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The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. Read more

Introduction

The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are now fully merged for all postgraduate degrees and together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy institutions in the United Kingdom.
The programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers that is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects. It offers graduate teaching at a level that matches the best graduate programmes elsewhere in the world, in a wide range of areas, including the history of philosophy.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MLitt
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: MLitt St Andrews Programme Director: Patrick Greenough | MLitt Stirling Co-ordinator: Dr Philip Ebert

Course objectives

The taught MLitt provides the foundation year of the programme. Modules are offered in three fundamental areas of philosophy: logic and metaphysics, moral and political philosophy, and history of philosophy. The degree is primarily designed as a preparatory year for entry to postgraduate work in philosophy. It provides a firm foundation of general understanding and skills in philosophy which will serve as a basis for sound philosophical research. Graduate students are taught in dedicated graduate classes.

English language requirements

All SASP courses are taught in English. Applicants who are NOT native speakers AND whose undergraduate degree was NOT taught in English must submit a recognised English Language test. We normally require a TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based). 250 (computer-based), or 100 (internet-based). A copy of your TOEFL certificate will be sufficient. Alternatively an IELTS score of 7.00 is also acceptable/sufficient. (Ideally we prefer the IELTS exam.)
The University of St Andrews offers pre-sessional English courses - you can find out more about them on the website of the St Andrews University English Language Teaching Centre http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/ .

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 7.0 with minimum 6.0 in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade A
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 67 with a minimum of 55 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 100 with no sub test lower than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

The programme is taught by seminars (normally one two-hour seminar each week for each module) and individual supervision. Assessment is normally by coursework: each full module is assessed by two essays.
To gain the Diploma, you must satisfactorily complete all the taught modules. To gain the MLitt, you must satisfactorily complete the taught modules and write a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Rating
Both Departments did well in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). Average ranking: St Andrews 3.15, Stirling 2.95.

Career opportunities

Students on the MLitt have proceeded to the further study of Philosophy at PhD level. Some have remained within the SASP Graduate Programme, either at Stirling or at St Andrews, and others have gone on to leading institutions in the UK and abroad.
A large number of former MLitt students have secured permanent university teaching positions. The general training in research and analytical thinking it offers also prepares you for a wide range of careers in various areas of public policy, public administration and governance.

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The MLitt in Philosophy is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Philosophy is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. 

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.
  • Students can choose any of the optional modules offered by the Department, allowing you to choose any combination of philosophical topics. 

Teaching format

Students on the MLitt in Philosophy have the opportunity to study a broad range of philosophical topics through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

Those on the MLitt in Philosophy may sign up for any of the postgraduate taught modules offered by the department, building a timetable which best suits individual interests. The course offers flexibility for those students who are not yet sure of their research interests, or who wish to gain a broader understanding of issues and debates across the discipline. This flexibility allows students to combine the modules which are of most interest; combining logic and ethics for example, or metaphysics and political philosophy.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) and a 15,000 word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an advisor at the beginning of the year. Your advisor will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part time studies

The Philosophy MLitt can also be taken as a part time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. It focuses on topics within metaphysics and logic; with classes covering logic and advanced logic, formal approaches to natural languages and contemporary and historical debates in metaphysics.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The Stirling and St Andrews Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • Students have a number of optional modules with a focus on metaphysics or logic to choose from.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

Students have the opportunity to study topics through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) and a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. Your adviser will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part time studies

The MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics can also be taken as a part-time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MLitt in Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. The focus is on introducing students to contemporary debates in the fields of Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy, whilst also encouraging connections between these various specialisms.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • Optional modules in Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy and Legal Philosophy are available to students on the MLitt.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

Students on the MLitt in Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy have the opportunity to study topics in these philosophical areas through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) a 15,000 word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an advisor at the beginning of the year. Your advisor will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part time studies

The MLitt in Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy can also be taken as a part time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, there is also an optional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year. 



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The European Masters MSc in Dependable Software Systems is a two-year taught programme run jointly by computer science departments at the University of St Andrews, . Read more

The European Masters MSc in Dependable Software Systems is a two-year taught programme run jointly by computer science departments at the University of St Andrews, National University of Ireland Maynooth and Université de Lorraine Nancy in France.

