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Masters Degrees (Agricultural Law)

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The PgC in Agricultural Law provides a firm basis for specialism for rural professionals such as chartered surveyors, solicitors, accountants and rural business consultants, whether as an introduction or as Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for those with experience. Read more
The PgC in Agricultural Law provides a firm basis for specialism for rural professionals such as chartered surveyors, solicitors, accountants and rural business consultants, whether as an introduction or as Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for those with experience. The modules earn CPD points for solicitors and other professionals.

The course

The PgC in Agricultural Law provides a firm basis for specialism for rural professionals such as chartered surveyors, solicitors, accountants and rural business consultants, whether as an introduction or as Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for those with experience. The modules earn CPD points for solicitors and other professionals.

Module options include those providing the necessary legal foundations for practice and covering the all-important areas of land law, agricultural, commercial and residential tenancies, the UK planning system and taxation computation and planning. The options choices enable you to tailor the programme to your own requirements.

How will it benefit me?

Completion of a PgC in Agricultural Law will give students a valuable specialism allowing them to more closely understand and address clients’ needs in the rural environment. The specialist options in Planning, Taxation and Land Law are underpinned by the development of post-graduate level study skills and a more general introduction to law in the Machinery of Government module. The course will aid students' effectiveness in the workplace, or in further studies, in developing their skills in accessing and preparing legal materials and in solving legal problems.

Contact Information

For further information on any aspect of postgraduate study, or to receive an application form please contact:

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Looking for an absorbing, fulfilling career in rural land and estate management? Our MSc Rural Land and Business Management course, which prepares you for… Read more

Looking for an absorbing, fulfilling career in rural land and estate management? Our MSc Rural Land and Business Management course, which prepares you for membership of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers, will equip you with the knowledge and skills necessary for a career in professional practice, advising the owners and occupiers of rural land and property on their assets and businesses.

The course focuses on equipping you with the specialist knowledge and skills necessary to deal with the challenges facing rural businesses, both now and in the post-Brexit environment. It aims to blend theory and practice to deliver a challenging programme, highly relevant to the changing demands of modern business. You will be encouraged to develop a critical awareness of the current challenges of your new profession, and learn how to apply an analytical, strategic approach to the sometimes difficult and complex situations you will meet in practice.

Why Henley?

Programme

Many of the UK’s most successful rural land managers began their careers at the University of Reading. The programme is recognised by the UK’s top employers as an excellent preparation for a career in rural surveying. You will be taught by experts in the field (both academics and current practitioners) and will undertake real-life case studies, and visits to farms, estates and other rural businesses – while working within the busy, vibrant society of one of the UK’s leading universities.

Real Estate & Planning

Our Department is the largest in the UK for teaching and research in real estate and planning. Established in 1968 at the University of Reading, we are the only major UK real estate and planning centre to be located within a business school. Being part of the Henley Business School reflects our close and longstanding collaborative relationship with industry.

We enjoy a worldwide reputation for excellence in both teaching and research and we are consistently highly ranked in all major league tables. We undertake internationally recognised, leading edge research into real estate, planning and land and we offer a comprehensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses, all of which are accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Our planning courses are also fully accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute. Our programmes are held in high regard by leading employers, many of whom come to us each year to recruit our graduates. We are proud of our outstanding employment record, with more than 95% of our students entering graduate level jobs within 6 months of leaving us.

Henley Business School

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Module descriptions are correct for modules taught in the academic year 2017/18. Optional module listings are indicative, and may be subject to change.

Core modules

  • Introduction to Agriculture and Rural Industries - 20 credits
  • Rural Property Law and Valuation  - 20 credits
  • Strategic Rural Asset Management  - 20 credits
  • Rural Policy and Planning - 10 credits
  • Business and Professional Values  - 10 credits 
  • Real Estate Economics  - 10 credits
  • Management Case Studies in Rural Surveying  - 20 credits
  • Dissertation  - 40 credits
  • Rural Field Trip - 10 credits

Plus elective modules from a range offered by the School of Agriculture and Henley Business School, which may include: Advanced Marketing, Appraisal of Agricultural and Rural Development Projects, Business Planning and Control, Ecosystem Services, Human Resource Management, Resource and Environmental Economics, Rural Diversification, Sustainability and Real Estate, Real Estate Asset Management.

