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Masters Degrees (Animal Feed)

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The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife. Read more

MSc Animal Sciences

The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife.

The focus is to deliver skilled professional animal scientists who are well equipped to tackle problems related to sustainable livestock development as well as to the management of livestock and companion animals. The animal-human interaction plays an important role in this study programme. Themes like animal nutrition, animal health, animal welfare, levels of management, genetic diversity and socio-economic factors are all widely discussed.

Programme summary

Humans interact with animals in many different ways, ranging from raising livestock for food to keeping pets for companion. Animal husbandry and livestock development are not only constrained by technical factors, such as feed supply, animal health, management and genetics, but also by infrastructural and socio-economic factors. Consequently, today’s animal scientists need in-depth scientific training combined with a critical attitude towards all factors that limit the sustainable development of animal husbandry. Our individually tailored programme trains students to become expert animal scientists, well-equipped to tackle relevant issues of livestock and animal management.

Specialisations

Within the MSc Animal Sciences you can choose from various specialisations. Each of the specialisations trains you to become an expert in the field. The specialisations in MSc Animal Sciences are:

Animal Breeding and Genetics
Understanding how genetic differences work and how they can be used in a sustainable manner in a wide range of species plays a central role in this specialisation. Students learn how breeding and genetics can contribute to safe and healthy food from animal origin and how it contributes to the health and welfare of animals.

Animal Nutrition
This specialisation deals with the interaction between animals and their nutrition. Students learn about the way animals digest and convert food by studying the nutrient flows and the physiology of the animals in relation to the composition of feeds. They also learn about the effect of feed in relation to health, welfare and behaviour of the animal.

Applied Zoology
Understanding the relationship between structure and function of all systems within the body is the main focus of this specialisation. Students look at organ structures, hormones, bone structure or the immune system of animals and learn how these systems respond to external influences.

Animal Health and Behaviour
Knowledge of the adaptive capacity of animals is required to be able to determine how to keep an animal healthy and how changes affect the animal. Students learn to study behaviour, stress or immune parameters or energy metabolism to determine e.g. which housing system or feed regime is best for animal health and welfare.

Animal Health Management
How can the risk of transmission of infectious diseases be quantified between and within groups of animals? And which factors are of influence on this process? In this specialisation, students learn to combine animal health management at population level with socioeconomic aspects by studying aspects of veterinary epidemiology.

Animal Production Systems
In this specialisation, students will look at animal production systems in relation to the environment worldwide. Students learn about human and animal interaction. They will also study the environmental, economical and social impact that animal production has on the world.

Professional Tracks and International Programmes
In addition to a specialisation, students can choose a professional track that leads to a specific type of career. You can focus on Research, Education, Communication & Policy, or Business & Management. We also offer international programmes that lead to a double master degree, i.e. in Animal Breeding & Genetics, Sustainable Animal Nutrition & Feeding, European Animal Management, or Animal Welfare Assessment.

Your future career

Our graduates work as nutritionists, policymakers, breeding specialists, advisors, managers, researchers or PhD students. They work for feed manufacturing companies, pharmaceutical companies or breeding organisations but also within regional and national governmental organisations, non-governmental organisations or research institutes and universities.

Alumna Linda van Zutphen.
"I work as a Communication Officer for the Research & Development and Quality Affairs department of Nutreco. This company is a global leader in animal nutrition and fish feed. I am involved in marketing and group communication about innovations, quality and sustainability. During my MSc Animal Sciences, I did my internship at Nutreco’s research facility in Spain. The MSc programme provided me with multidisciplinary knowledge on animal production and the skills to apply this. My job gives me the opportunity to combine my scientific background with my passion for communicating about the applications of our research in products for animal health."

Related programmes:
MSc Biology
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Biosystems Engineering
MSc Organic Agriculture.

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*subject to validation. The course. Read more
*subject to validation

The course

The course is designed to equip practitioners with the higher level skills and knowledge to apply recent developments in nutritional science, technology and legislation to support sustainable expansion and intensification of ruminant production systems and meet consumer demands for ruminant products both within the UK and globally. It is primarily aimed at UK graduates, veterinary surgeons and specialists within the animal feeds industry, but may also be of interest to overseas applicants.

