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This is the only MA programme in the United Kingdom focusing exclusively upon the history, theory and practice of Anglo-German cultural relations from circa 1800 until the present. Read more
This is the only MA programme in the United Kingdom focusing exclusively upon the history, theory and practice of Anglo-German cultural relations from circa 1800 until the present. The programme deals mainly with the literary, theoretical and cultural dimensions of these relations, and also contains a unique practical component, in which students are taught by practitioners from British and German cultural institutions, as well as by experts from the fields of publishing, translating and the media. As such the programme provides a pathway either for future academic study or for a career outside of academia.

Programme outline
You will take the core module: Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers � which includes the study of inter- and intracultural relations between (national) cultures and will analyse the theory and history of Anglo-German cultural transfers from the late Eighteenth-Century to the present day. The second part will bring students into contact with practitioners in this field and introduce them to the reality of cultural transfers.

You will also take two out of the following three module options:

Anglo German Aesthetics in the �Long� Eighteenth-Century
Anglo-German Travel Writing
In Pursuit of Prejudice? Mutual Perceptions of Identity
You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor.

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The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Read more
The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Our MPhil programme provides a 9-month course (October to June) in the scholarly methods and disciplines relevant to the study of the history, languages, literatures, and material culture of the peoples of Britain and Ireland, Brittany and Scandinavia in the earlier Middle Ages.

The course enables candidates to achieve an understanding of early Insular culture as a whole, as well as specialising in aspects of particular interest, whether historical, palaeographical, literary, or linguistic. Training is given in scholarly methods and practices, complemented by instruction in the particular fields of the candidate's interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc

Course detail

During the MPhil, students should have:

(1) developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen area within Anglo- Saxon, Norse & Celtic and of the critical debates within it;
(2) developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field;
(3) shown independent judgement based on their own research.
(4) acquired and/or consolidated linguistic, palaeographical or other scholarly skills;
(5) participated effectively in seminar discussions and made an oral presentation of their research;
(6) learnt how to schedule independent research to produce written work of a high standard to a strict deadline.

Format

After two weeks of orientation and study-skills training, MPhil students meet for a weekly hour-long text-seminar throughout the first two terms of the course. The text-seminar focuses on a sequence of literary texts (studied in translation), including key Latin and vernacular texts from all the fields within ASNC, preceded by a group of earlier works that provided the intellectual background to the medieval world.

Alongside this core seminar, students are expected to attend the two courses they have chosen to pursue from among the selection of linguistic/literary and historical subjects offered in the Department, which are taught through a varying combination of lectures, classes and seminars. In this way, a significant proportion of the taught element of this MPhil is tailored to the individual needs of each student, hence the possible variation in weekly hours of seminars, classes and lectures.

Assessment

The MPhil dissertation (between 10,000 and 15,000 words) makes up 50% of the total mark for the course, and is submitted in the last week of the third term (mid-June). Students are required to submit a dissertation title, with abstract, by the mid-point of the second term (February).

At the end of the first term of the course (December), students are required to submit a 5000-word Review of Scholarship essay, intended as a survey and assessment of scholarship on the topic of the projected MPhil dissertation. The mark for the Review of Scholarship essay constitutes 10% of the overall MPhil grade.

Over the course of four days in the first week of the third term (April), students write a 3000-word take-home essay, on a broad topic chosen from a selection, and drawing on at least three of the works of literature discussed during the course of the MPhil text-seminar, which runs throughout the first two terms of the course. The mark for the take-home essay makes up 10% of the overall mark.

Students are required to take two 3-hour written examinations which assess knowledge and skills acquired during the first two terms of the academic year, in two courses chosen from among those taught in the Department. Courses on offer include Anglo-Saxon history, Scandinavian history, Brittonic and Gaelic history, Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Welsh, Medieval Irish, Insular Latin, and palaeography, most of which can be pursued at beginner, intermediate or advanced level; Germanic philology, Celtic philology, and textual criticism are further options for students with the appropriate prior knowledge. Each written examination is worth 15% of the total MPhil mark, and is assessed independently by two examiners.

