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On a national and international scale there is an increasing need to reconcile the need for increased food production with the need for conservation of natural resources. Read more

The course

On a national and international scale there is an increasing need to reconcile the need for increased food production with the need for conservation of natural resources. There is also a need for people to understand and deal with complex land situations such as within agricultural systems. This course is intended to provide students with a detailed understanding of basic and applied agro-ecology and the issues associated with, on the one hand, the increased and shifting needs for food production and on the other the need for conservation and management of natural resources. Sustainable food production and sustainable intensification are of high policy importance both nationally and internationally. Agro-ecology is a key aspect of sustainable intensification.

How will it benefit me?

An understanding of agro-ecology and the organisms and systems that underpin agricultural systems can facilitate the ability to manage agricultural systems in a more sustainable manner.
This course will provide the foundation for a career in both conservation and in agriculture.
The course will provide you with specialized training in agroecology and farmland conservation.

You will be able to:

Appraise the role of agro-ecology within the wider context of global food security and sustainable food production
Evaluate the strategic and operational issues and conflicts affecting the sustainable management of agricultural ecosystems in order to select the most appropriate conservation management solutions.
Evaluate the interactions between organisms and consider these when making management recommendations for successful agro-ecological landscapes
Develop the ability to solve conflicts in agro-ecosystems by the application of novel research techniques

The course will:
Prepare you for a career in conservation agriculture, or agriculture or conservation more widely.
Offer vocational training in the field of agroecology.
Enable you to make a more informed choices for further study, such as PhD studies or other career development

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The Plant Sciences programme has been designed to help meet the worldwide demand for scientific expertise in the development of plant and crop production and farming systems. Read more

MSc Plant Sciences

The Plant Sciences programme has been designed to help meet the worldwide demand for scientific expertise in the development of plant and crop production and farming systems.

Programme summary

Plant Sciences deals with crop production ranging from plant breeding to the development of sustainable systems for the production of food, pharmaceuticals and renewable resources. It is linked with a professional sector that is highly important to the world economy. The programme focuses on the principles of plant breeding, agro-ecology and plant pathology and the integration of these disciplines to provide healthy plants for food and non-food applications. Technological aspects of crop production are combined with environmental, quality, socio-economic and logistic aspects. Students learn to apply their knowledge to develop integrated approaches for sustainable plant production.

Specialisations

Crop Science
Sound knowledge of crop science is essential to develop appropriate cultivation methods for a reliable supply of safe, healthy food; while considering nature conservation and biodiversity. An integrated approach is crucial to studying plant production at various levels (plant, crop, farm, region). This requires a sound understanding of basic physical, chemical, and physiological aspects of crop growth. Modelling and simulation are used to analyse yield constraints and to improve production efficiency.

Greenhouse Horticulture
Greenhouse horticulture is a unique agro-system and a key economic sector in the Netherlands. It is the only system that allows significant control of (a-) biotic factors through protected cultivation. The advances in this field are based on technological innovations. This specialisation combines product quality with quality of production and focuses on production, quality- and chain management of vegetables, cut flowers and potted plants.

Natural Resource Management
The development of sustainable agro-ecosystems requires understanding of the complex relationships between soil health, cultivation practices and nutrient kinetics. Other important aspects include the interactions between agriculture and nature, and competing claims on productive land worldwide. Natural Resource Management provides knowledge and tools to understand the interactions between the biotic and abiotic factors in agro-systems to facilitate diverse agricultural demands: bulk vs. pharmaceutical products, food vs. biofuel, conservation of biodiversity, climate change, and eco-tourism.

Plant Breeding and Genetic Resources
Plant Breeding and Genetic Resources ranges from the molecular to the population level and requires knowledge of the physiology and genetics of cultivated plants. Plant breeding is crucial in the development of varieties that meet current demands regarding yield, disease resistance, quality and sustainable production. The use of molecular techniques adds to the rapid identification of genes for natural resistance and is essential for accelerating selection by marker assisted breeding.

Complete Online Master
In September 2015, Wageningen University started the specialisation "Plant Breeding" as the first complete online Master of Science. For more information go to http://www.wageningenuniversity.eu/onlinemaster.


Plant Pathology and Entomology
The investments made in crop production need to be protected from losses caused by biotic stress. Integrated pest management provides protection by integrating genetic resistance, cultivation practices and biological control. This specialisation focuses on the ecology of insects, nematodes and weeds, and the epidemiology of fungi and viruses, including transmission mechanisms. Knowledge of plantinsect, plant-pathogen, and crop-weed relations establishes the basis for studies in integrated pest management and resistance breeding.