Entry requirements

Candidates will be expected to have obtained a 2:1 honours degree in an appropriate agricultural, veterinary or scientific subject. Alternatively, candidates with a good UK-based HND or foundation degree in an appropriate agricultural or scientific subject, together with related industrial or professional experience of at least two years will be considered. For all candidates evidence of qualifications and experience will be required.

How will it benefit me?

Globally the demand for animal products is expected to increase by 85% by 2050 and this increase in demand can only be satisfied by increases in production efficiency and sustainable intensification of ruminant production systems. Within the UK, ruminant production systems are under increasing pressure to maintain profitability and improve product quality, whilst maintaining animal welfare and reducing any detrimental effects on the environment. As animal feed represents over 80% of the variable costs associated with production, an understanding of the science and technology associated with digestion, metabolism, growth and lactation will be essential in order to increase the efficiency and maintain the profitability of ruminant production systems in the future. These awards will provide a recognised higher education qualification for graduates intending intending to work in the ruminant sector, and contribute towards the continued professional development of veterinary surgeons and specialists already in full time employment.

Careers

There are many career opportunities for those with a post-graduate qualification in ruminant nutrition including teaching and research positions at academic institutions and advisory work as subject specialists in the animal production or animal feed industries.

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This new vocational course offers the unique opportunity to integrate an in-depth scientific knowledge of animal nutrition with the acquisition of business skills and a detailed operational understanding of the animal feed industries, developed through a series of case studies. Read more
This new vocational course offers the unique opportunity to integrate an in-depth scientific knowledge of animal nutrition with the acquisition of business skills and a detailed operational understanding of the animal feed industries, developed through a series of case studies. This combination will equip you with the knowledge and skills for working in either research or industry.

Key facts

The course has close links with industrial partners, with guest lectures, site-visits and an annual on-campus Nottingham Feed Conference, providing access to the latest developments in the animal feed industry.
The programme is managed by the school’s Division of Animal Sciences, which has an international reputation for research in animal nutrition, development, reproduction and biotechnology. The division also manages a successful undergraduate degree in Animal Sciences.
The school is ranked the no.1 research environment in the UK (for Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science) in the 2014 REF (Research Excellence Framework). 97% of our work (in the Schools of Biosciences and Veterinary Medicine and Science ) was judged to be of international quality.
Academic staff in the school have links with the University's School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, also based on the Sutton Bonington Campus.
Students have access to the on-campus University Farm and Dairy Centre.

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Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. The course aims to develop an appreciation of the theoretical and practical application of health and welfare knowledge in a wide range of contexts. These include the use of animals in a global society, agricultural production and welfare implications, companion animal biology and the more generic roles and uses of animals in society.

Why study Animal Health and Welfare at NTU?

• Staff expertise and experience in the field of animal health and welfare science across a range of species.
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus which offers 200-hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience.
• You will have access to our modern Animal Unit on campus which houses over 200 animals.
• Benefit from a new £2.5 million campus eco-library offering IT resources 24-7.
• Benefit from excellent links to partner organisations, conservation projects and academic institutions across the world.
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Quantitative and qualitative welfare assessment of zoo housed giraffe involved in visitor feed experiences. Dr Sam Ward.
• An analysis of the health and welfare implications of canine sporting disciplines. Dr Jacqueline Boyd.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

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The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. Read more
The MSc Advanced Food Safety programme at QUB is tailored towards students who aim to or currently work within the agri-food sector. It will offer the opportunity to obtain a unique qualification in the field of food safety delivered by research-active scientists within the Institute for Global Food Security.

The major focus of the programme will be on new and emerging issues within the diverse field of food safety and it will concentrate on developments in analytical approaches used to monitor and regulate food safety with the view to protect human health.

Key topics covered will include: food fraud and traceability and the analytical methods used to detect fraud and ensure food safety and authenticity; the links between environmental chemical contaminants and biological hazards present in animal feed and human food - highlighting new emerging technologies that enable rapid and early detection of food safety incidents and diagnosis of animal diseases.