Highlights

  • Students study at two of the three following internationally recognised universities in computer science: University of St Andrews, National University of Ireland Maynooth and Université de Lorraine Nancy in France.
  • Students undertake a significant project, including a wide-ranging investigation, leading to their dissertation which enables them to consolidate and extend their specialist knowledge and critical thinking.
  • Students gain the logical reasoning and problem-solving skills needed for a career in the software industry.
  • While at St Andrews, students have 24-hour access to excellent modern laboratories, provisioned with modern dual-screen PC workstations and group working facilities.

Teaching format

Students study at two of the three partner universities. Semesters 1 and 3 normally consist of foundational topics upon which students can build their specialisations, whereas Semesters 2 and 4 normally consist of specialised modules and project work. In both universities, students complete a dissertation research project. 

At St Andrews, teaching methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical classes. Most modules are assessed through practical coursework exercises and examinations. Class sizes typically range from 10 to 50 students.

At St Andrews, all students are assigned an advisor who meets with them at the start of the year to discuss module choices and is available to assist with any academic difficulties during the year. A designated member of staff provides close supervision for the MSc project and dissertation.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The following are European Masters modules offered by the University of St Andrews. Find out more about the specific modules offered by the other universities

The modules in the St Andrews programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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MLitt in Film Studies. The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level. An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas. Read more

MLitt in Film Studies

• The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level.

• An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas.

• Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay.

• Two specialist modules provide you with the opportunity to transfer and apply the theoretical knowledge and research skills acquired in the core module to a more concrete level of intellectual investigation, focusing on the creation of meaning and aesthetic value in the context of global dynamics of cultural production and distribution.

• The specialist modules vary annually and reflect current staff research interests. Emphasis throughout the year is placed on individual research.

Features

* Film Studies was ranked first in Scotland for world leading and internationally excellent research in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.

* Senior expertise of high profile scholars, such as Professor Robert Burgoyne, Professor Richard Dyer, Mr Jean Michel Frodon and Professor Dina Iordanova, all internationally known and respected leaders in the field .

* Regular visits from high-profile film critics, film. The most recent have been celebrated Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán, who in April 2015 visited the Department and attended a screening of two of his films, followed by a Q&A session.

* The new programme in Global Cinema: Managing and Cultural Curation, is offered out of the Institute for Global Cinema and Creative Cultures (IGCCC: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/globalcinema ) which capitalise on achievements, global connections and on our reputational advantages as leaders in the study of global culture, film circulation and film festivals.

In learning and teaching, St Andrews sets the highest of standards and attracts students from all over the world with understandably high expectations. In its first five-yearly review in 2009, the Department’s teaching provision achieved the highest possible commendation. Teaching and research are closely co-related, and postgraduate teaching is informed by the staff’s research activity.

At St Andrews, we investigate cinema as a key form of cultural output and as the dominant type of creative expression. Focusing on the global dimension, our programmes cover key aspects of Film Studies through the lens of transnational cultural studies.

Film Studies at St Andrews is committed to questioning the traditional view of what is ‘normal’ cinema. We attempt to uncover the agendas (be they national, ‘western’, cultural, commercial, industrial, and so on) that define how we think about cinema, both in terms of the kinds of films we watch for pleasure, and those we study at university. There is much to be learned by studying what is produced at the margins of dominant societies, in addition to the canonical films of Hollywood and the European art house. We are interested in exploring the ways in which racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual subcultures conceptualise their identities. Similarly, we are keen to look at films produced at the periphery of established nations, co-productions between smaller players struggling to survive in the global marketplace and popular genre films often deemed unworthy of high-brow critical attention. Similarly, we

look at films that focus on transnational communities or appeal to international markets that deal with lesser-known histories and are made in foreign languages but are nonetheless worthy of critical examination and intellectual engagement.

Studying film at St Andrews will help you master a range of advanced research skills and acquire knowledge related to the construction and analysis of the moving image, the past and present day realities of various national and regional film traditions, the dynamics of the global film industry, and the theoretical approaches related to film.

