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Masters Degrees (Ancient Religion)

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The MA in Ancient Religions will appeal particularly to those students who are interested in a broad geographic expanse of ancient societies with a particular focus on their religions. Read more
The MA in Ancient Religions will appeal particularly to those students who are interested in a broad geographic expanse of ancient societies with a particular focus on their religions.

Course Overview

The MA Ancient Religions offers students whose interests centre on this field the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to investigating the Celtic, Christian, Egyptian, Jewish, Greek, Minoan/Mycenaean and Roman religions, The programme enables students to gain a clearer understanding of the interrelations of religion and society in a cross-cultural perspective and so better enables them to understand multi-religious worlds. Moreover, students will gain a wider understanding of the cultural economic and social forces underpinning the ancient world and these ancient ideas and practices in particular.

Modules

-Pagans, Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity
-Ancient Egyptian Religious Beliefs
-Cosmology, Magic and Divination
-Celtic Otherworlds: From the Druids to the Monastic Voyage Tale
-Spaces, Places and Objects in Ancient Mediterranean Religions
-New Testament Apocrypha

Key Features

If you wish to expand your knowledge about ancient religions at a postgraduate level, then the MA in Ancient Religion is for you. The scheme allows you to study a wide range of modules covering a wide range of ancient religions.

All our modules in the MA in Ancient Religions are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries. Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Assessment

An MA degree in Ancient Religions involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in a clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA by Research in Ancient History is a research degree pursued over one year full-time or two years part-time. This MA allows students to study in depth a topic related to the history, culture, or archaeology of the classical world, from Mycenaean Greece to the fall of the Roman Empire.

Key Features of Ancient History MA by Research

The expertise of the Department of History and Classics spans from the ancient cultures and languages of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to the history of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Europe. The research of our staff and postgraduates is integral to the life of the department, and it means that Swansea is a dynamic, exciting, and stimulating place to study Ancient History.

History and Classics is part of the Research Institute for the Arts and Humanities (RIAH: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/), which organises a large number of seminars, conferences, and other research activities. There are also a number of research groups which act as focal points for staff and postgraduates, including: the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales, Centre for Ancient Narrative Literature (KYKNOS), Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO) and the Centre for research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS).

Students of the MA by Research in Ancient History are encouraged to develop a methodological awareness and are introduced to key concepts and interpretative techniques that shape the study of the ancient civilisations in the modern world. This programme develops research skills needed for high-level work in any field of Ancient History. Students have access to skills and training programmes offered by the College of Arts and Humanities and the University.

Ancient History Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, literature, history, and archaeology. Particular research strengths include:

• Ancient Egyptian Religion

• Ancient Egyptian Kingship Ideology

• Egyptian Temple Texts of the Graeco-Roman Period (‘Ptolemaic’)

• Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Ancient Egyptian Demonology

• Ancient Narrative Literature

• The Ancient Novel

• Ancient Philosophy

• Ancient Technology

• Archaeology of Roman Egypt

• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation

• Greek Social History (Archaic to Hellenistic)

• Historiography

• History and Archaeology of Asia Minor

• History of Late Antiquity

• Imperialism in Egypt and the Near East

• Roman Republican and Imperial History



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The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism. Read more

The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism.

About this degree

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key aspects of and approaches to ancient history. They develop the ability to assess historical evidence critically and synthesise historical data from printed, manuscript, archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and papyrological sources, and are equipped with the tools necessary for further research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two to four optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Sources and Methods in Ancient History

Optional modules

Optional modules will be finalised in Spring 2018. Please contact the department for more information. The following optional modules were available in 2017/18 and this is an indicative list only:

  • Babylon under Imperial Rule, 539-c. 50 BC
  • Hellenistic Encounters with Egypt
  • The City of Rome (BA/MA), (Royal Holloway)
  • Lived Ancient Religion in Hellenistic Greece
  • Economic and Social History of Rome (Royal Holloway)
  • Greek and Latin language at various levels
  • Propaganda and Ideology in Ancient Rome
  • Hellenistic Epigraphy
  • Greek Law and Lawcourts (Royal Holloway)
  • Continuity and Change in the Ancient Near East
  • Classical Chinese Medicine
  • Persepolis (King's College London)
  • Roman Britain (King's College London)

