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The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife. Read more

MSc Animal Sciences

The two-year MSc programme Animal Sciences is a continuation of a BSc in Animal Sciences or an equivalent programme in the field of livestock, companion animals and wildlife.

The focus is to deliver skilled professional animal scientists who are well equipped to tackle problems related to sustainable livestock development as well as to the management of livestock and companion animals. The animal-human interaction plays an important role in this study programme. Themes like animal nutrition, animal health, animal welfare, levels of management, genetic diversity and socio-economic factors are all widely discussed.

Programme summary

Humans interact with animals in many different ways, ranging from raising livestock for food to keeping pets for companion. Animal husbandry and livestock development are not only constrained by technical factors, such as feed supply, animal health, management and genetics, but also by infrastructural and socio-economic factors. Consequently, today’s animal scientists need in-depth scientific training combined with a critical attitude towards all factors that limit the sustainable development of animal husbandry. Our individually tailored programme trains students to become expert animal scientists, well-equipped to tackle relevant issues of livestock and animal management.

Specialisations

Within the MSc Animal Sciences you can choose from various specialisations. Each of the specialisations trains you to become an expert in the field. The specialisations in MSc Animal Sciences are:

Animal Breeding and Genetics
Understanding how genetic differences work and how they can be used in a sustainable manner in a wide range of species plays a central role in this specialisation. Students learn how breeding and genetics can contribute to safe and healthy food from animal origin and how it contributes to the health and welfare of animals.

Animal Nutrition
This specialisation deals with the interaction between animals and their nutrition. Students learn about the way animals digest and convert food by studying the nutrient flows and the physiology of the animals in relation to the composition of feeds. They also learn about the effect of feed in relation to health, welfare and behaviour of the animal.

Applied Zoology
Understanding the relationship between structure and function of all systems within the body is the main focus of this specialisation. Students look at organ structures, hormones, bone structure or the immune system of animals and learn how these systems respond to external influences.

Animal Health and Behaviour
Knowledge of the adaptive capacity of animals is required to be able to determine how to keep an animal healthy and how changes affect the animal. Students learn to study behaviour, stress or immune parameters or energy metabolism to determine e.g. which housing system or feed regime is best for animal health and welfare.

Animal Health Management
How can the risk of transmission of infectious diseases be quantified between and within groups of animals? And which factors are of influence on this process? In this specialisation, students learn to combine animal health management at population level with socioeconomic aspects by studying aspects of veterinary epidemiology.

Animal Production Systems
In this specialisation, students will look at animal production systems in relation to the environment worldwide. Students learn about human and animal interaction. They will also study the environmental, economical and social impact that animal production has on the world.

Professional Tracks and International Programmes
In addition to a specialisation, students can choose a professional track that leads to a specific type of career. You can focus on Research, Education, Communication & Policy, or Business & Management. We also offer international programmes that lead to a double master degree, i.e. in Animal Breeding & Genetics, Sustainable Animal Nutrition & Feeding, European Animal Management, or Animal Welfare Assessment.

Your future career

Our graduates work as nutritionists, policymakers, breeding specialists, advisors, managers, researchers or PhD students. They work for feed manufacturing companies, pharmaceutical companies or breeding organisations but also within regional and national governmental organisations, non-governmental organisations or research institutes and universities.

Alumna Linda van Zutphen.
"I work as a Communication Officer for the Research & Development and Quality Affairs department of Nutreco. This company is a global leader in animal nutrition and fish feed. I am involved in marketing and group communication about innovations, quality and sustainability. During my MSc Animal Sciences, I did my internship at Nutreco’s research facility in Spain. The MSc programme provided me with multidisciplinary knowledge on animal production and the skills to apply this. My job gives me the opportunity to combine my scientific background with my passion for communicating about the applications of our research in products for animal health."

Related programmes:
MSc Biology
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Aquaculture and Marine Resource Management
MSc Biosystems Engineering
MSc Organic Agriculture.

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The MRes in Animal Behaviour and Welfare offers an opportunity to expand your knowledge of animal behaviour and animal welfare science. Read more
The MRes in Animal Behaviour and Welfare offers an opportunity to expand your knowledge of animal behaviour and animal welfare science. You will explore advances in animal behaviour within animal cognition, animal personality, animal communication and language, sexual selection and sexual conflict, and social behaviour. You will also look at contemporary issues in animal welfare science such as methods of animal welfare assessment, animal welfare legislation, welfare implications of keeping animals in captivity and issues related to improving and assessing animal welfare.

