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The Hearing Aid Aptitude Test distance learning programme is designed to meet the needs of suitably qualified Audiology practitioners wishing to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Hearing Aid Dispenser (HAD). . Read more

The Hearing Aid Aptitude Test distance learning programme is designed to meet the needs of suitably qualified Audiology practitioners wishing to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Hearing Aid Dispenser (HAD). 

Overview

The Hearing Aid Aptitude Test distance learning programme is designed to meet the needs of suitably qualified Audiology practitioners wishing to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Hearing Aid Dispenser (HAD). 

Hearing Aid Dispensers work in private practice to assess, fit and provide aftercare for hearing aids. It is a challenging and rewarding profession that requires a combination of scientific knowledge and patient handling skills. Hearing aid technology is an exciting and rapidly changing area. Hearing Aid Dispensers are required to be skilled at identifying and utilizing the latest technology to meet the needs of their clients.

Hearing Aid Dispensers may work independently or for commercial businesses ranging in size. Depending on the nature of the company there may be opportunities for a Hearing Aid Dispenser to develop business and management skills. The private sector is a rapidly expanding market offering practitioners rapid career progression opportunities.

The Hearing Aid Aptitude Test distance learning programme comprises one web based module which can be accessed remotely. The module consists of 6 sub sections and contains all the programme teaching and learning resources.  Assessment is via an in-house multiple choice exam paper.

Accreditation

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC). Successful completion of the programme confers eligibility to apply to the HCPC to register as a Hearing Aid Dispenser, which is a legal requirement in order to sell hearing aids privately.

The Institute of Sound and Vibration Research has an international reputation for teaching and research training. We currently run The BSc Healthcare Science (Audiology) degree programme and MSc Audiology programme. We currently have around 100 PhD students, with approx. 25 in audiology and related areas. Projects are funded by a range of UK and EU research councils, governments throughout the world and the UK National Health Service, to name but a few. Research projects are often cross-disciplinary and multi-centre.

Programme Structure

The next Hearing Aid Aptitude Test distance learning programme will commence on the 8th January 2018 with the assessment taking place 6 weeks after the start of the programme on the 19th February 2018. Applicants are able to register onto the programme at any time during the first 2 weeks of the programme (latest application date: 15th January 2018).

It is mandatory that students access all the recorded teaching material. This will be monitored through Blackboard and students that have not accessed the teaching material will not be eligible to sit the assessment until they have met the requirement. The programme will run a minimum of twice a year, usually commencing in January and June, depending on demand.



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The purpose of this module is to provide you with knowledge and understanding of the core concepts related to Adult Auditory Rehabilitation including principles of health psychology and signal processing as well as technical and psychosocial aspects of the rehabilitation process. Read more

The purpose of this module is to provide you with knowledge and understanding of the core concepts related to Adult Auditory Rehabilitation including principles of health psychology and signal processing as well as technical and psychosocial aspects of the rehabilitation process. As an Audiologist or Hearing Aid Dispenser this will help you to assess the needs of adult patients with hearing loss and provide patients with accurate and up to date information in order that they can make informed decisions about their management and treatment including devices, equipment and features.

Module Aims

  • Equip you with the basic knowledge and understanding required to provide a clinical auditory rehabilitation service for adults with hearing loss and/or tinnitus or to pursue research in a hearing-aid related field.
  • Enable you to apply your practical and theoretical knowledge and comprehension to all aspects of the rehabilitation needs of adult hearing-impaired patients and adult patients with tinnitus.
  • Enable you to develop skills to critically evaluate and analyse information from the relevant scientific literature.

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Explain and critically analyse the arguments for, and the current consensus on, patientcentred rehabilitation for adults with hearing loss, including the assessment and analysis of need, effects of psychosocial factors, the provision of accurate and balanced information regarding management options, the facilitation of the patient’s decision making (especially regarding technology) and the role of communication strategies and tactics.
  • Formulate evidence-based recommendations for the rehabilitation of individual patients with common forms of hearing loss and tinnitus based on critical evaluation of a range of sources of information including that shared by the patient and the research literature.
  • Explain the process of individualised hearing-aid fitting on the basis of audiometric and other information, including the selection of an ear-mould/shell with appropriate modifications, the verification of the technical performance and other functional properties of a hearing aid (both in a coupler and the real ear), the validation of the fitting and the provision of relevant instructions and information to the particular user.
  • Identify and describe a wide range of different technologies (e.g. hearing aids, assistive devices, auditory implants), strategies (e.g. communication), skills (e.g. facilitation) and tools. (e.g. counselling and decision making tools) and other resources potentially available to the audiologist and patient to improve the patient’s hearing-related quality of life and explain their main pros and cons for common forms of hearing loss and psychosocial circumstance.
  • Demonstrate mastery of effective self-directed learning, scientific and patient-centred communication.