Continuing

MPhil students may apply to continue to a PhD in ASNC; the academic condition for continuation is an overall mark of 70 or more in the MPhil course, and 70 or more for the dissertation. A viva on the dissertation is compulsory for all students who have been made an offer for continuation to PhD.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc/apply

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This unique programme introduces you to a variety of approaches to the early Medieval period in England and Scandinavia, with particular emphasis on languages, scripts and texts. Read more
This unique programme introduces you to a variety of approaches to the early Medieval period in England and Scandinavia, with particular emphasis on languages, scripts and texts.

The course is excellent preparation for postgraduate research in the subject area, but is also suitable for those planning a career in the heritage industry, or with a more general interest.

The course offers you the basic linguistic, textual and analytical skills for early medieval studies, within a broader comparative and thematic context.

In addition to language and literature, Nottingham is also particularly renowned for its specialisation in Name-Studies and in Runology, and the MA programme has close links with related work in other disciplines, such as Archaeology and History.

Key facts

Nottingham is renowned for its work in Runology, Name Studies, Norse and Viking Studies and staff in the School of English and the Institute of Medieval Studies have received international acclaim for their research in these areas
We encourage an interdisciplinary approach to Viking and Anglo-Saxon Studies, and you will be able to participate in joint events and field trips with the School of History and the Department of Archaeology
This course is informed by work carried out in the University’s Institute for Name-Studies and the Centre for the Study of the Viking Age
The School was ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015 and 9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014).

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You learn about European Celts, German invaders with Roman culture and legacy. There are in-depth insights of kingdoms, cultures, invasions and accounts of who we really are. Read more
You learn about European Celts, German invaders with Roman culture and legacy. There are in-depth insights of kingdoms, cultures, invasions and accounts of who we really are. The programme offers theories, method and languages, history and literature.

COURSES
Reading Celtic
Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates
Tales of Vengeance and Enchantment: The Heroic Age in Irish and Icelandic Saga Literature
Modern Irish Language for Postgraduates
Special Study in Language and Literature
Reading Celtic
Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates
Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship and Exercise of Authority: Early Middle Ages
Special Study in Language and Literature

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe. Read more
King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe.

This MA programme gives you the skills and analysis you need for medieval historical study and delving into the significant topics of the period, from Magna Carta to the history of medieval women. It will also introduce you to the burgeoning field of digital humanities through collaboration with the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH) where the digital and historical worlds meet.

Key benefits

-One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2015).

- International centre of excellence for the study of Medieval history.

- Introduces students to the burgeoning field of digital humanities through collaboration with the King's Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH).

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medieval-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA programme is amongst the most successful of its kind worldwide, teaching students the skills and analysis required for medieval historical study and delving into significant topics of the period, from Magna Carta to the history of medieval women. Furthermore, the MA introduces students to the burgeoning field of the digital humanities through collaboration with the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH). Staff and students also regularly contribute to and attend lectures by the multidisciplinary Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies (CLAMS).

The History department has traditional expertise in Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe. Major research projects in medieval history currently being undertaken by MA teaching staff include the AHRC-funded online databases Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England (PASE) and Henry III Fine Rolls, an AHRC-funded project The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe and the Leverhulme Trust funded project Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066.

Modules on the MA in Medieval History are taught by weekly seminars where students are expected to contribute to discussion and prepare presentations. Students can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series such as European History 400-1500 or The Making of Britain 400-1400.

- Course purpose -

To train scholars moving into academic work after completing an undergraduate degree, but also for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

- Course format and assessment -

Students on the one year full-time programme attend 4-8 hours of taught classes per week, whilst students following the two year part-time MA attend 2-6 hours of taught classes per week. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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An American M.A. and a European LL.M. in three years. Read more
An American M.A. and a European LL.M. in three years

Thanks to a partnership between AGS and the Law School of Université de Cergy-Pontoise in France, students enrolled in the Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy program at AGS may choose a dual-degree option whereby they earn two Master's degrees over the course of three years:

- A U.S.-accredited M.A. (Master of Arts) in International Relations and Diplomacy
- A Europe-accredited LL.M. (Master of Laws) in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics

In addition, students in this program earn a Certificate in Anglo-Saxon Law from AGS.
This dual program takes place entirely in France, in the Paris area. All courses are instructed in English; additional French language and culture courses are offered to non-French speakers.

