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Masters Degrees (Analytic Philosophy)

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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. Read more

This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, including such core areas as metaphysics, ethics, social and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

  • If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
  • If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
  • We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, metaphysics, epistemology – including virtue epistemology - and philosophy of mathematics.
  • You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
  • MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy as well as by externally funded events in (among other areas) epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
  • Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:

1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):

  • Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty 
  • Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
  • Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
  • Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
  • Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
  • Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
  • Epistemology: the nature and scope of human knowledge
  • Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
  • Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
  • Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills. 

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts. 

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.



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Philosophy tackles some of the deepest and most complex questions about humanity and its place in the world. This programme will allow you to study the key debates, trends and approaches in different areas of philosophy while improving your skills in research and critical analysis. Read more

Philosophy tackles some of the deepest and most complex questions about humanity and its place in the world. This programme will allow you to study the key debates, trends and approaches in different areas of philosophy while improving your skills in research and critical analysis.

Core modules will give you an overview of different topics in analytic philosophy, from philosophy of mind, religion, language and science to epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and metaphysics. You’ll also choose from a variety of modules specialising in the areas and topics that interest you the most.

You’ll be supported by active researchers in a stimulating environment based around our six research centres, with access to excellent library resources covering a broad span of subjects. It’s an excellent opportunity to gain diverse skills for a wide range of careers, as well as further study.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Throughout the course you’ll take two core modules introducing you to different topics, approaches and methods in areas of analytic philosophy. You’ll explore current and historical debates in subfields including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, ethics, metaethics, aesthetics, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of science— all while improving your skills in research and critical thinking.

From this foundation, you’ll build specialist knowledge in areas that particularly interest you with your choice of optional modules. You can take an upper-level undergraduate module (with boosted assessment requirements) to fill gaps in your background knowledge, sign up for an independent study, or choose from several MA modules the School has to offer.

You’ll continue to specialise when you complete your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that allows you to showcase the skills and knowledge you’ve gained. You can choose to swap one of your optional modules to extend your dissertation if you want to go into even more depth.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

You’ll study three compulsory modules including your dissertation, as well as a single optional module. If you choose the standard dissertation (60 credits) rather than the extended dissertation (90 credits), you can take a further optional module.

  • Analytic Philosophy A 30 credits
  • Analytic Philosophy B 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Special Options in Philosophy A 30 credits
  • Independent Study A 30 credits
  • Independent Study B 30 credits
  • Special Options in Philosophy B 30 credits
  • Topics in the Philosophy of Physics 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • Advanced Topics in Realism and Representation in Science 30 credits
  • Advanced Topics in Metaphysics of Science 30 credits
  • Philosophy of Science: Classic Debates & Current Trends 30 credits
  • Metaphysical Issues in Philosophy of Religion 30 credits
  • Contemporary Readings in Philosophy of Religion 30 credits
  • Sin, Public Discourse and Public Life 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits
  • Theology and Public Life 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our modules are taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, where you can discuss the issues arising from your reading with fellow students and your tutor. You’ll also have one-to-one supervisions while you work on your dissertation. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

We use different forms of assessment, including essays, seminar participation and your dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a range of in-depth subject knowledge, but it will allow you to develop high-level skills in research, analysis, interpretation and communication.

All of these qualities are valuable to a range of employers across sectors and industries, and we’re proud of our record in preparing postgraduates for their careers after graduation. They’ve gone into roles such as teaching, consultancy, business management, administration, accountancy, law, journalism and the civil service among others.

Many of our graduates also progress to further study, and ultimately pursue academic careers.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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Our Philosophy MSc offers you the opportunity to work closely with our staff in courses based upon their own expertise and current research. Read more

Our Philosophy MSc offers you the opportunity to work closely with our staff in courses based upon their own expertise and current research. It will introduce you to the cutting edge of recent developments in analytic philosophy, from the practical and applied, to the most theoretical end of the subject. 

Why this programme

  • The extraordinary amount of staff time and personalised attention that students on our Philosophy MSc programme receive makes this degree exceptional. Its courses are designed to reflect the developments at the forefront of the discipline, drawing upon the extensive and internationally recognised expertise of our staff in metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, ethics and political philosophy. 
  • Our courses are closely connected with research activity of both individual members of staff and the collaborative undertakings of the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience, the Forum for Philosophy and Religion, and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy.
  • MSc students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by these bodies. They will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students also present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
  • Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The degree consists of a choice of a choice of four semester-length courses across a range of philosophical topics, all driven by the cutting edge research of our professors and lecturers. There is also a 10-15000 word dissertation to be completed on a topic of your choice, supported by an expert supervisor over the summer.