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in the field of ancient history, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and museum visits. Most teaching is available inside UCL, but some is held at other London colleges. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Ancient History MA

Careers

This degree provides an outstanding foundation for those wishing to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career. It is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museums and heritage and the education sector.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Communications Intern, Terra Firma
  • PhD in Ancient History, UCL
  • Senior Executive Officer, Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)
  • Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Senior Intelligence Analyst, British Transport Police

Employability

Students develop an enviable range of skills by taking this degree. Debates, small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained are also highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with UCL History alumni.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MRes Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist research-intensive degree tailored to those interests and to pursue their own independent research to a further extent than in an MA. Read more
The MRes Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist research-intensive degree tailored to those interests and to pursue their own independent research to a further extent than in an MA.

Course Overview

The MRes is a degree best suited to students with a proven penchant for independent research. The MRes includes 60 credits (3 modules) of taught modules, but the main focus of the degree is on a longer piece of individual research (30,000 words). Applicants are required to discuss their proposed research with the School before application, and the proposed research must be in one of the areas of supervision offered by the School of Classics.

The MRes in Ancient History begins with a specialist Research Methodology module introducing students to the multiple sources, materials, theories and methodologies for the study of ancient Greek and Roman civilisations. Students then have the opportunity to choose two modules according to their own interests in the ancient world, with the option to specialise in a particular aspect of ancient history, whether in chronological terms, such as Greek or Roman history, or in terms of themes, such as the ancient economy. The choice of taught modules gives students not only the opportunity to explore areas that they might not have had the opportunity to study before, but also to specialise in a specific aspect of the ancient world in preparation for the MRes dissertation.

The dissertation is the greater part of the MRes in Ancient History, as students have the opportunity to conceive and research a topic of their own design of greater length and depth than the MA dissertation.

This will enable those students with a greater preference for independent research, and perhaps with a clearer sense at the start of the programme of what they would like to base their research upon, to undertake in-depth research within a structured programme of study. It will also provide students with an excellent introductory pathway into further study at MPhil or PhD level.

Modules

-Julius Caesar and his Times:
-Pagans, Jews, and Christians in Late Antiquity
-History and Historians in the Ancient World
-Power and Culture in the Hellenistic East
-Ancient Medicine: Myth and Practice
-Women in ancient Myth and Society

Key Features

The MRes in Ancient History is designed to provide students with a penchant for independent research the opportunity to pursue research into a subject of their own choice. The subject of the dissertation is discussed and agreed in advance, and it is expected that the choice of taught modules will relate to the research subject chosen.

The main general areas of research supervision in the School are:
-Greek and Roman epic
-Latin poetry of the late Republican and Imperial periods
-Literary uses of mythology
-Greek and Roman Africa
-Hellenistic Asia Minor and the Near East
-Identity, ethnicity and ethnogenesis in the Roman empire
-Roman religion
-Ancient Economy, particularly of the Greek Classical period and of the Roman empire
-Greek and Roman historiography
-Sex and Gender in the ancient world
-Health and healing in the ancient world
-Graeco-Roman relations with India

The above are general subject areas. Please contact us to discuss your specific ideas and interests.

Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries, whilst our independent study modules allow you to explore your passion in its entirety.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are able better to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Ancient History with us here at Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MRes degree in Ancient History involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and powerpoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

This breadth of assessment type creates variety in the student experience, allowing you to explore the subject in different ways, and also embeds within the Ancient History programme the specific employability skills desired, indeed required, by employers today.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. Read more
Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. We have strong links with related disciplines such as history, archaeology and modern languages. We welcome postgraduates in any of our areas of research expertise.

Classics and Ancient History at Newcastle has a long and distinguished international reputation. We deliver quality research and teaching. We have taught Latin and Greek since 1874. We have taught Ancient History since 1910 and Classical Archaeology since 1931.

