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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This is an innovative and exciting programme in which you focus on writing a full-length, literary novel of between 90,000 and 150,000 words. Read more
This is an innovative and exciting programme in which you focus on writing a full-length, literary novel of between 90,000 and 150,000 words.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/232/contemporary-novel-practice-as-research

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You meet regularly with your supervisor and have the opportunity to take part in informal reading groups and research seminars to which students, staff and visiting speakers contribute papers. You also benefit from a series of research skills seminars that run in the spring term, which gives you a chance to share the research expertise of staff and postdoctoral members of the department.

As a basis for advanced research, you must take the School and Faculty research methods programmes.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.
The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The recently established Centre for Victorian Literature and Culture provides a stimulating and distinctive research environment for staff and students through seminars, conferences and collaborative research projects. The MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture is the only MA of its kind in the UK, and both the MA and the Centre places a particular emphasis on Victorian literature and culture associated with Kent and the south-east.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving series of events and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research offers a pioneering Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice (DPRP). Read more
The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research offers a pioneering Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice (DPRP). The course is designed to enable experienced professionals working in a range of policy arenas – locally, nationally, and globally – to develop their policy analysis expertise without having to take a full career break. Combining advanced training in policy research and analysis with a thesis based on original research, it is based on a cohort model and can be spread out over up to six years.

Key features

- A combination of advanced policy research and analysis training with a thesis component based on original research
- Part-time programme structure designed to cater for busy professionals
- A means to enable participants to draw on their working experience at the same time as engaging with up-to-date academic research and thinking
- A cohort structure based around an annual two-week residential to provide networking with other participants as part of the programme
- Access to a wide range of sector-specific expertise across the University, including Technology Policy, International Development, Health, Education and Social Policy

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/prof-doct-in-poli-rese-and-prac/

Why take a professional doctorate in policy research and practice?

In all areas of government and public administration – whether in local government, national civil services or international organisations – the world of policy making is changing fast. There is an increasing recognition of the need for a secure and transparent evidence base on which to make policy, but there are also a range of approaches and methods that policy makers can use to assess the evidence base and consider the likely impact of different policies. This Doctorate will enhance professional capability and critical reflection on the theories, methods and practices of policy making.

The course involves a blend of face-to-face and distance learning. The academic coherence of the course is built around a ‘hub and spoke’ model comprising two core policy analysis units (in Transformational Policy and Practice and Policy Research Methodology) and two specialist units to enable students to broaden and deepen their understanding of policy research across a range of disciplines. You are required to complete four ‘taught’ units over three years of study – two core and two optional – followed by a supervised piece of original research over up to three years.

Educational aims of the programme

The Professional Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice is designed to:

- give particular priority to the transfer of multidisciplinary research and learning to the workplace, to enhance the academic and the professional contribution that policy makers and practitioners can make to theory and practice in their field
- engage current practitioners with knowledge, awareness and understanding of philosophical, organisational, political, social, economic, managerial, interpersonal, and technical dimensions of policy
- develop the capability to broaden an understanding of critical issues facing policy makers today
- provide you with a broad foundation from which you can hone your specific interests towards the conduct of supervised research and make an original contribution to your field
- support you in publishing and disseminating your research

Course structure

The Professional Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice is built around a part-time cohort model. You will advance through the course with a cohort of other participants from a range of countries, sectors and organisations. Teaching is focused on a two-week residential held in early September each year, with subsequent virtual seminars, tutorials, and supervision throughout the rest of the year.

This structure will enable you to interact, learn, and network with a stable cohort of participants, while ensuring the flexibility to continue your own professional career.

The course is structured into two stages: the taught stage and the thesis stage.

If your circumstances change and you are unable to complete the course, there are alternative qualifications that may be awarded depending on the number of credits accumulated.

- Taught stage:
The taught stage is based on four units. In the first year, two compulsory core units provide advanced training in policy analysis and research methods. The first year is designed to equip you with the knowledge and capability to understand and use a range of research methodologies, novel analytical frameworks and toolkits to address key issues within a broad policy context. The two core generic analysis units include:

- Transformational Policy and Practice – to introduce you to theoretical understandings of ‘policy’ and policy making and how they relate to practice. This will include a series of case studies of policy making and implementation from different countries

- Policy Research Methodology – to develop your knowledge and understanding of the methodologies (philosophic frameworks) employed in policy research, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as the merits of particular quantitative and qualitative methods.

