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Masters Degrees (Agricultural Finance)

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The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. Read more
The Economics and Finance MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced economic and finance theory and quantitative methods, while allowing you to specialise or take options in a range of subjects reflecting the School’s main areas of research expertise in finance. It prepares you for work as a professional economist in the financial and banking sectors, public sector and international organisations.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/200/economics-and-finance

Course structure

The Economics and Finance MSc is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

There are compulosry modules in Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments, Financial Economics and Asset Pricing, Advanced Macroeconomics, Econometric Methods, Time Series Econometrics and Research Methods. These modules build upon students’ existing knowledge, understanding and skills.

Students develop a deeper understanding of economic and finance theory, quantitative and research methods, and policy applications. The teaching and learning of skills are carefully integrated into the structure of the modules and degree programme. The final two modules are chosen from a range of options based upon the finance research interests of our academic staff.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme proceed to the dissertation stage where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an Economics/Finance topic.

Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC822 - Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and finance, and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic and financial theory, econometrics, financial econometrics and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics and finance in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic and financial knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional in the fields of economics and finance or related areas

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our International Finance and Economic Development MSc prepares you for work as a professional economist in the various public and private institutions concerned with international finance and development throughout the world, or for a career in research or teaching in the field of international finance. Read more
Our International Finance and Economic Development MSc prepares you for work as a professional economist in the various public and private institutions concerned with international finance and development throughout the world, or for a career in research or teaching in the field of international finance.

The programme is designed to provide an education in international finance, economic development, advanced economic theory and research methods, while still allowing students to specialise by taking an option that reflects the School’s main areas of research expertise.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/206/international-finance-and-economic-development

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)
EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics, and their application to international finance and economic development. This education is based upon high-quality teaching that motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- develop your understanding of the theoretical and applied issues involved in international finance and economic development

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- develop your ability to apply economic and econometric knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems in the areas of international finance, economic development and economics in general

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as professional economist in the area of international finance and economic development

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Graduate Diploma in Agriculture is particularly appropriate for students who are re-directing their careers towards agriculture. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Agriculture is particularly appropriate for students who are re-directing their careers towards agriculture. In addition to developing the pure agriculturist, the course provides students with a detailed knowledge of the UK agricultural industry.

Students are able to handpick their modules from a broad range of subject areas, to create a bespoke course, tailor made to meet their individual requirements. The ability to customise course content makes this the ideal opportunity for graduates, and professionals from other disciplines, looking to re-direct their career towards agricultural and associated rural industries.

A summer study tour, and £250 worth of rural skills training, are included in the cost of the course.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over one academic year, or part-time over two, three or four years.

You will complete three compulsory modules, followed by four modules selected from a wide range of undergraduate modules allowing you to tailor the course to meet your career aspirations. You can undertake practical skills training courses at the Rural Innovation Centre to further enhance their employability.

You will participate in lectures, farm walks and visits, case studies, assignments, and management projects to develop your knowledge across curricular themes. You will also take part in a summer study tour, which exposes you to a variety of agricultural enterprises.

Prospective students are strongly encouraged to complete pre-course reading in order to secure a minimum basic knowledge of agriculture and to highlight possible areas of weakness.

Modules

• 2256 Applied Agricultural Science
• 3100 Farm Business Management
• 3227 Agricultural Management

Plus choice of FOUR elective modules from:

• 1008 Agricultural Mechanisation and Buildings
• 1046 Human Nutrition, Health and Society
• 1054 Introduction to Food Production
• 2086 Red Meat Chains
• 2087 White Meat Chains
• 2232 Entrepreneurship, Intrapreneurship and Enterprise Development
• 3006 Emerging Agricultural Issues
• 3008 Advanced Livestock Production
• 3009 Agricultural & Equine Journalism
• 3010 Game & Deer Management
• 3011 Rural Business Diversification
• 3020 Advanced Crop Production
• 3067 Farm Machinery Management
• 3084 Entrepreneurship
• 3087 Advanced Dairy Food Chains
• 3090 Forestry and Woodland Management
• 3093 Farmland Ecology
• 3096 Wine Industry
• 3097 Small Scale Farming and Local Food Supply
• 3104 Food and Agri-business Strategies
• 3205 Management Information Systems for Farming Businesses
• 3207 Farming and Integrated Environment Local Delivery
• 3210 Applied Agricultural Finance
• 3218 Sustainable Business and Agrifood Supply Chains
• 3228 Integrated Organic Systems