Our staff include scholars of outstanding international reputation. Our research covers all major aspects of the study of the ancient world, with research strengths in:
-Rhetoric and historiography
-Ancient philosophy, science and medicine
-Reception and recreation of ancient texts
-Ancient concepts of divinity

Our research specialities include:
-The ancient Near East
-Greco-Roman culture and religion
-Early Christianity and patristics
-Greek art and archaeology
-Greek ethnography
-History and archaeology of Roman Italy
-Greek and Roman music
-Greek language and literature, including Homer, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric
-Latin language and literature, including historiography, rhetoric and Augustan poetry
-Reception of the classical tradition
-Ancient science and medicine
-Ancient Greek and Roman patristics and philosophy

MPhil supervision is usually available in:

Ancient history and classical archaeology

-The history and archaeology of pre-Roman and Roman Italy
-The late Roman Republic
-Greco–Roman religion
-The social and cultural history of the Roman Empire
-Roman Greece
-Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt
-History of the Jews
-Greek art and archaeology
-The history and archaeology of the ancient Near East

Classical language and literature

-Latin language and literature
-Ancient oratory and rhetoric
-Latin poetry
-Ancient historiography
-Greek tragedy
-Greek influence on later literature
-Greek and Roman music

Philosophy and science

-Ancient and early Christian philosophy
-The history of Greek and Roman medicine
-Greek and Roman music
-The exact sciences in Graeco-Roman antiquity

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The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place you in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills. Read more

The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place you in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills.

The major civilisations of the ancient world, including those of Egypt, Greece and Rome, still shape global culture today. Our MA in Ancient History enables you to gain an advanced understanding of ancient culture, whether you focus on literature, thought, art or religion. The MA gives you an opportunity explore the history, political and social organisation, or material artefacts of ancient cultures, to demonstrate a critical engagement and develop an informed sense of the similarities and differences between them and our own culture.

The programme allows you to develop your research skills and to become by the end of the degree an independent researcher, well equipped for future work for a PhD or to undertake research outside academia. The programme begins by focusing on research skills, which you study alongside either an option module or a language module (in ancient Greek or Latin). For the Spring Term, you choose two option modules that reflect the research interests of staff within the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies at Kent.

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your 12 month MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

This programme is taught at our Canterbury campus. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend a term in Rome. This gives you direct access to Roman sites, museums and architecture, in order to see how the Roman Empire has shaped the city to this day.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-ancient-history.html

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide research training in the subject area of ancient history

- expand your depth of knowledge of key subject areas in ancient history

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender or physical disability from both within the UK, and EU, and also from overseas

- develop new areas of postgraduate teaching in response to the advance of scholarship

- provide you with the skills to equip you for a further career either for doctoral research in ancient history, or in employment, with the use of these transferable skills

- develop your competence in applying skills to analysis of a diverse body of ancient evidence

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to the ancient material

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills to prepare you for graduate employment

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- provide you with opportunities for shared multidisciplinary learning with archaeology, religious studies and philosophy

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more

Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.

You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:

• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine 

• Ancient Politics and Society

• Classical Receptions 

• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges 

• Literary Interactions

At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

If you decide to join us at Exeter you will become part of one of the largest and most successful Classics and Ancient History Departments in the UK. We have an excellent reputation for both our teaching and our research with league table rankings to match.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows;

  • Food and Culture;
  • Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context;
  • Hellenistic Culture and Society – History;
  • Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ;
  • Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity;
  • Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes;
  • Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought;
  • Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality;
  • The City of Rome (subject to availability);
  • Greek;
  • Latin;
  • Fast-Track Greek;
  • Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:

• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics

• Classical art and archaeology

• Classics in the history of sexuality

• Comparative philology and linguistics

• Food in the ancient world

• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy

• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic

• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality

• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies

• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen

• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis

• Latin literature

• Palaeography



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We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Our . remarkably diverse faculty. Read more

We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Our remarkably diverse faculty includes world experts who both teach, and conduct path-breaking research on, the archaeology, history, languages, literatures, and religions of ancient Egypt, the Near East, Greece and Rome, including Judaism, Christianity, and early Islam. Our programs, which can be individually tailored to fit specific interests, foster interdisciplinary study, at the same time developing the relevant skill sets to prepare our students for future study and employment.

What makes the program unique?

Every program is unique and students have the option to design a perfect curriculum for them. Our strengths include rigorous training in the primary languages, Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Middle Egyptian, and Classical Arabic; broad coverage of the mythic systems of ancient civilizations; in-depth study of the dramatic, historical, legal, literary and religious texts produced by those civilizations; advanced training in practical methods of archaeology and epigraphy; and exploration of the traditions and receptions of antiquity by later eras.