This postgraduate programme will allow you to advance the knowledge you gained from your animal related degree and provide you with the required knowledge and skills to develop practical solutions for existing and emerging problems in animal behaviour and animal welfare science. The knowledge and skills that you gain from the programme will enhance your career prospects and can be applied in future scientific research and in practical areas such as conservation, animal welfare organisations, research centres and zoos.

The Masters by Research in Animal Behaviour and Welfare includes 60 credits of taught modules, including core modules of advances in animal behaviour, contemporary issues in animal welfare, and research methods and optional modules such as wildlife conflict, postgraduate independent study and reflection on practice. These modules tend to be taught in two day blocks. This means that the teaching is condensed to allow the Masters study to occur round other commitments in our students' lives.

These modules will give you the opportunity to expand your knowledge of animal behaviour and welfare science, advance your skills in critically evaluating current research, and develop your abilities in research design and statistical analysis. These skills, along with one to one support, will allow you to understand and apply current scientific thinking, develop new ideas and evaluate current processes and practices. This will allow you to effectively design and carry out your dissertation research project. This will be original research that will make a valuable contribution to the field of animal behaviour or animal welfare. The dissertation is highly flexible and provides you with the freedom to develop a research project of your own choosing in order to fit in with your specific interests and career aspirations.

The programme can be completed full time in one year; part time routes are available and should be planned with your Programme Manager.

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This programme has popular international appeal and is endorsed by many international organisations for its up-to-date understanding and application of the latest animal welfare methods and practices. Read more

Programme description

This programme has popular international appeal and is endorsed by many international organisations for its up-to-date understanding and application of the latest animal welfare methods and practices.

We provide students with an understanding of animal welfare that can be applied in animal research, management, care, production, inspection, assessment and preparation of legislation.

In addition to the core teaching team, we have many guest lecturers travel to Edinburgh each year to teach on the programme, allowing you to benefit from the experience and knowledge of professionals working throughout the animal behaviour and welfare community.

Our students benefit from the expertise of organisations such as:

RSPCA
WSPA
SSPCA
Humane Slaughter Association
Why study Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare?

Programme structure

The programme involves taught courses and your own dissertation.

Throughout the taught courses you will take part in many visits to farms and animal facilities and will study the following courses:

Introduction to Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare
Biology of Suffering
Animal Cognition and Consciousness
Scientific Methodology
Animal Welfare Applications

You can complete the programme over one, two or three years.

Dissertation:
From March until August, you will work on a research project.

Career opportunities

Graduates move on to a variety of jobs such as research technicians, scientific advisors and lecturers. Many will also continue their study and enrol in a PhD.

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Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical animal science has become an area of global importance as world trade continues to expand and the challenge of future research is to develop better methods for improving production in all livestock species within tropical regions.
Tropical animal science covers the field of animal nutrition, welfare, and production with the aim of improving productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Master of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of tropical animal science and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Demonstrate an integrated understanding of tropical animal science and its application to improve human quality of life by means of increased and cost effective food production in tropical regions
*Evaluate and apply established and evolving evidence and concepts to reflect critically on theory and professional practice
*Design, plan and ethically execute a research project related to tropical animal science
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Prepare a dissertation on a topic related to tropical animal science and compare and contrast the results obtained with those reported in the literature
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through selection and integration of available subjects in tropical animal science
*Interpret and justify theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills.

Award title

Master of Tropical Animal Science (MTropAnimSc)

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. Read more
Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. It aims to improve our knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs, which is required to provide a high standard of care to the whole range of animals kept in captivity.