Each of these generic units carry 18 credits and are assessed with an 8,000 assignment or equivalent. Successful completion of these units would normally entitle you to the PG Certificate exit award if appropriate.

- Specialist streams:
Over the subsequent two years you elect two specialised units, relevant to their field of practice, from a choice of up to four units. These are designed to enable you to develop and hone specific interests towards the conduct of supervised research: current optional units are listed below. The five initial units are:

- international development policy
- education policy
- health policy
- technology policy
- social policy (awaiting final approval).

Each specialist unit carries 18 credits and is assessed by an 8,000 word assignment.

You will be asked to choose a specialist unit in the first year, while undertaking your core modules so that teaching resources can be planned for the following year.

- Research enquiry:
You will spend the final three years of your study developing a supervised research enquiry. Supervision is primarily provided virtually over this period but it would normally be expected that you adhere to a minimum number of face-to-face contact hours. We also provide other online support for you during this time including webinars and online forums.

About the IPR

The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) brings together many of the University’s research strengths to foster inter-disciplinary research of international excellence and impact. It bridges the worlds of research, policy and professional practice to enable us to address some of the major policy challenges we face on a local, national and global scale.

Read more (http://www.bath.ac.uk/ipr/)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/index.html

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We offer research programmes in a variety of areas including Advanced Separations Engineering, Bioprocessing Research Unit, Reaction and Catalytic Engineering and Water and Wastewater engineering. Read more
We offer research programmes in a variety of areas including Advanced Separations Engineering, Bioprocessing Research Unit, Reaction and Catalytic Engineering and Water and Wastewater engineering.

Our philosophy

The Department of Chemical Engineering is a multidisciplinary centre focusing on research into future sustainable materials and technologies. Chemical engineering research is crucial and supports development and production of new materials, fuels, drugs, consumer products, health care products, foods and beverages, electronic components, medical implants, and more.

As the number and complexity of chemical, biochemical and biological materials used in consumer products and supporting technologies increases, this research will play an increasingly vital role in the development of modern societies across the world.

Our applicants

We seek applications from outstanding individuals from anywhere in the world who are strongly committed to and potentially capable of high-quality academic research in any of the disciplinary areas covered by our Research Centres. You can apply for one of our pre-defined research projects or develop your own proposal. Our academic staff are always open to ideas that extend existing work or introduce new topics to their subject areas.

The dissemination of research findings is seen as a vital component of the research process and graduate students are encouraged to prepare papers for publication as part of their research training.

Successful applicants are welcomed very much as junior academic colleagues rather than students, and are expected to play a full and professional role in contributing to the Department’s objective of international academic excellence.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/chemphd/index.html

Structure

The MPhil programme combines taught research training and applied research practice.

Candidates join the Department as a member of the Research Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/chem-eng/research/index.html) in which they initially have a broad research interest and that will have overseen their acceptance into the Department.

Candidates are expected to carry out supervised research at the leading edge of their chosen subject, which must then be written up as a substantial thesis.

International students

Please see the International students website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/international/) for details of entry requirements based on qualifications from your country.

In addition all non-native speakers of English are required to have passed English language tests as follows.

If you need to develop your English language skills, the University’s Academic Skills Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/asc/) offers a number of courses.

Only English language tests taken in the last two years are valid for entrance purposes.

About the department

This is a dynamic department, actively pursuing advanced research in many areas of chemical, biochemical and biomedical engineering, and also offering taught Masters courses. The Department is internationally recognised for its contributions to research, many of which are achieved in partnership with industry and prestigious research organisations. Our staff are highly skilled with excellent international reputations, and our facilities are amongst the best in the country.

Facilities and equipment
The Department has a full range of research facilities with pilot plants for all major areas of research. Our analytical facilities include gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), UV-VIS, FTIR and Raman, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), microcalorimetry, adsorption measurement systems, surface and pore structure analysis systems and particle sizing equipment. Within the University, there is access to atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopes.