Careers and accreditations

The programme has an excellent employment record – 100% for the last four years. We have long-standing links with the major firms in the sector who regularly recruit from the University. Recent graduates have gone on to work for multi-disciplinary rural consultancy firms including Bidwells, Carter Jonas, CKD Galbraith, Fisher German, Knight Frank, Savills and Strutt & Parker, and specialist firms such as Dalcour Maclaren, as well as for regional firms throughout the country. They have also taken jobs with rural estate owners as trainee land agents, and organisations such as the National Trust and RSPB.

Our graduates tell us the content of the course is highly relevant to the profession, training them to be analytical thinkers and leaders. They have frequently progressed to become directors of landed estates or surveying firms. Some have secured posts in environmental organisations, government agencies, planning consultancies, or in academia. Others find this higher degree pathway an ideal entry qualification into wider management careers.

Most graduates complete the two years’ professional training and experience required to become members of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and many also become members of the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers.

Our alumni association, the Reading Real Estate Foundation, organises career development and recruitment events for students throughout the year. These include an evening lectures series with key industry speakers, an annual Careers Fair and a highly successful mentoring programme – unique in the sector – which pairs individual students with industry professionals. We also have a professional Careers Development Advisor who helps our students with every aspect of the career process, including identifying work placements, internships and permanent career opportunities.



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This is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. Read more
This is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. It is a fast-track route to qualification as a Chartered Surveyor. The course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

The Royal Agricultural University is in partnership with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), which fully accredits this one-year Masters degree.

This course is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. It is a fast-track route to qualification as a Chartered Surveyor.

This course is for graduates looking to acquire the specialist knowledge and skills necessary to work as a rural property manager. It also prepares graduates for qualification as a Chartered Surveyor and Fellow of the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers.

Structure

The course will be studied full-time over 12 months.

You will study eight modules in the autumn and spring terms, with final examinations taking place in May. The dissertation is typically undertaken between May and September.

You will attend lectures and group tutorials.There is also a range of practical sessions, and visits to local farms, commercial properties, and rural estates where owners, occupiers and their professional advisors provide additional insights into the management of rural property. Assessed coursework features strongly throughout the course.

Before starting the MSc, students receive reading lists and study material so that they can develop a basic grounding in study areas with which they are not familiar.

Modules

• 4002 Agriculture
• 4007 Dissertation
• 4015 Farm Business and Enterprise Management
• 4016 Rural Planning and Buildings
• 4019 Rural Property Law
• 4029 Environmental and Woodland Management
• 4031 Rural Policy and Implementation
• 4033 Rural Valuation
• 4043 Rural Asset Management

Career prospects

Our Rural Estate Management graduates are directly involved with managing all types of property. The professional work of the Rural Property Manager may include:

• Valuation, and the sale and purchase of land and rural property
• Management and letting of land and property
• Farm business planning and diversification
• Development of land and buildings and rural planning
• Management of woodlands and the environment
• Compulsory purchase (roads, pipelines cables etc) and compensation claims
• Tax and financial strategy

Types of employer include:

• National, international, regional, and small firms of chartered surveyors
• Private estates
• Large landowners such as the National Trust, county councils and utility companies
• Planning and environmental consultancy
• Research and education
• Leisure management
• Rrural conservation
• Investment management.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Gain a solid grounding in the scientific principles behind environmental management issues. Accredited by Climate-KIC (knowledge and innovation community). Read more
  • Gain a solid grounding in the scientific principles behind environmental management issues
  • Accredited by Climate-KIC (knowledge and innovation community)
  • Develop skills for a career in areas such as environmental management and consultancy or for future doctoral research
  • Take advantage of outstanding teaching collections and facilities housed in modern premises
  • Participate in world-leading fieldwork and research

What will you study?

Core modules include:

  • Environmental Management : Principles and Practice
  • Resource and Environmental Economics
  • Waste and Environmental Management
  • Ecosystem Services
  • Contemporary Issues in Environmental Law
  • Research Skills and Career Learning
  • Research Project

Optional modules include:

Recommended

  • Field Class 
  • Research and Enterprise Micro-Placement 
  • Quantitative Analysis of Environmental Data , or
  • Qualitative Research Methods 

Stream 1: Contaminated and Urban Environments

  • Pollutant Behaviour in the Environment 
  • Environmental Pollution 
  • Laboratory analysis of soils and pollutants 
  • Environmental Consultancy 
  • Air Pollution: Effects and Control 
  • Environmental and Pollution Microbiology 
  • Urban Ecology 
  • Plants, greenspace and urban sustainability

Stream 2: The Changing Environment

  • Climate Change 
  • Carbon and Global Change 
  • Climate Policy, Justice and Society 
  • The Science of Climate Change 
  • Preparing for Floods 
  • Energy, Climate Change and Development 
  • Global Environmental Change and Development 
  • Climate Change and Food Systems 

Stream 3: Agriculture and Rural Environments

  • Issues in Agricultural Systems 
  • Wildlife and Farming 
  • Water agriculture and irrigation 
  • Agriculture in the Tropics 
  • Principles of Integrated Pest Management 
  • Rethinking agricultural development 
  • Conservation Biology 
  • Climate Change and Food Systems

Please see our modules outline for further information.