Detailed description of the program

:M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS:

All information about the Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy program at AGS can be found here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations


:Preparatory courses in Law:

In order to be eligible for the LL.M. program, students who do not have a legal background are required to take four preparatory courses while pursuing their M.A. at AGS:

- Introduction to Common Law
- American Tort Law
- American Contract Law
- American Criminal Law

Students who successfully complete the four preparatory courses earn a Certificate in Anglo-Saxon Law from AGS. Near completion of these preparatory courses and the AGS degree, qualified students may apply to the LL.M. program at Cergy (see below for details).


:LL.M. in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics at Université de Cergy Pontoise (UCP):

The LL.M. program is a one-year full time program. Courses are taught in English. They take place in the greater Paris area, on the campus of Université de Cergy-Pontoise, accessible by public transportation (RER) from the center city.

The LL.M. in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics at Université de Cergy-Pontoise provides specialized knowledge in French, European Union and International Law for students preparing to work for or in relation with Intergovernmental Organizations, NGOs, European institutions, and International Corporations.

The faculty in the LL.M. program is composed of both academics and lawyers or other professionals. In some cases, seminars are taught by and within international law firms based in Paris. Through this setting, the program provides its students with a network of contacts among the international legal community in Paris.

In addition to the optional French language courses offered at AGS along with the M.A., students follow a course in French Language and Culture at UCP along with the LL.M. courses in the last year. This course is specifically designed to allow foreign students to develop their communication skills in French and learn about French culture - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses

More about the LL.M. program - http://www.droitucp.fr/formations/master/m2-recherche/droit-llm.php

The UCP Law School ranks among the top five law schools in France (see SMBG and Juristudiant rankings).
http://www.meilleures-licences.com/licence-droit-anglais/universite-de-cergy-pontoise-faculte-de-droit-licence-en-droit-parcours-droit-anglo-americain.html?PHPSESSID=90fbf46e5db8dfa20aae8b3a7724a9f8
http://www.juristudiant.com/forum/sujet.php?id_sujet=253&PAGE=3

Université de Cergy Pontoise is a leading center of education and research in France and internationally. It is a young dynamic university with an international scope. There is a student body of 20,000, including 3,000 in the law School. The faculty is composed of 1,000 members. UCP offers all levels of undergraduate and post-graduate studies in various disciplines around five major poles: law, languages, literature and social sciences, economy and management, science and technology.

More about Université de Cergy-Pontoise - https://www.u-cergy.fr/en/index.html

Steps of the Dual Program

1. In their first two years, students complete the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, as well as - for those who do not already have a legal background - four preparatory Law courses at AGS.

Note: although the application process for the LL.M. part of the dual program does not start until the fourth semester, students are strongly encouraged to express their interest in pursuing this dual option as early on as possible so as to schedule the preparatory Law courses as evenly as possible over the four semesters of the International Relations program.

2. In their fourth semester at AGS, students apply to the LL.M. program at UCP.

Thanks to AGS-UCP partnership, students who do not have a legal background are eligible for this program as long as they successfully complete the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy as well as the four preparatory courses in Law. However, admission is not automatic; students have to apply directly to UCP (see UCP website.) AGS provides consultation on the application process. - http://www.droitucp.fr/formations/master/m2-recherche/droit-llm.php

3. In their third year, students follow the LL.M. in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics program at Université de Cergy-Pontoise.

More

Tuition - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/admissions/tuition/double-degree-programs

Applying - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/admissions/applying/double-degree-programs

Note: AGS offers this dual program in partnership with Université de Cergy-Pontoise. AGS is not responsible for the operations and contents of the LL.M. part of this dual program, which remain under the sole responsibility of the partner institution.

