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This is Europe’s only graduate course in reproductive health research and is designed for those interested in acquiring the research skills necessary to conduct policy-relevant research into sexual and reproductive health. Read more
This is Europe’s only graduate course in reproductive health research and is designed for those interested in acquiring the research skills necessary to conduct policy-relevant research into sexual and reproductive health. It provides a non-clinical foundation in family planning, obstetric health, AIDS and sexually-transmitted infections.

This Master's course is recognized by the ESRC as providing high quality research training and a small number of ESRC scholarships (including 1+3 scholarships) are available to UK or EU residents. These are advertised each year with the School scholarships information.

The curriculum has a focus on middle- and low-income settings but also provides excellent training in the principles and methods of research for high-income countries.

Careers

Graduates go into public health and reproductive health programmes, evaluation of family planning programmes, research for governmental and non-governmental agencies and university teaching.

Prize and awards

A prize is awarded each year to the student who has submitted the best project of the year for examination.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/rshr_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msrshr.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of evidence-based approaches to research of reproductive and sexual health issues

- critically assess and apply these research approaches to inform development, health and social welfare programmes

- demonstrate a good understanding of the socio-cultural, political and ethical issues surrounding reproductive and sexual health

- identify and address appropriate research questions in reproductive and sexual health, using methods from a range of public health disciplines

- carry out research activities to identify effective components of reproductive and sexual health services within programmes

Structure

Term 1:
Students take the following compulsory modules:

Basic Epidemiology
Foundations in Reproductive Health
Principles of Social Research
Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health

Further optional modules include:

Extended Epidemiology
Health Policy, Process & Power
Introduction to Health Economics
Population Studies

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). One module (in Slot 4) is compulsory.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Research Design & Analysis*
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Health Care Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Sociological Approaches to Health

- Slot 2:
Family Planning Programmes*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Conflict and Health
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Qualitative Methodologies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:

Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health*
Social Epidemiology*
Medical Anthropology and Public Health

- Slot 4:
Sexual Health

- Slot 5:

AIDS*
Analysing Survey & Population Data*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Proposal Development

A restricted number of modules may be taken by self-study, using electronic access teaching material.

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/trsh.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July-August), students complete a research project. Acceptable types of project are: data analysis; a project proposal; an original literature or policy review.

Students normally remain in London for the preparation of their project report. Exceptionally, and only if appropriate, part of the project period may be spent away from the School, whether in the UK or abroad. Arrangements for this must be discussed and agreed with the Course Director.

Intercalating this course

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msrshr.html#sixth

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This is Europe's only graduate programme in demography with an emphasis on health and social epidemiology, and is designed for those interested in acquiring a technical understanding of the structure and dynamics of population change, its causes and consequences. Read more
This is Europe's only graduate programme in demography with an emphasis on health and social epidemiology, and is designed for those interested in acquiring a technical understanding of the structure and dynamics of population change, its causes and consequences. The curriculum includes advanced training in the theories and methods of the population sciences, statistics, epidemiology, and research methods.

The course teaches research skills which are highly valued in the job market generally and are welcomed in a wide variety of research fields. The teaching draws on several related disciplines within the School and the modular approach can be adapted (within reason) to suit different needs.

The course is recognised by both the MRC and ESRC as providing high quality research training and a small number of scholarships from these bodies (including 1+3 scholarships) are available to UK or EU residents. These are advertised each year with the School scholarships information.

Graduates have careers in public health, academic research of a very wide nature, NGOs, reproductive health programmes, health services, government statistical offices, policy and planning. The Selwyn-Clarke Prize is awarded for the best project of the year.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/dh_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/intercalating/index.html)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msdh.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of scientific, evidence-based approaches to the study of population issues

- critically assess and apply these approaches to inform development, health and population programmes

- formulate research questions and use demographic and health data, and appropriate methods of analysis, to address them

- identify causes and consequences of population change and relate these to underlying population dynamics

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of demographic behaviour in social, economic and policy contexts

- critically assess and apply findings of population studies to health and social policy

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of major population trends, including historical trends, in developed and developing countries

Structure

Term 1:
Students take the following compulsory modules:

- Demographic Methods
- Basic Epidemiology
- Population Studies
- Principles of Social Research
- Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five study modules, one module from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Students are expected to take modules related to demography for at least two of their other four choices.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:

Research Design & Analysis*
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Health Care Evaluation
Sociological Approaches to Health

- Slot 2:

Family Planning Programmes*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Conflict and Health
Design and Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:

Social Epidemiology*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Medical Anthropology and Public Health
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health

- Slot 4:
Population Dynamics & Projections (compulsory)

- Slot 5:

AIDS*
Analysing Survey & Population Data*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Proposal Development

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tdhe.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project to enable them to acquire personal experience of the process of contributing to knowledge in any of the fields covered by the course, for submission by early September. Acceptable types of project are: data analysis; a project proposal; an original literature or policy review.