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our students go on to work in a wide variety of academic and research posts, as well as in public and private sector organisations within the UK and internationally.

Graduates are highly employable in the growing market for environmental managers and consultants. Our programmes also provide in-service training for those already working within the profession.



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Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. Read more
Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. You will be able to work on real issues, using the specialist expertise gained from your course.

The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/poverty-reduction-policy-and-practice/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all specialisms

- Specialisms:
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you may choose elective modules within a particular specialism. Choosing a specialism creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core modules:

- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Understanding Poverty [compulsory]
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- Climate Change and Development

Elective Modules:
Specialisms
Development Management:
- Rural Finance
- Rural Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning and Management
- Gender and Social Inequality
- Management in Rural Development

Inclusive Growth:
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Energy and Development
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy
- Rural Finance

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Natural Resource Economics
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- International Environmental Law

Research Modules:
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary)contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

- Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.
Assessment of the Research Component

The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

As with all CeDEP programmes, the Poverty Reduction programme is designed to assist both existing development professionals and people moving into the field of international development. For the former, the programme offers a chance to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature. It is anticipated that most graduates of this programme will find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis and implementation for poverty reduction

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with issues of poverty reduction

- consultancies and development projects involved in activities promoting poverty reduction

Particular opportunities may be related to the choice of specialisms in natural resources management, agricultural and rural development, or development management

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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Your programme of study. This programme accepts graduates from any discipline to convert and become full RICS accredited in Land Economy and Rural Surveying. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme accepts graduates from any discipline to convert and become full RICS accredited in Land Economy and Rural Surveying.

Land Economy and Rural Surveying is very employable internationally, and it is an essential discipline in which you can contribute to the built environment covering anything from towns, cities, roads, transport systems and leisure venues. We are moving towards mega cities in which people will connect via technology to improve quality of life and infrastructure. This gives society a considerable challenge in terms of ensuring quality of life in the future where there will perhaps be more regulation. In order to give you the best start in the profession our programme is fully RICS accredited and it is the only programme of its type in Scotland. The discipline has been a strength at University of Aberdeen for many years now and our connections with industry are excellent over this time.

The programme gives you a very thorough knowledge of all areas associated with land economy and rural property management. This includes looking the wide range of environmental challenges, rural management such as forestry and game management, agriculture and planning and environmental law. These modules are disciplines in themselves and very useful for your career opportunities which could be wide ranging, adding real value to your programme.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Forestry and Game Management

Agricultural Principles and Practices

Planning, Land and Environmental Law

Semester 2

Valuation for Rural Surveyors

Rural Business Management

Rural Policy in Practice

Research Methods

Semester 3

Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/286/rural-surveying-and-rural-property-management/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • The programme is fully RICS accredited which means you get and MLE and RiCS and professional status at graduation
  • You are given plenty of challenges in terms of the diversity of projects which require successful rural decision making
  • You gain valuable business skills which allow you to consider self employment options, consultancy and specialist status
  • If you want to convert this programme is available to graduates from any discipline

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 27 Months
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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The Master of Environmental Sciences (MEnvSci) is a 180 point interdisciplinary degree that draws on a wide range of papers across the Biological, Chemical, Earth and Engineering Sciences. Read more

The Master of Environmental Sciences (MEnvSci) is a 180 point interdisciplinary degree that draws on a wide range of papers across the Biological, Chemical, Earth and Engineering Sciences.

A key feature of this degree is the development of scientific and interdisciplinary (cross-faculty) research skills, including collection and analysis of data and critical review of the relevant literature.

The MEnvSci is normally a 12-18 month degree comprising a minimum of 90 points in taught papers at 500 level and a maximum 90 point thesis.  The balance of thesis papers to taught papers may be altered subject to permission from the graduate co-ordinator in your discipline of choice.

Study an MEnvSci at Waikato University and you will enjoy more lab and field work, more one-on-one time with top academics and access to world-class research equipment. Our great industry contacts may also mean exciting collaborations with local, national and international companies and organisations.