Syllabus

  • Overview of adult auditory rehabilitation and hearing aid fitting.
  • Understanding the impact of hearing loss in the context of the World Health Organisation.
  • International Classification of Functioning and the biopsychosocial models of disability.
  • Psychosocial impact of acquired hearing loss.
  • Introduction to hearing aids and components.
  • Specification and measurement of electroacoustic characteristics.
  • Range of devices and features, advantages and limitations of different options, consideration of the evidence base where appropriate.
  • Impressions, ear moulds, earshells and modifications.
  • Hearing aid selection and fitting: candidacy, ergonomic considerations, selection of electroacoustic characteristics by prescription methods.
  • Verification of hearing aid performance.
  • Counselling skills in audiology, including enabling adjustment and change.
  • Models of tinnitus distress.
  • Tinnitus management approaches.
  • Evaluation of auditory rehabilitation.
  • Evaluation of tinnitus interventions.


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For many people regular physical exercise is not carried out a sufficient level to stay healthy and maintain a basic level of fitness. Read more

For many people regular physical exercise is not carried out a sufficient level to stay healthy and maintain a basic level of fitness. This project will examine if augmenting a conventional exercise routine with recreational virtual environments, will increase the intrinsic mo tivation with a group of users.

Building on research in VR/AR platforms with 3D 6 Degrees of Freedom accurate low latency controllers where users’ physical movement can be tracked ,the game /experience will lead the user through a number of predefined physical activities over a specific time period.

The user’s movements and other biometric data are collated and assessed in the context of the user’s perception of exertion and motivation to continue to carry out the exercise. We hope to gain an understanding of the links between differing VR/AR experiences and motivation to carry out physical exercise.

Methodology proposed

This project will use a mixed methodology. A pilot study will be carried out on usage of the new the new system.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Through knowledge creation, application and transfer, this project will deepen our understanding of the factors determining motivation for physical exercise in a VR/AR environment. In line with the IT Carlow’s strategic research objectives, the outputs will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and at conferences.



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John Cabot University’s Master of Arts (MA) in Art History guides students toward professional mastery of the materials and methods of art history with emphasis on first-hand research in the museums, monuments, and archaeological sites of Rome. Read more

John Cabot University’s Master of Arts (MA) in Art History guides students toward professional mastery of the materials and methods of art history with emphasis on first-hand research in the museums, monuments, and archaeological sites of Rome. The degree can be completed in approximately fifteen months of full-time study. The program has a dual focus: the visual cultures of Rome and the Mediterranean across time, from antiquity to the present; and the acquisition of technical skills for primary research. It also stimulates critical perspectives on the impact of Roman art worldwide. 

Overview

Taught by John Cabot University’s international faculty, the degree program can be completed in three semesters of full-time study (Fall-Spring-Fall) and an intervening summer. It unfolds in three phases: a structured Foundation Year (Fall-Spring); a Master’s Exam (Summer); and a Thesis Semester (Fall). 

Seminars and courses take place at John Cabot University’s campuses in the centrally-located Trastevere district of Rome and in nearby Roman museums, churches, palaces, monuments, archaeological parks, archives, rare book libraries, restoration labs, study collections, artists’ workshops, public installations, and contemporary art galleries. These venues of visual culture and documentation constitute the laboratory of the degree. Some courses involve travel to other parts of Italy—for example, to Naples, Florence, or Assisi.

Financial Aid and Scholarhsips

JCU Financial Aid Office Mission

To help dedicated and deserving students meet their educational goals through a focused and merit-based scholarship program. The University assists selected students of limited means and/or extraordinary academic achievement by making it possible for them to experience the high quality of education that JCU offers. Financial Aid at JCU comes in various forms and from various sources such as loans, scholarships, and other resources. Applicants to the MA in Art History will be considered for the following forms of financial assistance:  

  • Full Tuition Fellowships (1-2 merit-based awards per year)
  • Partial Tuition Grants for up to 50% of tuition and fees

JCU alumni admitted to the MA receive a tuition discount of €1000. This alumni discount also applies for students who have studied abroad at JCU for a semester or summer. Alumni are also eligible for the financial assistance outlined above. The Alumni Discount is not applicable for those who receive full tuition fellowships.

For more information on scholarships and financial aid visit the website here: http://www.johncabot.edu/master-art-history/financial-aid.aspx

Part-Time Study

Applicants who are EU citizens or who have an Italian permit of stay (permesso di soggiorno) are eligible for admission as part-time students. Part-time students take between three and nine credit hours per term and are allowed four years to complete all degree requirements.

For more details on part time study: http://www.johncabot.edu/master-art-history/degree-program.aspx

For more information on the department of Art History you can download our brochure here: http://www.johncabot.edu/academics/art_history_2014.pdf



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Overview. A multidisciplinary perspective on the most relevant local and global issues regarding solidarity, including citizenship, poverty, sustainability, migration, welfare reform, social movements and private initiatives. Read more

Overview

A multidisciplinary perspective on the most relevant local and global issues regarding solidarity, including citizenship, poverty, sustainability, migration, welfare reform, social movements and private initiatives.