International and industrial links
We have active links with UK universities - Bristol, Durham, Glasgow, Leeds, Imperial College, Liverpool, Oxford, Cambridge, Southampton, Edinburgh - and with European institutions including the CNRS laboratory at Toulouse and Lappeenranta University of Technology in Finland together with the Universities of Alicante, Delft, Oveido, Porto, Paris, Aachen and Wroclaw.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

Careers information
We are committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their research training including personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and career management. Most of our graduates take up research, consultancy or process and product development and managerial appointments in the commercial sector, or in universities or research institutes.

Other resources
Postgraduate students are encouraged to become members of professional societies and to present the results of their research at national and international scientific meetings. The Department runs a vibrant weekly research seminar programme where students are given the opportunity to present their research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/index.html

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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. Read more
This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. In contrast to our MRes programmes in Sport and Exercise Physiology and Psychology, this programme gives students the option to study elements of both physiology and psychology. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. In order to place their highly specialised knowledge into a more holistic perspective, students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules
In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Clinical Exercise Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Performance Physiology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
Built on a solid research foundation, the curriculum offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules enabling you to tailor the programme to your own specific interests. Read more
Built on a solid research foundation, the curriculum offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules enabling you to tailor the programme to your own specific interests. The MA Language and Linguistics also offers a broad-based but advanced introduction for those new to the study of language, linguistics and communication, as well as building on topics that will be familiar to those who studied language and linguistics an undergraduate level.

The MA in Language and Linguistics enables you to develop knowledge and research skills over the course of the programme. We support you to become an independent and active learner, able to understand key issues in the different sub-fields of language and linguistics. Throughout the course you will improve your research skills by being given specific training in research methodology, planning your own work and being involved in ongoing research projects led by various members of staff. You will also gain a thorough understanding of different theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used to explore the linguistic structures of a language.

We develop your ability to undertake linguistic analysis confidently and effectively; to collect, evaluate, synthesise and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data; and to critique arguments and research. The curriculum also develops important work-related skills, such as the ability to communicate clearly and persuasively and to work both independently and in collaboration with others.

The structure of the MA enables you to develop expertise in specific areas of linguistics and language study. Particular strengths in the Centre for Language and Communication Research are discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, systemic functional linguistics, corpus linguistics, forensic linguistics, intercultural communication and professional communication. The wide range of subject modules available ensures that you develop a strong foundation in the discipline area whilst also having the flexibility to pursue your own specific research interests within that area.

We aim to give our students experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the Centre is home to world-leading research in linguistics and communication.

Distinctive features

• Access to an established research training programme making it possible to continue to PhD, should you wish

• Provision of an integrated foundation in research activities and bases in order that you are prepared for research activities

• Hands-on experience of working on an established staff research project in order to gain practical insights into the ways that research works in authentic team contexts

• Optional modules which form the bulk of the programme and provide a vital foundation for later dissertation-writing

• Situated in the lively Centre for Language and Communication Research, where we regularly host talks from visiting academics from around the world, Advanced Research Residencies and Summer Schools, and where a range of reading and research groups run on topics including sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, systemic functional linguistics and forensic linguistics.

Structure

The programme is offered in full-time mode over one academic year or part-time mode in two years. You will need to complete 180 credits - 120 credits in taught modules and 60 credits in the dissertation. The dissertation can only be undertaken on successful completion of the taught element of the course. Each stage is weighted at 50% of the overall mark.

In the taught stage, you will take a mixture of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits. The core module base is focussed on research training and experience.

You will submit a proposal for the dissertation during the latter part of the taught stage. This proposal must be accepted before undertaking the dissertation.

Core modules:

Language Testing and Assessment (part-time only)
Qualitative Research Methods
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics (part-time only)
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy
Digital Literacies

Teaching

During the taught stage, you will be taught mostly through weekly seminars / workshops, where you will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of particular topics related to language and linguistics.

You will be able to discuss concepts and ideas in small groups and open class discussions, to consolidate and get feedback on your individual learning, and to develop communication skills in informal group discussions and oral presentations.

Depending on your prior experience, you might be encouraged to attend the lectures for various undergraduate modules as well. You will be taught through weekly or fortnightly supervision sessions in Research Experience. These will offer the opportunity for structured but independent learning of practical skills. Teaching will be varied and responsive.

