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Masters Degrees (Agricultural Development)

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IMRD, part of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship programme, is a joint degree which offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. Read more
IMRD, part of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship programme, is a joint degree which offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. The 2 year master programme (120 ECTS) is jointly organized by 12 institutes leading in agricultural economics and rural development from all over the world. IMRD offers a combination of basic and specialized theoretical and practical training in technical, economic and social sciences. This competitive master programme has a high extent of international student mobility, making it possible to learn from specialists worldwide.
-Study each semester at a different university and compare international views on rural development.
-Gain practical experience through a 1 month case study in Italy or Slovakia.
-Several scholarship opportunities: Erasmus Mundus, IMRD consortium, ICI-ECP.
-1/3 of our graduates start a PhD; others work at UN, FAO and in the agribusiness industry
-Obtain a joint MSc in Rural Development.
-European and US students can combine this degree with a MSc in Agricultural Economics (University of Arkansas, US) and obtain a double degree at the end of the programme. Choose the ATLANTIS learning path.
-European and South-Korean students can combine this degree with a Master of Arts in Economics (Korea University, Seoul National University). Choose the EKAFREE learning path.
-Study in Europe, the US, South-Korea, India, South Africa, Ecuador or China, depending on the learning path you choose.

IMRD offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. Depending on the focus and mobility track you choose, you can study at one or a combination of our 12 partners in Europe, India, South-Africa, Ecuador, China, the US or South-Korea.

Learning path IMRD >> International MSc in Rural Development: study 2 years at the IMRD - Erasmus Mundus programme, possibly supported by an Erasmus Mundus scholarship. At the end you obtain the Joint IMRD Diploma. Study at one or a combination of our partners in Europe, India, South-Africa, Ecuador or China.

Learning path ATLANTIS >> MSc in Rural Development and MSc in Agricultural Economics: European and US students can combine this degree with a MSc in Agricultural Economics (University of Arkansas, US) and obtain a double degree at the end of the programme.

Learning path EKAFREE >>MSc in Rural Development and MA in Economics: European and South-Korean students can combine this degree with a Master of Arts in Economics (Korea University, Seoul National University).

Structure

Structure of the programme:
-General Entrance Module - Semester I 30-35 ECTS - UGent.
-Advanced Module I - Semester II 15-40 ECTS - any partner university or thesis partner university.
-Case Study - Summer Course 10 ECTS - Nitra University or Pisa University.
-Advanced Module II - Semester III 15-40 ECTS - opposite choice of semester II.
-Thesis Module - Semester IV 30 ECTS - thesis partner university.

Learning outcomes

Our programme will prepare you to become:
-A trained expert in integrated rural development specialized in agricultural sociology, economics, policy and decision making, with a competitive advantage on the international job market.
-A master of science with a unique international theoretical knowledge in development and agricultural economics theories and policies, combined with a practical based comparative knowledge of different approaches to rural development
part of an international network of specialists in agronomics and rural development.

Other admission requirements

The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests:
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. Read more
The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. It is clear that solutions to the challenge of sustainable development require holistic, integrated and co-ordinated actions across a very wide range of sectors, and will increasingly require a multidisciplinary approach. This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/sustainable/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Sustainable Development students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

- Specialisms
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you choose elective modules within a particular specialism. This creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core Modules:

- Understanding Sustainable Development [compulsory]
- Climate Change and Development
- Environmental Science and Management
- Ethics for Environment and Development

Elective modules:
Specialisms

Development Management:
- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning & Management
- Management in Rural Development

Environmental Economics:
- Economic Principles [advised]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Environmental Management:
- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- Natural Resource Economics

Rural Development and Change:
- Agricultural Trade and Policy
- Understanding Poverty
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Rural Development
- Gender & Social Inequality

Research component :
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- RP506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will have a wide range of backgrounds and will typically find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis in the fields of sustainable development and environmental planning

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the sustainable dimensions of economic change

- consultancies and development projects concerned with issues of sustainability and analyses of the interface between environment and poverty

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Rural Economics and Management. Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. Read more
Rural Economics and Management : Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countriesIn the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds.