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The Aberystwyth University’s MA in Medieval Welsh Literature offers you an exciting opportunity to engage with the Welsh language and literature of the medieval period through historical, social and intellectual approaches. Read more
The Aberystwyth University’s MA in Medieval Welsh Literature offers you an exciting opportunity to engage with the Welsh language and literature of the medieval period through historical, social and intellectual approaches. You will study a rich array of Welsh texts and cultural phenomena by engaging with three core modules – The Four Branches of the Mabinogi, Welsh Language I and Welsh Language II – and two further modules from a fascinating selection.

By studying the central canon of Welsh texts, you will develop a sound knowledge of the language, culture and thought of the middle and medieval periods in Wales. You will read and appreciate the most important of Middle Welsh texts in the original language, and you will discuss the narrative techniques, characterisation, themes and structure of these tremendously important texts. You will also encounter important texts from neighbouring cultures and traditions, such as Anglo-Saxon, Irish and Late Latin, so that you may fully contextualise the central literary artefacts of your study.

In addition to the subject-specific knowledge, this study programme is constructed in such a way to develop you personally, and equip you with a strong compliment of skills that you can draw upon in many postgraduate employment situations.

Upon completion of this degree, you will have mastered the diverse skills needed for evidence-handling, such as locating, gathering, selecting, organising and synthesising large bodies of evidence into a coherent and compelling interpretation. You will also have mastered the highly creative nature of the source texts and their authors, and you will have responded with imagination, insight and creativity. Together, your analytical rigour and creative independence will make you an attractive prospect for employers in a range of fields.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/medieval-welsh-literature-masters/

Overview

This MA offers students who have not necessarily had the chance to study for a first degree in Welsh or Celtic Studies to engage closely with the Welsh language and literature of the medieval period while at the same time learning Modern Welsh in order to be able to read and converse confidently by the end of the year. This is a unique combination which is popular with students of cognate disciplines (Modern Languages, Medieval Studies, Old and Middle English, Classics) who wish to improve their language and interpretative skills to equip them for doctoral work. Other students, sometimes with a background in archaeology or history, are interested in knowing more about the culture and language of Wales in the medieval period with an eye to working in the education, heritage, and tourism sectors.

A variety of Welsh texts, from 600 to 1600, will be studied in the original language taking account of their manuscript and cultural contexts, and using a variety of critical approaches including comparative work with texts from neighbouring cultures and traditions such as Irish, Late Latin, and some Anglo-Saxon and Middle English. Our main aim, however, is to equip you with a working knowledge of the Medieval Welsh language, and to ensure that you are fully conversant with the full range of current scholarship including that written in the Welsh language. The dissertation will allow you to develop a topic of your choice and to produce a sustained piece of work up to 20,000 words which will demonstrate to future employers your ability to research independently (under the guidance of a specialist) and to exercise your critical faculties and writing skills at a high level.

Welsh is the everyday language of the Department and the usual language of administration, but learners are given every encouragement to start using the language as soon as they can, and to attend a range of cultural and social events. Staff and students meet in our fortnightly lunch-time research seminars, and the Postgraduate Study Room, located in the heart of the Department, next to the Hugh Owen Library, makes for a good deal of informal interaction between taught Masters’ students, research student, staff and undergraduates. Postgraduate employment stands currently at 100%.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Welsh Medieval Literature

This degree will suit you:
- If you wish to study Welsh language and literature at an advanced academic level;
- If you desire a strengthen your critical and scholarly abilities through engagement with Welsh texts;
- If you wish to explore your enthusiasm for this exciting and highly satisfying subject;
- If you aim to foster transferable skills and engage in professional and personal development for entering employment.

- Employability:
Every element of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Welsh Medieval Literature enhances your employability. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. As an emerging language specialist, your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

The very nature of a literature course requires you to develop thoughtful responses to a range of texts, authors and contexts. You will develop confidence in thinking which is both thorough and creative, and demonstrates your initiative, self-motivation, flexibility and independence of mind along the way. The organisational skills you will learn on this course will help you direct your individual flair, bringing a balance of skills that prospective employers will find attractive.