Students normally remain in London for the preparation of their project report. Exceptionally, and only if appropriate, part of the project period may be spent away from the School, whether in the UK or abroad. Arrangements for this must be discussed and agreed with the Course Director.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msdh.html#sixth

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This course equips students with the knowledge and statistical skills to make valuable contributions to medical research as well as public health in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Read more
This course equips students with the knowledge and statistical skills to make valuable contributions to medical research as well as public health in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Epidemiological methods underpin clinical medical research, public health practice and health care evaluation to investigate the causes of disease and to evaluate interventions to prevent or control disease.

Graduates enter careers in medical research, public health and community medicine, epidemiological field studies, drug manufacturers, government or NGOs.

The Nand Lal Bajaj and Savitri Devi Prize is awarded to the best project each year. The prize was donated by Dr Subhash Chandra Arya, former student, in honour of his parents Dr Nand Lal Bajaj and Mrs Savitri Devi.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/epi_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mse.html

Additional Requirements

Additional requirements for the MSc Epidemiology are:

- evidence of numeracy skills (e.g. A level Mathematics or Statistics or a module with a good mark in their university degree)

- it is preferable for a student to have some work experience in a health-related field

Any prospective student who does not meet the above minimum entry requirement, but who has relevant professional experience, may still be eligible for admission. Please contact the course directors () if you are not sure whether this is the right course for you.

Objectives

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and awareness of the role of epidemiology and its contribution to other health-related disciplines

- choose appropriate designs and develop detailed protocols for epidemiological studies

- enter and manage computerised epidemiological data and carry out appropriate statistical analyses

- assess the results of epidemiological studies (their own or other investigators'), including critical appraisal of the study question, study design, methods and conduct, statistical analyses and interpretation

Structure

Term 1:
All students take the compulsory modules and usually take optional modules.

Compulsory modules are:
- Clinical Trials
- Epidemiology in Practice
- Extended Epidemiology
- Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health .

Optional modules include:
- Demographic Methods
- Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.).

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Study Design: Writing a Proposal (compulsory)

- Slot 2:
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology (compulsory)

- Slot 3:
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases*
Medical Anthropology and Public Health*
Social Epidemiology*
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health*
Applied Communicable Disease Control
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health
Medical Anthropology and Public Health; Nutrition in Emergencies
Tropical Environmental Health

- Slot 4:
Environmental Epidemiology*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Genetic Epidemiology*
Design and Evaluation of Mental Health Programmes
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights; Globalisation & Health; Nutrition Related Chronic Disease

- Slot 5:
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*
AIDS
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Integrated Vector Management
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tepi.html

Residential Field Trip

This course has a compulsory two-day residential retreat outside London. This is held on the Wednesday and Thursday of the first week in Term 1. This is included in the £200 field trip fee.

Day field trip to Oxford

A one-day field trip to Oxford usually takes place in November during reading week. Students are encouraged to attend but it is not a compulsory part of the course.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a written research project on a topic selected in consultation with their tutor, for submission by early September. This can be a data-analysis of an adequately powered study, a study protocol, a systematic review or an infectious disease modelling study. Students do not usually travel abroad to collect data.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mse.html#sixth

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This is a multidisciplinary programme that bridges the fields of epidemiology, laboratory sciences and public health. It includes a strong practical component and the opportunity to undertake a research project overseas. Read more
This is a multidisciplinary programme that bridges the fields of epidemiology, laboratory sciences and public health. It includes a strong practical component and the opportunity to undertake a research project overseas. The course will train students in all aspects of the control of infectious diseases and prepare them for a career in a range of organisations.

This course will equip students with specialised skills that will facilitate a career in the control of infectious diseases as staff of health ministries, health departments, national or international disease control agencies, aid organisations or universities.