The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses.

The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS). The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen:

Rural Economics and Management

Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countries are studied in depth.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning Outcomes

-Understand different socio-economic concepts, theories and multi-disciplinary approaches with respect to rural economies and rural development.
-Have profound insights in different rural development realities, and compare rural development issues, approaches and policies within an international context..
-Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterise and analyse the economic and social problems of rural areas, food and agricultural chains, natural resource management, national and international agriculture.
-Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve problems related to agriculture, food chain and natural resource- management, and to rural development and countryside stewardship.
-Design, implement and monitor national and international agro-food policies, rural institutions and rural development programmes.
-Construct innovative tools and instruments for the (multifunctional) development of rural areas.
-Design and assess research in the domain of rural development, formulating a problem statement and operationalizing objectives and research questions within an adequate research plan.
-Select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect and analyse data from literature and empirical research in the domain of rural development.
-Critically reflect on topical rural development issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.
-Work in an integrated internationally composed team dealing with rural development and food production challenges, interacting respectfully with diverse others and developing a global perspective.
-Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders of the socio-professional world (food sector, NGOs, rural organisations, rural administration, universities and research institutes).
-Communicate convincingly (written, oral, using appropriate tools) about (own) research findings and project results and their underpinning rationale.
-Effectively and appropriately use good language, communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.
-Design and plan own learning processes based on continuous reflection (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, and attitudes and functioning.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.
-Independently perform scientific research in the domain of rural development. Give proof of a clear international orientation.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted).
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Sustainable rural development is seen as critical to survival of rural areas at a global level. Central to the success of any rural development programme, is a skilled team of experts to think strategically about rural development and ensure its delivery. Read more
Sustainable rural development is seen as critical to survival of rural areas at a global level. Central to the success of any rural development programme, is a skilled team of experts to think strategically about rural development and ensure its delivery. This graduate programme will be of direct relevance to those interested in becoming leaders in rural development and promoting sustainability in the rural sector. It will also be of interest to those currently employed in rural development.

AIM
The Diploma course is strongly inter-disciplinary. It aims to develop an understanding of the underlying processes of economic, social and environmental practice with an emphasis on sustainability. Thus, as well as teaching the theories and concepts underlying rural development, the course places strong emphasis on the application of theory to development problems in rural areas, with an emphasis on the EU.


STRUCTURE AND CONTENT
Students on the full-time diploma course are required to take a total of four taught modules and a double module Work Experience Placement during the academic year from September to June.


Global Sustainability, Local Solutions and Rural Policy (single module)
This module explores the history of Rural
Development locally and provides an introduction to European Union, national and regional policies and strategies. Students will become familiar with key policies such as the Common Agricultural Policy, EU Rural Development Programmes, Rural Development Programme, and a range of EU legislation relating to rural policies.

Students will have had the opportunity to develop the following knowledge:

• CAP reform, Decoupling and Single Farm Payment
• Use of Community Initiatives such as LEADER
• Diversification of the rural economy
• Rural Champion, Rural White Paper and Rural Proofing
• Agri-Environment Programmes, Countryside Management, Forestry and Organic Farming schemes

Rural Development: Rhetoric and Reality (single module)
This module aims to provide students with the basic skills necessary to take responsibility for a project management process from start to finish. The following are the main areas covered.
• Fundraising and income generation
• Social inclusion: key concepts
• Rural poverty
• Physical Planning for Rural Areas
• Sustainable Rural Tourism
• Community Development

Foundations for Sustainable Development (i) (single module)
This is a broad ranging module exploring the major global issues in environmental sustainability, such as Climate Change, Biodiversity, Waste Management, Water Management, Renewable Energy. The module will introduce concepts and methodologies such as Environmental Economics, Ecological Footprinting and Environmental Impact Analysis as well as moral and ethical ways of considering sustainable development problems.