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This dedicated masters programme in science and religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for PhD work. Read more

This dedicated masters programme in science and religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for PhD work.

This is one of the world’s very few science and religion programmes.

Much of the recent debate surrounding ‘new atheism’ has taken place within a poorly informed view of the history and philosophy of science and its relationship with religion. This programme aims to inform and engage with the debate in depth, looking at it from scientific, philosophical, historical, ethical and theological perspectives.

The history of science is studied from ancient times through the modern scientific revolution, together with philosophical trends in our understanding of reality. The main areas of dialogue between science and religion are explored in depth, including cosmology, evolution, divine action and miracles, consciousness and the human person.

Programme structure

This programme is run over one year full-time (or two years part-time). You will be taught mainly in small classroom/seminar groups. You will be given training in research methods which offers a practical approach to postgraduate level skills of critical investigation and writing, and receive individual supervision for your 15,000 word dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Compulsory courses comprise History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition; Cosmos, Cell and Creator: Current Debates in Science and Religion; and two courses in research methods.

Option courses

You will choose three options, which can be taken from courses in science and religion, such as:

  • Economy, Ecology, and Ethics
  • Key Thinkers in Science and Religion
  • Philosophy of Time
  • Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Debates
  • Science and Religion in Literature
  • Science and Scripture

The options on offer change from year to year, so please consult the Programme Director for advice on what will be available. With the agreement of your Programme Director, you may also choose options from other taught masters programmes, language courses, and advanced undergraduate courses.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to provide a strong foundation for postgraduate research in the field or for employment in a range of areas requiring critical analysis and empathetic understanding.



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The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that places you in a strong position for further study for a PhD, or for careers outside academia that require research skills. Read more
The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that places you in a strong position for further study for a PhD, or for careers outside academia that require research skills.

The major civilisations of the ancient world still shape global culture today, with the Roman Empire spanning Europe, Africa and Asia. Our MA in Ancient History enables you to gain an advanced understanding of ancient culture, whether you focus on literature, thought, art or religion, and includes your second term spent in Rome, the heart of the Roman Empire.

A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially its capital city, through its novel Spring Term component taught at Kent’s Rome centre in collaboration with the American University of Rome. This allows you to gain direct access to Roman sites, museums and architecture, in order to see how the Roman Empire has shaped the city to this day. There is also a version of this programme that allows you to study at Canterbury only.

The programme allows you to develop your research skills and to become by the end of the degree an independent researcher, well equipped for future work for a PhD or to undertake research outside academia. The programme begins by focusing on research skills, which you study alongside either an option module or a language module (in ancient Greek or Latin). For the Spring Term, you choose two option modules that reflect the research interests of staff within the Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html).

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

You take one core module and one optional module during your first term in Canterbury and your second term in Rome. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)
CL715 - Early Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL716 - Early Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL723 - Early Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL724 - Early Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL820 - The Political, Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World:An (30 credits)
CL823 - Sexuality, Secrecy and Sin:Ancient Christianity and the World of Late A (30 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are chosen, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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How did the ancient Romans view religious-political differences? How did ancient Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authorities use authoritative texts? What potential for pluralism exists in modern monotheisms and secularisms?. Read more
How did the ancient Romans view religious-political differences? How did ancient Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authorities use authoritative texts? What potential for pluralism exists in modern monotheisms and secularisms?

Tension between group solidarity and productive relations with ' others' has been part of human history for as long as evidence exists. In Europe it has played out most enduringly in relations among the monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Today, in the face of mass migration from Muslim regions, questions of political identity and belonging remain bound up with religious affiliation. This one-year degree programme focuses on relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims in the antique world and how these relations have formed our modern society. We will explore concepts as religious pluralism, politics, and their many interfaces globally in particular.

In this track within the Master's Programme in Theology & Religious Studies, you will:
* examine the literary sources of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in a historically informed way in order to bring critical perspectives to modern interpretations;
* identify continuing issues in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic self-definition, toleration of difference, and exclusionary or conversionist tendencies;
* map a range of ancient possibilities for coexistence or conviviality and their opposites under changing conditions.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• integrated approach of religious pluralism, politics, and their many global interfaces
• focus on historical context of modern societies
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• opportunity to pursue your own research interests

Job perspectives

As a graduate you can become an adviser and policymaker on interreligious issues and multicultural society. You may work in cultural organisations and companies in the public sector. In addition, you can work in the media. You can become a teacher of religion or philosophy. If you want to pursue an academic career, you can follow this track as a specialization within the research Master's programme.