Why this programme

◾Top 100 University
◾This Animal Welfare Degree programme is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM); a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining ecology and evolution with more applied problems in animal health
◾When studying Animal Welfare you will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in understanding and responding to animal welfare-related issues, legislation related to use of animals, and both theoretical and applied ethics.
◾In addition, you will have opportunities to develop skills in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, conservation biology, epidemiology and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity.
◾A unique strength of the Animal Welfare MSc at the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.
◾The IBAHCM also offers an MSc in Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology. This degree is more focused on ecology and evolutionary biology and provides the opportunity for you to gain key quantitative skills that are not often a focus of welfare-based programmes.
◾You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or research laboratories, whenever possible.
◾You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, government agencies, officers of animal welfare, protection, or wildlife crime, veterinary nursing and aquaculture
◾We have many links with animal welfare-related organisations through them coming to us to teach their expertise to our Animal Welfare degree and the class going to visit their organisation to obtain a first-hand view of what working is like at these organisations. Many of them also provide the students with opportunities to carry out their independent research project within their company. Students will also be able to capitalise on the strong ties between the veterinarians and ecologists at the IBAHCM. This allows us to directly link fundamental and applied research and offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both theory and praxis.
◾We have currently the following partners involved in this programme: ◾Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA)
◾Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie
◾BlairDrummondSafari Park
◾ChesterZoo
◾The Aspinall Foundation (Howletts & Port Lympne)
◾National Museum Scotland

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
◾Ethics, legislative policy and welfare science – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.
◾Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
◾Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation.

Core courses
◾Key research skills: Scientific communication; Introduction to R; Advanced linear models; Experimental design and power analysis
◾Animal ethics
◾Animal welfare science
◾Legislation related to animal welfare
◾Independent research project.

Optional courses
◾Enrichment of animals in captive environments
◾Care of captive animals
◾Biology of suffering
◾Assessment of physiological state
◾Freshwater sampling techniques
◾Marine sampling techniques
◾Invertebrate identification
◾Vertebrate identification
◾Molecular analyses for DNA barcoding and biodiversity measurement
◾Phyloinformatics
◾Conservation genetics and phylodynamics
◾Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
◾Single-species population models
◾Multi-species models
◾Spatial processes
◾Introduction to Bayesian statistics.

Animal Welfare is a very broad and applied field and the programme aims to provide coverage of all the different aspects of the topic which are often treated separately. Science is an essential skill in order to have a good understanding of welfare but we appreciate that applicants may come from diverse backgrounds and therefore the course includes a rigorous training in science communication, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. The programme also includes teaching by practitioners and visits to organisations with first-hand experience of applied welfare problems. The programme also attempts to cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare, including zoos, farms, laboratory animals and wildlife.

Career prospects

Students are exposed to potential work places and can make valuable contacts with professionals in the welfare community. Where possible this is a two-way exchange in which communities are offered help with any issues they have and for which assistance may be provided in finding a solution (e.g. through independent research projects, supervised by university staff). This is also an option open to other courses and could benefit the students in the long-term as well as give the university valuable connections with the wider community.

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The overall objective of this online distance learning programme is to provide knowledge and an understanding of animal welfare science, with a focus on the international issues arising from animal use in all its forms. Read more

Programme description

The overall objective of this online distance learning programme is to provide knowledge and an understanding of animal welfare science, with a focus on the international issues arising from animal use in all its forms.

The programme is delivered by researchers and teachers from both the Jeanne Marchig International Centre for Animal Welfare Education (within the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies) and the Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) with a series of guest lecturers from around the world.

The programme offers courses in a variety of areas, including:

history, culture and concepts of animal welfare
animal behaviour
animal welfare assessment
animal ethics
recommendations and policy
legislation, regulation and enforcement
science communication
applied animal welfare - production, companion and captive wild animals

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

A blend of online learning methods are utilised, such as discussion forums, podcasts and live tutorials. The programme is modular, allowing us to offer a flexible student-centred approach to the choice of courses studied.

Students may choose to study to certificate, diploma or masters level.

The full MSc in International Animal Welfare, Ethics and Law programme can be completed within two years if students wish to study several courses at any one time so all taught courses are completed in one year and the second year is devoted to a dissertation project.

Alternatively students can take up to 6 years to complete the full MSc programme and there is also the option to graduate with either an International Animal Welfare, Ethics and Law postgraduate certificate or diploma.

Year 1: certificate
You will take two compulsory courses - International Animal Welfare Science and Animal Ethics, Policy and Law - plus an optional course.