While the bulk of your papers will be drawn from the Faculty of Science & Engineering, you may also include papers from the Faculty of Arts & Social SciencesWaikato Management School, the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies and Te Piringa - Faculty of Law.

Facilities

The University of Waikato's School of Science is home to a suite of well-equipped, world-class laboratories.  You will have the opportunity to use complex research equipment and facilities such as NMR spectroscopyDNA sequencing and the University of Waikato Herbarium.

The School of Engineering’s specialised laboratories includes the Large Scale Lab complex that features a suite of workshops and laboratories dedicated to engineering teaching and research.  These include 3D printing, a mechanical workshop and computer labs with engineering design software.

Build a successful career

Depending on the major completed and your particular interests, graduates of this degree may find employment in a range of science-related industries, including local and regional councils, Crown Research Institutes, energy companies, environmental agencies, government departments, environmental consulting companies, private research companies, universities, food and dairy industries and agriculture and fisheries industries.

Career opportunities

  • Agricultural Adviser
  • Biosecurity Officer
  • Coastal Resource Manager
  • Consent Planner
  • Environmental Analyst
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Hydrologist
  • Oceanographer
  • Water Resource Manager


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The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. Read more
The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, environment-development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred.

This programme takes a critical political ecology frame and examines environmental policy and its intersections with development from a social justice angle. It is taught and convened by leading political ecologists and offers a critical analysis of key issues including water, forestry, climate, fisheries, agricultural production, biodiversity, conflicts and energy supply.

The masters asks important questions including:

- How does the environment intersect with global poverty, wealth and questions of inequality?
- Can Carbon trading offer a solution to managing climate change?
- How does access to water intersect with dynamics of wealth and poverty?
- Is wildlife conservation implicated in social injustices?
- What role can and do environmental movements play in development?
- Is there a link between environmental change and violent conflict?
- What is the political ecology of forests?

The MSc programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the Department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The MSc Environment, Politics and Development has four components: two compulsory modules; one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words. Please see Postgraduate Modules (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/pgcourses/) for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscenvironpoldev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Ecology of Development. They then select one of four further core modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development; or Law and Natural Resources. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of environment, politics and development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 15/16 (pdf; 85kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscenvironpoldev/file101710.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.5 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures
Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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In this one-year MSc programme, you have the opportunity to learn about how trees, people and agriculture can be combined in sustainably managed farms, forests and landscapes. Read more
In this one-year MSc programme, you have the opportunity to learn about how trees, people and agriculture can be combined in sustainably managed farms, forests and landscapes. There is a long tradition of agroforestry practice in many parts of the world, but recently it has become a major focus in international development and is now at the forefront of innovation in natural resource management. Bangor is a world leader in agroforestry with a fantastic reputation for its research activities and our graduates are either already employed when they start the course and/or have a strong track record in finding employment within the sector. Students and academic staff are active collaborators with international organisations such as the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center, Costa Rica (CATIE) and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). You can expect to develop the skills required for a research and professional career from the comprehensive programme we offer.

The overall aim of the programme is to provide an integrated education in natural resource management, combining ecological and social dimensions of agricultural and forest sciences, focussed on application to real world systems where trees interact with agriculture. The programme is designed to develop both subject-specific knowledge and cognitive and key skills. The course has a world focus and the University has strong links with agroforestry organisations which means that many of our students have undertaken fieldwork in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas, as well as in Wales/UK. Besides fantastic overseas opportunities, we also have a university farm (Henfaes Research Centre) located a short distance outside of Bangor where many students carry out experiments for their final projects.

This course is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters and gives partial fulfilment of Professional Membership Entry.

We work in partnership with the World Agroforestry Centre.


Course Structure
The programme has two parts. Part Part 1: runs from September to May and consists of five taught modules and a study tour. The taught part of the course is based on lectures, seminars, practical sessions and directed study, allowing an opportunity to examine a broad range of topics in detail and develop personal skills and expertise. A range of different assessment methods are used including reports, presentations, practical write-ups and online and written exams. Part 1 must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2, the dissertation phase.

Part 2: June to September is set aside for production of a dissertation on a topic selected by the student in consultation with their academic supervisor. Dissertations can be in almost any aspect of agroforestry that interests you; they can have a temperate or tropical focus, and can include field work either locally in Wales, elsewhere in the UK, or overseas.