All modules within the MA in Language and Linguistics make extensive use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central, where you can access discussion forums and find course materials.

During the dissertation stage, you will conduct independent research on a topic of your choice with regular supervision from a member of staff.

Assessment

The taught modules within this programme are assessed through a variety of methods, including academic essays, linguistic analyses, analytical reports, research projects and oral presentations. Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will often be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest.

The emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments.

Career prospects

This programme will offer preparation for all careers where language is used for any purpose, for example, to influence or persuade, inform, educate or entertain. Gaining an MA will demonstrate higher abilities in research and communication.

Examples of future work destinations include research, teaching, speech and language therapy, publishing, writing, editing, information design, librarianship, as well as professional jobs, such as banking and HR, and public sector jobs, such as those in the civil service or local government. However, the degree is not limited to these possible directions and offers a good preparation for roles in a variety of fields which involve reasoning, critical and evaluative work, verbal and written skills, assimilation of information, communicative skills such as an awareness of linguistic variation, as well as some quantitative skills and skills in presenting information using technology.

You may also choose to undertake further study in the form of a PhD.

Placements

The Research Experience module offers the opportunity to work with a member of staff on an ongoing, authentic research task within part of a larger research study. This is a distinctive form of study and offers the opportunity to gain hands-on research experience and to reflect systematically on that experience. Findings from the Research Experience module will feed directly into ongoing work in the Centre for Language and Communication Research.

There are no formal study abroad opportunities associated with this programme

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The MSc and MRes Psychological Research Methods has been designed specifically to prepare graduates in Psychology or related disciplines for;. Read more
The MSc and MRes Psychological Research Methods has been designed specifically to prepare graduates in Psychology or related disciplines for;

- a PhD degree
- research related careers in academic or applied psychological disciplines
- careers in which data handling and analytical skills are of relevance.
- Students also complete the course as a means of improving their research skills in preparation for further training as a professional psychologist (often as a clinical or educational psychologist).

Both awards are equivalent, although the MSc has a larger taught component whilst the MRes places greater emphasis on the conduct of independent research. You may wish to apply to the MSc in Psychological Research Methods in the first instance and then you can make a choice of award later, in conjunction with the Course Leader and teaching team.

What will you study?

In Term One, all full-time MRes and MSc students complete the same core modules which may include:

Advanced Experimentation and Statistics (One)
Psychometrics (One): Developing Psychometric Scales development in Research and Practice
Qualitative Research Design and Analysis (One)
Research and Professional Skills
Observational Methods

In Term Two, students pursuing the MSc award will complete five more taught modules. MRes students complete just two modules of their choice, allowing them to concentrate exclusively on quantitative / psychometric methods or qualitative methods. You also complete a larger empirical research project (worth 100 credits) under the supervision of a research active member of staff. Modules may include:

Advanced Experimentation and Statistics (Two)
Psychometrics (Two): Developing Psychometric Scales development in Research and Practice
Qualitative Research Design and Analysis (Two)
Testing Psychological Theories using SEM
Research and Professional Skills (Two)

You will also complete an extended essay on a methodological topic of your choice and an empirical research project (Worth 60 credits), both under the supervision of a research active member of staff.

- Specialist Psychological Research Methods Essay (MSc only)
- Psychology Research Project

For more information about the modules you may study on this course visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/researchmethods

Facilities

The University has made significant financial investment in the Psychology Division over recent years upgrading accommodation, facilities and equipment used exclusively for the provision of our psychology courses and for research. We have a first class undergraduate teaching laboratory suite and a second teaching laboratory specifically catering for postgraduate students.

In addition there are specialist suites dedicated to particular areas of interest in psychology, including:

social interaction, group work and interviewing
computer gaming and cyberpsychology
eye-tracking
cognitive modelling and visual analysis
psychophysiology.

Alongside these are new flexible cubicles for student project work, a psychometric test bank library, and a technical workshop.