QUB MSc Advanced Food Safety Video: https://youtu.be/TFxBDS9mb-k

Content

Advanced Food Bioanalysis
Bio-entrepreneurship and Advanced Skills
Agri-food Traceability and Fraud
Food Safety, Health and Disease
Foundations for Research in the Biosciences
Literature Review
Research Project (triple module)

Assessment

Continuous assessment of coursework, examinations, and assessment of modules based solely on submitted work related to private individual study. A MSc will be awarded with Distinction to students who achieve a dissertation and average mark both exceeding 70 per cent, and with Commendation for marks over 60 per cent.

Opportunities for Careers

Excellent opportunities exist within agri-food companies, diagnostic research companies and regulatory testing laboratories. Graduates will also be in a position to progress to further PhD level research study.

Special Features

A major component will include the completion of a laboratory-based, food safety related research project within the Institute for Global Food Security, offering the opportunity to gain practical experience in the use of conventional and emerging bioanalytical technology platforms.

Facilities and capabilities include:
Biosensor instrumentation
Cell culture and microbiological suites
GC, HPLC and UPLC systems
Proteomic and metabolomic profiling
ICP, GC, qToF and QqQ mass spectrometers
Spectroscopic analysis
Real time PCR and surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology

Additional information for International students

http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQueens/InternationalStudents/

Applicants who are non-EEA nationals must satisfy the UK Border Agency (UKBA) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.0, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

*Taken within the last 2 yrs.

Please see http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs for more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals.


Up to date information on course fees can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance/TuitionFees/

The University provides information on possible sources of awards which is available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/PostgraduateCentre/PostgraduateFunding/

Information on the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/Research/GRI/TheInstituteforGlobalFoodSecurity/


Visit the MSc Advanced Food Safety page on the Queen’s University Belfast web site for more details! (http://www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Course-Finder/PCF1718/PTCF1718/Course/AdvancedFoodSafety.html)

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Do you want to develop your technical poultry production practice to postgraduate level?. Harper Adams University has developed a Masters degree in Poultry Production. Read more
Do you want to develop your technical poultry production practice to postgraduate level?

Harper Adams University has developed a Masters degree in Poultry Production.

The course

The poultry meat and egg sectors continue to show a consistent growth across all continents, with greater levels of expansion in developing regions of the world. Poultry meat production exceeded 100 milion tons in 2013 with broiler production accounting for all but 10 per cent of this production. With the anticipated expansion in world human population of 9.3 billion primarily in developing countries the demand four poultry meat is expected to continue into the future with India and China representing particularly large markets. Egg production is also expected to continue its expansion. Poultry is a major consumer of animal feed grain, with 40% of the total being used by poultry. There will be competing demands for this feed, which the poultry sector will need to respond to.

The UK poultry industry is characterised by a small number of large integrated companies a position increasingly mirrored on a global scale. Whilst there is a clear opportunity for growth there are a number of known challenges including feed price volatility in the short to medium term, the increased competition for raw materials in the longer term, poultry health, human health related issues (e.g. Campylobacter), concerns over antibiotic use.

The global poultry sector is particularly well placed to address the needs for increasing quantities of animal derived protein, this programme will provide the platform for students to address these and other emerging issues through focused and tailored assignments allowing students to plot their own pathway of learning.

The programme will serve to offer a portfolio of multidisciplinary topics within a selection of specialised integrative modules to advance students’ understanding of the relevant biosciences underpinning poultry farming. This will be presented within a theme of mono-gastric animal production where there are many similarities of principle and scientific approaches.

In summary the course:

Supports students to develop a level of understanding and knowledge that allows them to work as subject specialists and lead developments within poultry production systems.
Supports students to evaluate the wider consequences of animal production systems, mitigating any detrimental effects on animal welfare, food quality and the natural environment.
Supports students in their development of an advanced understanding of the biological factors that limit animal production and the scientific, technological, economic and social factors that influence animal production systems.

How will it benefit me?

The course will:

Prepare students for a career in Poultry Production.
Offer vocational training in the area of applied Poultry Production.
Prepare students for PhD studies.

Modules are usually delivered as an intensive short course, taught over a one week block, with a maximum of 5 days per 15 credit module providing in the region of 35 hours of contact time.
Teaching may consist of formal lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical exercises, laboratory sessions, study visits or the use of guest speakers.
The PgC, PgD and MSc are offered full-time and part-time to allow those in work to study towards an award at a pace that suits their needs and time available.
The PgC is particularly well suited to those currently working in the sector as a means of initial training or CPD.