Solidarity is one of today’s main challenges. Highly volatile flows of people, goods and ideas, as well as the restructuring of markets and governing institutions have led to a high degree of globalization. Global links crisscross national borders and challenge established conceptions and structures. In addition, neoliberal reforms of state and society across the globe rewrite social contracts between people and states. How is solidarity imagined and practiced in this contemporary context?

The Master’s programme in Anthropology and Development Studies – with the theme of Shifting Solidarities – is at the cutting-edge of both social and cultural anthropology and development studies. The issue of solidarity in a neoliberal, postcolonial world encompasses a wide array of anthropological and development questions. By developing your own research questions, you'll be encouraged to delve deeper into the most relevant local and global challenges of solidarity.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ads

Why study Anthropology and Development Studies at Radboud University?

- This programme is at the cutting edge of both social and cultural anthropology and development studies. Joint classes with students from anthropology and development studies will give you a great opportunity to see all the global challenges from the other discipline as well as your own.

- Using a multidisciplinary perspective this programme also draws on knowledge from other disciplines including sociology, political sciences, economics and geography.

- This programme will prepare you for a wide array of jobs. From policy officer in the public sector or at (international) aid organisations to consultant at an engineering or consultancy firm.

- You can choose to go abroad for the research for your Master's programme.

- The Master's programme is run by the chair of Anthropology and the chair of Development Studies, both of whom have a wide network of international contacts that extends from China to Chile and from South Africa to the Pacific . This means you’ll have plenty of opportunities for arranging internships internationally.

- Radboud University offers a unique one-year Advanced Master in International Development (AMID) that you could apply for after completing your Master's. During this postgraduate programme, you'll combine real-life work at an aid organisation or a government department with practice-based instruction at the university.

Career prospects

Studying Anthropology and Development Studies constitutes excellent preparation for a wide range of jobs. You're not limited to the career-path of becoming an aid worker, but are also trained for research and policy-making jobs. Many of our students therefore find work in the public sector or at international organisations, as well as in in education. After studying Anthropology and Development Studies at Radboud University, you'll have a broad array of options in the job market.

- Entering the labour market as an ADS graduate

As an Anthropology and Development Studies graduate from Radboud University, you'll have excellent prospects on today's job market. Former student, Margriet Tolsma, found work as a regional coordinator at Amnesty International. Anoeshka Gehring continued in the field of research and commenced her PhD in legal anthropology and migration in February 2011. Other graduates found work as:

- a policy maker or executive at cultural institutions;

- an advisor at aid and welfare organisations such as the UN, Oxfam NOVIB, Cordaid or the Dutch Council for Refugees;

- a researcher at a university or NGO, trade union, consultancy firm or private institution;

- a policy officer, advisor or researcher at the central government (diplomat training, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Justice Department) and local government (provincial and municipal level) or non-profit organisations;

- a social studies teacher in secondary or vocational education;

- a journalist.

- Want to boost your chances of landing a job? Take the postgraduate course!

After completing your Master's you will have the option of doing the Advanced Master in International Development (AMID). This one-year postgraduate programme is offered by the chair of Development Studies and is unique in the Netherlands. During this programme, you will combine real-life work at an aid organisation or a government department with practice-based instruction at the university. This programme will significantly boost your chances on the labour market.

Meet Radboud University

- Information for international students

Radboud University would love to meet you in your country (http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/behavioural-science/meet-radboud/information-for) in order to give all the information you need and to answer any questions you might have about studying in the Netherlands. In the next few months, an advisor of Radboud University will be attending fairs in various countries, always accompanied by a current or former student.

Furthermore, we understand if you would like to see the Radboud Campus and the city of Nijmegen, which is why we organise an Master's Open Day for international students, which you are welcome to attend (http://www.ru.nl/openday)

- Information for Dutch students

Radboud University offers students in the Netherlands plenty of opportunities to get more information on your programme of choice, or get answers to any questions you might have. Apart from a Master's Evening and a Master's Day, we also organise Orientation Days and a Master’s Afternoon for HBO students.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ads



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Design for the Digital Age. The program is tailored to practicing designers seeking to enhance their digital skills and leadership potential as well as professionals with relevant design experience who want to enter the field. Read more

Design for the Digital Age

The program is tailored to practicing designers seeking to enhance their digital skills and leadership potential as well as professionals with relevant design experience who want to enter the field. It encompasses the full product development cycle in communication design — from idea conception to prototyping to feedback-based refinements — and familiarizes you with business strategy.