Delivery and assessments

You will be assessed in a variety of ways and on a modular basis through: examinations, coursework, essays, laboratory reports,
oral presentations, research project. The course adopts a pragmatic approach to research, arguing that all research methods and approaches, whether quantitative, psychometric, qualitative, or mixed, should be attuned to the subject-matter and the nature of the research hypothesis or question to be answered. Offering a balanced appreciation of all methodological approaches, their relative strengths and weaknesses, the course will leave you equipped to conduct research in any area of psychology.

Careers

On graduation, you will possess the methodological and practical knowledge required to realise your potential as an independent researcher in various fields of Psychology or in closely related disciplines.

Many of our graduates have gone on to pursue an academic and / or research career in various areas of psychology (by working as a research assistant or associate, for example, or by studying for a PhD). You may choose to use your research methods qualification as a stepping stone to undertaking further training as a professional psychologist (for example, in forensic, clinical, and educational psychology) or to secure careers in data handling and analysis outside psychology.

Your qualification is likely to be popular with many employers because you will have demonstrated an ability to write essays and reports, to master advanced methods of data analysis and to talk and present in front of other people.

Careers and job application advice is available to all our postgraduate students and is provided on a one-to-one basis by a subject specialist within the Division, supported by the University-wide careers service. We're very proud of the achievements of our many graduates and look forward to helping you achieve a successful career in psychology (for example, in industry or the civil service).

Scholarships

The School of Social Sciences offers a number of competitive scholarships for our full-time and part-time Masters courses. For more information please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3scholarships

Want to find out more? Come along to one of our postgraduate Open Evenings. For further details please visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3events

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MSc degree courses are provided in three key areas of Analytical Chemistry, Environmental Analytical Chemistry and in Pharmaceutical Analysis. Read more
MSc degree courses are provided in three key areas of Analytical Chemistry, Environmental Analytical Chemistry and in Pharmaceutical Analysis. They are designed to provide advanced knowledge and hands-on training in modern analytical instrumental techniques. Separation science, sensors, and spectroscopic techniques are key elements alongside chemometrics, instrumentation and advanced research project completion. You will have the flexibility to specialise in a chosen field and further advancement to PhD research is available to highly motivated and talented postgraduates.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr03/

Course Details

On completion of this course, you will be able to:

- identify, formulate, analyse and solve problems in the analysis of chemical compounds
- outline fundamental and applied aspects of chemical analysis
- design and carry out a method of pharmaceutical and chemical analysis, including instrumental analysis
- prepare written laboratory reports that provide a description of the experiment, explain the experiment and reasoning clearly, and provide an appropriate conclusion
- communicate effectively with the chemistry, environmental and pharmaceutical communities
- carry out research and method development in chemical, pharmaceutical and environmental analysis
- prepare a written research report in the form of a dissertation

Format

The courses consist of a 12 month full-time intensive programme of lectures, laboratory work on set experiments and a dissertation based on individual research and development in the selected field of modern analytical science, under the supervision of an expert staff member. Part-time students may complete the course over 24 months subject to flexible day release from industry.

Core modules

CM6012 Modern Analytical Techniques, Chemical Data Analysis and GLP (10 credits)
CM6013 Separation Science, Sensors and Process Analytical Technology (10 credits)
CM6014 Materials, Pharmaceutical and Bio-analysis (10 credits)
CM6015 Practice of Analytical Chemistry (10 credits)
CM6026 Industry Led Workshops (5 credits)
CM6027 Taught Postgraduate Transferable Skills Development (5 credits)

Elective modules

EV4002 Environmental Monitoring (10 credits)
PF6301 Biopharmaceuticals: Formulation Design, Secondary Processing and Regulatory Compliance (10 credits)

Research Project Module (30 credits)

CM6020 Research Project and Dissertation in Analytical Chemistry (30 credits)

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/science/page05.html#analysis

Research Project and Industry Placement

You will be required to complete a six-month research project based on your individual research and development in a selected field of modern science. You carry out your research in UCC’s laboratories or at an approved academic or industrial partner.

When you complete your research dissertation in an industrial setting, it provides the company with an opportunity to assess your skills and abilities and to screen potential future full-time employees. Students also have the opportunity to travel aboard to do their research project. This highlights the international recognition of the course and the close links established between the course and the relevant institutes.