Employers in every industry value such skills, and the pattern of creativity, research, analysis and discussion in this course will stand you in excellent stead for entry into the competitive jobs market.

- Personal, Professional and Project-Management Skills:
The Master’s dissertation requires you to work independently and to pursue your own individual dissertation topic. You will access to the support and expertise of the Welsh department staff, but you are required to cultivate a professional work ethic to deliver this extremely demanding academic dissertation. The project management skills you will gain in preparing this project are entirely transferrable to almost any work context that Master’s graduates apply for.

Studying for this Master’s degree will allow you to sharpen up all your research and analysis disciplines, your professional work ethos and your presentation and communication skills. A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/medieval-welsh-literature-masters/#how-to-apply

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The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies is a wide-ranging and thoroughly interdisciplinary programme. Students can specialise in periods from 700-1700 and in disciplines from archaeology to history to literary studies to theology. Read more
The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies is a wide-ranging and thoroughly interdisciplinary programme. Students can specialise in periods from 700-1700 and in disciplines from archaeology to history to literary studies to theology. At the same time, students learn to situate these specialisms within an interdisciplinary perspective, understanding how the materials they study can be complemented by those usually within the purview of a different discipline. While focusing on the ‘medieval’ and the ‘early modern’, the programme also shows students how to subject those terms to appropriate and searching critical scrutiny.

Durham University offers outstanding resources to students on the MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies. The University’s Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies brings together scholars and students from departments including Archaeology, Classics, English, History, Modern Languages, Physics, and Theology. With some fifty researchers, the IMEMS is one of the largest gatherings of scholars in this area in the world. It is a vibrant research community which holds regular seminars and workshops, and has a large and extremely active postgraduate community, whose Medieval and Early Modern Student Association organise regular seminars and conferences. Durham has excellent libraries and archives, at both the University and Cathedral.

Core modules

In 2015, these included:

Research Skills for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (30 credits)
Issues in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (30 credits)
15,000-word dissertation (60 credits).
Optional modules
Students also choose two optional modules from a wide variety available. In the past topics have included:

Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Norman
Christian Northumbria humanism
Literature in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish
Palaeography and codicology
The Reformation; religion and worship.

Scholarships and Funding

https://www.dur.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance/

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The MA in Medieval Studies allows study in medieval history, literature and manuscript studies. This interdisciplinary programme enables students to study the Medieval period from a range of different subject disciplines that embraces History, English, Theology, Celtic studies and Archaeology. Read more
The MA in Medieval Studies allows study in medieval history, literature and manuscript studies.

Course Overview

This interdisciplinary programme enables students to study the Medieval period from a range of different subject disciplines that embraces History, English, Theology, Celtic studies and Archaeology.

There are two compulsory modules that can be taken in the first or second semester, Research Methodology and Studying the Medieval. Research methods introduces students to the nuts and bolts of research, bibliographical and archival sources. ‘

'Studying the medieval' builds on this foundation to look more closely at record sources for Medieval Studies and at aspects of the study of medieval manuscripts, such as iconography and typology. This module is based in large part on the University’s special collections in the Roderick Bowen Library and Archives; unique in Wales this offers our students close and unrivalled access to our medieval manuscripts and early printed books

Students may then choose 4 further modules in medieval history (such as ‘Thomas Becket: archbishop, martyr, saint’) or medieval literature (such as ‘Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxon Heroic’).

For MA students the second part of the course comprises a 60 credit dissertation.

Modules

-‘Research Methodology’ (bibliographical and archival content)
-‘Studying the Medieval’ (medieval primary sources; manuscript study)
-‘The Cistercian World’ (medieval monasticism)
-‘Thomas Becket: archbishop, martyr, saint’ (medieval church history and hagiography)
-‘Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxon Heroic’ (medieval literature)

Key Features

The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter or via VLE and online learning technologies. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed researchers.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-The option to complete the full programme remotely through online and distance learning

Assessment

The individual modules (all 20 credit) are assessed by written assignments: essays, commentaries, short exercises. Those registering for or progressing to the MA complete a dissertation of 60 credits.