Year 2: diploma
You can choose up to 60 credits of optional courses, which include:

•Production Animal Welfare
•Cat and Dog Welfare
•Captive and Free-ranging Wild Animal Welfare
•Animals in Research, Testing and Education
•Clinical Animal Behaviour
•Equine Behaviour and Welfare
•Equitation Science
•Anthrozoology (new for 2017)


Year 3: masters
You complete a dissertation of between 10,000-15,000 words which can be a research project or an extended systematic review of the literature in a topic of Animal Welfare Science, Ethics or Law.

Postgraduate Professional Development

If you are looking for a shorter course option, we offer online credit-bearing courses that run for 11 weeks at a time. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses through our Postgraduate Professional Development scheme. These credits will be recognised in their own right at postgraduate level, or may be put towards gaining a higher award, such as a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc.

Career opportunities

Graduates can use their qualification to enhance their career prospects in academia, research, governmental and non-governmental organisations and consultancies.

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Drawing expertise from across a wide range of animal categories the course will extend your understanding and analysis of the scientific background underpinning the study of animals. Read more
Drawing expertise from across a wide range of animal categories the course will extend your understanding and analysis of the scientific background underpinning the study of animals. The course lecturers have all published widely and their research interests include farm animal behaviour, physiology and welfare, the welfare of exotic animals, ruminant nutrition and behavioural neurobiology.

The programme is divided into three stages, to complete the Master's level qualification, you must complete six modules as well as an independent research thesis. Interim qualifications are available for those who do not wish to complete a Master's programme. Those who complete 60 credits are able to gain a PgCert award and those who gain 120 credits gain a PgDip qualification.
Our Masters programme in Animal Welfare runs over one year full-time and is aimed at students who have completed a first degree in a biological sciences-related subject and who wish to further their career in animal welfare. Individual modules may also be taken as part of a continuing professional development programme.

The modules covered in this programme are:
• Principles of Animal Welfare (20 credits)
Provides a bridge for those students who have not previously studied animal welfare. The concepts of animal welfare and the cause of changes in animal welfare status will be covered as well as the role of economics in the field.

• Attitudes to Animals (20 credits)
Develops an appreciation of current and historical attitudes towards animals and how these impact on animal welfare and on society.

• Physiology of Animal Welfare (20 credits)
Investigates the structure and function of animal brains and the link between brain physiology and behaviour patterns. Explores in depth the role of physiological control systems in the stress response.

• Animal Behaviour & Cognition (20 credits)
Promotes understanding of the cognitive abilities of animals and assesses the consequences of these on animal welfare status in captivity.

• Animal Welfare in Industry & Law (40 credits)
Equips students with the skills and knowledge necessary to evaluate the welfare of animals and develop solutions to welfare problems, as well as exploring the role of legislation in animal industries both in the UK and abroad.

• Research Project (60 credits)
Under the guidance of their project supervisor, each student will design and undertake a major research project on an aspect of animal welfare.

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Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

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This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure. Read more

Overview

This is an advanced course for students who want to develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the biology, welfare and conservation of domesticated and wild animals managed for production or leisure.

Course Modules

The MSc programme is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis during two teaching blocks (semesters one and two) and a period of supervised and independent study (summer). It may also be completed over a two-year period on a part-time basis. The first two semesters (15 weeks each) include 4 taught modules. The dissertation is studied during the subsequent 20 week period in the summer. Each taught module is worth 15 credits whilst the dissertation is 60 credits.

Programme

Semester One (September to January)
Animal Physiology / Comparative Animal Nutrition / Wildlife Resources / Research Methods
60 Credits

Semester Two (January to May)
Animal Ethics and Welfare / Animal Protection and Habitat Conservation / Behaviour / Current Issues in Animal Science
60 Credits

Summer (May to September)
MSc Dissertation
60 Credits

The full MSc degree course consists of 120 compulsory taught credits plus 60 core credits from the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) can be awarded with 120 taught credits. Whilst a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) can be awarded on the successful completion of any 60 taught credits. Credits obtained from the dissertation can also be used when considering whether a postgraduate diploma can be awarded. Before progressing onto the Masters dissertation from the Diploma, students would need to complete the Research Methods module or its equivalent as a prerequisite.