Your future career

Graduates in Plant Sciences have excellent career prospects and most of them receive job offers before graduation. They are university-trained professionals who are able to contribute to the sustainable development of plant production at various integration levels based on their knowledge of fundamental and applied plant sciences and their interdisciplinary approach. Graduates with a research focus are employed at universities, research institutes and plant breeding or agribusiness companies. Other job opportunities are in management, policy, consultancy and communication in agribusiness and (non-) governmental organisations.

Alumnus Maarten Rouwet.
“I was born in Germany and raised in the East of the Netherlands. After high school I applied for the Bèta-gamma bachelor at the University of Amsterdam where I majored in biology. After visiting the master open day at Wageningen University I knew that the master Plant Sciences had something unique to offer. In my master, I specialised in plant breeding, an ever so interesting field of research. I just started my first job as junior biotech breeder of leavy vegetables at Enza Zaden, a breeding company in Enkhuizen. One of my responsibilities is to identify resistances in wild species of lettuce and to implement these in breeding programmes of cultivated lettuce.”

Related programmes:
MSc Biosystems Engineering
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Biology
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation
MSc Organic Agriculture
MSc Plant Biotechnology.

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The "Italian Food and Wine" MSc degree will focus on the understanding, management, promotion and protection of high-value food products, including wine. Read more

MSc Italian FOOD & WINE (ItF&W)

The "Italian Food and Wine" MSc degree will focus on the understanding, management, promotion and protection of high-value food products, including wine.

Programme Summary

In this MSc course, the internationally-recognised Italian food production system is analysed as a model for defining and characterising the individual elements that contribute to the unique value of food products that are inextricably linked to place (terroir) through historic, social and cultural ties. These elements also include more recent developments in technology, nutrition, food safety, diet and health, and sensory science that are at the heart of a growing international demand for terroir-related high-value foods.

The specific learning outcome is a deep understanding of the multi-faceted characteristics that distinguish these foods from others in the marketplace and that can be exploited in products’ valorisation and consumer information strategies both in the EU and international markets. The ultimate objective of this multi-disciplinary program is to train professionals who are well-versed in the complex system of producing high-value foods and wines whose quality is profoundly linked to tradition and place of origin.

Who is the MSc candidate?

This programme is open to Italian and foreign students interested in learning and implementing effective actions for the valorisation of high-quality food products and wines.

What career opportunities does the MSc provide?

Graduates will be expert in the technical and economical management, valorisation and protection of high quality agro-food products - in an export and territorial development-oriented perspective - by using the Italian system as the reference model. He/she will find employment opportunities in quality-oriented agro-food companies, in producers' organizations, and in public and private consultancy companies involved in the protection, valorisation, marketing, consulting, training and communication activities for high-quality agro-food products.
The most relevant positions concern: ii) marketing of high-quality foods and wines, on both the EU and international market; ii) design and implementation of promotion and protection strategies for these products; iii) management of producers' organizations; iv) 'off-trade' and 'on-trade' buying activities, mainly in the international market; v) information on high-quality foods and wines management; vi) planning and management of territorial development strategies based on 'terroir-related' quality agro-food products.

How is the programme organised?

During the two-years MSc course students choose 12 course units – according to their individual background and interest - among the following:

Plant biodiversity and food
Animal biodiversity and food
Quality, processing and sensorial analysis of Italian food
Quality, processing and sensorial analysis of Italian wine
Food microbiology and quality
Food safety and hygiene
Food traceability for food quality
Food, wine and nutrition

Value adding quality schemes and consumer demand
Food and Wine-based territorial valorization and rural development
Quality-oriented Food and Wine management and governance

Consumer behavior
Food, wine and society
Food and Wine history and anthropology
Food and wine: perspectives from abroad

Foreign language (Italian or English)

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory and field activities, practical exercises, and seminars by outside experts that feature a rich variety of relevant case studies of Italian foods and wines. Opportunities for intensive tutoring and for master thesis-related stages of at least six months duration will be available with outstanding companies in this sector of the food industry or with other relevant organisations in the private or public sphere.

Visit the MSc “Italian food and wine” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.unipd.it/en/italian-food-and-wine) for more details.