Career Opportunities

-Museum
-Archives
-Heritage sector
-Professional Writers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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This Second Cycle Degree Programme provides advanced knowledge of the languages, literatures and cultures of European, American and postcolonial countries, promoting cross-cultural perspectives within a solid background in humanities. Read more

Learning outcomes

This Second Cycle Degree Programme provides advanced knowledge of the languages, literatures and cultures of European, American and postcolonial countries, promoting cross-cultural perspectives within a solid background in humanities.

Languages available:

Albanian, Anglo-American, Czech, English, French, German, modern Greek, Polish, Portuguese and Brazilian, Romenian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish.

Curricula available

English and American Literary and Cultural Studies

The sub-curricula available are:

• Literary Studies
• Cultural Studies (Joint degree)
Literatures and Cultures
The sub-curricula available are:
• Anglo-American Studies
• English Studies
• French Studies
• German Studies
• Iberian Studies
• Slavic and Balkan Studies

Estudios Ibéricos e Iberoamericanos (Double degree)

Master européen en Etudes Françaises et Francophones (Double degree)

Occupational profiles

Second-cycle graduates, thanks to the skills acquired and their possession of critical knowledge giving them independent judgment in carrying out their activities, will be able to pursue their studies in the research field and to hold leading positions in national and international businesses and within public and private institutions and organisations.

Attendance

Attendance is open, but strongly recommended.

Examination assessment and graduation

Educational activities include classroom teaching, workshops and internships, in order to acquire wide-ranging skills that can be readily transferable into the world of work.

Knowledge gained by students will be assessed through written and oral exams during their entire university career.

The final exam consists in writing a thesis, which must possess the characters of originality, exhaustive documentation and scientific investigation [IT] and which will be discussed with a committee of university professors and experts.

Access to further studies - Specialist Master’s Programmes (1st and 2nd level) and Research Doctorates

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As well as making a substantial contribution to the interdisciplinary MA in Medieval Studies offered by the Centre for Medieval Studies, the English Medieval School offers an MA in Medieval Literatures. Read more
As well as making a substantial contribution to the interdisciplinary MA in Medieval Studies offered by the Centre for Medieval Studies, the English Medieval School offers an MA in Medieval Literatures.

The MA in Medieval Literatures is a one-year programme that combines the study of Old and Middle English, and approaches medieval English literature as part of a dynamic, multilingual literary culture in which English interacted with Latin, Old Norse, and French. The MA caters both for those students who wish primarily to study the literature of medieval England, and also those who wish to explore other medieval European literatures as well. The MA thus takes full advantage of staff expertise in Latin, Old English, Middle English, Old Norse, Old French (including Anglo-Norman), while another area of special focus is Palaeography.

The course teaches a range of linguistic and technical skills which are essential for further medieval research.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. Read more
If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. We are lucky in the West Country to have prehistoric Dartmoor on our doorstep, where the recent Whitehorse Hill burial was uncovered. Exeter itself is a city built on Roman foundations and the nearby Ipplepen dig is shedding further light on Romano-British history. The Anglo-Saxons too were active in our part of the world and we have excellent interdisciplinary ties with the History Department and Centre for Medieval Studies. In the past there have been opportunities for Exeter students to participate in fieldwork and outreach activities in as diverse locations as Argentina, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan, South Dakota and Texas. In some cases, fieldwork may consist of archaeological work in a museum rather than excavation.

The MA Archaeology programme is flexible, so you can choose the modules that interest you – including those on Experimental Archaeology, Human Osteoarchaeology and Zooarchaeology. If you’re interested in going on to doctoral study then our MA will give you the right training and our academic staff will be happy to support you through the process of funding applications.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study called 'modules' .

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer within our other Masters, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Experimental Archaeology in Practice; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology; Funerary Osteoarchaeology and Musculo-skeletal Anatomy

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Learning and teaching

Most of our teaching is done collaboratively in small groups because we feel this is the best way to help you develop. Your classes will be a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops where you will learn the methodology and practical skills you need. We have a range of specialist equipment and excellent facilities including laboratories, kiln room, and spaces for experimental archaeology.