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There is an increasing need for specialists within agriculture who have an understanding of both the business and technical aspects of the industry. Read more
There is an increasing need for specialists within agriculture who have an understanding of both the business and technical aspects of the industry. This postgraduate course is aimed at people who are interested in pursuing a career within the land based industries in a professional capacity. This could include consultants, agronomists, animal nutritionists, farm managers/ owners and those working for government departments on technical and regulatory issues.

There is currently a high demand for well trained and suitably qualified personnel within the agricultural industry, and a need for specialists who not only have an understanding of their sector, but have the skills to interact professionally with their clients. A core group of modules will focus on topics such as professional leadership and management, food and agricultural policy, business planning, project management. In order to develop the student’s own area of expertise there are a number of elective modules in business, crop or livestock production. Many positions require professional qualifications so there is the potential within the course to study FACTS, BASIS or AMTRA (additional fee and assessment will be required for these qualifications). In addition, the Institute of Agricultural Management (IAgrM) considers this course as suitable evidence of CPD for those wishing to pursue ‘Professional Agriculturalist’ status.

The course is offered on a part-time distance learning basis to make it accessible to those in employment or with family commitments to be able to participate. Applicants may come from a wide range of backgrounds including farmers, growers, vets and other agricultural and food sector workers who wish to develop their career and businesses in the land-based sector.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- the technical and management skills required in modern agricultural professional practice
- the knowledge and understanding of how policy decisions impact on the land-based sector
- the ability to appraise research information and apply this to sustainable agricultural practice

The MSc Agricultural Professional Practice degree is awarded by the University of Glasgow.

Course Content

The programme is a mix of technical production, management, and skills development modules. The MSc consists of eight taught modules, followed by a period of dissertation project work. Five modules are compulsory:

Professional Leadership and Management
This module will develop key skills required for professional practice in Agriculture eg. communication skills, facilitating meetings, networking, customer relations, presentation skills and dealing with the media. It will also focus on professionalism, leadership and management skills and will include the setting of personal goals for career progression and identifying relevant CPD opportunities. Participants will be encouraged to identify and display appropriate attitudes, behaviors and values for their own situation.

Food and Agricultural Policy
This module will develop an understanding of the local, national and international policies that impact on the whole food chain from agricultural production, through business development to the consumer.

Business Planning and Decision Making
Business planning, analysis and decision making are essential components of successful rural business management. The applied nature of this course allows students to choose a business with which they are familiar thus making the experience relevant to their own work environment. This module will assist in the process of formulating a business plan to a professional standard, suitable for submission to a potential lender. The process of planning and control, and assessing the financial consequences of that plan will also be covered in the module.

Project Management for Agricultural Professionals
A key role of any agricultural consultancy is management of projects for clients. Underpinning this work is the role of project management. Firstly, this module will consider how to plan a project, manage resources and monitor progress. Secondly, this module will consider how to design an investigation and then analyse and interpret data from this work. The assignments will apply this information in work related projects.

Topical Issues in Modern Agriculture
The purpose of this module is to allow students to integrate the knowledge they possess and, by constructing a reasoned argument, develop broader understanding of their professional area and its relevance to related industries and the wider society. It is designed to develop the critical analysis and evaluation skills of students whilst dealing with complex issues and making informed judgements. The module will typically consist of a series of structured online debates on selected topics of contemporary relevance. Students will engage in constructive discussion of the topics giving critical analyses of the issues. Students will also research an issue that is relevant to their profession and then present it to the class, for peer review.

A further three modules are chosen from a range of options, including:
- Integrated Agricultural Management
- Sustainable Nutrient Management
- Animal Health and Veterinary Medicine
- Arable Crop Protection
- Grassland and Fodder Crop Protection
- Animal Feed Technology

MSc Project (taken following successful completion of taught modules)
This module takes the form of an in-depth investigative or research project on a topic related to agriculture which will be decided in consultation with the Module Leader and project supervisor. It will develop investigative skills and enable the critical evaluation and presentation of information.