In this one-year, 30-credit curriculum, you develop creative problem-solving strategies to relay and translate messages, information, and ideas. Your full-time course of study is built on four components: instruction in advanced core design competencies, practices and methods courses, external partnerships, and the core studio sequence. Parsons faculty — skilled at bringing together design thinking, aesthetics, and technology—guide you to explore innovative composition and visualization methods, interaction design, typography, and industry best practices.

Industry Ready

You graduate from the program with your own unique, forward-looking aesthetic anchored in professional skills acquired throughout the program, which include entrepreneurship, strategic working methodologies, and contemporary prototyping. You are prepared for digital design work settings, with competence in various industry-standard technologies, including front-end development skills (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript), and experience navigating professional partnerships with teams and clients.

Future Opportunities

Graduates pursue careers in Interaction Design, User Experience (UX) Design, Digital Product Design, and Product Management.

Financial Aid Deadline

All applicants selected for admission into our program are considered for a merit scholarship award that is determined by the strength of their application. Scholarship award notification is communicated at the same time as the admission decision. If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, we encourage you to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which can be found on the Web at http://www.fafsa.gov. The FAFSA is available each year on October 1. You do not need to wait for an admission decision to apply for federal aid; we recommend submitting by our FAFSA priority deadline of February 1 for fall applicants. (The New School’s federal school code is 002780.)

Creating Collaboratively, from Concept to Product

The specialized course of study provides coding experience and engages the iterative process and a range of collaboration and teamwork strategies. You work from design conception and pitching through post-launch critical analyses of user experience (UX) and interaction (UI). The New York City location enables you to take advantage of the city’s diverse technology and design resources while learning alongside like-minded designers in the Parsons community. You can supplement core courses with a related university-sponsored public program and an elective offered at Parsons or another school or college of The New School, such as a class in psychology, marketing, data visualization, or another field. This program is offered by Parsons' School of Art, Media, and Technology (AMT). You can learn about the AMT community and explore the blog to see what students, faculty, and alumni are doing in NYC and around the world.

You can request more information here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/commdesign?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_parsons_grad&utm_term=communication_design



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Parsons’ Master of Science in Data Visualization is a multidisciplinary program in which students develop skills bringing together visual design, computer science, statistical analysis, and ethical considerations of data analysis and representation. Read more

Parsons’ Master of Science in Data Visualization is a multidisciplinary program in which students develop skills bringing together visual design, computer science, statistical analysis, and ethical considerations of data analysis and representation. The presentation of data plays a critical role in the shaping of opinion, policy, and decision making in today’s increasingly global society. Giving students a competitive edge as they enter the field, the MS program responds to the increased demand for experts who can turn data into insight.

This program is part of Parsons' School of Art, Media, and Technology (AMT). Learn about the AMT community and explore our blog to see what students, faculty, and alumni are doing in NYC and around the world.

Theory and Practice

Housed within Parsons’ School of Art, Media, and Technology, the MS Data Visualization program can be completed in one or two years. The 30-credit curriculum integrates theory and studio practice, so students acquire the creative, quantitative, and coding tools needed to analyze and depict data, gaining a holistic understanding of context, audience, and objectives. With the MS in Data Visualization, students obtain the diverse skill set needed for success in a range of careers related to data interpretation. Students graduate with portfolios demonstrating their ability to create databases and Web-based software tools that reflect an understanding of data analysis and information visualization for varied applications.

Opportunities with Local Industry

The program’s setting in New York City, a technological hub and pioneer of open-source culture, offers invaluable industry access. Students intern with industry leaders and external partners from the government, nonprofit, and commercial sectors. Faculty invite guest lecturers and critics to share their insights and expose students to new possibilities in data visualization and related career paths.

Future Opportunities

Graduates find success in a wide variety of fields including data analysis, digital design, advertising and branding, journalism, business consulting and analytics strategy, management, strategic planning, entrepreneurship, social enterprise, public policy, trend forecasting, and business intelligence.

You can request more information about all possible future opportunities here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/data-visualization?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_parsons_grad&utm_term=data_visualization

Financial Aid Deadline

All applicants selected for admission into our program are considered for a merit scholarship award that is determined by the strength of their application. Scholarship award notification is communicated at the same time as the admission decision. International students are eligible only for merit scholarships. If you are a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen, we encourage you to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which can be found on the Web at http://www.fafsa.gov. The FAFSA is available each year on October 1. You do not need to wait for an admission decision to apply for federal aid; we recommend submitting by our FAFSA priority deadline of February 1 for fall applicants. (The New School’s federal school code is 002780.)