Students who secure employment upon graduation fit into the organisation and contribute productively much sooner that other graduates. For students with an interest in future careers as PhD researchers, research projects are offered across a broad range of topics.

Careers

The MSc courses aim to provide you with the necessary skill set to develop methods and solve problems as demanded by many industries today (including pharmaceutical, environmental and forensic analytical laboratories). You are also introduced to research and innovation in analytical science.

Many analytical chemists, pharmaceutical chemical analysts and environmental chemical analysts go on to pursue careers in industry, government and forensic laboratories and opportunities for further research often result.

The course sets out to bridge the gap between the current undergraduate degree knowledge and what is relevant and expected by industry. There is a strong emphasis on developing transferable skills and ensuring that the career path for the student is either industry or academically focused. A large percentage of students gain employment in industry after completion of the course, however a number of graduates also decide to progress to international PhD opportunities.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

Read less
MSc degree courses are provided in three key areas of Analytical Chemistry, Environmental Analytical Chemistry and in Pharmaceutical Analysis. Read more
MSc degree courses are provided in three key areas of Analytical Chemistry, Environmental Analytical Chemistry and in Pharmaceutical Analysis. They are designed to provide advanced knowledge and hands-on training in modern analytical instrumental techniques. Separation science, sensors, and spectroscopic techniques are key elements alongside chemometrics, instrumentation and advanced research project completion. You will have the flexibility to specialise in a chosen field and further advancement to PhD research is available to highly motivated and talented postgraduates.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr04/

Course Details

On completion of this course, you will be able to:

- identify, formulate, analyse and solve problems in the analysis of chemical compounds
- outline fundamental and applied aspects of chemical analysis
- design and carry out a method of pharmaceutical and chemical analysis, including instrumental analysis
- prepare written laboratory reports that provide a description of the experiment, explain the experiment and reasoning clearly, and provide an appropriate conclusion
- communicate effectively with the chemistry, environmental and pharmaceutical communities
- carry out research and method development in chemical, pharmaceutical and environmental analysis
- prepare a written research report in the form of a dissertation

Format

The courses consist of a 12 month full-time intensive programme of lectures, laboratory work on set experiments and a dissertation based on individual research and development in the selected field of modern analytical science, under the supervision of an expert staff member. Part-time students may complete the course over 24 months subject to flexible day release from industry.

Core modules

CM6012 Modern Analytical Techniques, Chemical Data Analysis and GLP (10 credits)
CM6013 Separation Science, Sensors and Process Analytical Technology (10 credits)
CM6014 Materials, Pharmaceutical and Bio-analysis (10 credits)
CM6015 Practice of Analytical Chemistry (10 credits)
CM6027 Industry Led Workshops (5 credits)
CM6027 Taught Postgraduate Transferable Skills Development (5 credits)
EV4002 Environmental Monitoring (10 credits)

Research Project Module (30 credits)

CM6021 Research Project and Dissertation in Environmental Analytical Chemistry (30 credits)

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/science/page05.html#analysis

Research Project and Industry Placement

You will be required to complete a six-month research project based on your individual research and development in a selected field of modern science. You carry out your research in UCC’s laboratories or at an approved academic or industrial partner.

When you complete your research dissertation in an industrial setting, it provides the company with an opportunity to assess your skills and abilities and to screen potential future full-time employees. Students also have the opportunity to travel aboard to do their research project. This highlights the international recognition of the course and the close links established between the course and the relevant institutes.

Students who secure employment upon graduation fit into the organisation and contribute productively much sooner that other graduates. For students with an interest in future careers as PhD researchers, research projects are offered across a broad range of topics.

Careers

The MSc courses aim to provide you with the necessary skill set to develop methods and solve problems as demanded by many industries today (including pharmaceutical, environmental and forensic analytical laboratories). You are also introduced to research and innovation in analytical science.

Many analytical chemists, pharmaceutical chemical analysts and environmental chemical analysts go on to pursue careers in industry, government and forensic laboratories and opportunities for further research often result.