We always offer the following courses: 

  • Metaphysics A (semester 1) and B (semester 2)
  • Philosophy of Language  A (semester 1) and B (semester 2)
  • Political Philosophy  A (semester 1) and B (semester 2)
  • Ethics A (semester 1) and B (semester 2)
  • Philosophy of Mind A (semester 1) and B (semester 2)

Students may either choose two topics and complete both semester-length courses in that topic (e.g. Metaphysics A and B and Philosophy of Language A and B) or choose semester-length courses in several topics (e.g. Ethics A and B, Philosophy of Mind A and Political Philosophy B). 

New courses are planned for 2016-17 (subject to approval) in the following topics: 

History of Analytic Philosophy including Wittgenstein and Quine A (semester 1) and B (semester 2).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills.

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts.

This degree also provides an exceptional foundation for philosophical research at the doctoral level.



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What is the meaning of existence? This is just one of the philosophical questions you’ll explore at Leuven's renowned Institute of Philosophy. Read more

What is the meaning of existence? This is just one of the philosophical questions you’ll explore at Leuven's renowned Institute of Philosophy. Its Master of Arts in Philosophy (MA) programme crosses the boundaries of all philosophical disciplines, traditions, and approaches to help you form your own well-rounded view. The programme aims to develop students' knowledge of philosophy by exposing them to more advanced study of the central issues of the subject and by equipping them with the requisite research skills needed to proceed to a higher degree.

What is the Master of Philosophy all about?

The Institute of Philosophy offers a comprehensive range of BA, MA, Research Master and PhD degrees, all taught in English. Viewed collectively, our undergraduate and post-graduate degrees aim to familiarise students with the history of philosophy as well as with contemporary movements in analytic and continental philosophy so that they are able to engage with the fundamental areas of philosophical research. The Institute of Philosophy is proud to offer its students a broad philosophical education and a wide range of courses and seminars, as well as personalised study support and guidance.

The aim of the MA programme is to deepen students’ knowledge of philosophy by exposing them to more advanced study of the central issues of the subject and by equipping them with the requisite research skills needed to proceed to a higher degree. The programme is comprehensive and at the same time allows students to begin to develop their own specialisation. 

This is a programme that can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The Master of Arts in Philosophy is a one-year programme of 60 ECTS Credits. With regard to its structure, the MA provides a broad range of both historical and systematic Core Courses which, together with elective courses, guarantee the comprehensiveness of the programme. Yet, the programme structure allows students to deepen their knowledge in a particular philosophical domain or period, thus laying the basis for their future specialisation.

The Master’s Thesis is a key part of the programme, where students demonstrate their research, writing and argumentative skills, as well as thorough insight in the chosen research question and the correct use of primary and secondary sources. Students are encouraged to present their thesis research to the international audience of fellow students, permanent teaching staff and young researchers associated with the institute at the yearly Graduate Student Conference. The Institute of Philosophy has hosted the conference with much success for more than seven years now. For help with the writing process or preparing a presentation, students can turn to the HIW Writing Lab.

International

Philosophy has been taught at KU Leuven since its founding in 1425. Throughout the centuries, the university has remained an important and influential centre of philosophical thought, with a strong commitment to the international dimension of education. In more recent times, the Institute of Philosophy, established in 1889, has continued this august tradition and is now an internationally recognised centre of philosophical research and education.

The Institute of Philosophy is international in every sense of the word.

  • It offers a complete programme of philosophical studies in English, in addition to a complete programme in Dutch.
  • It has its roots in the eminent tradition of European continental philosophy. In recent years, however, it has embraced other philosophical traditions ranging from Anglo-American thought to non-Western philosophy. The Institute is truly committed to philosophical pluralism.
  • Members of its teaching staff come from, among others, the USA, Italy, the Netherlands, Germany, and South-Africa.
  • It attracts visiting scholars and students from all over the world. Some 70 different nationalities are represented.
  • It has Erasmus+ exchange agreements with more than 40 European universities, including universities in Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Paris, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Madrid, Siena and Istanbul. Master students who did the BA Philosophy at KU Leuven have the opportunity to study at a foreign partner university for one semester, in either the first or the second semester. 
  • With 5 research centres, some 40 full-time staff and more than 150 adjunct faculty members, post-docs and doctoral students, it is among the largest research groups in philosophy on the continent.
  • It hosts several international conferences every year with widely varying themes and involving a mix of well-established and up-and-coming philosophers from near and far.
  • It has one of the finest philosophical libraries in the world. The library contains more than 90,000 volumes and maintains subscriptions to more than 300 journals. It is user-friendly, with open stacks, a liberal lending policy, extensive electronic resources and an online catalogue.
  • In 2017 the Institute of Philosophy was ranked 30th in the world among philosophy programmes (QS World University Rankings).