You can request more information on available scholarships here: http://www.newschool.edu/m/data-visualization?utm_source=find_a_masters&utm_medium=hyperlink_listing&utm_campaign=pm_parsons_grad&utm_term=data_visualization



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Whatever the industry, and whether operating globally or nationally, it’s more important than ever for businesses to manage their supply chains and ecosystems carefully in order to succeed. Read more

Whatever the industry, and whether operating globally or nationally, it’s more important than ever for businesses to manage their supply chains and ecosystems carefully in order to succeed. Companies, government departments and international organisations cannot survive for long without rigorous, efficient and strategic management of supply chains and logistics. They need to demonstrate their resilience against disruption and adversity, the incorporation of new technologies, and the application of e-security, location and outsourcing decisions in a world of rapid technological change, global industrial restructuring and retrenchment and onset of dangerous climate change.

On our one-year International Supply Chain Management MSc you’ll gain a thorough understanding of the forces at work and knowledge of sophisticated tools to strategically manage both large, complex, technology-based supply chains, as well as more traditional ones. You’ll cover logistics and procurement often across national boundaries, companies, regions and time-zones.

Our focused and highly relevant curriculum is based on current thinking and real world experience and needs in managing supply chains globally as technologies, markets and the international business and trade environment are changing fast. You’ll learn from senior academics and experienced practitioners, with input from CEOs and senior executives across a range of industries. These industry connections have informed the content and design of the course.

We recruit students from arts, sciences, manufacturing, business, management and services and prepare them for successful careers across many industries: high technology manufacturing, engineering, electronics and computing, service sectors, fashion and clothing, food and agriculture, pharmaceuticals and bio medical, aid agencies, disaster relief and NGOs.

The Centre for Professional Studies was founded in 2013, recognising that international industries, firms, organisations and governments are demanding exceptional candidates who have the knowledge base and practical skills to finance, manage and execute processes and projects successfully. Our courses combine theory with industry related knowledge and expertise to provide you with an excellent headstart for a challenging career.

  • You’ll be equipped with the practical and intellectual skills you need to become a professional supply chain manager in any industry.
  • You will gain an advanced understanding of the international supply chain and the approaches to finance, manage and execute supply chain excellence
  • You will learn about the tools and techniques used by best practice companies and their applicability in different contexts
  • You’ll learn from highly experienced practitioners, including input from CEOs and senior executives from international firms across a range of industries.

Course structure

  • Introduction to Project Management
  • International Supply Chain Management
  • Global Logistics and International Trade
  • Operations and Quality Management
  • Supply Chain and Financial Performance
  • Risk Management and Resilient Supply Chains
  • Sustainability and Megatrends
  • Information Systems and Technology
  • Global Sourcing and Procurement
  • Business Research Methods
  • Project by Dissertation

Teaching & assessment

Over the 12 months of this course, you’ll take ten taught course units, attend various seminars and workshops and complete a final project or dissertation. Each term is made up of five taught course units. And at the end of the year, you will apply the techniques and theories you’ve learned during the taught elements in a Masters level thesis of 12,000 – 15,000 words on a supply chain related topic. The dissertation will typically consist of a literature review followed by empirical work, involving either qualitative or quantitative research.

You’ll learn from highly experienced practitioners, including input from CEOs and senior executives from international firms across a range of industries. These industry connections have informed the content and design of the course, in a way that will not only build on your existing knowledge and experience, but increase your chances of finding employment at a salary level higher than the graduate national average wage in your chosen sector. 

Your future career

Graduates of our supply chain courses have proven to be highly employable and pursued careers across a range of industries. 

Roles in supply chain and logistics management can vary and are not limited to professionals who oversee the implementation and operations of supply chains, outsourcing, procurement, transportation and logistics. A typical role could include taking ownership for a specific aspect of a supply chain project, ensuring that it is delivered to all stakeholders and meets the competitive needs of an organisation. You might be the person who provides detailed knowledge on a specific supply chain management discipline, or provides professional support services to a range of supply chain and procurement needs of an organisation, including international aid and disaster relief logistics management and planning.

With an MSc you can progress your career in a wide range of positions in industry, make substantial contributions to multidisciplinary teams, strategically managing domestic and international supply chains, logistics, procurement, global sourcing, finance, technology acquisition, and risk management, amongst others. This will help you progress through an organisation into senior management positions or change career paths across industries, government and NGOs. Some industries you could go into include:

  • Electronics, Mobile Communication and Computing
  • Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare
  • Food and Agriculture
  • Energy
  • Supermarkets
  • Textiles, Clothing and Fashion Industries
  • Finance and International Banking
  • Manufacturing, Aerospace, Automotive, Heavy Engineering
  • High –tech Materials and Components Start-Ups
  • Minerals, Oil &Gas
  • Commodities Trade, Procurement and Distribution
  • Shipping
  • Airlines
  • Music, Film Production, TV Production
  • Government Departments
  • International Aid, Disaster Relief and NGO


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This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Audiological Science MSc provides a detailed study of the hearing and balance mechanisms. their structure, function and pathology. Read more

The Audiological Science MSc provides a detailed study of the hearing and balance mechanisms: their structure, function and pathology. The relationship between laboratory research and clinical aspects forms a key element: lectures, demonstrations and tutorials will be complemented by practical experience in the clinic and laboratory.