Facilities and collections

The Department is housed in its own buildings, in North Street. They are within easy walking distance of the University Library, local cinema and town centre. The Department is well resourced with a dedicated teaching room. Recently the Department has started to use the wonderful facilities at the nearby Byre Theatre for most of our seminars, and for other film-related activities. MLitt classes are usually held at the Byre. A Film Studies Postgraduate Study Centre houses a DVD collection, postgraduate workspaces, viewing stations and off-air recording facilities.

At St Andrews you will be exposed to a rich and diverse film programme. Regular course-related film showings take place in a custom-built theatre. In addition, a range of screenings takes place across the University during term time, featuring films related to anthropology, international relations, and history.

St Andrews has excellent library provision, with book, journal and other information resources in Film Studies at a level consistent with an international centre of excellence. The Main Library hosts one of the best collections of international cinema on DVD and video (over 9,000 titles). The Library also holds over 1,000,000 print monographs, over 32,000 electronic books, and substantial journal title holdings in print and over 33,900 full-text electronic titles. Well over 2,000 monographs are classified under Film Studies and related subjects. There are holdings of approximately 100 film, television and media-related journals, of which about 65 are available electronically; there is also networked access to various databases, including Box of Broadcasts, Film Indexes Online and Film & Television Literature Index Full-Text.

Careers

In our media saturated culture, the opportunities for Film Studies graduates are remarkably diverse. Directly related are careers in academia, creative industries, development, distribution, film festival/cinema programming, and arts administration.

A Film Studies degree opens doors to many other spheres, including media management, film and TV research, journalism, publishing, advertising, cultural entrepreneurship, nongovernmental organisations, marketing, public relations and education. Recent destinations include: Junior Assistant Producer, European Tour Productions (IMG Media); Adjunct Instructor, SUNY (State University of New York) at Oswego; Consultant for Propel London Media.



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The International MLitt in Crossways in Cultural Narratives is a two-year taught postgraduate programme open to both European and non-European students. Read more

The International MLitt in Crossways in Cultural Narratives is a two-year taught postgraduate programme open to both European and non-European students. It is run by an international consortium of the following universities:

  • Bergamo, Italy
  • Nova Lisboa, Portugal
  • Poznan, Poland
  • Perpignan, France
  • Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • St Andrews, Scotland
  • Sheffield, England
  • Guelph, Canada
  • Tres de Febrero, Argentina
  • Tübingen, Germany
  • Mexico City, Mexico.

The programme centres on the theme of crossways and cultural hybridisation. Its major discipline is literature with a comparative approach, but it includes modules in aesthetics, history of ideas, semiotics, linguistics and communication. Study at St Andrews focuses on the areas of cultural identities and comparative literature.

Highlights

  • The major focus is on literature, with a comparative approach, but it includes modules in aesthetics, history of ideas, semiotics and communication.
  • The truly international programme offers students the ability to study three languages at three different institutions.
  • Students plan their own mobility track, or course of study, across two years.

Teaching format

The course is divided into four semesters. Students spend Semesters 2 and 3 at the same university, and Semesters 1 and 4 at two different universities. Please note that students may not choose a mobility track comprising both St Andrews and Sheffield, and they may not spend the same academic year in both Canada and the UK.

Students may choose their modules (subject to final approval by the Crossways Academic Council), or they may choose a preselected pathway of modules.

During the programme, students participate in courses delivered through lectures and seminars which are graded by either continuous assessment, the preparation of a researched dossier or examinations at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students work autonomously on a final dissertation under supervision by members of the consortium's teaching staff.

Work placement

Students who study at St Andrews for Semester 2 and 3 have the option of going on a work placement during their second semester or between their second and third semesters. Those on a work placement will write a short 6,000-word dissertation report as well as a 4,000-word academic essay reflecting on their placement.

Students are encouraged to arrange their own work placements at an organisation of their choice. All work placements are conditional upon the approval of the local coordinator.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

Below are the modules which are compulsory for study at the University of St Andrews.