Entry Requirements

Applicants will normally hold a good BSc Honours degree (2.2 or above) from a recognised university in a related science subject such as animal science, agriculture, biological sciences, zoology, veterinary or bioveterinary science or other appropriate life-science degree. Applicants with a BSc (Hons) 3rd class pass, with extensive industrial experience may also be considered for the Masters programme. Applications from non-UK students are particularly welcome. All applications received will be reviewed and decisions for admission to the programme will be made on individual merit. Applicants may be interviewed if there is some doubt over the extent of academic qualification or linguistic skills.

Applicants for whom English is a second language are required to demonstrate a level of competence that enables them to study at a postgraduate level. A test score of 6.5 is required in the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) tests.

Learning & Teaching Methods

The teaching methods are a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, visits and student managed learning. The self-guided study takes place under the supervision of experienced staff from the Centre of Equine and Animal Science at Writtle University College. Students are assessed using a number of methods, for example written examination, reports, essays, seminars, debates, oral presentations, case studies and project dissertation.

The research project is an essential part of the MSc programme and provides the opportunity to carry out an independent piece research, critically analyse data and write a dissertation. The project will normally include hands-on practical experimentation to teach students how to gather and process data and problem solve. The project is supervised by an academic member of staff and takes place over an extended period during the spring and summer. The project can be based either at Writtle University College or other suitable external institution.

Potential areas for dissertation projects

Investigation of keeper-animal relationships in zoos
Animal behaviour and welfare research in collaboration with Colchester Zoo
Assessment of prevalence and risk factors for obesity in companion animals
Lameness detection and measurement in dairy cows
Estimation endangered wild animal population densities
Use of molecular biology techniques in conservation genetics of captive wild animals
Incidence of small mammals in agricultural landscapes
Diet selection and nutrient intakes in captive animals
Behavioural indicators of welfare and performance using different castration methods in lambs

Careers

Graduates are likely to use their award to secure management-level jobs and/or to improve their promotion prospects if they are already employed both in international and national organisations. Many opportunities exist in either government services or related agencies services: for example senior positions in DEFRA as quarantine officers or animal health inspectors. There are also numerous career opportunities in companies specialising in farm animal nutrition and pet food manufacturing, breeding and reproduction, veterinary medicines and pharmaceuticals. There also opportunities in charities engaged in animal welfare such as the RSPCA, zoos, animal rescue centres and safari parks. Also, independent wildlife agencies such as the RSPB, Scottish Natural Heritage, Natural England, and the Countryside Council for Wales would be interested in Animal Welfare and Conservation graduates. Some graduates may take up lecturing positions in universities and colleges or proceed to do further postgraduate study e.g. PhD.

Fees and Financial Support

Part-time student fees for each semester will be charged on a pro-rata basis. There are limited bursaries for part-payment of fees (for UK students only) from the Alice Noakes Memorial Trust. Applications for these bursaries can only be made via the course manager on admission to the course.

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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Tropical animal science covers the field of animal nutrition, welfare, and production with the aim of improving productivity of livestock, and better utilisation of animal resources in tropical, subtropical and similar agro-ecological environments.
Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Apply advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments in animal production and health issues relevant to developing countries and tropical regions of the World
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Communicate theoretical knowledge using high level written English language and, where appropriate, numeracy skills, to a variety of audiences
*Make high level independent judgements in a range of professional functions, including professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks, with responsibility and accountability for personal outputs and all aspects of the work.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF TROPICAL ANIMAL SCIENCE (GCertTropAnimSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Tropical Animal Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)

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Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include. *Animal nutrition. Read more

What is tropical animal science?

Tropical animal science focuses on animal health and reproduction in tropical climates. Study areas may include:
*Animal nutrition
*Applied pathology
*Aquatic pathobiology
*Epidemiology and biometrics
*Immunology
*Microbiology
*Parasitology.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from agricultural science, animal science, rural science, and science or related degrees who want to specialise in tropical animal health and reproduction.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Diploma of Tropical Animal Science will be able to:
*Apply advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of Tropical Animal Science and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Apply an integrated understanding of tropical animal science and its application to improve human quality of life by means of increased and cost effective food production in tropical regions
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through selection and integration of available subjects in tropical animal science
*Interpret and justify theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions to non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills.

Award title

Graduate Diploma of Tropical Animal Science (GDipTropAnimSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Master of Tropical Animal Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under this course.