The course sets out to bridge the gap between the current undergraduate degree knowledge and what is relevant and expected by industry. There is a strong emphasis on developing transferable skills and ensuring that the career path for the student is either industry or academically focused. A large percentage of students gain employment in industry after completion of the course, however a number of graduates also decide to progress to international PhD opportunities.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The work-based Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is aimed at Senior Practitioners engaged in health, social work or higher education. Read more
The work-based Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is aimed at Senior Practitioners engaged in health, social work or higher education. Equivalent to the traditional PhD, the DProf in Professional Practice is an innovative blend of taught modules and research projects which investigates the students own sphere of professional practice and workplace.

Studying for a DProf is a truly challenging and deeply rewarding experience, and Swansea University provides an excellent environment in which to pursue your research studies in Professional Practice.

Key Features of DProf in Professional Practice

A research degree in Professional Practice gives you the chance to pursue a research project based around your own passions and interests, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career, boost employment prospects outside academia, or enhance your existing skill set.

The Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is the equivalent of a PhD, but differs in that it incorporates a training element along with three, theme-based, research projects which are focused on your own practice and workplace. This means you do not need to take time out of work to upgrade your qualifications.

Key features of the Professional Practice DProf include:

- Two compulsory research training modules of 30 credits each: ‘Introduction to Work-based Research in Professional Practice’ and ‘Planning Work-based Research’.
- A focus on identifying, planning, implementing and evaluating three work-based research projects.
- Pursuing research in Professional Practice which is of relevance to your workplace and role.
- An environment in which you can develop and enhance transferable skills such as problem solving, independent thinking, project management, and critical thinking.
- The support of two academic supervisors throughout your studies in Professional Practice.
- The availability of structured training, interdisciplinary seminars, dedicated research facilities and software from both the College and University.
- Support from a dynamic community of research staff and students each pursuing their own lines of research.

The most recent UK-wide assessment of the quality of research in HEI’s (the Research Assessment Exercise 2008), revealed that 70% of the research carried out by the College was of international or world-leading quality. With our research into the health disciplines demonstrating outstanding quality in originality, significance and rigour, students can be assured that they will be immersed in the dynamic and supportive research culture needed for their studies including the DProf in Professional Practice.

The DProf in Professional Practice is only offered on a part-time basis lasting six years in duration, and is open only to UK based students.

Drawing on cutting edge research, the College of Human and Health Sciences is bringing about real-life benefits for the healthcare, social care, voluntary and private sectors, ultimately leading to improvements for patients, users, practitioners, managers and policy makers.

As a forerunner in the field, the College is well placed to respond rapidly to changes in the delivery of care, whilst also establishing links with the main service providers in Wales, such as the NHS. Our researchers are continually working to tackle the challenges facing the health and social care system across the full range of areas, from biomedical studies, service organisation, workforce practices and public health through to policy and ethics.

Currently Professional Practice students are looking at effecting change in an elderly rehabilitation service, creating, implementing and evaluating an equitable lymphoedema service in Wales.

Facilities

Professional Practice students benefit from the College of Human and Health Sciences' state-of-the-art facilities including:

- Simulated clinical practice facilities and bioscience practice rooms, for realistic workplace experiences.
- Specialised psychology laboratories hosting a sleep laboratory; computer controlled visual and auditory displays for work on perception, attention, memory and language; an eye movement laboratory; fMRI brain scanner; EEG facilities and a nutrition laboratory.

We also have access to many different facilities and further equipment at organisations that we work closely with, such as the NHS.

Other resources include:

- Service Users and Carers Group which can help in providing essential advice or improving engagement between your research project and the user community.
- Structured training programmes, interdisciplinary seminars from worldwide speakers, dedicated research/study facilities and specialist analytical software.

As well as being immersed in the vibrant research community of the College and its research groups, you will also be able to access wider support and advice through the research networks staff are involved in, such as,

- Wales Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience
- Older Person and Ageing Network Cymru (OPAN):
- Welsh Health Economic Support Service (WHESS):

Research

Delivering high quality research is a key step in enhancing the health, social and economic well-being of all sections of society. It is essential that decisions on policy and practice are informed by the latest research findings and evidence available if we hope to improve organisational effectiveness and sustainability, social welfare and cohesion, and quality of life.

Through our cutting edge research, the College of Human and Health Sciences is bringing about real-life benefits for the health care, social care, voluntary and private sectors, ultimately leading to improvements for patients, users, practitioners, managers and policy makers.