For more details of modules offered at St Andrews, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. It focuses on topics within epistemology, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language; with classes covering normativity, intentionality, representation, consciousness, rules, thought, and reason and rationality available.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report.
  • A range of modules are available with a specific focus on epistemology, the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

The MLitt degree requires two semesters of full-time (or four semesters part-time) coursework, normally equivalent to four modules. Each module has a minimum contact time of 12 hours. The modules are taught as small group discussion seminars, with an average size of four to eight students in each group. Additionally, there may be class trips where relevant to the taught modules.

The assessment for the taught modules is based on coursework including:

  • book reviews
  • annotated bibliographies
  • visual analysis and object analysis essays
  • reading journals
  • research papers.

Part-time studies

The MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language can also be taken as a part-time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The History of Philosophy MLitt is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the . St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP). Read more

The History of Philosophy MLitt is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP), taught by staff from both the University of St Andrews and the University of Stirling. It offers the ability to study a range of different philosophical periods, from the classical period, via mediaeval philosophy, modern philosophy, including the Scottish Enlightenment and Kant, to early analytic philosophy. If you are interested in focusing on the inter-connected questions, themes and topics which span these periods, the History of Philosophy MLitt is a good choice.

Highlights

  • Philosophy at St Andrews was ranked top in Scotland and fifth in the UK in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.
  • The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK in the latest
  • Students can choose modules which best suit their interests, with topics ranging from the classical philosophy of Plato through to the work of contemporary philosophers.
  • Supervisors at both St Andrews and Stirling are available to oversee the MLitt dissertation.

Teaching format

Students have the opportunity to study a range of philosophical periods through lectures, tutorials and reading groups. Modules are taught in small groups, normally consisting of four to ten students. All postgraduate taught students in the Department participating in the compulsory Current Issues modules. In 2017-2018, there were approximately 40 postgraduate taught students in the Department.

The programme consists of six taught modules taken over two semesters (each assessed by coursework) a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of your choice.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. Your adviser will provide you with individual guidance on essay planning and writing, academic conduct, and advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

Part-time studies

The History of Philosophy MLitt can also be taken as a part-time programme. Students will be expected to take three modules per year over two years, working on the dissertation over two summers. For more information about part time study, please contact the SASP secretary by emailing .

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MSc in Sustainable Development and Energy is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the School of Geography and Sustainable Development. Read more

The MSc in Sustainable Development and Energy is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the School of Geography and Sustainable Development.

The course is part of a double Masters degree in which students spend one year at St Andrews and the second year studying abroad at the MGIMO in Moscow. The MSc at St Andrews is awarded independently of the second year at Moscow.

Highlights

  • Students benefit from studying abroad at MGIMO in Moscow, taking a wide range of energy modules, and being a part of the Arctic Research Centre.
  • Interdisciplinary teaching provides multiple perspectives. Students are taught by experts from disciplines across the University and beyond. 
  • Practical experience supplements leading theory. Many lecturers and visiting speakers have practical experience of advising government, business and communities on aspects of sustainable development, and are all leaders in their academic fields. 
  • Students are placed in internships at an energy company in Moscow during their second year.
  • Field trips, such as to a Scottish highland estate, bring the subject alive by exploring practical applications of sustainable development. (Field trips are run at no additional cost.)

Teaching format

During the first year at St Andrews, students complete seven taught modules. Teaching methods include lectures, tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. Over the course of the year, but with particular focus during the summer months, students research a project area and produce an academic literature review, a professional policy brief and a reflective essay.

During the second year at MGIMO, students complete six modules. Teaching is conducted by leading CEOs in energy companies. Students are placed in an internship with an energy company during their second year at Moscow which typically lasts from 4 to 12 weeks depending upon student availability and the company's role. Internships are usually unpaid, but this can vary depending upon experience. All travel costs for internships are normally covered.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules at St Andrews have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017-2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The Sustainable Aquaculture distance learning modular programme is taught part time via an online e-learning platform offering online tutorial support, direct email contact with tutors, video streams and access to student bulletin boards. Read more

The Sustainable Aquaculture distance learning modular programme is taught part time via an online e-learning platform offering online tutorial support, direct email contact with tutors, video streams and access to student bulletin boards. This structure allows students the maximum flexibility to complete their studies while continuing in their employment.