Part 1 Subjects:

Agroforestry Systems and Practice: This module explores agroforestry systems and practices worldwide and introduces the concepts behind them. Through a series of case studies, the module explores ecological and biophysical interactions in agroforestry systems, and considers the range of social, economic and ecosystem benefits they deliver, including ways in which we are trying to reduce the environmental impact of food production and overcome constraints to food security.

Silviculture: The purpose of the module is to develop students’ understanding of the silviculture of single trees and trees in complex systems. This module develops an understanding of the principles and practice of silviculture, the place of silviculture in the sustainable cultivation of trees, and the role it plays in delivering ecosystem services from trees, woodlands and forests. We explore the unique characteristics of forest soils and of soil physical, chemical and biological properties, how these influence site productivity and how these are influenced by land management.

Natural Resource Management: The purpose of this module is to give students a theoretical understanding of the systems approach to managing natural resources to provide various ecosystem services, as well as a practical grounding in the ways in which natural resource managers can draw on a variety of knowledge sources to inform themselves and others of the impacts of land management interventions.

Research Planning and Communication: This module seeks to develop students’ understanding of the role of science and the scientific process in formulating and addressing context relevant questions, and communicating scientific output to different audiences. During the course of the module, students will devise, conduct and write up a policy-relevant scientific study.

Natural Resource Development: The purpose of this module is to introduce the international development context to students and to give a practical grounding in project planning. During the module, students will develop a full project proposal in line with funding guidelines for an agroforestry based natural resource development intervention.

Study Tour: We round off the taught part of the course with a study tour which gives students the opportunity to see the practical application of natural resource management principles that are discussed in earlier parts of the programme. During visits to areas which are managed for a range of objectives, you will meet and discuss with different stakeholders and collect information relevant to a specific research topic.

Part 2:

Dissertation: Execution and written presentation of a suitable scientific project which is devised by the student and an individual academic supervisor and validated by the Programme Director. A suitable project entails a worthwhile scientific question, of direct relevance to the degree programme being undertaken, established within the context of current knowledge and concepts that allows the formulation and testing of one or more hypotheses. This normally involves up to 5 months full-time work, typically including: 2-3 months for data collection from the field, laboratory or computer; 1-2 months for data analysis; and 1-2 months for writing-up.

Previous MSc dissertation projects and training courses held in collaboration with the World Agroforestry Centre can be viewed here.

Professional Accreditation

This degree is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters (ICF) and qualifies students for associate membership.

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NEW PROGRAMME. The Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) is excited to announce the launch of a new programme entitled. Read more

NEW PROGRAMME

The Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) is excited to announce the launch of a new programme entitled MSc Agroecology, Water and Food Sovereignty (title subject to validation), which will commence in September 2018. The programme will encompass enhanced knowledge from our now larger team of experts and will be informed by recent research. This will replace the MSc in Agroecology and Food Security which will run for the last time in the September 2017-18 academic year. Please check our website for details which will be published very soon.

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Food security is of critical concern globally, and the development of food systems that provide food of high quality and quantity in a sustainable way, is now a research and policy priority.

The MSc in Agroecology and Food Security is designed to equip professionals and graduates with the knowledge to critically analyse and assess the relationships between agroecological food production and management, farming systems, climate change economics and the environment.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Run by Coventry University's Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR) whose mission is to create resilient food systems worldwide, the course:

-Draws on the outstanding range of academic and practical expertise of CAWR staff plus world-renowned guest lecturers

-Is designed for students from a variety of different academic and professional backgrounds and from the natural and social sciences (e.g. previous experience of agriculture not necessary)

-Provides unique content in terms of its cutting edge focus on transforming the food system through alternative paradigms, concepts, and methodologies to enable real and equitable change

-Is based at the UK’s national centre for organic horticulture in 10 acres of organic gardens.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course will provide you with the knowledge of the major agricultural production systems found in different parts of the world and the main theoretical approaches to understanding contemporary food systems.

The course covers a range of subject areas including:

  • Food security; 
  • agroecological production systems; 
  • clean energy, climate and carbon; 
  • agroecological techniques and practices; 
  • stabilisation agriculture;
  • gender, food systems and natural resources; 
  • environmental impact assessment; 
  • ecological management and assessment;
  • international environmental law;
  • remote sensing and digital image analysis; 
  • project management.

For each module, teaching normally takes the form of weekly 'face-to-face' contact at the University (including lectures, workshops, seminars and exercises) throughout each semester, with associated directed and self directed study, which may be undertaken off-campus.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

All students undertake an individual research project, which may be associated with an appropriate organisation or company in the UK or overseas. Equipped with a detailed understanding of food systems and a range of appropriate practical skills your potential for employment will be strong.