Career prospects

Many graduates enter practical farming or take up commercial or administrative posts in the related land-based industries. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers as:

• Farm Managers
• Farm Workers
• Senior Planners
• Project Managers
• Livestock Skills Instructors

Graduates may qualify for progression on to a Masters course.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Our Finance and Econometrics MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced finance theory and econometric methods. Read more
Our Finance and Econometrics MSc programme is designed to provide an education in advanced finance theory and econometric methods. Students develop a deeper understanding of econometric and financial theories, quantitative and research methods, and policy applications.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/203/finance-and-econometrics

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC822 - Financial Economics: Capital Market Instruments (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of finance and econometrics, and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of finance theory, econometrics and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- develop your ability to apply economic and econometric knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional economist/econometrician or in an area related to finance and/or econometrics

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Who is it for?. Your peers on the course will be on average, 24, with a minimum 2.1 or equivalent bachelor’s degree. It’s likely you will have a few years’ work experience either through an internship of full-time employment. Read more

Who is it for?

Your peers on the course will be on average, 24, with a minimum 2.1 or equivalent bachelor’s degree. It’s likely you will have a few years’ work experience either through an internship of full-time employment. You needn’t have any prior knowledge of energy, commodities, shipping or finance, although you should be comfortable with quantitative methods (mathematics and statistics).

Objectives

You’ll emerge from this course fully equipped to operate effectively in this highly competitive international industry. You’ll gain a solid foundation in energy economics, markets and trading, and be able to formulate strategy for fossil fuels, electricity and renewables. Your studies will encompass energy transportation, especially seaborne and are rounded off with extensive study of finance and financial markets and essential transferrable skills in accounting and IT. You can complement your core modules with optional modules and, if you wish, an independent research project.

What will you learn

  • Develop your knowledge and understanding of generation from exhaustible and renewable sources, demand determinants, transportation, trading, pricing and risk.
  • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of corporate finance, as well as financial markets, institutions and instruments.
  • Understand and critically evaluate current international issues in energy and commodities, finance and trade.
  • Formulate decisions in the energy sub-sectors of oil, gas, electricity, involving aspects such as refinery/petrochemical economics, energy transport solutions (pipeline/ship), generation and distribution of electricity, and managing energy risk.
  • Analyse factors affecting the energy, finance and commodity trade sectors.

Assesment

We review all our courses regularly to keep them up-to-date on issues of both theory and practice.

To satisfy the requirements of the degree course students must complete:

  • eleven core courses (10-20 credits each) and five electives (10 credits each)

or

  • three electives (10 credits each) and an Applied Research Project (20 credits)

or

  • one elective (10 credits) and a Business Research Project (40 credits)

Assessment of modules on the MSc in Energy, Trade and Finance, in most cases, is by means of coursework and unseen examination. Coursework may consist of standard essays, individual and group presentations, group reports, classwork, unseen tests and problem sets. Please note that any group work may include an element of peer assessment.

Induction Weeks

The course starts with two compulsory induction weeks, focused mainly on:

  • An introduction to the Cass Careers offering with a focus on key skills and attributes that employers are looking for.  The annual MSc Careers Fair at this time also provides the opportunity to meet over 60 companies who are recruiting across many sectors including finance, energy, insurance, real estate, shipping, strategic management and internal auditing.
  • a refresher course of basic financial mathematics, statistics, computing and electronic databases.

Career pathways

Graduates from the course are typically employed in positions related to energy, metals and agricultural commodities, shipping/freight operations, finance, consultancy and industry. Types of organisations employing trading houses include:

  • Commodity trading houses (e.g. Glencore, Trafigura)
  • Oil & gas companies (e.g. Shell, ENI, Total)
  • Professional services and specialist consultancy firms (e.g. KPMG, PwC, Wood McKenzie)
  • Shipping companies
  • Export/Import companies


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Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Read more
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Improving sustainable agricultural productivity and secure and equitable access to food has become a major global challenge.