The majority of the research projects are performed overseas, with collaborating public health or research organisations and NGOs. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this overseas opportunity, which is crucial to the nature of the course.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/cid_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/intercalating/index.html)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscid.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- investigate the transmission of endemic and epidemic infections

- select appropriate methods of control

- design, implement and evaluate co-ordinated control methods

- assess constraints of local public health delivery systems

- manage available resources in the context of the control of infectious diseases

- focus their efforts on particular geographical regions or specific diseases

Structure

Term 1:

After orientation, students take two compulsory modules: Basic Statistics and Introduction to Disease Agents & Their Control, which focus on the life cycle and characteristics of infectious disease agents according to their principal transmission routes; the principal intervention strategies used to combat infectious diseases; and examples of successes, partial successes and failures in intervention programmes against infectious diseases.

In addition, students take one of the following module combinations:

- Basic Epidemiology; Health Economics; and Health Policy, Process and Power
- Extended Epidemiology and Health Economics or Health Policy, Process and Power

An interdisciplinary approach is emphasised which takes account of the social, political and economic context in which health systems operate.

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:

Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Health Care Evaluation*
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infections
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries
Clinical Virology
Economic Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Research Design & Analysis
Study Design: Writing a Study Proposal.

- Slot 2:

Clinical Bacteriology 1*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Health Systems
Qualitative Methodologies

- Slot 3:

Applied Communicable Disease Control*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health*
Economic Analysis for Health Policy*
Medical Anthropology & Public Health*
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health*
Tropical Environmental Health*
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination*
Basic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology

- Slot 4:

Clinical Bacteriology 2*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights
Globalisation & Health; Sexual Health
Vector Biology & Parasite Infections

- Slot 5:

AIDS*
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries*
Integrated Vector Management*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Integrating Module: Health Services Management
Mycology
Nutrition Programme Planning
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tcid.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project studying aspects of an intervention programme, for submission by early September. If appropriate, this may take the form of an optional period in a relevant overseas location. Most students on this course undertake projects overseas. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscid.html#sixth

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This course combines theoretical knowledge and practical training in the immunology of infectious diseases through comprehensive teaching and research methods. Read more
This course combines theoretical knowledge and practical training in the immunology of infectious diseases through comprehensive teaching and research methods. Students will gain specialised skills in applying scientific concepts, evaluating scientific data and carrying out modern immunological techniques. Students will benefit from the unique mix of immunology, vaccinology, molecular biology, virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology and clinical medicine at the School.

Infectious diseases represent an increasingly important cause of human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Vaccine development is thus of great importance in terms of global health. In parallel with this growth, there has been a dramatic increase in studies to identify the innate, humoral or cellular immunological mechanisms which confer immunity to pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. As a result, increasing numbers of scientists, clinicians and veterinarians wish to develop their knowledge and skills in these areas.

The flexible nature of the course allows students to focus on attaining a broader understanding of infectious disease through attending taught units. Students can also undertake an extended research project within groups led by experienced team leaders. Such projects can involve basic investigations of immune mechanisms or applied field based studies.

Graduates from this course go into research positions in academia and industry, and further training such as PhD study.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/iid_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msiid.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate specialist knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of host immunity to infection against the diverse range of pathogens which confront human populations

- apply this specialist knowledge to a range of practical skills and techniques, in particular modern molecular and cellular techniques for assessing immune responses to pathogens

- critically assess, select and apply appropriate research methods to investigate basic immunological mechanisms and applied issues in the immunology of infection

- critically evaluate primary scientific data and the published scientific literature

- integrate and present key immunological concepts at an advanced level, both verbally and in written form

Structure

Term 1:
There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by two compulsory modules:

- Immunology of Infectious Diseases
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Advanced Immunology 1 (compulsory)

- Slot 2:
Advanced Immunology 2 (compulsory)

- Slot 3:
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology*
Clinical Immunology*
Extended Project*
Basic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries

- Slot 4:
Extended Project*
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications*
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights
Genetic Epidemiology

- Slot 5:
AIDS*
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Extended Project*
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection*
Mycology*

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tiid.html

Residential Field Trip

Towards the end of Term 1, students get the opportunity to hear about the latest, most exciting aspects of immunological research at the British Society of Immunology Congress. The cost is included in the £500 field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project on an immunological subject, for submission by early September. Some of these projects may take place with collaborating scientists overseas or in other colleges or institutes in the UK. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msiid.html#sixth

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This course provides core training in the theoretical and practical aspects of medical parasitology, covering the protozoan and metazoan parasites of humans and the vectors which transmit them. Read more
This course provides core training in the theoretical and practical aspects of medical parasitology, covering the protozoan and metazoan parasites of humans and the vectors which transmit them. Students will gain specialised skills to enable them to pursue a career in research, control or teaching related to medical parasitology.