This course can be studied on a modular basis, as a PGCert, PGDip or MSc.

Highlights

  • Flexible modular e-learning allows students to complete their studies while continuing in their employment.
  • The course uses an online e-learning platform with tutorial support, direct contact with tutors, video steam and access to student bulletin boards.

Teaching format

Both PGDip and MSc students take taught modules covering all aspects of aquaculture both vertebrate and invertebrate over an 18-month period. MSc students then spend the next six months researching and writing a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words to be submitted on a specified date at the end of the course.

Classes are taught through a combination of weekly lectures and tutorials and are assessed through a combination of written examinations and coursework. The course consists of a series of compulsory core modules and a choice of five optional modules matched to students’ specific interests.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change.

Core modules

  • Aquaculture and Fisheries: the global importance of aquaculture and fisheries industries worldwide.
  • Biology for Aquaculture: the fundamental biology, anatomy and physiology of both invertebrate and vertebrate aquaculture species. 
  • Nutrition for Aquaculture: the anatomy, physiology and nutritional requirements of key fish and invertebrate species.
  • Health and Disease: the factors that influence disease processes in cultured fish and invertebrates. 
  • Management, Husbandry and Sustainability: production management and business management of modern aquaculture practices.
  • Markets, Products, Processing and Food Safety: advanced knowledge of aquaculture markets, products, processing and food safety.
  • Local and Global Impacts of Aquaculture: the environmental impact of aquaculture practices on both local and global scales.

Optional modules

  • Advanced Welfare and Ethics
  • Breeding and Genetics
  • Larval Rearing
  • Ornamental and Aquaria Production
  • Recirculation Aquaculture Systems.

Research Dissertation

Students on the MSc programme complete a 15,000-word dissertation at the end of their studies. The dissertation involves the study of a defined problem within the field of sustainable aquaculture. Students are required to collate and analyse data and to discuss their results in the light of existing literature. In some cases, projects might also involve the design of experiments or the gathering of data. 

If students choose not to complete the dissertation requirement for the MSc, there is an exit award available that allows suitably qualified candidates to receive a Postgraduate Diploma. By choosing the exit award, you will finish your degree at the end of the taught portion of the programme and receive a PGDip instead of an MSc.

Careers

Graduates will typically pursue a career in higher level management, research and development or business development within the global aquaculture business.

The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.



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The MSc in Photonics and Optoelectronic Devices is a 12-month taught programme run jointly by the . School of Physics and Astronomy. Read more

The MSc in Photonics and Optoelectronic Devices is a 12-month taught programme run jointly by the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of St Andrews and the School of Engineering and Physical Sciences at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, which makes available to students the combined diversity of research equipment and expertise at both universities.

Highlights

  • Students have access to well-resourced teaching laboratories which allow hands-on experience to explore a wide range of laser devices and optoelectronic technologies. 
  • The programme is offered in collaboration with Heriot-Watt University and run by schools known for pioneering work in lasers and optoelectronics. 
  • The School helps students to find a summer placement usually with a photonics company, which can allow students to gain vocational training in the optoelectronics and laser industry alongside their studies.

Teaching format

Students take modules at St Andrews in Semester 1 and Heriot-Watt in Semester 2, followed by approximately 3.5 months working on a project, which is usually with an optoelectronics company. 

Teaching comprises lectures, tutorials and laboratory work. Lecture classes are relatively small, with typically around 20-30 students in a class. Lecture modules are assessed largely through examinations at the end of each semester whereas the laboratory work is assessed continuously. The lecture and lab modules develop important skills and knowledge that can be used in the summer project. The project is an on-the-job investigation or development of some aspect of photonics, often in a commercial setting.

Well-equipped teaching laboratories allow you to explore the science of photonics and interact directly with academic staff and the School’s early-career researchers. Teaching staff are accessible to students and enjoy explaining the excitement of physics and its applications.