Job examples

• Consulting & Policy
You are able to provide well-founded advice on interreligious issues and multicultural society. You can use this expertise in an advisory position at cultural organizations, in companies or in the public sector. Your knowledge equips you for policymaking positions in this field.

• Media & Journalism
The current debate often refers to perceived historical realities. Your expertise in the formative periods of Judaism, Christianity and Islam enables you to ask critical questions concerning modern-day claims about these religious traditions. You can use your knowledge and skills as an editor at a publishing company, broadcasting company, newspaper or news and current affairs magazine. You could also work as a freelancer.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's programme you will have enough knowledge of the subject to become a secondary school teacher in the subject of Religious Studies and Philosophy or Social Studies. You could also opt for a position in higher vocational education, for example teaching Theology at a university of applied sciences. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Classics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Classics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Greek and Latin languages are the key to our knowledge of the ancient world, and the origin of many modern European languages. This MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in the ancient languages, and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world. In addition to developing their ability to read fluently in the ancient languages and to translate them accurately and sensitively, students are introduced to the critical and analytical methodologies that shape the study of Classical literature in the twenty-first century. Students in the MA in Classics should normally already have studied either Latin or Greek, and will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of the other.

Key Features of MA in Classics

The MA Classics studies Greek and Latin language, literature and civilisation.

The MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in ancient languages and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Classics MA is split across the year offering three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time Classics MA students take three modules in the first year, three in the second year and write the dissertation in the third year.

MA in Classics Aims

To acquire advanced reading skills in ancient Greek and Latin.

To develop the ability to translate from ancient Greek and Latin accurately and sensitively.

To develop the theoretical and analytical skills relevant to the study of ancient texts in the original languages.

To prepare for further text-based research on any aspect of Greek or Roman history and culture.

Through the precision and awareness to detail entailed in the study of ancient languages, to acquire a range of transferable skills relevant to a range of employment opportunities, including those which involve language acquisition and translation.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Classics course typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres

• Ancient Greek or Latin Language

• Ancient Greek or Latin Texts

• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, history and archaeology.

Particular strengths include:

• Ancient Narrative Literature

• The Ancient Novel

• Plato and Platonism

• Greek Tragedy

• Ancient Technology

• The Archaeology of Roman Egypt

• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation

• Greek Social History

• The History and Archaeology of Asia Minor

• Late Antiquity

• Roman Military History

All staff in History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. In addition, regular research seminars and lectures are run through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are

encouraged to attend.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Classics graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.



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The Antiquity MA. Classics and Ancient History pathway is for students interested in advanced study of any aspect of Greco-Roman civilisation. Read more

The Antiquity MA: Classics and Ancient History pathway is for students interested in advanced study of any aspect of Greco-Roman civilisation.

Modules emphasise independent interpretation of primary evidence, and encourage you to draw connections across historical periods, between different types of evidence (textual, archaeological, iconographic), and between different cultures.

This programme offers an ideal opportunity to pursue your interests in the Graeco-Roman world in greater depth and also provides an ideal foundation for further research at doctoral level. All students take at least one classical language module, plus a general module on Research and Scholarship designed to introduce them to the professional skills required by an independent researcher. This is one of several pathways available on the Antiquity MA.

Times Higher Education ranked us among the top five departments of Classics in the country for our performance in the latest Research Excellence Framework exercise.

Course details

This is the degree for you if you enjoyed studying the ancient world as an undergraduate, and would now like to study Classics and Ancient History in greater depth and at a higher level; or if you want to explore this aspect of antiquity and it wasn’t included in your first degree.

It allows you to specialise, but also encourages you to branch out into related disciplines and to consider interdisciplinary approaches.

You will choose two core language modules, at least one which should be Greek or Latin, from a range which includes:

  • Beginners' Greek
  • Beginners' Latin
  • Advanced Greek
  • Advanced Latin
  • Modern Languages

You will also study a third core module in Research and Scholarship.