Graduates enter a range of global health fields ranging from diagnostics through to applied basic research and operational control to higher degree studies and academic/teaching-related positions.

The Patrick Buxton Memorial Medal and Prize is awarded to the best student of the year. Founded by relatives of Patrick Alfred Buxton, Professor in Entomology, who died in 1955.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/mp_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmp.html

Additional Requirements

An additional preferred requirement for the MSc Parasitology is an interest in parasites of public health importance and disease transmission. Any student who does not meet the minimum entry requirement above but who has relevant professional experience may still be eligible for admission. Qualifications and experience will be assessed from the application.

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to demonstrate:

- detailed knowledge and understanding of the biology, life cycles, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of parasitic infections in humans and their relevance for human health and control

- detailed knowledge and understanding of the biology and strategies for control of the vectors and intermediate hosts of human parasites

- carry out practical laboratory identification of parasite stages both free and in tissues and diagnose infections

- specialised skills in: advanced diagnostic, molecular, immunological, genetic, chemotherapeutic, ecological and/or control aspects of the subject

- the ability to design a laboratory or field-based research project, and apply relevant research skills

- prepare a written report including a critical literature review of relevant scientific publications, and show competence in communicating scientific findings

Structure

Term 1:
There is a two-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and an introduction to major groups of pathogens, followed by three compulsory core modules:

- Parasitology & Entomology
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies
- Critical Skills for Tropical Medicine

Recommended module: Molecular Biology

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Some modules can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques*
Advanced Immunology 1
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries

- Slot 2:
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology*
Advanced Immunology 2
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination*
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health
Tropical Environmental Health

- Slot 4:
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications*
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases
Genetic Epidemiology

- Slot 5 :
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Integrated Vector Management*
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection*
AIDS

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tmpa.html

Residential Field Trip

There is a compulsory one week field course, after the Term 3 examinations, on vector and parasite sampling and identification methods.The cost of £630 is included in the field trip fee.

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project, for submission by early September. This may be based on a critical review of an approved topic, analysis of a collection of results or a laboratory study.Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmp.html#sixth

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This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This course develops the careers of doctors whose interest is the practice of medicine in tropical and low- and middle-income countries. The course offers a wide choice of modules and provides training in clinical tropical medicine at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases.

The Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (DTM&H):
All students going on the MSc will take the Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. Students with a prior DTM&H, or holding 60 Masters level credits from the East African Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene may apply for exemption from Term 1 via accreditation of prior learning.

Careers

Graduates from this course have taken a wide variety of career paths including further research in epidemiology, parasite immunology; field research programmes or international organisations concerned with health care delivery in conflict settings or humanitarian crises; or returned to academic or medical positions in low- and middle-income countries.

Awards

The Frederick Murgatroyd Award is awarded each year for the best student of the year. Donated by Mrs Murgatroyd in memory of her husband, who held the Wellcome Chair of Clinical Tropical Medicine in 1950 and 1951.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/tmih_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- understand and describe the causation, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and control of the major parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases of developing countries

- demonstrate knowledge and skills in diagnostic parasitology and other simple laboratory methods

- understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, including selecting appropriate study designs

- apply and interpret basic statistical tests for the analysis of quantitative data

- critically evaluate published literature in order to make appropriate clinical decisions

- communicate relevant medical knowledge to patients, health care professionals, colleagues and other groups

- understand the basic sciences underlying clinical and public health practice

Structure

Term 1:
All students follow the course for the DTM&H. Term 1 consists entirely of the DTM&H lectures, seminars, laboratory practical and clinical sessions, and is examined through the DTM&H examination and resulting in the award of the Diploma and 60 Master's level credits at the end of Term 1.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). Recognising that students have diverse backgrounds and experience, the course director considers requests to take any module within the School's portfolio, provided that this is appropriate for the student.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Clinical Virology*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Advanced Immunology 1
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infection
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco
Economic Evaluation
Generalised Liner Models
Health Care Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques
Research Design & Analysis
Sociological Approaches to Health
Study Design: Writing a Proposal