As a forerunner in the field, the College is well-placed to respond rapidly to changes in the delivery of care, whilst also establishing links with the main service providers in Wales, such as the NHS and Local Authorities.

Our research is delivered through discipline focused research centres. In doing so, we have secured funding from a number of prestigious collaborators and funding bodies in recent years such as the Welsh Government, NHS Wales, Public Health Wales; European Union; Amgen Europe; Ministry of Defence; GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; British Medical Association; National Institute for Social Care and Health Research; Astrazeneca; and the Wellcome Trust. These collaborations have been crucial in ensuring research informs, and is informed by, the wider healthcare environment.

Student Profile

Meet Wendy Mashlan, Doctorate in Professional Practice: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/media/Wendy%20Mashlan.pdf

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The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year course that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Read more

Introduction

The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year course that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions.

The Master's of Research (MRes) is designed
- to enable students to become well-trained historians
and
- to demonstrate their fitness to undertake research to doctoral level at Stirling or other universities in Britain and overseas. Both are achieved through the completion of independent study modules, field seminars and skills training, under supervision.

There are four variants of the MRes in Historical Research:
- MRes in Historical Research: The American Revolutionary Era
- MRes in Historial Research: Medieval Scottish History
- MRes in Historical Research: Environmental History
- MRes in HIstorical Research: Modern European History and Politics

Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs.

Accreditation

The MRes programme and all constituent modules are constructed in line with the University's academic procedures and are fully assessed and externally examined. The programme is recognised by both the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council both of whom have given PhD awards to outstanding Stirling graduates of the MRes.

Key information

- Degree type: MRes
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time: 12 months Part-time: 24 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Jim Smyth

Course objectives

This programme prepares you for further research:
- to co-ordinate the provision of additional or external skills training and to develop the application of research skills
- students will obtain practical experience of devising and applying a research method to interrogate primary sources
- qualitative and quantitative analyses
- the application of IT in information retrieval, especially bibliographical database software,
- communication skills, written and oral
- project design involving the conceptualisation of research questions and the presentation of data and data analysis

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

The MRes has been designed with three career destinations in mind:
- to prepare graduate students for further research at doctoral level
- as a route to an academic career
- as a higher degree in its own right

The MRes will also enhance continuing professional development, particularly in teaching, journalism, marketing, and heritage management through in-depth study of particular fields; by aiming to develop critical analytical skills and research techniques, the programme provides preparation for a wide variety of research-based careers in the public and private sectors.
Most of our graduates go on to study for a PhD either by continuing at Stirling or at another University in the UK, Europe or North America. Recent graduates have secured posts in firms and institutions as varied as Historic Scotland, Sea World, and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl).

Chances to expand your horizons
There is a lively series of guest lectures which students can attend on this programme.

Where are our graduates now?
The MRes has been designed with three career destinations in mind:
- to prepare graduate students for further research at doctoral level and as a route to an academic career
- as a higher degree in its own right
- to enhance continuing professional development, particularly in teaching, journalism, marketing, and heritage management through in-depth study of particular fields; by aiming to develop critical analytical skills and research techniques, the programme provides preparation for a wide variety of research-based careers in the public and private sectors

Employability

Skills you can develop through this programme
- command of a substantial body of historical knowledge
- understand how people have existed, acted and thought in the context of the past
- read and use texts and other source materials critically and empathetically
- appreciate the complexity and diversity of situations, events and past mentalities
- recognise there are ways of testing statements and that there are rules of evidence which require integrity and maturity
- reflect critically on the nature and theoretical underpinnings of the discipline
- marshall an argument, be self-disciplined and independent intellectually
- express themselves orally and in writing with coherence, clarity and fluency
- gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information
- analyse and solve problems
- use effectively ICT, information retrieval and presentation skills
- exercise self-discipline, self-direction and initiative
- work with others and have respect for others’ reasoned views
- show empathy and imaginative insight
- prepare for further academic research such as a Phd

In addition, our students have the opportunity to further develop their transferable skills through voluntary internships working on collections of material held within the Division (The Scottish Political Archive and the University's own archive (e.g. UNESCO recognised Royal Scottish National Institution for mentally disabled children).

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Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

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