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- check at. http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione. http://www.unipd.it/en/how-apply. Instructions in English. http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento2011&keyIF0362. Read more

Admission Notice now available

- check at
http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione
http://www.unipd.it/en/how-apply

Instructions in English:
http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento=2011&key=IF0362
.

Biotechnologies for Food Science

In the 2016-2017 academic year, the University of Padova inaugurated a new curriculum of the Master Degree “Biotechnology applied to Food Security and Nutrition” (Second Cycle Degree) entitled “Biotechnologies for Food Science " to be entirely taught in English.
The “Biotechnologies for Food Science " Master degree (MSc) is an interdisciplinary and research-oriented Master of Science Programme and explores how to produce healthier and safer food following a cross-cutting, farm/field-to-fork approach. It is focused on the application of advanced biotechnologies in food production and safety and it is the ideal trait-d’union between the requests of consumers, of producers in the agro-food sector and research applied to production and food-safety.
The course has a strong component on cutting-edge methods, such as genomics, bioinformatics, proteomics, metabolomics, nanotechnologies, all in the context of animal and crop production as well as food quality and safety. Theoretical lessons are mixed with practical training, offering hands-on experience in advanced DNA, RNA, and protein analysis together with substantial lab sessions in bioinformatics. Lectures will deal with food production, hygiene and quality, molecular methods of agro-food analyses, effects of agro-biotech products on human beings and environments. Moreover environmental stresses, disease mechanisms, pathogens and pests will be treated as essential to understand how to protect crop and farm animals and how food might impact on human health: the lectures move across animal infectious disease, immunology, microbiology, plant pests and pathogens as well as abiotic stresses to show how biotechnology might help preventing disease and improve food production. As consumers are increasingly worried about the presence of contaminants in food and on the real origin of what they eat; the Programme includes a course in food toxicology and regulation, and one on traceability for food authentication.
Our Programme is based at the Agripolis campus, where are located four departments of the School of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine of the University of Padova, all of which contribute to the MSc course, offering the best opportunities for a rich, cross-disciplinary experience in a highly qualified scientific environment.

Who is the MSc candidate?

This programme is open to Italian and foreign students from the EU and abroad, interested in learning and implementing effective value-added practices for the production of high-quality food products both in the EU and in international markets. English knowledge must be minimum at B2 level (CEFR). Applying students might possibly have a three-year Bachelor’s degree in a field connected with the Master’s curriculum. Good background in molecular biology, biochemistry, and microbiology is requested.

How is the programme organised?

Biotechnologies for Food Science is a 2-year Master programme (120 ECTS, equivalent to a Master of Science). Requirements for graduation include courses and preparation and defense of the Master thesis. Students will be encouraged to spend a period of their studies abroad, through Erasmus+ or other local programmes and agreements. Financial support to meet part of the cost for thesis work is granted to best students.
Visit the MSc “Biotechnologies for Food Science” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione) for more details.

Teaching methods

Teaching takes place in an international environment and includes lectures and laboratory activities, practical exercises and seminars by experts; opportunities for intensive tutoring and for master thesis-related stages of at least six months duration will be available with outstanding companies in the sector of the food industry or with other relevant organisations in the private or public sphere. The Programme assists students to find suitable internship opportunities with qualified laboratories in Italy and abroad.
Examinations are written or oral and assess students’ participation also through reports, presentations, and group work.

Course structure

During the two-years MSc course students attend the following 12 course units

Applied genomics for animal and crop improvement
Applied Bionformatics
Food Microbiology and Food Microbial Biotechnology
Molecular basis of disease, immunology, and transmissible diseases
Laboratory of advanced DNA, RNA, and protein analysis
Biotechnology for crop production
Epidemiology and risk analysis
Traceability tools for species authentication  
Advanced technologies for the agrifood sector (nanotechnologies, proteomics, metabolomics)
Biotechnology for plant protection
Food toxicology and food regulation
Foreign language (English)

First year
During the first year of the programme the student will acquire knowledge on animal and crop genomics, focusing on the most advanced methods for high throughput genomic analysis (transcriptomics, genome-wide SNP analysis, epigenomics) and on the most recent approaches for selective breeding (genomic selection, genomic prediction). In parallel, the student will learn how bioinformatics tools might be applied to manage large sets of data, how biological data bases are organized and how to link different types of data. Extensive practical training in bioinformatics will be offered with various sessions in a dedicated lab. Food-borne pathogens and the positive role of microorganisms in food processes will be examined in an integrated microbiology course, while the molecular basis of pathology, host-response to infection, epidemiology, and diagnostics of transmissible diseases will form the basis of two courses. A course on biotechnology for crop production will introduce the molecular and physiological basis of crop production. Biotechnological approaches to improve crop yield, with particular attention to fruit production, and to reduce impact of abiotic stresses will examined. Molecular tools for food traceability and an intensive practical lab in DNA/RNA/protein analysis applied to food control will conclude the first year.