[[Course Structure ]]
The programme is studied by part-time distance learning, with learning material presented using SRUC’s online learning environment which allows students to undertake the course from their own home or workplace.

The course is supported by regular weekend schools where participants attend SRUC Aberdeen for seminars, practical sessions and farm visits which provide a valuable part of the learning experience through group discussions and presentations.

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study four modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week during ‘term’ time.

Students wishing to complete the MSc, and who reach progression standard, will then go on to complete a research project following successful completion of all the taught modules.

Study weekends are an integral part of teaching and learning through interaction with peers, industry subject specialists and teaching staff. Students are strongly recommended to attend the two study weekends in September and February if they are to succeed in this course.

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Would you like to be involved in finding solutions to future challenges of food and energy production, such as climate change, population growth and limited energy resources? Are you interested in animal welfare, clean soil, environmental issues or the newest methods in biological and genetic engineering? Would you like to learn about automation and robotics in agriculture?. Read more
Would you like to be involved in finding solutions to future challenges of food and energy production, such as climate change, population growth and limited energy resources? Are you interested in animal welfare, clean soil, environmental issues or the newest methods in biological and genetic engineering? Would you like to learn about automation and robotics in agriculture?

Join the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences on the Viikki Campus to find solutions for the challenges of today and tomorrow. The University of Helsinki is the only university in Finland to offer academic education in this field.

In the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences, you can pursue studies in plant production sciences, animal science, agrotechnology, or environmental soil science, depending on your interests and previous studies. For further information about the study tracks, see Programme contents.

Upon completing a Master’s degree, you will:
-Be an expert in plant production science, animal science, agrotechnology, or environmental soil science.
-Be able to assess the sustainability and environmental impact of food and energy production.
-Be able to apply biosciences, ecology, chemistry, physics or statistics, depending on your study track, to the future needs of agriculture.
-Have mastered the key issues and future development trends of your field.
-Have mastered state-of-the-art research and analysis methods and techniques.
-Be able to engage in international activities, project work and communication.
-Be able to acquire and interpret scientific research information in your field and present it orally and in writing.
-Have the qualifications to pursue postgraduate studies in a doctoral programme or a career as an expert or entrepreneur.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences comprises four study tracks:
Plant production sciences – plants as sources of food, feed, energy, beauty and wellbeing
During your studies, you will have the opportunity to apply biology to the breeding, cultivation, protection and production ecology of crop or horticultural plants. Producing sufficient food is one of the great challenges facing humanity. Plant production sciences have an important mission in finding solutions to this challenge. Plants are cultivated not only for food and feed, but also for bioenergy, green landscapes and ornamental purposes; plant production sciences seek new, improved solutions for all these purposes.

Animal science – animal health and wellbeing
During your studies, you will become familiar with issues pertaining to the wellbeing, nutrition and breeding of production and hobby animals as well as with the relevant biotechnology. In this study track you will apply biochemistry, animal physiology, genetics and molecular biology for the benefit of sustainable animal production. The Viikki Research Farm, in urban Helsinki, provides plenty of opportunities for hands-on learning!

Agrotechnology – technology with consideration for the environment
This study track provides you with the opportunity to study technologies that are key to agricultural production and the environment, from the basics to the latest innovations. Advances in technology and automation offer new horizons to fearless inventors interested in developing machinery and engineering for the reorganisation, implementation and adjustment of production in accordance with the needs of plants and animals.

Environmental soil science – dig below the surface
These studies allow you to literally dig beneath the surface. The soil is a central factor for the production of renewable natural resources, the diversity of nature, and the quality of water systems. As an expert in environmental soil science you will know how the soil serves as a substrate for plants and affects the quality of food, and how it can be improved.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences comprises four study tracks, allowing you to focus on a specialisation according to your interests and previous studies: plant production sciences (quota of 40 students), animal science (quota of 25 students), agrotechnology (quota of 15 students), and environmental soil science (quota of 5 students).

You can be admitted to the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences either directly from the relevant Bachelor’s programme or through a separate admissions process. A total of 80 students will be admitted through these two admissions channels.