Career perspectives

Graduates in philosophy go on to careers in many different sectors, including business, civil service, politics, education, publishing, media, the socio-cultural sector, journalism, academia ...

Many employers seek candidates who are not only well grounded in a specific field, but are also able to handle the diverse challenges arising in a fast-paced workplace. Graduates in philosophy are well positioned to think clearly and respond effectively in the workplace.



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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Specifically dedicated to continental philosophical approaches to creativity and imagination, this programme is one of a kind in the UK. Read more
Specifically dedicated to continental philosophical approaches to creativity and imagination, this programme is one of a kind in the UK. It is designed to provide you with an understanding of the roles of creativity and imagination in artistic, social and cultural contexts. You will be encouraged to think critically about the ways in which creativity and imagination have been neglected concepts and how they are immensely relevant today in understanding our historical situation.

Why study Philosophy at Dundee?

This programme provides a year-long study on philosophical approaches to understanding the nature of creativity and its significance within recent social and cultural contexts. It mainly focuses on Continental philosophy, with particular emphasis, for example, on Deleuze, Foucault, Gadamer, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Ricoeur and Sartre. Topics of study include faculties of imagination, idleness and leisure, the image, phenomenology of the imagination, the origin of art, play, and the unconscious.

In addition to engaging with a variety of key sources in Continental philosophy, students will also explore related areas, such as psychoanalysis, sociology and theology. This course is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about Philosophy at Dundee?

As a student in the Philosophy department, you will be a member of an active postgraduate community where students regularly participate in research seminars, reading groups and conferences.

Philosophy's Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminars are a forum for MLitt, MPhil and PhD students to present and discuss their work. Students are also encouraged to organise and participate in specialist reading groups. In recent years, staff and students have met to examine Kant's Critique of Judgement, Schopenhauer's World as Will and Representation, and Deleuze's Francis Bacon: the logic of sensation.

There are also regular research seminars, with papers given by invited international and UK speakers, reflecting the Philosophy Section's research specialisms in both continental and analytic fields.

Who should study this course?

This programme is ideal for if you wish to pursue doctoral studies in continental philosophy in relation to aesthetics, art, the philosophy of technology, and socio-political problems. It is also well suited to students training to be artists and wishing to gain a better understanding of philosophical examinations of artistic practices. You are not expected to have a previous degree in philosophy. However, you should be prepared to think and write philosophically with respect to close analysis of texts and the formulation of your own arguments.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised research, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups. Students will be supervised on a yearlong module in an area of research independently selected by the student. Learning methods will include essay assessments, abstracts, and an annotated bibliography. Non-assessed methods include oral presentations at seminars and an annual conference hosted by the School of Humanities.

What you will study

Students take the following core modules and the Philosophy dissertation.

Philosophies of Imagination
Economies of Creativity
Self-Directed Study
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

How you will be assessed

Written coursework/continuous assessment (essays, abstract, annotated bibliography): 66%
Dissertation of approx. 10,000-12,000 words: 34%

Careers

For students interested in doctoral studies, teachers seeking training to Masters level and those working in creative industries, the Dundee philosophy programme is the only Scottish university specialising in Continental philosophy. It therefore provides its graduates with a unique opportunity. Because the department has a highly regarded international reputation for its research, any graduate wishing to pursue a doctorate in Continental philosophy will be well situated to continue. Our recent postgraduate students have been successful in obtaining funding from the AHRC, the Carnegie Trust, the UK Overseas Research Scheme, and the Royal Institute for Philosophy.

Postgraduates and Postdoctoral Research Fellows in the Department have gone on to academic posts in Philosophy and related disciplines in Britain, Ireland and the United States.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Philosophy degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

Graduates will therefore benefit should they wish to pursue careers in such fields as teaching, creative industries, journalism, media, politics, risk management.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This degree offers specialist interdisciplinary study within Philosophy and English Studies. It brings together modules addressing the interrelations between literary practice and philosophical perspectives. Read more
This degree offers specialist interdisciplinary study within Philosophy and English Studies. It brings together modules addressing the interrelations between literary practice and philosophical perspectives.