Methods for Rural and Sustainability Research (single module)
The purpose of this module is to provide students with a basic understanding of the various methods which are used in both rural and sustainable development practice and research.
The module is intended to complement other modules in the curriculum by providing students with a range of techniques which can be utilised in gathering knowledge, undertaking analyses, reporting findings and applying knowledge. Formal lectures are supplemented by case studies and visiting speakers.


Work Placement/Internship (double module)
Each student will work with a University tutor to identify and undertake a specific piece of work either in their own workplace or in a suitable co-operating organisation that has a rural or sustainability interest. The placement must normally be completed during years 1 & 2 of the degree and will be guided by an agreed set of learning objectives and work tasks. Assessment will be based on the student’s diary or log, a final report prepared by the student and an oral presentation to students, staff and the placement mentor. This internship will offer students the opportunity to combine theory with practical tasks and to develop professional work habits.

The aim is to ensure, by the end of the programme, adequate coverage of the range of disciplines relevant to sustainable rural development. All taught modules will be assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and written and oral examination.


PROGRESSION TO MSc
Students who attain the required standard in the six modules and submit a satisfactory research proposal may progress from the Graduate Diploma to the MSc by completion of a dissertation which is equivalent to three modules. This element of the programme involves original research including a literature review, data gathering and analysis. The research will be carried out under the supervision of a member of the academic staff from July to September (inclusive).

Up to date information on course fees can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance/TuitionFees/

The University provides information on possible sources of awards which is available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/PostgraduateCentre/PostgraduateFunding/

Additional information for International students

http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQueens/InternationalStudents/

Applicants who are non-EEA nationals must satisfy the UK Border Agency (UKBA) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.0, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

*Taken within the last 2 yrs.

Please see http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs for more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals.

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The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. Read more
The programme attracts applications from students with a variety of academic and experiential backgrounds. We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, environment-development issues. A good first degree in a social science is preferred.

This programme takes a critical political ecology frame and examines environmental policy and its intersections with development from a social justice angle. It is taught and convened by leading political ecologists and offers a critical analysis of key issues including water, forestry, climate, fisheries, agricultural production, biodiversity, conflicts and energy supply.

The masters asks important questions including:

- How does the environment intersect with global poverty, wealth and questions of inequality?
- Can Carbon trading offer a solution to managing climate change?
- How does access to water intersect with dynamics of wealth and poverty?
- Is wildlife conservation implicated in social injustices?
- What role can and do environmental movements play in development?
- Is there a link between environmental change and violent conflict?
- What is the political ecology of forests?

The MSc programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the Department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The MSc Environment, Politics and Development has four components: two compulsory modules; one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words. Please see Postgraduate Modules (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/pgcourses/) for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscenvironpoldev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Ecology of Development. They then select one of four further core modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development; or Law and Natural Resources. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of environment, politics and development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 15/16 (pdf; 85kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscenvironpoldev/file101710.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.5 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures
Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our International Finance and Economic Development MSc prepares you for work as a professional economist in the various public and private institutions concerned with international finance and development throughout the world, or for a career in research or teaching in the field of international finance. Read more
Our International Finance and Economic Development MSc prepares you for work as a professional economist in the various public and private institutions concerned with international finance and development throughout the world, or for a career in research or teaching in the field of international finance.

The programme is designed to provide an education in international finance, economic development, advanced economic theory and research methods, while still allowing students to specialise by taking an option that reflects the School’s main areas of research expertise.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/206/international-finance-and-economic-development

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC802 - Advanced Microeconomics of Consumers, Marketsand Welfare (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)
EC805 - Advanced Macroeconomics I (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC824 - Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC820 - Time Series Econometrics (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics, and their application to international finance and economic development. This education is based upon high-quality teaching that motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- develop your understanding of the theoretical and applied issues involved in international finance and economic development

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- develop your ability to apply economic and econometric knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems in the areas of international finance, economic development and economics in general

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as professional economist in the area of international finance and economic development

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics
Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance
Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour
Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics
Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics
Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics
Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSc in Applied Economics and International Development provides training in the application of economic principles to the problems of international development. Read more
The MSc in Applied Economics and International Development provides training in the application of economic principles to the problems of international development.