Programme Structure

With a scope of 120 credits (ECTS), the Master’s programme can be completed in two academic years. The degree comprises:
-60 credits of advanced studies in the selected study track, including your Master’s thesis (30 credits)
-60 credits of other studies from the curriculum of your own or other degree programmes

The study tracks of the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to construct thematic modules around importance topical issues: the bioeconomy, the recycling of nutrients, food systems, and the production and exploitation of genomic information.

You must also complete a personal study plan (PSP). Your studies can also include career orientation and career planning.

Various teaching methods are used in the programme, including lectures, practical exercises, practical laboratory and field courses, practical training, seminars, project work and independent study.

Career Prospects

As a graduate of the Master’s Programme in Agricultural Sciences, you will have the competence to pursue a career or to continue your studies at the doctoral level.

According to the statistics of the Finnish Association of Academic Agronomists, the current employment situation for new graduates is positive. Graduates have found employment in Finland and abroad as experts in the following fields:
-Research and product development (universities, research institutes, companies, industry).
-Administration and expert positions (ministries, supervisory agencies, EU, FAO).
-Business and management (companies).
-Teaching, training and consultation (universities, universities of applied sciences, organisations, development cooperation projects).
-Communication (universities, media, companies, ministries, organisations).
-Entrepreneurship (self-employment).

As a graduate you can apply for doctoral education in Finland or abroad. A doctoral degree can be completed in four years. With a doctoral degree you can pursue a career in the academic world or enter the job market. The qualifications required for some positions may be a doctoral rather than a Master’s degree.

Other admission details

Applications are also accepted from graduates of other University of Helsinki Bachelor’s programmes as well as from graduates of other Finnish or international universities. In these cases, admission will be based on your previous academic performance and the applicability of your previous degree. For the latest admission requirements see the website: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/masters-admission-masters-programme-in-agricultural-sciences-master-of-science-agriculture-and-forestry-2-years/1.2.246.562.20.29558674254

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Government and private companies are working to develop new ways to improve existing food and animal feed crops, and to develop novel crops to meet future challenges. Read more
Government and private companies are working to develop new ways to improve existing food and animal feed crops, and to develop novel crops to meet future challenges. The last decade has seen rapid developments in our understanding of plants and their significance to our wellbeing and this has been achieved through advances in a range of disciplines including genetics, genomics, cell biology, physiology, ecology and studies on climate change.

Graduates of this one-year MSc will be equipped with the knowledge and skills in these recent advances to rise to the future challenges in academia, industry and policy development. Innovation and entrepreneurship permeate the course as central themes and, in addition, a specific module on entrepreneurship in plant biology is delivered. This MSc covers a wide diversity of both topics and approaches, and is taught by a high-profile research-oriented group of academics. Students will have full involvement in active research groups and access to, and experience of, a large array of state-of-the-art facilities and technologies.

Key Fact

Researchers from the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science represent the single largest grouping of plant scientists in Ireland, with research interests ranging from genetics and molecular biology of the cell to plant physiology and ecology. They actively work with organisations such as Coillte (Forestry), the Irish Agricultural and Food Development Authority (Teagasc), the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, and industry partners.

Course Content and Structure

Modules include:
• Entrepreneurship in Plant Biology
• Future Crops and Sustainability
• Current Developments in Plant Biology
• Insect-Plant Interactions
• Biological Invasions
• Plant-Atmosphere Climate Interactions
• Ecological Significance of Different Photosynthetic Pathways
• Plant Development
• Programmed Cell Death in Plants
• Plants and Stress

Career Opportunities

Graduates will have a distinct advantage when applying for PhD studentships or other more advanced graduate training in the area of plant biology and biotechnology. This MSc is ideal for graduates interested in pursuing scientific careers in academia, agriculture and plant science-based or biotechnology industries. Graduates will haveo pportunities to pursue postgraduate education and research and work in areas such as plant biotechnology, scientific journalism/publishing and for government agencies involved in governmental and non-governmental policy.

Facilities and Resources

• UCD Rosemount Environmental Research Station
• Controlled plant growth facility and bioreactors
• Plant Metabolomics Technology Platform
• Plant Cell and Tissue Culture Facility

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen.