- Slot 2:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Advanced Immunology 2
Clinical Bacteriology 1
Family Planning Programmes
Health Systems; History & Health
Molecular Virology; Non Communicable Eye Disease
Population, Poverty and Environment
Qualitative Methodologies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Applied Communicable Disease Control
Clinical Immunology
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health
Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases
Implementing Eye Care: Skills and Resources
Medical Anthropology and Public Health
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health
Tropical Environmental Health
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination

- Slot 4:
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights*
Global Disability and Health*
Immunology of Parasitic Infection: Principles*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Bacteriology 2
Design & Evaluation of Mental Health Programmes
Environmental Epidemiology
Evaluation of Public Health Interventions
Genetic Epidemiology
Globalisation & Health
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications
Nutrition Related Chronic Diseases
Population Dynamics & Projections
Reviewing the Literature
Sexual Health
Survival Analysis and Bayesian Statistics
Vector Biology & Vector Parasite Interactions

- Slot 5:
AIDS*
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy*
Mycology*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Analysing Survey & Population Data
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Environmental Health Policy
Integrated Vector Management
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection
Nutrition Programme Planning
Pathogen Genomics
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/ttmi.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project in a subject of their choice, for submission by early September. Projects may involve writing up and analysing work carried out before coming to the School, a literature review, or a research study proposal. Some students gather data overseas or in the UK for analysis within the project. Such projects require early planning.

Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved. The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mstmih.html#sixth

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Our MSc Computational Finance equips you with the core concepts and mathematical principles of modern quantitative finance, plus the operational skills to use computational packages (mainly Matlab) for financial modelling. Read more
Our MSc Computational Finance equips you with the core concepts and mathematical principles of modern quantitative finance, plus the operational skills to use computational packages (mainly Matlab) for financial modelling.

We provide practical, hands-on learning about how modern, highly computerised financial markets work, how assets should be priced, and how investors should construct a portfolio of assets. In addition to traditional topics in derivatives and asset pricing, we place a special emphasis on risk management in non-Gaussian environment with extreme events.

You master these areas through studying topics including:
-Non-linear and evolutionary computational methods for derivatives pricing and portfolio management
-Applications of calculus and statistical methods
-Computational intelligence in finance and economics
-Financial markets

You also graduate with an understanding of the use of artificial financial market environments for stress testing, and the design of auctions and other financial contracts.

Our Centre for Computational Finance and Economic Agents is an innovative and laboratory-based teaching and research centre, with an international reputation for leading-edge, interdisciplinary work combining economic and financial modelling with computational implementation.

Our research is geared towards real-world, practical applications, and many of our academic staff have experience of applying their findings in industry and in advising the UK government.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Professional accreditation

This degree is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).This accreditation is increasingly sought by employers, and provides the first stage towards eventual professional registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Our expert staff

This course is taught by experts with both academic and industrial expertise in the financial and IT sectors. We bring together leading academics in the field from our departments of economics, computer science and business.

Our staff are currently researching the development of real-time trading platforms, new financial econometric models for real-time data, the use of artificially intelligent agents in the study of risk and market-based institutions, operational aspects of financial markets, financial engineering, portfolio and risk management.

Specialist facilities

We are one of the largest and best resourced computer science and electronic engineering schools in the UK. Our work is supported by extensive networked computer facilities and software aids, together with a wide range of test and instrumentation equipment.
-We have six laboratories that are exclusively for computer science and electronic engineering students. Three are open 24/7, and you have free access to the labs except when there is a scheduled practical class in progress
-All computers run either Windows 7 or are dual boot with Linux
-Software includes Java, Prolog, C++, Perl, Mysql, Matlab, DB2, Microsoft Office, Visual Studio, and Project
-Students have access to CAD tools and simulators for chip design (Xilinx) and computer networks (OPNET)
-We also have specialist facilities for research into areas including non-invasive brain-computer interfaces, intelligent environments, robotics, optoelectronics, video, RF and MW, printed circuit milling, and semiconductors

Your future

We have an extensive network of industrial contacts through our City Associates Board and our alumni, while our expert seminar series gives you the opportunity to work with leading figures from industry.