About this degree

Students learn how people develop, or are born with, hearing and/or balance difficulties; how to test for hearing and balance problems and how to rehabilitate or habilitate patients with these problems. They learn the theory and science underpinning these practical clinical skills including acoustics and the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and vestibular systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, eight core modules (120 credits), full-time nine months is offered.

Core modules

  • Signals, Systems, Acoustics and the Ear
  • Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
  • Diagnostic Audiology
  • Introduction to Amplification and Aural Rehabilitation
  • Balance
  • Paediatric Audiology
  • Clinical and Professional Practice
  • Research Methods and Statistics

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practical demonstrations, and clinical placements. Practicals will consist of observations followed by supervised testing for rehabilitation and diagnostics in the Ear Institute’s specialist Skills Laboratory. Assessment is by essays, presentations, written examinations, clinical practical examinations and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Audiological Science MSc

Careers

Many graduates are now employed as audiologists either within the NHS or private sector or work as hearing aid dispensers. 

Please note that the Audiological Science MSc does not meet the requirements of the UK regulatory bodies on its own. The programme provides the required theoretical skills and knowledge for clinical registration in the UK but does not provide the practical training required. Applicants wishing to practise as an audiologist or hearing aid dispenser in the UK will need to transfer to the Audiological Science with Clinical Practice MSc (two-year full time). This is subject to availability and there is a competitive interview process.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Audiologist, Princess of Wales Hospital (NHS)
  • Audiologist, St George's Hospital (NHS)
  • Senior Assistant Audiologist, Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • Student Audiologist, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust
  • Trainee Healthcare Scientist, Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and studying MsC Neurosensory Science, Aston University

Employability

As well as working as audiologists, graduates have also pursued academic careers, completing PhDs and taught doctorates. International students have used the knowledge and skills gained to promote and develop audiological services in their countries. It is suitable for audiologists who have no graduate-level qualification in audiology and wish to develop their careers, or academic researchers who have a specialist interest in audiology.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Ear Institute is the largest and most broad-based academic unit for research into hearing and deafness in the UK. Students benefit from the range of clinical and research expertise among its staff.

The UCL Ear Institute is associated with the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, which houses the largest clinical audiology unit in the country, and works closely with NHS audiology departments to provide placement and observation opportunities for students.

The programme has close links with healthcare providers and industry (e.g. hearing aid manufacturers) providing students with access to the latest practice and technology and excellent networking opportunities.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Ear Institute

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website



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This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Read more

This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Bringing together the study of medicine and humanities, the course provides an inclusive approach that mirrors the reality of aid operations and informs the reflexive processes of both analytical and applied disciplines. Students will be able to draw synergies from an exceptionally wide breadth of disciplinary traditions and research expertise.

Aims

1. Provide critical insights into competing perspectives on how Humanitarianism and Conflict Responses can be understood, analysed and explained - from both an historiographic and contemporary viewpoint.

2. Develop analytical skills in critically evaluating the idea of humanitarianism and the ways that responses to conflict are organised, justified and implemented. This includes competency in developing a reasoned argument, critically considering data sources and defending different approaches.

3. Develop skills in gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources. This will be complemented by guidance on how best to manage workloads and obtain research materials.

4. Enable students to apply research skills to a relevant research area.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme

Students should be able to show a critical understanding of :

1. Key issues and debates in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of policies at international and national levels.

2. Both the range of social science topics associated with Humanitarianism and Conflict Response and the normative and historiographic assumptions which underpin these issues.

3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of the causes of conflict, reconstruction, ethics and international governance structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGOs and other civil institutions.

4. A detailed and extensive understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, of the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject; and of how to produce an original piece of academic research, all through their dissertation.

Special features

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Teaching and learning

View the course handbook to see details of the current unit options.

Coursework and assessment

This will vary from course unit to unit.

Course unit details

Course units may include:

  • Humanitarianism and conflict response: inquiries
  • Emergency humanitarian assistance
  • Fundamentals of epidemiology
  • Humanitarian responses to crises: case studies
  • The history of humanitarian aid
  • Research & evaluation methods
  • Global health
  • The Arab revolts and post-revolutionary state formation
  • Anthropology of violence
  • Performance in theory and practice
  • The ethics of killing
  • Ethics in world politics
  • Conflict analysis
  • Democracy: theory & practice
  • Reconstruction and development
  • Global governance

Career opportunities

As a hard-working, ambitious Manchester postgraduate, a wide range of exciting careers are within your reach. Students at the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute come from a broad range of backgrounds, with varying levels of experience. Many who already have work experience will be able to harness the knowledge gained from their course to progress within their field of expertise, reaching senior roles in government and non-governmental organisations. Others will be able to use the course as a starting point to progress onto careers within NGOs, HR consultancies, financial institutions, academic institutions and more. Whatever your level of experience, you can access support from your tutors, the University Careers Service and an extensive alumni network to boost your career prospects further than ever before whilst at Manchester.