Post admission requirements

Q Fever immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to Q Fever within the first teaching period of their studies. Students who are not immune to Q fever will not be permitted on-site at some facilities and consequently this may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University has:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)

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Our MSc in Animal Science provides students with the research-led, high quality postgraduate teaching, education and professional training required to pursue leading careers in a wide range of Animal Science related fields throughout the world. Read more

About the course

Our MSc in Animal Science provides students with the research-led, high quality postgraduate teaching, education and professional training required to pursue leading careers in a wide range of Animal Science related fields throughout the world. Throughout this course you will be able to use a multidisciplinary approach to explore collaborations with veterinarians, scientists and the industry, learning about the latest scientific advances in the field of animal science. Through a strong emphasis on student centred study you will encounter many opportunities to develop your skills in original thought, analysis, interpretation and reasoning; as well as encouraging you, where appropriate, to pursue your own specific areas of interest. As such you will develop into a reflective, autonomous researcher. On graduation you will be ideally placed to ensure that the demands of production and welfare are appropriately balanced through the development and implementation of innovative management practices and dissemination
of knowledge and advice to practitioners.

Why study MSc Animal Science at Aberystwyth University?

The Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) has an internationally renowned reputation for teaching and research in animal sciences.

With 360 members of staff, 1350 undergraduate students and more than 150 postgraduate students IBERS is the largest Institute within Aberystwyth University. Our excellence in teaching was recognised by outstanding scores in the National Student Satisfaction Survey (2016), with three courses recording 100% student satisfaction and a further 10 scoring above the national average. IBERS has previously been awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. The latest employability data shows that 92% of IBERS graduates were in work or further study six months after leaving Aberystwyth University. Our joint submission with Bangor University to the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF) displayed that 78% of our research as world-leading or internationally excellent, and 97% of our research is internationally recognised with 76% judged as world-leading in terms of research impact.

Opportunity to attend conferences with lectures from international animal science experts.

Undertake a challenging course taught by enthusiastic, helpful and research-active staff, and further enhanced by contributions from experts and academics, many of whom are of international renown.

IBERS has an equine teaching yard and the only dedicated and fully licensed equine research yard in the UK outside of veterinary colleges.

IBERS has 1000 ha of farmland, a 400 cow dairy unit, upland and lowland sheep and beef units and a flock of layer hens.

Course structure and content

This course can be studied one year full-time or up to 24 months part-time. When studied full-time, the course is divided into three semesters. During the first two semesters, students complete 120 taught credits (six 20 credit modules), which are delivered primarily through lectures, practicals, field trips, workshops, and seminars.

During the final semester (June to September), you will complete your master’s dissertation and will arrange your level of contact with your assigned dissertation supervisor.

Core modules:

Animal Breeding and Genetics
Infection and Immunity
Research Methods in the Biosciences
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Equine Nutrition or Livestock Nutrition
Equine Reproductive Physiology and Breeding Technology
Grassland Science
Livestock Production Science
Understanding Equine Action: from Anatomy to Behaviour

Assessment

Depending on the modules chosen, assessment is via a mix of written assignments (essays, reports, case studies, research projects, research critiques, research proposals, critical reviews, and abstracts), written examinations, seminar presentations, and online assignments.

Successful submission of the dissertation in the final semester leads to the award of an MSc.

Skills

This course will empower you to:

Advance your specialised knowledge in Animal Science
Enhance your problem-solving and data handling skills
Develop study and research skills
Develop and sustain a self-initiated programme of study
Develop your skills of original thought, analysis, evaluation, interpretation and reasoning
Enhance your communication skills
Work effectively independently and as part of a team

Careers

Our Animal Science students often progress to careers in:

Academia
Scientific research and development
Public and private commercial enterprise
Scientific publishing
Animal nutrition
Animal welfare
Teaching and training
Animal breeding
Consultancy and advisory work
Laboratory work
Government agencies and non-government organisations
All throughout the world.


Many of our previous graduates have also progressed to PhDs or veterinary medicine.