The programme is designed for students with a good first degree in a sciences or social sciences subject, who would like to pursue a career in economics and international development. You must also have some previous quantitative background, eg a good mark in mathematics from a pre-university school course.

The programme offers great flexibility and breadth of choice in module options in the areas of international finance, trade and development, environment and rural economies.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/192/applied-economics-and-international-development

Course structure

The programme is studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (six of which are compulsory) and a dissertation.

The compulsory modules provide a basis for you to acquire the basic skills for the programme, while the optional modules enable you to choose from applied subjects in the first and second terms. All MSc students take a module in Research Methods, which provides practical skills and knowledge for MSc-level research.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on an issue in international development. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC815 - Growth and Development Theory (15 credits)
EC832 - Political Economy of Public Policy (15 credits)
EC833 - Economic Principles (15 credits)
EC835 - Quantitative Methods for Economists (15 credits)
EC834 - Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (15 credits)
EC821 - Econometric Methods (15 credits)
EC825 - Applied Microeconometrics (15 credits)
EC829 - Environmental Valuation (15 credits)
EC831 - Rural and Peasant Economies (15 credits)
EC816 - International Finance (15 credits)
EC803 - Trade and Development (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and related subjects, and their application to problems of international development, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential. The teaching is informed by the research and scholarship of our teaching staff

- build on your existing knowledge, abilities and skills and develop a deeper understanding of the way in which economics and quantitative techniques can be applied to problem-solving and policy in international development

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as professionals in international development

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

- Labour and education economics

Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

- Macroeconomics, money and finance

Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

- Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour

Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

- Development economics

Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

- Agri-environmental economics

Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

- Transport and regional economics

Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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There is an increasing need for specialists within agriculture who have an understanding of both the business and technical aspects of the industry. Read more
There is an increasing need for specialists within agriculture who have an understanding of both the business and technical aspects of the industry. This postgraduate course is aimed at people who are interested in pursuing a career within the land based industries in a professional capacity. This could include consultants, agronomists, animal nutritionists, farm managers/ owners and those working for government departments on technical and regulatory issues.

There is currently a high demand for well trained and suitably qualified personnel within the agricultural industry, and a need for specialists who not only have an understanding of their sector, but have the skills to interact professionally with their clients. A core group of modules will focus on topics such as professional leadership and management, food and agricultural policy, business planning, project management. In order to develop the student’s own area of expertise there are a number of elective modules in business, crop or livestock production. Many positions require professional qualifications so there is the potential within the course to study FACTS, BASIS or AMTRA (additional fee and assessment will be required for these qualifications). In addition, the Institute of Agricultural Management (IAgrM) considers this course as suitable evidence of CPD for those wishing to pursue ‘Professional Agriculturalist’ status.

The course is offered on a part-time distance learning basis to make it accessible to those in employment or with family commitments to be able to participate. Applicants may come from a wide range of backgrounds including farmers, growers, vets and other agricultural and food sector workers who wish to develop their career and businesses in the land-based sector.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- the technical and management skills required in modern agricultural professional practice
- the knowledge and understanding of how policy decisions impact on the land-based sector
- the ability to appraise research information and apply this to sustainable agricultural practice

The MSc Agricultural Professional Practice degree is awarded by the University of Glasgow.

Course Content

The programme is a mix of technical production, management, and skills development modules. The MSc consists of eight taught modules, followed by a period of dissertation project work. Five modules are compulsory:

Professional Leadership and Management
This module will develop key skills required for professional practice in Agriculture eg. communication skills, facilitating meetings, networking, customer relations, presentation skills and dealing with the media. It will also focus on professionalism, leadership and management skills and will include the setting of personal goals for career progression and identifying relevant CPD opportunities. Participants will be encouraged to identify and display appropriate attitudes, behaviors and values for their own situation.

Food and Agricultural Policy
This module will develop an understanding of the local, national and international policies that impact on the whole food chain from agricultural production, through business development to the consumer.