Associated organisations

A close link has been formed with the humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize, it delivers emergency aid in over 60 countries to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural or man-made disasters or exclusion from healthcare through its staff of 25,000 health professionals, logistics experts and administrators. The HCRI is also building a network of associate fellows based in relevant organisations and academic institutions around the world.



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The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Read more
The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program prepares teachers not only as effective and ethical practitioners but also as scholars and leaders in the profession.

Faculty members are international leaders in research and are highly skilled in the education of deaf people. A carefully designed system of faculty advisement is a prominent feature of the program. On-campus facilities, state-of-the-art technology, and a well-established system of educational access services combine to make this a vital program for both deaf and hearing students who desire careers as professional educators of deaf students.

Plan of study

Course work requires a minimum of four semesters. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 must be maintained. Before graduation, students are expected to have at least intermediate-level signing skills as determined by a Sign Language Proficiency Interview.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university,

- Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Have a basic knowledge of American Sign Language as measured by a departmental skill assessment, or willingness to take American Sign Language I (or its equivalent) at NTID or another college prior to beginning the program,

- Have a level of writing proficiency appropriate to graduate study as indicated by a review of undergraduate writing-intensive courses and an expository essay,

- Submit letters of reference and an expository essay that indicates evidence of professional commitment and potential for success in the program,

- Submit scores from Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Participate in an individual interview, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 213 (Internet-based) are required.

Additionally, 30 semester credit hours in a content area are required by the New York State Education Department for initial certification to teach a secondary (grades 7–12) content area. Students who do not have the required number of hours must complete the additional credits before applying for New York State certification. Secondary academic subjects include American Sign Language, English, mathematics, social studies, or science. Please note: The social studies content area includes economics and government, and at least 21 semester hours in the history and geography of the United States and the world.

Additional information

- Financial Aid

NTID graduate tuition rates are less than one-half of RIT’s tuition. Approximately 70 percent of students enrolled in the MS program in secondary education receive some type of financial assistance each year. Students complete only the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for financial aid. Students enrolled in this program may be eligible for grant funding from the U.S. Department of Education. In addition, federal loan programs may be available.

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The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Read more

The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Development agencies want staff trained in political economy analysis skills while academics and governments now focus more than ever on the political underpinnings of global development challenges.

This MSc makes a direct link between academic and practical policy approaches to international development, with an emphasis on exploring and understanding the politics of developing countries and the relationship between politics and development. Issues examined include: the impact of political systems, governance and political actors on developmental successes and failures; the relationships between global, regional, national and local organisations, networks and institutions and the driving of developmental change and the politics of aid and international donors.

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

It is now clearer than ever before that the greatest development challenges of our time – poverty, conflict, famine, poor governance etc. – are driven primarily by political, not technical, factors. The aim of this programme is to provide theoretical and empirical training to students to enable them to understand the role that politics plays in both facilitating and undermining development, in both the North and the South.

The programme is aimed at recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects and focuses on a range of key questions, including:

  •  are democracy and development intrinsically linked?
  • how do theories of development link to development practice?
  • what is the ‘developmental state’?
  • how do historical and structural factors play into developmental change, or failure?

The programme is taught by some of the leading thinkers on the relationship between politics and development, each of whom work closely with policy-makers in the UK and internationally. Students will also benefit from engagement with major research programmes focused on the politics of development based in IDD, including theGovernance and Social Development Resource Centre.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. In the summer term, students complete assignments and focus on their 12,000 word dissertation.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories and approaches and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • The different political systems operating in developing countries and how and why such systems have come about.
  • The complex relationship between politics and development
  • The impact of political systems and political actors on developmental success and failure.
  • The impact of the political economy in developing countries and globally on aid and donor policies 
  • The ability to critically analyse and understand complex political and economic relationships and events.
  • The ability to understand in-depth and critically evaluate approaches to political analysis in developing countries.
  • The ability to critically, clearly and concisely argue the case for and against a range of development strategies.
  • The ability to interpret, explain and critically evaluate approaches to the political economy of development.
  • The ability to make presentations and write in a well argued, well-structured and readable manner, making good use of a wide range of references.

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government… Read more

The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government, public enterprises or non-governmental organisations, whether at local, national or international level. The MPA bridges theory and practice, enabling students to acquire the skills and understanding needed for effective management and strategy in government. The programme is delivered in a highly motivated international learning environment.

The Finance pathway enables managers in the public sector and not-for-profit sector to update and improve their understanding of financial and economic management. The programme is particularly designed for those working in finance ministries, finance sections within sectoral ministries, development banks, local government, public enterprises, aid providers, non-governmental organisations, and research and training organisations who wish to participate at a strategic level in financial management decisions.