Second year
In the second year, the first semester have three courses. One will focus on novel technologies (proteomics, metabolomics, nanotechnology) and their application to food production. A second one will extend knowledge on plant biotechnology exploring advanced technologies for crop disease and pest management. A third one will deal with contaminants in food and food legislation. The second semester is completely dedicated to lab internship. It is possible to join a research lab in the campus or to have a working stage in the private sector.
link to the Campus descriptions:
http://youtu.be/gR4qcWUXvGg

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This course examines crop improvement through advances in resource use efficiency, crop protection and modern crop improvement and breeding techniques. Read more
This course examines crop improvement through advances in resource use efficiency, crop protection and modern crop improvement and breeding techniques. Focusing upon the understanding of plant to crop systems, and with an emphasis on research training, the course is ideally suited to those wishing to pursue careers in research institutes, plant breeding, agro-industry and advance to higher research degree (PhD) study.

The course consists of a number of taught modules and a major research project.

Specialist facilities for plant work include modern glasshouses and controlled environment growth rooms in which plants and tissue cultures can be raised. The laboratories contain a wide range of modern equipment including ultracentrifuges, apparatus for radioisotope studies, gas liquid chromatography and spectrophotometry. A number of experimental plots containing arable and horticultural crops are available for use by students, particularly in relation to their projects. Crop Science fieldwork is carried out as part of the normal arable rotation on the farm, which is within easy reach of the laboratories.

The School also has a Tropical Crops Research Unit - computer controlled glasshouses are available for research on a range of tropical species.

Links with industry further enhance the course by providing valuable industry knowledge and experience and relating the subject to commercial practice

Scholarships may be available -please see our web-site.
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About this course. -Accredited by the Association of Nutrition. -Become an ‘Associate Registered Nutritionist’ upon graduation. -Join a Department with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research. Read more
About this course:
-Accredited by the Association of Nutrition
-Become an ‘Associate Registered Nutritionist’ upon graduation
-Join a Department with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research
-Benefit from the Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, a human nutrition research group that is unique in the UK

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Scientific basis for nutritional requirements and policy
-Genes, lifestyle and nutrition in health and disease
-Chemistry of food component
-Metabolism
-Postgraduate research skills for nutrition

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

The safety, quality and nutritional properties of the food reaching consumers depends upon an understanding of science and technology.

You will gain the knowledge required to embark on a career within a range of organisations, including multinational food manufacturers, ingredient suppliers, major retail chains and smaller companies supplying niche markets. Alternatively, you could go on to study for a PhD.

Recent examples of jobs obtained by our graduates have included: Process Technologist with Pepsico International, Quality Executive with Agro Tech Foods, New Product Developer with Bakkavor, Food Technologist with Tesco and Research and Development Technologist with Kerry Ingredients and Flavours.

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About the course. -Develop knowledge of the application of science and technology to the provision of safe and quality food. -Gain the ability to apply and maintain quality systems that meet international expectations. Read more
About the course:
-Develop knowledge of the application of science and technology to the provision of safe and quality food
-Gain the ability to apply and maintain quality systems that meet international expectations
-Join a Department with an outstanding reputation for excellence in teaching and research
-Benefit from a well-equipped building and training opportunities for further research on graduation

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Food control management
-Food safety and microbiology
-Food processing
-Risk analysis in the food chain
-Sensory properties of foods

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

WHAT CAREER CAN YOU HAVE?

The safety, quality and nutritional properties of the food reaching consumers depends upon an understanding of science and technology.

You will gain the knowledge required to embark on a career within a range of organisations, including multinational food manufacturers, ingredient suppliers, major retail chains and smaller companies supplying niche markets. Alternatively, you could go on to study for a PhD.

Recent examples of jobs obtained by our graduates have included: Process Technologist with Pepsico International, Quality Executive with Agro Tech Foods, New Product Developer with Bakkavor, Food Technologist with Tesco and Research and Development Technologist with Kerry Ingredients and Flavours.