Why study Philosophy and Literature at Dundee?

You will work closely with an enthusiastic team of lecturers, and receive a high degree of individual supervision in an active research culture. The Philosophy Programme at Dundee is one of the main centres in the UK for the study of European Philosophy. We have the highest number of specialist researchers and teachers on Nietzsche, existentialism, phenomenology and recent French and German philosophy in Scotland.

This course is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

Research Excellence

The School of Humanities at Dundee is a centre of research excellence. Postgraduate students join a vigorous research culture led by world-leading scholars. In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

What's so good about Philosophy and Literature at Dundee?

As a student in both the English and Philosophy departments, you will be a member of an active postgraduate community where students regularly participate in research seminars, reading groups and conferences.

Philosophy's Postgraduate Work-in-Progress Seminars are a forum for MLitt, MPhil and PhD students to present and discuss their work. Students are also encouraged to organise and participate in specialist reading groups. In recent years, staff and students have met to examine Kant's Critique of Judgement, Schopenhauer's World as Will and Representation, and Deleuze's Francis Bacon: the logic of sensation.

There are also regular research seminars, with papers given by invited international and UK speakers, reflecting the Philosophy Section's research specialisms in both continental and analytic fields. The English department also offers a regular postgraduate forum, a postgraduate website, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

Who should study this course?

This course is ideal both for students who wish to prepare for doctoral work in either Continental Philosophy or English Studies and for return-to-study students who are looking for a wider breadth of learning and are interested in the close connections between Continental Philosophy and literary practice.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

Students must take:

Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture (core)
Optional modules (80 credits in total) either from MLitt English Studies or MLitt Philosophy
Either the English dissertation or the Philosophy dissertation
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation.

Careers

The opportunity of advanced philosophical study may serve as the grounding for PhD research. Our recent postgraduate students have been successful in obtaining funding from the AHRC, the Carnegie Trust, the UK Overseas Research Scheme, and the Royal Institute for Philosophy. Postgraduates and Postdoctoral Research Fellows in the Department have gone on to academic posts in Philosophy and related disciplines in Britain, Ireland and the United States.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Philosophy degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This uniquely flexible programme offers postgraduate teaching in central aspects of Western philosophy in the broadly analytic tradition. Read more
This uniquely flexible programme offers postgraduate teaching in central aspects of Western philosophy in the broadly analytic tradition. The curriculum is research-led, with specialist modules taught by leading figures in their fields, and with a consistent focus on the fostering of intellectual curiosity and the development of independent thinking. The programme allows you to follow your own philosophical interests and provides a sound platform for those wishing to proceed to more advanced research work in philosophy.

The MA is open to those with a first degree in philosophy wishing to progress to more advanced levels of study and also to those without undergraduate training in philosophy. If you did not study philosophy as an undergraduate, you take a special route through the programme.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Our uniquely flexible MA may be studied in the evening or in the day, over 1 or 2 years, and with or without prior philosophical study.
In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked 15th in the UK, with a research environment judged conducive to producing internationally excellent research.
In the Philosophical Gourmet Report 2014-2015, Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked among the strongest in the UK, and was highly ranked in philosophy of action, philosophy of art, seventeenth-century philosophy and feminist philosophy.
We offer a wide range of modules taught by our internationally recognised research staff.
As a philosophy student, you will be part of the thriving philosophical community in the University of London and eligible to attend the extensive range of seminars and conferences put on by the Institute of Philosophy. Library resources include the department's specialist library, which supplements the main Birkbeck Library and University of London libraries. You will also have access to computer workstations with email and internet facilities.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Philosophy at Birkbeck was ranked 15th in the UK, with a research environment judged conducive to producing internationally excellent research.

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The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. Read more

The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. The programme offers the flexibility for recent graduates in the subject to study chosen topics in greater depth.

About this degree

The programme allows students to develop an advanced knowledge of problems in contemporary analytic philosophy, the history of philosophy and the study of value. It provides students with an understanding of a representative range of central philosophical debates and of the nature of philosophical problems, and encourages them to develop and defend their own viewpoint.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), six optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

These modules introduce students to graduate study in philosophy. Students will give short presentations on central topics and classic papers which form the basis of discussion.