Opportunities present themselves in national and international government agencies, non governmental policy, research and development organisations, the private sector including food companies and the farming sector.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.



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The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. Read more
The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. It is clear that solutions to the challenge of sustainable development require holistic, integrated and co-ordinated actions across a very wide range of sectors, and will increasingly require a multidisciplinary approach. This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/sustainable/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Sustainable Development students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

- Specialisms
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you choose elective modules within a particular specialism. This creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core Modules:

- Understanding Sustainable Development [compulsory]
- Climate Change and Development
- Environmental Science and Management
- Ethics for Environment and Development

Elective modules:
Specialisms

Development Management:
- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning & Management
- Management in Rural Development

Environmental Economics:
- Economic Principles [advised]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Environmental Management:
- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- Natural Resource Economics

Rural Development and Change:
- Agricultural Trade and Policy
- Understanding Poverty
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Rural Development
- Gender & Social Inequality

Research component :
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- RP506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will have a wide range of backgrounds and will typically find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis in the fields of sustainable development and environmental planning

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the sustainable dimensions of economic change

- consultancies and development projects concerned with issues of sustainability and analyses of the interface between environment and poverty

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Read more
Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Food is also essential to the social body. Who eats what, who eats with whom, and whose appetites are satisfied and whose denied, are all profoundly social dynamics through which identities, relationships, and hierarchies are created and reproduced.

The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. The programme asks students to trace the passage of food from plant to palate, and to examine who benefits, and who suffers, from contemporary modes of food production, exchange, preparation, and consumption. Students examine food policy at national and international levels, as well as the role played in its formation by the food industry.

Focus is given to the study of famine and the controversial role of food aid in securing food supplies. Debates over the impact of agricultural biotechnology on agrarian livelihoods and knowledge systems, as well as on the natural environment, are assessed. Movements toward organic agriculture, fair trade, and slow food are also analysed.

An anthropological approach to the study of food draws upon and challenges the perspectives of other disciplines, whether agronomy or nutritional science, economics or law, history or literature. Dependent upon individual interests and experiences, graduates of the programme may pursue research degrees in any number of academic disciplines, or find employment in food-related government ministries, international organizations, development agencies, or non-governmental associations, as well as in the fields of public health, education, and media, or in the catering industry.

Click here for a last of past Dissertation Titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/ma-anthropology-of-food-dissertation-titles-2006---present.html)

Click here for Alumni Profiles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/foodstudies/studentprofiles/)

Course teachers Johan Pottier, Harry G. West, and Jakob Klein were awarded the 2009 Excellence in Instruction Award by the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. West was named joint runner-up for the SOAS Director’s Teaching Prize in 2011-2012. The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Food was named a Finalist in the Best Food Initiative category in the BBC Food & Farming Awards in 2015.

Scholarships:
Applicants for the MA Anthropology of Food may be eligible to apply for Scholarships and Bursaries (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/

Programme Structure Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Food and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 147kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/file39766.pdf

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This market-leading Master's course in Environmental Management addresses the management principles necessary for the successful implementation of sound environmental management practice and legal processes involved in environmental control at a range of scales. Read more
This market-leading Master's course in Environmental Management addresses the management principles necessary for the successful implementation of sound environmental management practice and legal processes involved in environmental control at a range of scales.

The course develops understanding of environmental processes and applies this to both the legal framework and management decision-making activities. The course seeks to raise your ability to understand and analyse environmental problems at Master's level, in order to develop solutions.

You will be presented with the tools needed for environmental management, including project management, life cycle analysis, accounting and reporting, environmental reviews and audits. The course includes the processes and legislative approaches related to the reduction of emissions to air, land and water, and the effects of pollution together with the legislative framework in which they are set.

Accreditation

The MSc in Environmental Science: Legislation and Management is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM.

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

This MSc course can be taken in part-time (from 1 day a week for 2 years) or full-time (from 2 days a week for 1 years) mode. Students can start in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modular blocks

- Environmental Law (15 credits)
- Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
- Environmental Management (15 credits)
- Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
- Biosphere (15 credits)
- Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modular blocks
Students normally choose 1 module from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “no modules from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “2 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

Group A (pick 1)
- Environment, Health and Societies
- Climate Change: Science and Impacts
- Chemical Regulation and Legislation in the EU
- Environmental Modelling

Group B (pick 1)
- Current Practice in Chemical Risk Assessment
- Clean Technology
- Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
- GIS and Data Analysis

Dissertation (60 credits)

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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