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About the course. -Gain detailed knowledge of the science and technology of food. -Develop the ability to provide industry and governments with an understanding of the science underpinning food safety and quality. Read more
About the course:
-Gain detailed knowledge of the science and technology of food
-Develop the ability to provide industry and governments with an understanding of the science underpinning food safety and quality
-Join a Department with an outstanding reputation for excellence in teaching and research
-Benefit from a well-equipped building and training opportunities for further research on graduation

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Sample modules:
-Chemistry of food components
-Food safety and microbiology
-Food processing
-Sensory evaluation of food
-Postgraduate research skills for food

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

EMPLOYABILITY

The safety, quality and nutritional properties of the food reaching consumers depends upon an understanding of science and technology.

You will gain the knowledge required to embark on a career within a range of organisations, including multinational food manufacturers, ingredient suppliers, major retail chains and smaller companies supplying niche markets. Alternatively, you could go on to study for a PhD.

Recent examples of jobs obtained by our graduates have included: Process Technologist with Pepsico International, Quality Executive with Agro Tech Foods, New Product Developer with Bakkavor, Food Technologist with Tesco and Research and Development Technologist with Kerry Ingredients and Flavours.

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role. Read more

MSc Biosystems Engineering

The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role.

Programme summary

During the master Biosystems Engineering, students are educated in finding innovative solutions. The programme combines knowledge of technology, living systems, natural and social sciences with integrated thinking using a systems approach. Solutions can be applied to either the field of food or nonfood agricultural production. During the programme, you develop independence and creativity while acquiring skills that enable you to analyse problems and work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Biosystems Engineering is a tailor-made, thesis oriented programme based on the specific interests and competencies of the student.

Thesis tracks

Farm Technology
This topic consists of four main themes, namely automation for bioproduction, greenhouse technology, livestock technology and soil technology. All these topics have the shared goal of designing systems in which technology is applied to the demands of plants, animals, humans and the environment. Examples of such applications include precision agriculture, conservation tillage, fully automated greenhouses and environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems that also promote animal welfare.

Systems and Control
Production processes and various kinds of machinery have to be optimised to run as efficiently as possible; and with the least amount of possible environmental impact. To achieve this, computer models and simulations are developed and improved. Examples include designing control systems for a solar-powered greenhouse to include a closed water cycle and designing a tomato-harvesting robot.

Information Technology
Information and communication play a vital role in our society. It is necessary to acquire, use and store data and information to optimise production processes and quality in production chains. This requires the design and management of business information systems, software engineering, designing databases and modelling and simulation.

Environmental Technology
Environmental technology revolves around closing cycles and reusing waste products and by-products. Processes have to be designed in such a way that they either reuse waste or separate it into distinct and reusable components. Examples include the production of compost, the generation of green energy or the design of environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems and greenhouses.

AgroLogistics
The goals of agrologistics are to get the right product in the right quantity and quality at the right time and to the right place as efficiently as possible while fulfilling the requirements of the stakeholders (such as government legislation and regulations). This requires the design of effective, innovative logistics concepts in agrifood chains and networks. Examples are the design of greenhouses developed for optimal logistics or designing a dairy production process with minimal storage costs.

Biobased Technology
The importance of biobased economy is increasing. Energy savings and the use of renewable energy are directions for achieving an environmentally sustainable industrial society. Biomass of plants, organisms and biomass available can be turned into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. In this track, you learn more about process engineering, biological recycling technology, biorefinery and how to abstract a real system into a physical model and analyse the physical model using dedicated software.

Your future career

Most graduates are employed in the agrofood sector, or related sectors of industry and trade, from local to international companies. They are project leaders, product managers, technical experts, sales specialists or managers at many kinds of companies including designers of agricultural buildings (animal husbandry systems, greenhouses) and bioenergy production systems. Others find jobs with IT companies (climate control computers, automated information systems) or firms in the agro-food chain that produce, store, process, distribute and market agricultural products. In the service sector or at governments, graduates enter careers as consultants, information officers or policymakers in the fields of technology and sustainable agricultural production, while others enter research careers at institutes or universities.

Alumnus Patrick Honcoop.
"I am working as a product manager at 365 FarmNet in Germany. 365FarmNet supports farmers to manage their whole agrarian holding with just one software application. I am responsible for the content of the software. I am the link between the farmers, the agrarian holdings and the software developers. I really enjoy these dynamics and variety within my function. Just like during my studies, when we visited farmers, companies and fairs during courses and excursions organised by the study association."