  • Research Preparation in Philosophy 1
  • Research Preparation in Philosophy 2

Optional modules

Options may include the following: 

  • Foundations of Effective Altruism
  • Intentional Agency, Acting for a Reason and Responsibility
  • Early Wittgenstein
  • Epistemology
  • Self-Knowledge
  • Philosophy of Mind
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Free Speech
  • Greek Philosophy
  • Nineteenth Century Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science
  • Metaphysics of Science
  • The Self in Early Analytic Philosophy
  • Sartre’s Philosophy
  • Epistemology of Disagreement
  • Equality
  • Recent Work in Practical Philosophy
  • Graduate Studies in the Philosophy of Language
  • Perception and its History

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in any area of philosophy taught and approved by the department, leading to in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through a combination of seminars, lectures, and supervisions. Students' performance is assessed through examinations, presentations, coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Philosophy MA

Funding

Applicants for this programme may be eligible for a number of funding opportunities, including UCL graduate scholarships.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have become successful lawyers, journalists, theatre directors and novelists among other careers. Those who perform sufficiently well on the MA can expect to pursue further research in philosophy in London or elsewhere.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course), University of Law
  • MFA in Creative Writing, Queens University of Charlotte, North Carolina
  • MPhil in Greek and Latin, UCL
  • MPhil Stud in Philosophy, UCL

Employability

The programme equips graduates with the skills to analyse complex ideas, develop independence of judgement and originality of thought, evaluate arguments rigorously, present views lucidly both orally and on paper, and question orthodox views. The programme provides an ideal basis for future academic study and many graduates proceed to research degrees in the UK and abroad.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has strengths in philosophy of mind, language, political and moral philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology and the history of philosophy.

Our students benefit significantly from our location in London, which is one of the international centres of philosophical activity. London is home of a number of renowned journals (PhilosophyMind & LanguageProceedings of the Aristotelian Society) and hosts regular visiting speakers from across the world. Over 60 philosophers are active in London making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.



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Building on the longstanding tradition of interdisciplinary research and teaching at Sussex, the Literature and Philosophy MA exemplifies the fruitful co-operation between Philosophy and English. Read more

Building on the longstanding tradition of interdisciplinary research and teaching at Sussex, the Literature and Philosophy MA exemplifies the fruitful co-operation between Philosophy and English.

You’ll study in a stimulating environment for creative thinking, open discussion and critical engagement. You'll draw on ideas from literature, philosophy (analytic and continental), psychology and intellectual history.

You have the opportunity to examine central topics at the intersection of philosophy and literature, such as: 

  • the autonomy of the work of art 
  • literature as philosophy
  • ethics and literature
  • the experience of reading
  • style and narrative
  • modernism and modernity.

Why choose this course?

  • Ranked 5th in the UK for Philosophy (The Guardian University Guide 2018), and our research quality in English and Drama was ranked in the top 10 in the UK in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014 REF).
  • English at Sussex is ranked in the top 15 in the UK (The Guardian University Guide 2018 and The Complete University Guide 2018) and in the top 100 in the world (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017).
  • You’ll benefit from activities organised by the Literature and Philosophy Research Network.

Full-time and part-time study

Choose to study this course full time or part time, to fit around your work and family life. Modules for the full-time course are listed below.

For details about the part-time course, contact Philosophy Postgraduate Convener Dr Gordon Finlayson at 

How will I study?

You’ll study core modules and options in the autumn and spring terms. In the summer term, you undertake supervised work on your dissertation.

You’ll be assessed through term papers and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

Our graduates have gone on to careers in:

  • education, the charity sector and NGOs
  • writing, journalism, and libraries and archives
  • publishing, website production and marketing.

A number of our graduates go on to further study and careers in academia.

Graduate destinations

90% of students from the School of History, Art History and Philosophy were in work or further study six months after graduating. Our Philosophy students have gone on to jobs including:

  • editorial assistant, Pavilion Books
  • media officer, Wickham Youth Action
  • assistant, Gareth Thomas MP.

(EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015 for postgraduates)



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You are interested in politics and philosophy and the interactions between these disciplines. You want to learn in small, intensive, discussion-based seminar groups. Read more
  • You are interested in politics and philosophy and the interactions between these disciplines
  • You want to learn in small, intensive, discussion-based seminar groups
  • You are interested in opportunities to connect abstract philosophical arguments to concrete political situations

This new pathway offers a specialisation in political theory, while also deepening your knowledge in other areas of philosophy. Students must have some Philosophy in their undergraduate degree. It is particularly suited for students from PPE, Philosophy and Law, or Philosophy and Politics undergraduate programmes. This is a course taught by both philosophy and politics discipline areas for high quality students tapping into the exceptionally large and talented group of staff who work in political theory and in philosophy at The University of Manchester. 