Students are also encouraged to attend relevant research seminars and departmental discussions given by research staff from other universities and specialists from the industry.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The lecture modules in this programme are delivered through lectures combined with tutorials, discussions and independent study; they are assessed through examinations and, in some cases, coursework. In the two lab modules, which are continuously assessed, students explore practical photonics for three afternoons a week.

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MLitt in Medieval English is an intensive one-year taught programme of study covering the mediaeval literature of England and Scotland from the Anglo-Saxon period to the early Renaissance. Read more

The MLitt in Medieval English is an intensive one-year taught programme of study covering the mediaeval literature of England and Scotland from the Anglo-Saxon period to the early Renaissance.

Highlights

  • The programme develops the various intellectual and practical skills necessary for research in the field of medieval literature.
  • Students will extend and deepen their knowledge of English and Scottish literature from the earliest Old English writings through to the close of the Middle Ages.
  • In addition to being a member of the School’s own Medieval and Renaissance Research Group, you will also become a member of the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies
  • Expert palaeography classes and access to unique manuscript materials are provided by the University’s Special Collections.

Teaching format

Over two semesters, students will take taught modules that are conducted as seminars with some didactic classes and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment is conducted through coursework essays, assessed exercises and the final dissertation. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary. Class sizes typically range from three to ten students.

During the course of the year, but with particular focus during the last four months, students will research and write a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choosing.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MLitt in German and Comparative Literature is a two-year taught programme run jointly by the . School of Modern Languages at St Andrews. Read more

The MLitt in German and Comparative Literature is a two-year taught programme run jointly by the School of Modern Languages at St Andrews and the University of Bonn. The programme will deepen your knowledge of the latest thinking in literary and comparative studies and give you the research, communication and writing skills needed to embark on a PhD or top-level graduate career.

Highlights

  • Students become truly bilingual and intercultural by studying at two world-renowned and historic universities.
  • The programme is taught by a group of internationally renowned experts in all major areas of German and comparative studies from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century.
  • Students spend their first year in Germany and the second year in Scotland.

Teaching format

Students spend their first year at the University of Bonn in Germany where they will take two compulsory modules on comparative literature and have a choice of optional modules covering a wide range of topics from medieval texts to current trends in German literature.

Students will spend their second year at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, where one semester will be devoted to studying two compulsory and one optional module, and the second semester will be spent focused on writing an 18,000-word dissertation.

Modules

These are the modules offered by the University of St Andrews during the second year of the MLitt/MA programme. Find out more about the modules taught by the University of Bonn.

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The MPhil in Philosophy is a two-year research degree that is awarded after successful completion of the taught element of the MLitt programme (see above) plus a supervised research thesis of 40,000 words. Read more

MPhil in Philosophy

The MPhil in Philosophy is a two-year research degree that is awarded after successful completion of the taught element of the MLitt programme (see above) plus a supervised research thesis of 40,000 words. The MPhil is primarily designed for those wishing to undertake an extra year of research study in preparation for PhD studies, although the MPhil remains a desirable independent qualification in its own right.

A distinctive feature of the SASP MPhil programme is that you have two academic supervisors to provide regular academic guidance and advice throughout the research project.

A further distinctive feature is that students in the second year of the MPhil programme are actively encouraged to participate and make presentations at the regular dedicated MPhil seminar hosted by senior members of staff.

The number of MPhil students is typically between five and ten, drawn from the UK and around the world. Many MPhil students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US.

- Entry to the MPhil
Entry to the programme is in the first instance via progression from the SASP MLitt programme. You must complete 120 credits of 5000-level modules, as in the MLitt regulations. If you meet the standard progression-to-dissertation requirements on the MLitt, you will have the option to write an MLitt dissertation of 15,000 words and either graduate with an MLitt degree or convert your MLitt dissertation into a 40,000-word MPhil thesis and graduate with an MPhil degree (subject to meeting all the requirements for the award of both qualifications).

Note that you can apply for admission to the MPhil programme as well as to the MLitt programme. You will still be required to complete the MLitt programme as detailed above in year 1 before progressing to the MPhil dissertation in year 2.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

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