Research areas

Our research at Exeter is world-leading and all our academic staff are actively engaged in both Britain and further afield. We are particularly unique for our expertise in the fields of Bioarchaeology and Experimental Archaeology. Our interests run from early prehistory through to the post-medieval period. Our geographic specialisations include the Americas, the British Isles, Europe, South Asia and North Africa.

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The MA History will allow you to focus on a particular period or geographical area, or to study a specific theme such as economic and social history, international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval and maritime, or gender history. Read more
The MA History will allow you to focus on a particular period or geographical area, or to study a specific theme such as economic and social history, international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval and maritime, or gender history. Students also have the option of following one of our specialist pathways or select from our full range of modules by following our open pathway.

Specialist pathways

Early Modern History; Maritime History; Medical History and War and Society

Modules

A wide range of optional modules are available which reflect the varied research interests of academic staff. These interests range widely from the early medieval period to the twentieth century and cover Britain, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. All aspects of the discipline are represented, from social, religious, cultural and gender history to the study of politics, economic development, international relations, and military conflict in a variety of contexts and eras. Particular areas of strength include early modern history, naval and maritime history, medical history, and the history of the connections between war, state and society.
Your choice of optional modules may include subjects as diverse as ritual in the Middle Ages; witchcraft and the supernatural in the 16th and 17th centuries; maritime and naval history; sexuality; health, medicine; gender and the body; party politics and international diplomacy; and the impact of modern wars on culture, economy, society and memory.

The programme

- offers an excellent education in a very wide range of historical subjects and geographical locations over a broad time-span from Anglo-Saxon England to modern Western and Eastern Europe, some parts of Asia, North and South America, and Africa;
- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;
- draws on the expertise of a number of highly respected research centres which are at the forefront of their respective disciplines;
- participation in joint seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms;
- excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Research Areas

Research is at the heart of History and our students are encouraged to come to Departmental Research Seminars and become an active part of wider research community. Our research centres regularly hold seminars and other research events which MA students are welcome to attend. Our current research centres include:
• Centre for Early Modern Studies
• Centre for Imperial and Global History
• Centre for Maritime Historical Studies
• Centre for War, State and Society
• Centre for Medical History
• Centre for Medieval Studies
• Institute of Cornish Studies

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The MRes in Economic and Social History will allow you to focus specifically on economic and social history and its methods of analysis, while giving you the opportunity to study other topics in international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval or gender history. Read more
The MRes in Economic and Social History will allow you to focus specifically on economic and social history and its methods of analysis, while giving you the opportunity to study other topics in international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval or gender history.

You can select from option modules that include subjects such as ritual in the Middle Ages; witchcraft and the supernatural in the 16th and 17th centuries; sexuality; health, medicine; gender and the body; party politics and international diplomacy; and the impact of modern wars on culture, economy, society and memory.

The MRes provides essential training for PhD study in History, as well as an opportunity to develop particular interests in the history of different countries and periods through taught modules and a 25,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choosing within the MRes programme subject area.

The Programme

- offers an excellent education in a very wide range of historical subjects and geographical locations over a broad time-span from Anglo-Saxon England to modern Western and Eastern Europe, some parts of Asia, North and South America, and Africa;
- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;
- draws on the expertise of a number of highly respected research centres which are at the forefront of their respective disciplines;
- participation in joint seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms;
- excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules which may be available are; Qualitative Methods in Social Research; Applied Quantitative Data Analysis; Philosophy of the Social Sciences ; Gender, Society and Culture in Early Modern England; Medieval Research Skills; Interpreting the Middle Ages; Supervised Independent Study in the Humanities; Supervised Independent Study in the Humanities; British Naval Power in the Era of Sail 1660-1815; Approaches to War and Society in the Twentieth Century; Medicine in Medieval and Early Modern England; Everyday Life in the Soviet Union; War 1450 to the Presen and Empires and Globalisation, c.1800-2000.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

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