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Geo-information Science
MSc Geographical Information Management and Applications
MSc Organic Agriculture

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The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. Read more

MSc Food Safety

The MSc programme Food Safety focuses on the technical aspects, as well as on the legal aspects of food safety and integrates these in Food Safety Management. The Food Safety programme of Wageningen University was the first MSc in Food Safety worldwide. The programme is unique, with a highly integrated approach to the field of food safety.

Programme summary

Wageningen University is one of the few universities in Europe able to offer education and research in all fields of food safety. This does not only include technical disciplines such as microbiology and toxicology, but also the legal, economic and communication aspects. The Food Safety programme at Wageningen University is one of the most modern and innovative in the world. Started in 2000 as the first of its kind, it is still the only two-year, full-time Master Food Safety programme offered in Europe and the only programme offering Food Safety Law. The programme prepares graduates for careers in the food industry, government or consumer organisations; the three key players in international food safety management.

The food industry is increasingly confronted with farm-to-table food safety measures, regulations, legislation and guidelines aimed at controlling food hazards. As a result, there is an increasing demand for managers with expertise in food safety evaluation who are able to survey and monitor the chemical, microbiological and physical parameters of product composition and product safety. Food safety experts are able to understand and analyse the variation in quality and safety of products. They are also able to assess the potential risks involved in the adoption of new production methods and processing techniques. Food safety evaluation concerns food constituents, agro-chemicals, environmental contaminants and natural toxins.

Food regulations are getting more and more complex, creating the need for regulatory affairs specialists in industry or in lobbying organisations. The programme is the only programme offering Food Safety Law for students with either a technical or a legal degree, thereby, fulfilling the need in society for such positions.

Specialisations

The programme offers three specialisations. All three specialisations have the courses on Food Safety Management and Food Law in common.

Applied Food Safety
This specialisation deals with the more technical (microbiology, toxicology, risk assessment) part of food safety. Food Safety Economics is also part of the programme. Thesis topics are also in these fields and graduates generally work in industry, universities and research institutes.

Food Safety Law
This specialisation is open for students with a technical or legal background. Courses focus on (international) food law, intellectual property rights and management. Theses are on food law. Graduates generally work as regulatory affairs specialists in industry.

Supply Chain Safety
This specialisation deals with safe food and ingredient supply. Globalisation leads to serious risks of contamination. In tropical countries, companies also face wars and political problems. Courses thus focus on Food Security, Risk Management in Food Chains and logistics, in addition to Microbiology and Food Law.

Your future career

The employment market is promising and all recent graduates found jobs with relative ease. The demand for university-trained professionals in this field is currently higher than the number of graduates available. Most recent graduates found jobs in the private sector, at universities or at food safety research institutes. Many graduates enter careers in government and go on to managerial positions. Due to the increased efforts of the EU in the development of national food safety organisations, there will be many more job opportunities in various European countries, both for technical as well as regulatory specialists.

Student Moath Almayman.
"The courses of the Master Food Safety consist of technical, managerial and legal aspects of food safety and are directly linked to real life situations. This in combination with the ability to perform extensive research and an internship at an international company to enhance my working experience, were reasons for me to choose this master. Even with a small population, Wageningen is a great cosmopolitan town. So many students from different backgrounds make it a very interesting place."

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Technology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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The MSc Food Quality Management programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. Read more

MSc Food Quality Management

The MSc Food Quality Management programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. The whole supply chain is studied from the primary sector to the final consumer. Food, flowers and cattle are also discussed.

Programme summary

Food quality management assures the health and safety of food and other perishable products (e.g. flowers) and has become increasingly important in today’s society, this is due to changing consumer requirements, increasing competition, environmental issues and governmental interests. This has resulted in a turbulent situation on the food market and in the agro-food production chain. The situation is further complicated by the complex characteristics of food and food ingredients, which include aspects such as variability, restricted shelf life and potential safety hazards; as well as many chemical, biochemical, physical and microbiological processes. To face this challenge, continuous improvement in food quality management methods is required wherever knowledge of modern technologies and management methods plays a crucial role.

Quality issues in food and other perishable products are generally tackled using either a technological or a managerial approach. At Wageningen, a concept has been developed that combines both aspects. This ‘technomanagerial’ approach forms the basis of the Food Quality Management programme. It provides a comprehensive and structured overview of quality management for predicting food systems’ behaviour and generating adequate improvements in these systems from a food chain perspective.