Contact: Dr Stephanie Collins

Tel: +44 (0)161 276 8028

Email:  

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Course unit details

Why is this course for me?

  • You don't want to pick between Politics and Philosophy.
  • You want to focus on analytic political theory -- issues of justice, rights, freedom, and equality -- while also sampling other philosophy courses -- on aesthetics, emotion, action, and science.
  • You want to learn in small, intensive, discussion-based seminar groups.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

Philosophy

The MRes In Philosophy offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing under the supervision of specialist scholars, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills.
We offer internationally recognised supervision in most of the main areas of philosophy:
- Metaphilosophy
- Philosophy of mind and action
- Phenomenology
- Contemporary analytic metaphysics
- Epistemology
- Political philosophy
- History of philosophy
- Moral philosophy
- Kantian philosophy

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MA offers students the opportunity to explore Western philosophical thought from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Read more

Overview

The MA offers students the opportunity to explore Western philosophical thought from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. It should appeal both to those who want an overview of the foundations of modern European thought, and to those with more specialized interests in Medieval and Renaissance studies, philosophy, or the history of ideas. Building upon the strengths of critical thinking, systematic reflection, and historical awareness developed at undergraduate level, the programme allows the student to explore thematic concerns of philosophers in the Western tradition from medieval times to the sixteenth century. The MA degree (Mode I) in Philosophy is taken by examination (100% continuous assessment) and by minor thesis, the topic of which must be in the subjects of Medieval or Renaissance Philosophy and approved by the Head of the Department. The dissertation comprises a maximum of 15,000 words, and is assessed by the supervisor and the external examiner.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/ma-medieval-and-renaissance-philosophy

Course Structure

The overall number of credits is 90 credits. Students will be expected to take 60 ECTS credits in taught modules. The final 30 credits will be awarded for the MA thesis. Modules themes include the early philosophy of Edith Stein, Nietzsche and his legacy, reading medieval philosophy, the ethics of war and conflict and Irish philosophers and philosophy, historical approaches and modern reception, and New Politics of the Renaissance: Machiavelli.

Career Options

Successful completion of the MA at a high level will normally equip students to proceed to study for a PhD, a necessary qualification for an academic career (in certain subject areas further language qualifications maybe required). Beyond the academic sphere, however, the skills the programme fosters (analytic skills, critical thinking, systematic research, clear argumentation, lucid writing) are indispensable to a wide variety of careers.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHV58

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Applicants may be required to attend for interview as part of the admissions process.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Because of its very nature, mental health care raises as many conceptual questions as empirical ones. The philosophy of mental health is a rapidly developing field developed by philosophers, clinicians, eg psychiatrists and mental health nurses and mental health service users. Read more
Because of its very nature, mental health care raises as many conceptual questions as empirical ones. The philosophy of mental health is a rapidly developing field developed by philosophers, clinicians, eg psychiatrists and mental health nurses and mental health service users. Based on the Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry co-authored by the course leader, the MA Philosophy and Mental Health course aims to develop a better understanding of psychiatry, and mental health care more broadly, through an analysis of some of its fundamental concepts.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The teaching materials are provided by the newly published Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry, co-authored by the course leader. This textbook is aimed at developing analytic and argumentative skills through exercises and guided readings. Tutorial supervision will be provided in guided discussion over the web using UCLan’s e-learning resources. Access to a computer connected to the web is thus a necessary requirement.

Most modules are assessed by a 5,000 word essay. The Introduction to Postgraduate Philosophically-Based Research module is assessed by three shorter assessments and the Dissertation is 10,000 words. Formative assessment is provided for a first short 2,000 word practice essay which can then be developed into the first longer essay.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The programme in Philosophy and Mental Health is part of a newly developing interdisciplinary field looking at conceptual and evaluative aspects of mental health care. More so than any other area of healthcare, mental health raises conceptual as well as empirical difficulties.

The role of values in diagnosis, the validity or objectivity of taxonomy, the central relationship of mind and brain are all key issues underpinning healthcare calling for conceptual as well as empirical clarification. The programme critically examines the assumptions that drive the agenda in mental health care. It aims to foster analytic and argumentative skills in its students in order for them to have a better understanding of practice and, in some cases, to carry out further and original research in this newly developing field. Students will be drawn from all areas of mental health care including service users as well as from a philosophy or psychology background. Based on the Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry, co-authored by the course leader, teaching will be by distance learning in a structure designed to fit with the busy working lives of those working in the field.

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