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. Students are able to take modules orientated towards development, production, marketing, policy, and economic transition. The course is designed for those who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural economist or to undertake higher studies within this area.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/agecon/

Structure

For the MSc in Agricultural Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core modules:

- either Economic Principles or Economics and Institutions for Development [the chosen module must be taken in the first year]
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy

Elective modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Natural Resource Economics
- Project Planning and Management
- Rural Development
- Rural Finance
- Sustainable Land Management
- Understanding Poverty (subject to approval by the Programme Convenor)
- Water Resources Management
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research component:

- Dissertation
- Research Methods

Strengthening quantitative skills:
It is recommended that students whose basic quantitative analysis skills are weak should also take a non-examined module:Quantitative methods (CF04) at or near the start of their studies. Study materials may be obtained from CeDEP’s online learning environment.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?:
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Typically, graduates of this programme will find work as applied economists in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking work in agricultural policy analysis
- public and private sector companies involved in upstream and downstream agricultural industries
- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the economic analysis of agricultural sector issues
- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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The Graduate Institute of International Development, Agriculture and Economics (GIIDAE) is now offering £125,000 worth of scholarship funding for 2018-19 academic year. Read more

The Graduate Institute of International Development, Agriculture and Economics (GIIDAE) is now offering £125,000 worth of scholarship funding for 2018-19 academic year. Find out more here.

  • Taught by internationally renowned academics working at the forefront of research and policy development
  • Examine development finance against the background of development and macroeconomic policy
  • Analyse the role of development finance in economic development from micro and macro perspectives
  • Focus on financial inclusion, microfinance, institutional design and policy reform in domestic and international financial system

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Development finance
  • Microfinance
  • Theories and practices of development
  • Macroeconomics for developing countries
  • Appraisal of agricultural and rural development projects

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Gain the skills and knowledge to keep feeding the world. As the population grows so do the challenges we face, and the need for creative solutions from agricultural specialists. Read more

Gain the skills and knowledge to keep feeding the world. As the population grows so do the challenges we face, and the need for creative solutions from agricultural specialists.

The demand for safe, wholesome food produced in an environmentally sensitive manner is a major political issue for national governments and internationally within global commodity markets. Global population is set to rise to 9 billion by 2050*, which will substantially increase the demand for food.

As a recognised centre of research excellence that is closely engaged with the industries, professions and organisations involved in the global agri-food chain and the UK rural economy, we can help you develop the skills to play a key role managing global agricultural production systems.

MSc students will learn to:

  • Understand global crop and animal production systems and their impact on environmental quality.
  • Produce management solutions that take into account the balance between crop and animal production, economic and social needs and environmental protection.
  • Communicate ideas and technical management solutions to different audiences.
  • Assess the quality of farmland environments and create strategies to enhance landscape and wildlife potential in different geographic locations.
  • Formulate, test and draw conclusions from hypotheses.
  • Solve problems through novel research techniques.

* Food Matters: Towards a Strategy for the 21st Century; UK Cabinet Office report, 2008

Funding

The full-time and two year part-time courses are eligible for a postgraduate loan.



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This course is designed to enable prospective farmers, farm managers and farm management consultants to work at the strategic level of management and leadership in the commercial environment of modern farming and agribusiness. Read more
This course is designed to enable prospective farmers, farm managers and farm management consultants to work at the strategic level of management and leadership in the commercial environment of modern farming and agribusiness. A mix of core business modules with specialist modules on the agricultural industry provide you with the relevant tools, and capabilities to succeed in this profession.

It is as much about management and the business of farming as it is about problem solving and opportunity finding within the agricultural industry. Our graduates are highly adaptable with the knowledge and skills to operate farm-based businesses with an entrepreneurial flair. Many have gone on to become Farm Managers, Consultants, Brand Managers, and Business Directors.

This course is for those from farming backgrounds who are taking on leadership roles within their family business.The course sets out the background, issues and challenges facing the national and global farming industry and helps you understand the value chain from ‘farm to fork’.

This MBA provides a unique opportunity for transatlantic study to put the management theories, concepts and strategies learnt into a European or USA context. You will have the chance to study the first term at the Utah State University or the Royal Agricultural University, with the remaining study periods undertaken at the RAU.

Key benefits

The MBA in Advanced Farm Management is accredited by the Chartered Management Institute. Upon successful completion of the degree, you will be awarded CMI Level 7 Diploma in Strategic Management and Leadership and will therefore become a Member of the Chartered Management Institute (MCMI). You can then apply to the CMI for full Chartered Manager status if you wish.

Structure

The MBA may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two or three years.

You will study eight modules; six business modules in the autumn term, two applied modules in the spring term, plus two elective modules to focus your studies to specific areas of interest. The Applied Research Project is carried out over the summer to be submitted in September. It will be presented as a review paper and as a research paper.

You will take part in lectures, seminars and discussions, farm management activities, and group and individual case study work in a real-world context. Visiting industry experts give students a valuable insight in to the sector in which they are involved.

Modules are assessed through a range of coursework.