The programme prepares graduates to understand and work together with the different players in the food industry (management, Research & Development) in order to ensure high quality products.

Specialisations

You will combine Food Quality Management courses with several courses based on your educational background and interest. These courses can be in fields of food technology (e.g. product design, process design), food safety (e.g. food safety management, microbiology), management (e.g. case studies management, entrepreneurship) or logistics (e.g. food logistics management, supply chain management). The programme is thesis oriented and tailor-made to your specific interests. The thesis and internship in the second year of the programme are carried out in cooperation with the food industry.

Your future career

Graduates from this programme will be experts in the field of food quality management and can enter careers in agribusiness, research and public administration:
• Typical positions include quality assurance manager (responsible for the quality of the ingredients for a specific product).
• Designer/specialist (working on the quality aspects of fresh products in the development process), advisor/consultant (advising companies on certification).
• Researcher (studying the improvement of existing quality assurance systems in the food industry).

Student Tasioudis Dimitrios.
"It was my desire to combine my scientific background with management studies that resulted in my decision to do the Master Food Quality Management. The master gives you a useful tool in understanding the meaning of every result in a real life situation and enables you to select the best solutions to tackle specific problems. Wageningen University is a great university where science flourishes and research is of utmost importance. It is the ideal environment to gain knowledge and to accomplish your goals."

Related programmes:
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies
MSc Food Technology
MSc Food Safety

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Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Read more

MSc Food Technology

Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. The programme focuses on aspects of production, composition and design of food products.

Programme summary

The Food Technology programme at Wageningen University has been in place for more than 50 years and is considered one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Wageningen University offers high-level courses and research in all areas of food science; ranging from advanced technical fields, such as Process Engineering or Chemistry, to fields with a more economic or sociological focus, such as Marketing and Gastronomy.

The Wageningen Food Science faculty is larger than that of any other European university. It includes professors and lecturers from a wide range of departments: Food Chemistry, Food Physics, Food Microbiology, Food Quality and Design, and Food Process Engineering. Food Technology covers nearly all aspects of food science and technology. As a result of being a very broad field, students are required to choose one of the specialisations offered.

Specialisations

Within the programme Food Technology you can choose your own specialisation that meets your personal interests.

Ingredient Functionality
This specialisation focuses on the composition of food, especially, on the role of various components, ingredients or structures in the quality and functionality of the final product. It deals with sensory, nutritive and textural aspects of foods in relation to their components. You major in Food Chemistry or Food Physics.

Product Design
While many new products are launched, not all succeed. This specialisation deals with the design and development of new or improved products. The focus is on the processes used in Food Technology, the design of new products from a consumer perspective and on modelling new product concepts/processes and predictive quality control. You major in Food Process Engineering or Food Quality and Design.

Food Innovation and Management
This specialisation combines courses in Food Technology with courses in Management Studies. It is intended for students who wish to work on product development in small businesses or who plan to start their own business. You will do a thesis in Management Studies and an internship in one of the Food Technology groups.

Food Biotechnology and Biorefining
This specialisation focuses on using micro-organisms or enzymes in food production. During this specialisation, you will learn about processes that can be used for biorefinery or agricultural raw materials. The focus is on biotechnological food production. You major in Food Microbiology, Food Chemistry, Food Process Engineering.

Dairy Science and Technology
This specialisation focuses on the dairy production chain. Its core programme consists of dairy-related courses and several additional courses, such as Food Components and Health, Advanced Fermentation Science and Predicting Food Quality. During the second year, you complete a dairy-related thesis research project and internship.

Sustainable Food Process Engineering
This specialisation focuses on the development of processes that are more efficient in their use of resources. Thesis can be carried out under the supervision of one of the following groups: Food Process Engineering; Operations Research and Logistics; Biobased Chemistry and Technology; or Food Quality and Design.

European Masters Degree in Food Studies
This international specialisation is developed in cooperation with the universities of Cork (Ireland), Lund (Sweden) and Agro-Paris Tech (Paris, France) as well as with ten large industrial partners. For more information see: http://www.eurmscfood.nl.

Gastronomy
This specialisation focuses on the molecular science behind products and dishes used in small scale settings. Scientific insights are used to develop improved food preparation techniques. The cultural aspects of food will also receive attention. You major in Food Chemistry, Food Physics or Rural Sociology.