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[General Information]]. Applied Animal Biology offers opportunities for advanced study and research leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in animal physiology, behaviour, welfare, and management of livestock, aquaculture, and wildlife species. Read more
[General Information]]
Applied Animal Biology offers opportunities for advanced study and research leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in animal physiology, behaviour, welfare, and management of livestock, aquaculture, and wildlife species. Graduate training in applied animal biology normally involves a combination of courses in both basic and applied sciences, with research leading to a thesis or dissertation. Students are expected to publish their research results in relevant leading international refereed journals. Coursework selected in consultation with the student's supervisory committee includes graduate courses in areas relevant to each student's research.

The program is enriched through collaboration with colleagues in other UBC graduate programs such as Zoology, and with agencies such as Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

On-campus teaching and research facilities are located in the MacMillan Building. Off-campus research facilities available to students include: the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre in Agassiz; shared research facilities at Fisheries and Oceans Canada at West Vancouver; and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Applied Animal Biology
- Subject: Agriculture and Forestry
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Applied Animal Biology is intended for students who want to study and/or work with animals. It provides students with fundamentals of animal behaviour, animal physiology and related fields as applied to farm, companion and other animals. It also exposes students to the role of animals in human society and the ethical, environmental and other issues that arise. It offers training in research skills needed for graduate work, and (with appropriate selection of courses) prepares students for admission to veterinary and human medicine. Students have various options to gain practical experience on farms and in laboratories, animal shelters and wildlife rehabilitation centres.

Potential career paths include veterinary medicine, human medicine, biomedical research, animal ecology, sustainable aquaculture, animal training, animal nutrition, wildlife rehabilitation, wildlife conservation, agricultural extension and animal welfare.

Facilities

On-campus facilities include laboratories in the MacMillan Building. Off-campus research facilities available to students include: the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre in Agassiz; shared research facilities at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans at West Vancouver; Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and the Agassiz Poultry Centre, which includes unique poultry and quail stocks for biomedical and genetic research. Field research facilities for studies in wildlife productivity are also available.

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Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. Read more
Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. This benefits you by providing a strong background in a broad cross-section of research methods used by researchers studying human and animal behaviour, a strong training in statistical methods and multidisciplinary study environment. You will learn how to formulate and test relevant research questions, and critically evaluate the research carried out by others in the field.

The programme will give you an insight into the varied means of performing animal behaviour research in a wide array of locations with wild and (semi-)captive animals – in the wild, laboratory, zoo or under human management. As part of the taught component you will be exposed to lectures and seminar discussions, research talks and discussions with speakers, boost and consolidate your knowledge and skills in statistical data analysis, participate in a one-week residential field course (during the Easter break) and in research skill training sessions. During the course you will continuously develop your abilities in critical analysis of the literature and of scientific evidence, project development, communication and scientific writing.

You will be part of the lively, internationally-recognised Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/centres/crab/) and will have the opportunity to work alongside our experienced researchers on a research apprenticeship which is a central component of the course. The apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills further and write up the research in the form of a journal article for potential publication. Apprenticeships can also be undertaken under the supervision of researchers at various institutions with whom we have developed long-term relationships.

On successful completion of the MSc you will have the skills to pursue a PhD, work as a research assistant and project manager or follow a career working in zoos, research centres, nature reserves, wildlife and other animal-related offices, education, scientific media and the expanding field of eco-tourism.

Research Apprenticeship

A distinctive feature of all our taught Masters programmes is the Research Apprenticeship. The Apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills by working alongside experienced researchers or practitioners. You will also gain experience of writing up your research in the form of a dissertation.

Many students undertake their apprenticeship with researchers in the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour in our School, both in the labs and in the field around the campus, Devon and abroad. Students work on a wide range of topics and with different animals, for example:
• Social behaviour, animal welfare and enrichment, zoo research, animal cognition, navigation, sensory ecology, behavioural ecology, ecotoxicology
• Fish (guppies, sticklebacks, killifish), mammals (primates, squirrels, whales, donkeys, dogs, meerkats, coyotes), birds (pigeons, chickens, pheasants, magpies, flamingoes, wood and sea birds), invertebrates (crabs, honeybees, bumblebees, desert ants, wood ants)

Programme structure

The programme is made up of compulsory modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Advanced Statistics; Behavioural Science Research Skills; Advances and Methods in Animal Behaviour; Research Apprenticeship; Current Research Issues in Animal Behaviour;

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