Modules

• 4012 Farm Business Management
• 4023 Operations Management
• 4076 Financial Management
• 4214 Sustainable Business Strategy
• 4215 Agricultural Economics
• 4216 Leadership and Change
• 4217 International Marketing Management
• 4219 Sustainable Agricultural Business Principles
• 4220 Applied Research Challenge

Plus further elective modules from:

• 3041 Corporate Finance
• 3211 Practical E-Business and E-Commerce
• 4001 Agricultural Management
• 4078 International Business
• 4080 Development Project Management
• 4203 Small Scale Farming and Local Food Supply
• 4205 Critical Issues in Ethical Leadership
• 4223 Economics of the Environment
• 4228 New Product Development in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4229 Adaptive Management in a Complex World

Study abroad opportunity

Applicants who wish to undertake their Term One modules at Utah State University (USU) will need to ensure that they have indicated this in their application by replying the specific question.

Applicants can participate in the US study only if they have paid the required fees (Home/EU: 1/3 of tuition fees, Overseas: 50% of tuition fees) and identified that they want to participate in the US study programme the latest by 30th June.

Please note that the term for the US study in Utah (USU) starts in the first week of August. Late applications for participation in the US term cannot be considered.

Career prospects

Previous graduates have gone on to develop successful careers as:

• Farm Manager
• Farm Consultant
• Global Brand Manager

Many of our graduates have returned home and are driving the family farming business forward.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes. Read more

If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes.

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA). This brings you up to the standards required to continue with MSc study. Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above then proceed to one of our MSc programmes. Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/196/economics-conversion-diploma-in-economic-analysis

Course structure

- Year 1

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA), which is a qualification in its own right, and brings you up to the standard required to continue with MSc study. The DEA consists of five compulsory modules.

- Year 2

Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above can then proceed to one of the following MSc programmes in year two:

- MSc Economics

- MSc Economics and Econometrics

- MSc Economics and Finance

- MSc Finance and Econometrics

- MSc International Finance and Economic Development

Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for students who already have a degree to proceed to study economics at Master’s level when they have not previously studied economics

- provide you with the knowledge, analytical and other skills from which you can proceed to further study in economics and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional economist or in an area related to economics

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics

Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance

Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour

Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics

Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics

Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics

Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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The international food and agribusiness industries continue to grow despite significant fluctuations in local and regional economic activity. Read more
The international food and agribusiness industries continue to grow despite significant fluctuations in local and regional economic activity. The rapid technological innovation pace, demographic shifts between urban and rural areas, immigration and access to skilled staff, climate change, water issues, and food security are among the topics studied in the International Food and Agribusiness MBA. Key areas include food processing and manufacturing, procurement, research and development, policy or government service, agricultural and food marketing, and supply chain management.

The MBA in International Food and Agribusiness is accredited by the Chartered Management Institute. Upon successful completion of the degree, you will be awarded CMI Level 7 Diploma in Strategic Management and Leadership and will therefore become a Member of the Chartered Management Institute (MCMI). You can then apply to the CMI for full Chartered Manager status if you wish.

Existing and aspiring multinational companies are looking for managers with transnational knowledge and linguistic skills, who are capable of functioning confidently in different regions of the world. Our business-minded graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers as food industry experts and consultants, Business Managers, and Project Managers for international organisations.

This MBA provides a unique opportunity for transatlantic study to put the management theories, concepts and strategies learnt into a European or USA context. You will have the chance to study the first term at the Utah State University or the Royal Agricultural University, with the remaining study periods undertaken at the RAU.

Structure

The MBA may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two or three years.

You will study six business modules in the autumn term, plus four focus modules, and one or two elective module(s) in the spring term. The Research Project is carried out over the summer to be submitted in September.

You will learn through lectures, seminars, problem-based and experiential case studies, workshops, cooperative work, reflective reports, group project work, presentations, lectures, seminars, and industry visits. You will be given guided independent learning tasks and be encouraged to increase your knowledge and understanding through private study and the completion of assessments.