Sensory Science
This specialisation combines Food Technology with Nutrition and Health. You will work with products and humans in different contexts and study how sensory systems function, how this relates to products and how to analyse these aspects.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs with relative ease, especially in the Netherlands and Western Europe. Recent graduates found positions in the private sector (from small- and medium-sized companies to large multinationals), at Wageningen University or other universities as PhD students, and at research institutes domestically and abroad. Graduates also work in the field of process technology at innovation centres, innovative food companies or government agencies. Most achieve management positions.

Student Harmke Klunder
“It is rich in proteins, unsaturated fats, vitamins and is available in large quantities all over the world. You may conclude, ‘The ideal food ingredient.’ However, would you still think it was ideal if you knew it was made from insects? With three other students, we added insects to a third world food product, thereby winning an international competition from the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists). Malnutrition in Africa could be fought by enriching their daily porridge, sorghumpap, with protein-enhanced termites. As food ingredients technologist, it is possible to look beyond the products found on the shelves of the local supermarkets.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Safety
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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The Management, Economics and Consumer Studies programme deals with the interrelationships between producers, consumers and society-at-large. Read more

MSc Management Economics and Consumer Studies

The Management, Economics and Consumer Studies programme deals with the interrelationships between producers, consumers and society-at-large. We offer specialisations for students with a Social Sciences background as well as a technical Life Sciences background.

Programme summary

During the programme, students will study the dynamics in the agro-food chain involving suppliers, producers, retailers and consumers; focusing on how they affect each other and how they affect, and are affected by, the economy and society. The domain of this programme is business and all the components of industry including production, distribution and final use or consumption. It covers managerial, economic, sociological and environmental aspects – internal and external – of households and businesses in the Netherlands, Europe and the rest of the world, in both developed and developing countries.

Specialisations

Within the MSc Management Economics and Consumer Studies you can choose from four specialisations. Each specialisation trains you to become an expert in that field.

Management Studies
This specialisation includes several options. Students can investigate and analyse the strategies and operations of companies in production and distribution networks as well as the dynamic decision-making processes involved in production. Alternatively, you may choose to focus on the various aspects of marketing and consumer behaviour in business, agribusiness and the food industry. It is also possible to acquire expertise in facility management, information systems, operations research (logistics), information management or quantitative decision modelling.

Consumer Studies
This specialisation allows you to study the behaviour, lifestyles and consumption patterns of consumers and households. Students will acquire insight into the economic and sociological aspects of consumers and households, and the factors determining consumption behaviour and patterns. Alternatively, the role of communication between the various actors in the food chain or consumer technology can be studied.

Economics, Environment and Governance
Students analyse the economic behaviour of various participants in the agricultural sector and rural areas in developed countries or study the pivotal role of agricultural and rural development in low-income countries. You can also specialise in Public Administration and Policy if you are interested in the governance of complex problems in domains of sustainable agriculture, climate change or water management. If students are more interested in environmental issues, they can focus on the economic or policy aspects of national and international environmental problems or the processes of environmentally-induced social change in modern industrial and developing societies.

Management, Innovation and Life Sciences
The goal of this specialisation, especially designed for students with a life science background, is to integrate technical and managerial knowledge. Examples of how this interaction can be of optimal use are complex innovation processes in production, logistics or market development. These processes have a high technological character in which innovation plays a central role and for which good communication and managerial skills are necessary. Three different profiles can be studied within this specialisation: innovation management, innovation in decision support and economics, and innovation in operations management.

Your future career

Graduates have career prospects as managers, consultants, researchers and teachers in the public or private sector. Career opportunities are found within financial institutions, marketing agencies or in the field of consumer affairs. Also, alumni work as policy makers in government agencies or non-profit organisations, in development and innovation in life science related businesses or organisations.

Alumnus Bart Zwartjes.
Innovate a new chip flavour, assist in expanding an encyclopedia made by consumers (Wikipedia), or write a review of a purchased product. These are just a few examples of co-creating as a consumer. Co-creation is a joint effort by company and consumer and companies have a lot to gain by this. Namely, 50-70% of all product innovations fail at market entry. Co-creation allows companies to offer products and services that meet consumer needs better. But why would consumers spend their free time helping out companies? Currently Bart works as a consultant for Cap-Gemini advising businesses on how to make successful use of co-creation.

Related programmes:
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Applied Communication Science
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Development and Rural Innovation.

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