Our recent graduates have gone on to become quantitative analysts, portfolio managers and software engineers at various institutions, including:
-HSBC
-Mitsubishi UFJ Securities
-Old Mutual
-Bank of England

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-CCFEA MSc Dissertation
-Financial Engineering and Risk Management
-Introduction to Financial Market Analysis
-Learning and Computational Intelligence in Economics and Finance
-Professional Practice and Research Methodology
-Quantitative Methods in Finance and Trading
-Big-Data for Computational Finance (optional)
-Industry Expert Lectures in Finance (optional)
-Mathematical Research Techniques Using Matlab (optional)
-Programming in Python (optional)
-Artificial Neural Networks (optional)
-High Frequency Finance and Empirical Market Microstructure (optional)
-Machine Learning and Data Mining (optional)
-Trading Global Financial Markets (optional)
-Creating and Growing a New Business Venture (optional)
-Evolutionary Computation and Genetic Programming (optional)
-Constraint Satisfaction for Decision Making (optional)

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UNIGIS is a Distance Learning Postgraduate Network in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) jointly run by Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Salford. Read more
UNIGIS is a Distance Learning Postgraduate Network in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) jointly run by Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Salford. The UNIGIS network has over 25 years' experience of success in delivering GIS postgraduate courses. Our highly regarded programme is designed to meet the needs of professionals working in the GI industry - or those wishing to enter the sector. UNIGIS aims to provide a deeper and balanced education in GIS.

Although GIS is a relatively new and emerging branch of geography, the UNIGIS network has over 25 years experience of successfully delivering GIS courses at postgraduate level. You study via web-based distance learning.

The application of GIS is growing rapidly in areas such as urban and regional planning, transportation and land use interaction, and retail marketing, which opens up a range of opportunties for graduates of these courses.

Features and benefits of the course

Three separate pathways are offered up to MSc level:
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Providing a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS permitting some choice in application selection. Develop in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by application area and the interactions between data, methods, people and technology.

Applied Geographical Information Systems (Applied GIS)
Helps develop an in-depth knowledge of GIS based methods for monitoring social/human and natural environments. Establish an effective understanding of the spatial interaction of social/human and environmental factors and develop the capability to extract information from a variety of sources and to analyse and assess within a GIS framework.

Geographical Information Technologies (GI Technologies)
Aids critical understanding of the software engineering practices and standards that underpin database and web application development and the methodologies for implementing those practices in a GIS context. A critical understanding of the issues involved in designing the storage and use of geographical data in databases and web-based applications is forged. Also key is proficiency in the design, implementation and evaluation of small scale database and web-application projects.

Assessment details

All study routes employ web-based delivery and aim to provide the conceptual and technical framework required for an in-depth understanding of GIS. Each route has either core or elective units available and all incorporate a project and dissertation which involves the design and execution of an original study.

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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. Read more
The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. It is designed to acquaint students with all aspects of the research process and to introduce them, mainly through active participation, to a wide variety of research techniques.

This enables students either to qualify for posts involving such skills in academic or research settings or, subject to the approval of the Higher Degree Committee of the University, to transfer to a course leading to a PhD.

The course is also highly relevant to those entering such professional fields as educational or clinical psychology where research skills form an important part of job requirements.

Course structure
Instruction in basic research methods, as applied to selected research fields among those listed below, will be given by means of lectures, tutorials and seminars. Emphasis will be placed throughout on practical exercises in the laboratory and in appropriate field settings such as schools and hospitals.

Course components are:
• Quantitative methods – including statistical methods and computing
• Ethical and professional issues
• Survey research methods and questionnaire design
• Interviewing and assessment methods
• Language and discourse analysis
• Observational methods and use of video in the laboratory and in the field
• Cognitive-developmental research methods
• Practical research skills: oral presentation; critical analysis; grant application.

During the last stage of the course, students will be required to design an empirical study and present a thesis on it of not more than 20,000 words.

Assessment
Final assessment will be based on coursework and the thesis. An oral examination may be held at the discretion of the Board of Examiners.

It is expected that some students will subsequently continue the investigation pursued in their thesis work with a view to obtaining a PhD.

Start date and duration
The course commences at the beginning of the academic session in late September/early October and is of 12 months’ duration on a full-time basis only.

Entry requirements
The entry requirements will normally be a first or second class Honours degree in Psychology, or an equivalent qualification recognised for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society.