Course details

The MPA is an international Masters’ programme, aimed at people who are pursuing (or would like to pursue) a career in public administration in government, public enterprises or non-governmental organizations, whether at local, national or international level. The MPA bridges theory and practice, enabling students to acquire the skills and understanding needed for effective management and strategy in government. The programme is delivered in a highly motivated international learning environment.

The aim of the Finance pathway is to enable public sector managers to update and improve their practical skills in financial and economic management. The aim is to enable managers to participate on financial management at the strategic level in their organisation rather than to focus on detailed technical skills like bookkeeping. The programme is particularly designed for those working in finance ministries, finance sections within sectoral ministries, development banks, aid providers local government, public enterprises, non-governmental organisations, and research and training organisations who need to understand the principles of financial management and work with operational staff like accountants. This is primarily a public sector management, not a business management, programme, although some of the themes covered are relevant to both sectors.

The approach taken within the programme is practical and introduces theories and conceptual models where they help understand and solve practical problems. Students analyse practical cases, using real data as far as possible to provide excellent experience and develop required skills in public economic and finance management.

The programme includes development of understanding of the role of the state in managing the economy and public finances; managing monetary, exchange rate, fiscal, trade and environmental policy; budgeting and control. The programme considers the issues associated with working with the private sector; and, in designing, planning, financing and evaluating projects. New approaches to reform of financial management including performance budgeting and improving accountability receive string attention. There is a special focus on decentralised service delivery reflecting IDD’s long experience on working in decentralised systems.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilizing a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. This is followed by the study trip and completion of the dissertation.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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You will learn how states and their governments communicate in international politics and how they shape long term strategies in a range of fields from military to diplomatic to aid and development. Read more

You will learn how states and their governments communicate in international politics and how they shape long term strategies in a range of fields from military to diplomatic to aid and development. This includes preparing for conflict between states or with insurgent groups, communicating a path during hostilities, transitioning through post-conflict situations and also how states use diplomacy, culture and economics to avoid conflict and engage in treaty and trade negotiations. You will also encounter crisis communications: how to shape strategic responses to natural disasters, terror attacks, and military invasions. To appreciate this complex field from multiple perspectives, students will further discover how insurgent and revolutionary movements think about and put into practice their communications strategies with populations and states.

Along with subject matter expertise, students will develop transferable analytic, research and practical skills in a dynamic and rigorous intellectual environment.

The course is associated with the King's Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) - a global network of universities, government agencies and alumni.

Key Benefits

  • War Studies is a multidisciplinary department devoted to the study of all aspects of war and conflict and the broad remit of international relations. In the 21st century we need to understand how states and insurgent movements communicate their policies and ideas in these dynamic contexts.
  • Develop skills for in-depth analytical and critical thinking about international politics. Work with the latest, cutting-edge research in your field.
  • Contribute to a vibrant research community. Our world-renowned staff and an international student body come from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Work with some of the world’s best academics in your field. Our Department staff publish world-leading research and offer outstanding research-led teaching and training.
  • Work with some of the world’s leading practitioners from governments, international organisations, and strategic communications agencies. We teach not only how to think about strategic communications but how to do it.
  • Build networks. Connect with visiting academics, government ministers, diplomats, soldiers, aid and trade leaders, and journalists who regularly lecture and deliver our seminars.
  • Grow your networks with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policymaking bodies in the UK and globally.
  • Enjoy living and studying right in the heart of London beside the River Thames.

Description

The aim of this course is to enhance knowledge of a broad range of subjects and approaches to engaging with international politics today.

The course is available to both full- and part-time students, and is available as an MA, Postgraduate Diploma, or Postgraduate Certificate. 

The MA course comprises modules that total 180 credits. You will take two 40 credits worth of required modules, and a further 40 credits of optional modules. These credits may be chosen from a wide range of modules available in the Department of War Studies. MA students are also required to take a 15,000-word research dissertation on a topic of Strategic Communications (60 credits).

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Per 40-credit required module, you will typically receive two hours per week over two ten week terms. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or combinations thereof or one lecture followed by a case study. In addition to this you can expect 360 hours of self-study. 

Per 20-credit module optional module, you will typically receive two hours per week over one ten week term. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or combinations thereof. A few options are formatted to run as intensive weekend sessions. In addition to this you can expect 180 hours of self-study. 

Per 40-credit optional module, you will typically receive two hours per week over two ten week terms. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or one lecture and one case study or combinations thereof. Some options are formatted to run as intensive weekend sessions. In addition to this you can expect 360 hours of self-study. 

For the Dissertation module, you will typically receive 12 hours worth of traning workshops and/or supervision. In addition to this you can expect 588 hours of self-study. 

Typically 1 credit equals 10 hours of work.

Assessments 

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of essays, project work, class participation, and/or exams. The dissertation module assessment will be assessed solely on the dissertation (100%).

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