RVC, University of London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

The course

The MSc consists of eight modules of 15 credits each, plus a compulsory research project (MSc only) of 60 credits -15 credits for integration of One Health principles learnt through development of and writing a research proposal and 45 credits for the empirical or trans-disciplinary innovative study.

The MSc consists of the following modules:
- Foundations of One Health
- Introduction to disease agents for One Health
- Infectious disease emergence core module
- Introduction to One Health epidemiology and surveillance
- Economics of One Health
- One Health skills development
- Medical anthropology and public health
- Optional module choice from; vector biology and vector parasite interactions, environmental epidemiology, epidemiology and control of communicable diseases, and globalisation and health
- Research project (MSc only)

How will I learn?

The MSc may be completed full-time in one year or part-time over two to three years, and consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

The PGDiploma is shorter (eight modules with no research project component) and may be completed in two terms.

The course starts in September each year and you will split your time between the RVC and LSHTM. Students studying the MSc will then undertake a four-month research project in an area and country of their choice.

Learning outcomes

The course will provide you with:

- A comprehensive foundation on the principles of diseases in the context of socio-ecological systems, global health and food safety
- Knowledge and skills in relation to One Health methodologies, transdisciplinary interactions and in using a systems approach

At the end of the course you will be able to:

- Understand the One Health concept and approach problem solving using a trans-disciplinary methodology
- Understand the origin, context and drivers of infectious disease at the human, animal and environment interface
- Evaluate impacts of multi-host infections on human, animal and ecosystem health and economics directly, or indirectly, via food, disease vectors or the environment.
- Develop a One Health systems approach to complex disease issues in monitoring, surveillance, diagnosis, prevention and control
- Critically review published literature
- Design a research project (MSc students only)

Read less
Food from aquatic systems is essential for much of the world’s population – but wild catches are declining. Fortunately Aquaculture (farming of aquatic animals) is an alternative source of high quality nutrition and employment. Read more

Introduction

Food from aquatic systems is essential for much of the world’s population – but wild catches are declining. Fortunately Aquaculture (farming of aquatic animals) is an alternative source of high quality nutrition and employment. Aquaculture has been very successful but diseases can be damaging. Aquaculture has over 40 years of experience in investigating and controlling fish and shrimp diseases worldwide, which it utilises to improve your problem-solving skills, equipping you to make a real contribution to the sustainability of aquaculture.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Trevor Telfer

Course objectives

The course is specifically aimed at students with a veterinary science qualification with the object of giving training in the wide range of disciplines and skills necessary for the investigation, prevention and control of aquatic animal diseases. You will gain an understanding of the biology, husbandry and environment of farmed aquatic species, in addition to specialist expertise in aquatic animal diseases. It is also intended to prepare students who plan to pursue a PhD in the area of aquatic animal health or disease.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The full Master’s course for each degree outcome is divided into four taught modules containing 12 subject areas or topics; two Foundation modules, two Advanced modules and a single Research Project module. The overall course is divided into three parts:

- Foundation modules
The Foundation modules are taught between September and December. There are six compulsory topics of study within two taught modules, taken consecutively, giving instruction in basic aquaculture concepts and skills. Successful completion of both Foundation modules will qualify you for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture.

- Advanced modules
The two Advanced modules consisting of six compulsory topics of study are taught between January and April. Successful completion of the advanced modules, subsequent to the Foundation modules, will qualify you for a Postgraduate Diploma in Aquatic Pathobiology.

- Research Project module
The Research Project module is normally completed between April and August, and involves research in many areas of aquatic animal health. These projects mostly laboratory based and often result in peer reviewed publications. Successful completion of the module, subsequent to foundation and advanced modules, will qualify you for an MSc in Aquatic Veterinary Studies.

Delivery and assessment

The course is delivered through a variety of formats including lectures, practical classes, seminars, field visits and directed study. Assessment consists of a number of assignments in a range of formats. The Research Project is graded on activities undertaken during the project, the thesis and a presentation you make in front of your peers, supervisors and examiners. The dissertation is examined by internal and external examiners.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

The degree has been taught for almost 40 years and only one of its kind. It gives students the unique opportunity to study the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of aquatic animal diseases in cultured organisms in one of the top institutions of the world.

Career opportunities

The course has run for almost 40 years and has trained over 200 students (in combination with Aquatic Pathobiology) from all over the world. It equips you with expertise applicable to a wide range of potential careers. Our graduates generally find employment in their area of interest, and the world employment market in the area of aquatic animal health remains buoyant.
The course provides a natural career progression for most candidates and a conversion course for others wishing to enter the field. It also provides training for those who wish to pursue a PhD, especially in aquaculture, aquatic health, fisheries and aquatic resources management.
Over the last five intakes, in combination with the Aquatic Pathobiology degree, about 30 percent of graduates have gone on to a PhD or further research, about 25 percent have taken employment as fish health consultants or veterinarians, about 20 percent work in government fisheries departments, about 15 percent are university lecturers and the remainder are managers of farms or aquaria or have other types of employment.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X