The Department
The Department offers facilities for postgraduate study and research in a number of fields focusing around the following main areas:
• Interactive Learning
• Developmental and Educational Psychology
• Road Use Behaviour
• Applied Social psychology
• Cognitive Neuropsychology

The Department has two Research Centres within it. The Centre for Research into Interactive Learning has a broad remit concerned with:
• Learning through peer interaction
• Expert-novice interaction
• Interaction with and around computers

The Centre for Applied Social Psychology carries out strategic and policy-oriented research into, amongst other topics:
• Use and misuse of illicit drugs
• Health and eating
• Problems of alcohol use in society
• Human factors and safety
• Aids

How to apply
Application forms may be obtained from:

The Secretary, Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1QE

Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2581
Fax: +44 (0) 141 548 4001
Email:

Further details can be viewed at http://www.strath.ac.uk/Departments/Psychology/

Contact details
For further information please contact:

Prof Kevin Durkin
Course Director
Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2574
Email:

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This degree explores ways that education can contribute to the development process, both theoretically and empirically, from a variety of perspectives – including human rights, social and human development, and human capital. Read more
This degree explores ways that education can contribute to the development process, both theoretically and empirically, from a variety of perspectives – including human rights, social and human development, and human capital.

The course enables students to understand current debates, and their implications for national and international education strategies. In doing so it locates educational debates within a wider development perspective.

Topics in the core modules include current challenges of education and development, including linguistic and cultural diversity, the education of nomads and other migratory groups, and responses to conflict, HIV/Aids and child-labour. The programme also examines international and national policies and practices, with the aim of providing students with the capacity to contribute to appropriate policy design for educational development.

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This degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities. Read more
This degree incorporates a number of topics including concepts used in gender analysis of development, social justice, gender and power, poverty and inequality, and gendered approaches to social and human development such as capabilities, social exclusion and human rights, and violence, religion and identities.

We offer a broad training integrating theory and development policy experience which is both sectoral (eg education; land and property; credit and finance; rural livelihoods; sustainable development, environment and conservation; HIV/AIDS) and cross-cutting (eg migration, and male gender identities and masculinities in development).

Our graduates are employed in the World Bank, the UK DFID, and other bilateral aid agencies, and in large international NGOs like Oxfam as well as in developing country government departments and as academics.

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This Master's offers a comprehensive overview of social development, combining academic and theoretical perspectives with more practical and policy-focused approaches. Read more
This Master's offers a comprehensive overview of social development, combining academic and theoretical perspectives with more practical and policy-focused approaches.

Key themes include vulnerability and social exclusion, poverty, gender relations and mainstreaming, and social analysis. We pay particular attention to issues such as social equality, education, migration, health provision and policy, the implications of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the role of civil society.

In the last two decades it has become apparent that development goes far beyond economic growth and encompasses broader human and social dimensions. The emerging paradigm is now influencing the agendas of major international development agencies, including the World Bank, UNDP, the EU, and the UK Department for International Development (DFID), as well as other bilateral donors.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computing and Future Interaction Technologies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computing and Future Interaction Technologies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Research Masters in Future Interaction Technologies and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) teaches graduate students to go beyond simply building new software and hardware, to evaluating how they would be used, and how they can be improved.

The MRes is taught by the Future Interaction Technology (FIT) Lab, within the Computer Science. The FIT Lab’s mission is to explore and apply Advanced Computer Science to make interaction technologies dependable, enjoyable and effective. Interaction technologies include mobile devices, the Web, Web 2.0, implants, home TVs, microwave cookers, ticket machines, navigational aids, etc. Furthermore, we aim to work on grand challenges, like improving safety in healthcare, or developing technology to reach the millions and help us live more effective and sustainable lives.

Our Research Masters programme in Future Interaction Technologies mainly concludes of a large individual research project worth 120 credits. Inclusive of this 120 credits is training and experience provided by our Lab & Field Research Methods module. You will spend around 8 months preparing for and working on this extensive project, which provides key experience in performing research-oriented projects. As the MRes has a research focus, you will spend more independent research time building a strong knowledge of research literature and striving to make a novel contribution to the HCI community.

Taught Component

In addition to the research project, you can choose from a range of modules that provide skills and development training in different areas during your studies on the Computing and Future Interaction Technologies MRes.

Modules available currently include:

Human Computer Interaction Project

Development (compulsory)

Interaction Technologies: Lab & Field Work (compulsory)

Interaction Technologies: Seminars & Readings (compulsory)

Research Methodology (compulsory)

Mobile Interaction Design

Interactive Systems Design

Interaction Technologies: Information Retrieval

Interaction Technologies: Hardware & Devices

The MRes in Computing & Future Interaction Technologies is ideally suited for continued academic research, but also provides the necessary skills and key experience to apply research methods in HCI practitioner positions in industry.



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