Tropical Agriculture

Delivers technical knowledge related to agriculture focussing on developing countries. The students can specialize in animal production or plant production by choosing the specific option. The major on Animal Production delivers in depth knowledge on production biology, animal nutrition, pasture management, animal genetics. The major on Plant Production focuses on themes like ethno-botany, crop protection, plant breeding, plant biotechnology. The courses are applicative and aim at presenting solutions for production problems in developing countries in an interdisciplinary way.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning and Outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted)
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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This MRes in Applied Anthrozoology aims to develop an appreciation of the practical application of anthrozoological knowledge in a wide range of contexts. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This MRes in Applied Anthrozoology aims to develop an appreciation of the practical application of anthrozoological knowledge in a wide range of contexts. These include the therapeutic use of animals, humane education and the more generic roles and uses of animals in society. The course will cover the diversity of human-animal interactions and will critically evaluate and assess the biological and social basis of these interactions, with the aim of improving our understanding and enhancing the overall quality of specific human-animal interactions.

Why study Applied Anthrozoology at NTU?

• Staff expertise and experience in the field of animal science across a range of species;
• Further develop your skills by undertaking a collaborative research project in the field of applied anthrozoology;
• Benefit from tuition in a unique postgraduate qualification in applied anthrozoology;
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus which offers 200 hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience;
• You will have access to our modern animal unit on campus which houses over 200 animals;
• Benefit from excellent links to partner organisations, conservation projects and academic institutions across the world; and
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly ‘family’ atmosphere.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Quantitative and qualitative welfare assessment of zoo housed giraffe involved in visitor feed experiences. Dr Sam Ward.
• The dog-handler dyad; what factors affect canine performance output? Dr Jacqueline Boyd.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

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Research profile. Read more

Research profile

Research in the Division of Genetics and Genomics aims to advance understanding of complex animal systems and the development of improved predictive models through the application of numerical and computational approaches in the analysis, interpretation, modelling and prediction of complex animal systems from the level of the DNA and other molecules, through cellular and gene networks, tissues and organs to whole organisms and interacting populations of organisms.

The biology and traits of interest include: growth and development, body composition, feed efficiency, reproductive performance, responses to infectious disease and inherited diseases.

Research encompasses basic research in bioscience and mathematical biology and strategic research to address grand challenges, e.g. food security.

Research is focussed on, but not restricted to, target species of agricultural importance including cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep; farmed fish such as salmon; and companion animals. The availability of genome sequences and the associated genomics toolkits enable genetics research in these species.

Expertise includes genetics (molecular, quantitative), physiology (neuroendocrinology, immunology), ‘omics (genomics, functional genomics) with particular strengths in mathematical biology (quantitative genetics, epidemiology, bioinformatics, modelling).

The Division has 18 Group Leaders and 4 career track fellows who supervise over 30 postgraduate students.

Training and support

Studentships are of 3 or 4 years duration and students will be expected to complete a novel piece of research which will advance our understanding of the field. To help them in this goal, students will be assigned a principal and assistant supervisor, both of whom will be active scientists at the Institute. Student progress is monitored in accordance with School Postgraduate (PG) regulations by a PhD thesis committee (which includes an independent external assessor and chair). There is also dedicated secretarial support to assist these committees and the students with regard to University and Institute matters.

All student matters are overseen by the Schools PG studies committee. The Roslin Institute also has a local PG committee and will provide advice and support to students when requested. An active staff:student liaison committee and a social committee, which is headed by our postgraduate liaison officer, provide additional support.

Students are expected to attend a number of generic training courses offered by the Transkills Programme of the University and to participate in regular seminars and laboratory progress meetings. All students will also be expected to present their data at national and international meetings throughout their period of study.

Facilities

In 2011 The Roslin Institute moved to a new state-of-the-art building on the University of Edinburgh's veterinary campus at Easter Bush. Our facilities include: rodent, bird and livestock animal units and associated lab areas; comprehensive bioinformatic and genomic capability; a range of bioimaging facilities; extensive molecular biology and cell biology labs; café and auditorium where we regularly host workshops and invited speakers.

The University's genomics facility Edinburgh Genomics is closely associated with the Division of Genetics and Genomics and provides access to the latest genomics technologies, including next-generation sequencing, SNP genotyping and microarray platforms (genomics.ed.ac.uk).