You will also choose three optional modules, at least two of which should relate to Classics and Ancient History. Options available may include:

  • Ancient Egyptian Religion
  • Empire and Identity
  • Greek Drama since 1900
  • Herodotus and Ancient Worlds
  • Individuals in History

Full module descriptions are available below. 

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by written assignment, exam or presentation, or a combination of these methods. You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a subject of your choice.  

Learning and teaching

The course is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods, including lectures and seminars. You will also receive one-to-one supervision to support you in the development of your dissertation.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology

Birmingham's Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills including: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Many of our postgraduates enter roles for which their programme has especially prepared them, such as museum and heritage activities and archaeological posts. Elsewhere, a range of professions are undertaken by our graduates, from librarianship and teaching to accountancy. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include: AC archaeology; University of Birmingham; National Trust; and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts.

Over the past five years, 91% of MA Antiquity postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. 



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Research profile. Postgraduate study of Science and Religion invites you to bring together the two great truth-seeking disciplines and understand the ways in which they both challenge and inform each other. Read more

Research profile

Postgraduate study of Science and Religion invites you to bring together the two great truth-seeking disciplines and understand the ways in which they both challenge and inform each other. This interdisciplinary venture is more than the sum of its parts.

You will make use of the methods of historical study, philosophy, theology, and literary studies to assess state-of-the-art scientific research alongside well-established areas of debate.

Research supervision is offered by academic staff with interests in physics, cosmology and faith; reduction and emergence; consciousness and the soul; evolutionary biology, human uniqueness, and the 'image of God'; the laws of nature and the idea of 'ultimate reality'; science and the doctrine of creation; miracles and science; the Bible and science; science and religion in literature and the arts; ecology, ethics and theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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The MA in Religion provides advanced study of the religious traditions of both the West and Asia. The programme offers two pathways. Read more
The MA in Religion provides advanced study of the religious traditions of both the West and Asia. The programme offers two pathways:
-Buddhist Studies
-Theology and Religious Studies

These reflect the expertise in the Department of Religion and Theology and allow you to study various religious traditions with scholars who are world-renowned experts in those fields.

Programme structure

Students follow one of two pathways, taking units worth 180 credit points.

BUDDHIST STUDIES PATHWAY
Core units (40 credit points):
-Buddhism: the Foundations (20 credit points)

Plus one of the following language units (20 credit points):
-Introductory Sanskrit I
-Classical Chinese
-Pali and Buddhist Sanskrit (only available to students with one year of Sanskrit)

NB: Not all languages will be taught each year

Optional units (80 credit points total; 20 credit points each). Optional units can vary each year but may include:
-Introductory Sanskrit 2
-Buddhism: The Mahayana Tradition
-The Practice of Theravada Buddhism in Asia
-Aspects of Chinese Buddhism
-Buddhist Psychology and Mental Health
-The Origins and Development of Zen Buddhism
-Yoga and Meditation
-Supervised Individual Study (on an aspect of Buddhism not covered by other units)
-An open MA unit chosen from those available in the Faculty of Arts

Dissertation
You will engage in supervised research on a topic of your choice and submit a dissertation of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES PATHWAY
Core units
-Buddhism: The Foundations (20 credit points)
-History of Christianity: Core Texts (20 credit points)

Optional units (80 credit points total; 20 credit points each)
-Medieval Mystics and Visionaries in Medieval England
-Reflection on Religious Pluralism in Contemporary Society
-Alchemy, Magic and Science in Early Modernity
-The Renaissance and the Rise of the Modern Age
-Reflection on Religious Pluralism in Contemporary Society
-Greek Language Level A
-Latin Language Level A
-Jesus in an Age of Colonialism
-Ancient Jewish Novels
-Atheism
-Buddhism: The Mahayana Tradition
-The Origins and Development of Zen Buddhism
-Yoga and Meditation
-Buddhist Psychology and Mental Health
-An open MA unit chosen from those available across the Faculty of Arts.

Dissertation
You will engage in supervised research on a topic of your choice and submit a dissertation of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

Careers

Students who complete this MA programme have taken up many different careers, including academic research, social work, banking and industry, counselling and teaching, design, journalism, film and the arts.

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