Modules will be assessed through professional reports, presentations, competitive reviews, reflective essays, case study analysis, critical academic papers, marketing plans, business evaluation projects, and written examinations.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4023 Operations Management
• 4076 Financial Management
• 4095 International Agri-Food Marketing
• 4111 Critical Issues in Food Technology and Innovation
• 4214 Sustainable Business Strategy
• 4215 Agricultural Economics
• 4216 Leadership and Change
• 4217 International Marketing Management
• 4220 Applied Research Challenge
• 4221 International Agribusiness Finance and Investment

Plus ONE* further elective module(s) from:

• 3084 Entrepreneurship
• 3096 Wine Industry
• 3211 Practical E-Business and E-Commerce
• 4078 International Business
• 4080 Development Project Management
• 4205 Critical Issues in Ethical Leadership*
• 4223 Economics of the Environment*
• 4228 New Product Development in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4229 Adaptive Management in a Complex World

* Please note that to achieve full credits, students must select either ONE of the 15 credit electives or BOTH of the 7.5 credit electives

Undertaking Term One of study in Utah, USA

Applicants who wish to undertake their Term One modules at Utah State University (USU) will need to ensure that they have indicated this in their application by replying the specific question.

Applicants can participate in the US study only if they have paid the required fees (Home/EU: 1/3 of tuition fees, Overseas: 50% of tuition fees) and identified that they want to participate in the US study programme the latest by 30th June.

Please note that the term for the US study in Utah (USU) starts in the first week of August. Late applications for participation in the US term cannot be considered.

Career prospects

Our business-minded graduates progress into successful careers across all areas of the global food and agribusiness sectors, many of whom secure management positions at transnational companies:

• International food industry experts and consultants – for private companies, governments, and international organisations such as FAO, World Bank, European Commission
• Business management
• Import and export management
• Food processing, manufacturing, and supply chain management
• Procurement
• Project coordination – overseeing international projects and operations
• Operational support – building international relations for an organisation
• Research and development

Working for organisations such as:

• USDA National Agricultural Statistics Office
• Garrett Capital
• Agrimarc Ltd
• Schickelsheim
• Co-op farms
• Moet Hennessy
• NSF Agriculture

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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The MSc in Applied Economics and International Development provides training in the application of economic principles to the problems of international development. Read more
The MSc in Applied Economics and International Development provides training in the application of economic principles to the problems of international development.

The programme is designed for students with a good first degree in a sciences or social sciences subject, who would like to pursue a career in economics and international development. You must also have some previous quantitative background, eg a good mark in mathematics from a pre-university school course.

The programme offers great flexibility and breadth of choice in module options in the areas of international finance, trade and development, environment and rural economies.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/192/applied-economics-and-international-development

Course structure

The programme is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

The compulsory modules provide a basis for you to acquire the basic skills for the programme, while the optional modules enable you to choose from applied subjects in the first and second terms. All MSc students take a module in Research Methods, which provides practical skills and knowledge for MSc-level research.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an issue in international development. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC833 - Economic Principles (15 credits)
EC835 - Quantitative Methods for Economists (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC829 - Environmental Valuation (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and related subjects, and their application to problems of international development, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of the way in which economics and quantitative techniques can be applied to problem-solving and policy in international development

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as professionals in international development

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

- Labour and education economics

Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

- Macroeconomics, money and finance

Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

- Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour

Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

- Development economics

Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

- Agri-environmental economics

Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

- Transport and regional economics

Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Are you interested in crop protection and sustainable agriculture? Are you looking for a research career working in agriculture and related areas? Do you want to do something positive for the environment? Then this is the postgraduate course for you. Read more

Are you interested in crop protection and sustainable agriculture? Are you looking for a research career working in agriculture and related areas? Do you want to do something positive for the environment? Then this is the postgraduate course for you:

The course

The continuing production of safe, wholesome food in an environmentally sensitive manner is a major political issue for national governments and internationally within global commodity markets. A report produced by the UK Cabinet Office in 2008 (Food Matters: Towards a Strategy for the 21st Century) predicts that the global population will rise to 9Bn by 2050 rising from a current estimate of nearly 6.8Bn. This increase in population size will substantially increase the demand for food. The global estimates vary in magnitude, but it is thought approximately 25% of crops are lost to pests and diseases, such as insects, fungi and other plant pathogens (FAO Crop Prospects and Food Situation 2009). 

The Crop Pest and Disease Management course will offer students training in techniques to facilitate crop food production. The course covers a broad range of topics in applied entomology, plant pathology and nematology and all students receive training in fundamental skills which will enable them to enter either a pest/disease management work environment or a research career in applied entomology, plant pathology or pest management. There is, however, considerable flexibility within the course thus enabling each student to focus on specialist subjects consistent with their interests and future career intentions. 

Research projects are available in a wide range of subjects covered by the research groups within the Crop and Environment Sciences Department and choices are made in consultation with expert staff. Projects at linked research institutes in the UK and overseas are also available. The course is underpinned by an extensive programme of research at Harper Adams and long-standing collaborations with research institutes and other organisations in the UK and overseas.