In addition to the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility’s high performance computing resources, The Roslin Institute has two compute farms, including one with 256 GB of RAM, which enable the analysis of complex ‘omics data sets.



Read less
In the first academic year of the MSc program, the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc program, the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject , major and optional courses chosen.

Human nutrition

Transfers specific and profound knowledge, insights and skills related to the food and public health nutrition security problems and possible solutions at population level. Therefore, this subject focuses on themes such as food chemistry, food and nutrition science, nutritional requirements, food and nutrition policy, nutrition surveillance, nutrition disorders, nutrition research, food and nutrition interventions, food safety, nutrition epidemiology, consumer behaviour, rural development and agriculture, development economics, project management, and project planning.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context.
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context.
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context.
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context.

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission details

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted):
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions world-wide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. Read more

Introduction

The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions world-wide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. The Institute is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and has more than 70 staff and 80 postgraduate students.

Our goal is to develop and promote sustainable aquaculture and in pursuit of this carry out research across most areas of aquaculture science including:
- Reproduction and Genetics
- Health Management
- Nutrition
- Environmental Management
- Aquaculture Systems and International Development

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September The course is available on a block-release basis (by selecting individual or a series of modules) over a period not exceeding five academic years.
- Course Director: Dr Trevor Telfer

Course objectives

Students will attain background knowledge in the principles of aquaculture and key factors influencing viability of aquatic animal production systems, including an understanding of aquatic animal biology, environmental issues, nutrition, reproduction and genetics, disease and health management.
The course provides advanced knowledge in chosen areas from; advanced broodstock management, aquaculture policy and planning, livelihoods analysis, geographic information systems, environmental management and biodiversity, feed formulation and resources, economics, marketing and business studies, shrimp culture, aquaculture engineering, aquatic animal health control, epidemiology, and ecotoxicology.
Students will be able to appraise aquaculture operations and contribute to management decision making. The student will have the skills necessary to establish, manage and appraise aquaculture enterprises and development projects from within the industry or public sector.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc course at the Institute of Aquaculture is highly modularised and is designed to give considerable flexibility for learning, while maintaining a high standard of training. This structure allows students to make more subject choices which will benefit their future career and also have greater flexibility of learning over time. There is a number of degree outcomes available. These differ primarily in their defined path of required modules; specialised outcomes have more compulsory modules where the Sustainable Aquaculture degree has greater choice.

Delivery and assessment

In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions and fieldwork are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both examiners and the external examiner.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

The Institute of Aquaculture, with a rating of 2.45 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), was graded the top aquaculture department in the UK.

Strengths

The Institute has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species.
In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and security of aquaculture development and practice, and improving the efficiency of utilising natural resources.
This gives out students the unique opportunity to be associated with these activities and obtain an insight into all aspects of aquacultural sciences and development worldwide.

Careers and employability

- Career opportunities
This course has run for over 30 years and has trained over 620 students from all over the world. The comprehensive nature of the course and our close links with UK and overseas industry allows good potential for employment in any aspect of commercial aquaculture. Approximately 30 percent of our students follow a direct route into industry.
Additionally, the course is an excellent grounding for research and further education, often building on the dissertation, and about 30 percent of graduates choose this route. Links with government departments throughout the world allow many of our graduates to establish careers in aquaculture development and aquaculture management in developing countries.

- Employability
We have designed our taught postgraduate courses so that, in addition to learning about your specialist discipline, you will be exposed to, and trained in, a number of skills which are not specific to aquaculture but which employers increasingly expect.
The majority of our MSc research projects are developed in association with industry and are aimed at solving problems for the aquaculture industry. We also have an informal internship programme with industry, which will involve suitable students in real commercial projects. In the past these have included: development projects in Thailand and Vietnam, investigating carrying capacity for Indonesian aquaculture, and working with aqua-treatments within the pharmaceutical industry.

- Industry connections
We work closely with the aquaculture industry in more than 20 countries, including every major company in Scotland, giving many of our students an opportunity to carry out industry-based research projects. During the course there are visits to various companies. Lectures and workshops in a number of modules are given by aquaculture professionals from Scotland.

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