A distinctive and integral feature of our MSc is the high degree of input from entomologists, plant pathologists and pest managers in collaborating governmental organizations and commercial biological control companies. This participation takes a variety of forms, including guest lectures, field visits and specific training courses, but may also include providing research projects in their organizations.

Examples of collaborating organizations include, CEH Wallingford, Forest Research, Horticultural Development Company, The International Pesticide Application Research Centre, The Natural History Museum London, Rothamsted Research, and Wye Bugs.

How will it benefit me?

Having completed the MSc you will be able to identify the underlying causes of major pest and disease problems and recognize economically important insects, plant diseases and weeds. 

You will also be able to apply integrated pest control methods and oversee their application. The course will focus on the ecological and management principles of pest control and you will learn to evaluate the consequences of pesticide use and application on the biological target. You will also receive training in the evaluation of the economic and environmental costs of integrated approaches to pest control in relation to biological effectiveness. Ultimately, the course will enable students to produce integrated pest and disease management solutions that pay due regard to agricultural, horticultural, social and environmental requirements.

In addition, there is considerable flexibility enabling each student to focus on specialist subjects consistent with their interests and future career intentions

The research project for the MSc will allow you to test hypotheses relevant to pest and disease management research by designing, carrying out, analysing and interpreting experiments or surveys. You will learn to evaluate and interpret data and draw relevant conclusions from existing pest and disease management case studies.

The MSc covers a broad range of topics relevant to pest and disease management and all students receive training in fundamental skills which will enable them to enter a vocational work environment or pursue a research career. There is, however, considerable flexibility enabling each student to focus on specialist subjects consistent with their interests and future career intentions. 

Scholarships and funding

The Horticultural Development Council typically fund three bursaries each of £5,000 to support the MSc IPM course. Visit the scholarship page for further details and application information.

The full-time and two year part-time courses are eligible for a postgraduate loan.

Unfortunately many universities have closed down or reduced their teaching and research in agriculture and crop science. There is a shortage of expertise in important topics, often in subjects that are closer to the farmer, where UK scientists and agronomists have traditionally played a leading role. Several key subjects are particularly vulnerable, including plant breeding, various aspects of pathology including mycology and virology, whole plant and crop physiology, agricultural entomology, nematology and soil science. There is a danger that valuable skills will be lost as researchers and teachers retire.

(Reaping the benefits: Science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture - October 2009, Royal Society)

Documents



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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich. The NRI provides research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. Read more

The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich. The NRI provides research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. It has a rapidly growing programme of research at MPhil and PhD level on social-scientific and interdisciplinary topics relating to development in the South and in Europe.

The institute provides a vibrant research environment for MPhil and PhD students in development studies with students from a number of countries and a variety of backgrounds in research, government and non-governmental organisations. Students are also actively encouraged to network with peers from other universities in the UK.

Research specialisms

The Livelihoods and Institutions Department works on a number of themes related to natural resources, environment and development. Particular interests include:

  • Participatory and client-oriented methods of agricultural research and their institutionalisation
  • Agricultural service delivery
  • Performance and impact assessment methodologies
  • Community based natural resource management
  • Land tenure
  • Urban agriculture and rural-urban linkages
  • Pastoralism
  • Vulnerability to disasters
  • Climate change.

The Food and Markets Department works on many economics-based development issues. Important themes include the performance of agricultural markets, value chains, international standards and agricultural trade, micro-finance, enterprise development and poverty reduction, ethical trade and corporate social responsibility.

Attendance

We welcome applications from potential students from either a social or natural science background. We can offer full-time or part-time registration, with students based on our campus in Medway or in their home countries, or some combination of the two.

Recent research projects

Recent research project topics include:

  • Forbidden (sacred) lakes and conservation: the role of indigenous beliefs in the management of wetland resources in the Niger Delta, Nigeria
  • Farmer organisations and their impacts for pro-poor growth among smallholder farmers in Malawi
  • Understanding the influence of livelihood features on cassava value chains
  • Rural territorial dynamics in North East Brazil: the Jiquiriçá Valley in Bahia
  • Pro-poor market-based approaches for economic recovery in post-conflict countries: the case of Liberia
  • Cross-borrowing and its impact on microentrepreneurs' repayment performance and well-being in Peru.

Outcomes

The aims of the programme are to:

  • Provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries
  • Strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Assessment

Students are assessed through their thesis and oral examination.

Careers

Postgraduate research students from the NRI have a good record of finding employment within their specific technical discipline or in the field of international development.



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