Business Planning and Decision Making
Business planning, analysis and decision making are essential components of successful rural business management. The applied nature of this course allows students to choose a business with which they are familiar thus making the experience relevant to their own work environment. This module will assist in the process of formulating a business plan to a professional standard, suitable for submission to a potential lender. The process of planning and control, and assessing the financial consequences of that plan will also be covered in the module.

Project Management for Agricultural Professionals
A key role of any agricultural consultancy is management of projects for clients. Underpinning this work is the role of project management. Firstly, this module will consider how to plan a project, manage resources and monitor progress. Secondly, this module will consider how to design an investigation and then analyse and interpret data from this work. The assignments will apply this information in work related projects.

Topical Issues in Modern Agriculture
The purpose of this module is to allow students to integrate the knowledge they possess and, by constructing a reasoned argument, develop broader understanding of their professional area and its relevance to related industries and the wider society. It is designed to develop the critical analysis and evaluation skills of students whilst dealing with complex issues and making informed judgements. The module will typically consist of a series of structured online debates on selected topics of contemporary relevance. Students will engage in constructive discussion of the topics giving critical analyses of the issues. Students will also research an issue that is relevant to their profession and then present it to the class, for peer review.

A further three modules are chosen from a range of options, including:
- Integrated Agricultural Management
- Sustainable Nutrient Management
- Animal Health and Veterinary Medicine
- Arable Crop Protection
- Grassland and Fodder Crop Protection
- Animal Feed Technology

MSc Project (taken following successful completion of taught modules)
This module takes the form of an in-depth investigative or research project on a topic related to agriculture which will be decided in consultation with the Module Leader and project supervisor. It will develop investigative skills and enable the critical evaluation and presentation of information.

[[Course Structure ]]
The programme is studied by part-time distance learning, with learning material presented using SRUC’s online learning environment which allows students to undertake the course from their own home or workplace.

The course is supported by regular weekend schools where participants attend SRUC Aberdeen for seminars, practical sessions and farm visits which provide a valuable part of the learning experience through group discussions and presentations.

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study four modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week during ‘term’ time.

Students wishing to complete the MSc, and who reach progression standard, will then go on to complete a research project following successful completion of all the taught modules.

Study weekends are an integral part of teaching and learning through interaction with peers, industry subject specialists and teaching staff. Students are strongly recommended to attend the two study weekends in September and February if they are to succeed in this course.

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Taught by internationally renowned academics working at the forefront of research and policy development. Examine development finance against the background of development and macroeconomic policy. Read more
  • Taught by internationally renowned academics working at the forefront of research and policy development
  • Examine development finance against the background of development and macroeconomic policy
  • Analyse the role of development finance in economic development from micro and macro perspectives
  • Focus on financial inclusion, microfinance, institutional design and policy reform in domestic and international financial system

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Development finance
  • Microfinance
  • Theories and practices of development
  • Macroeconomics for developing countries
  • Appraisal of agricultural and rural development projects

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Read more
Agriculture plays a critical role in poverty reduction by providing food, raw materials, employment, and ecosystem services. However, its ability to do this is threatened by demands from rising populations, stagnant yields, and increasing pressures on natural resources. Improving sustainable agricultural productivity and secure and equitable access to food has become a major global challenge.

This course provides students with the essential tools required for theoretical and empirical economic analysis, particularly in relation to the renewable natural resources sector. It aims to equip students with the rigorous technical skills that are generic to the field of agricultural economics, while maintaining a focus on applications rather than abstract analysis. Students are able to take modules orientated towards development, production, marketing, policy, and economic transition. The course is designed for those who wish to pursue a career as an agricultural economist or to undertake higher studies within this area.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/agecon/

Structure

For the MSc in Agricultural Economics students will take:

- 4 core modules
- 3 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

Core modules:

- either Economic Principles or Economics and Institutions for Development [the chosen module must be taken in the first year]
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy

Elective modules:

- Applied Econometrics
- Climate Change and Development
- Natural Resource Economics
- Project Planning and Management
- Rural Development
- Rural Finance
- Sustainable Land Management
- Understanding Poverty (subject to approval by the Programme Convenor)
- Water Resources Management
- One module selected from another programme, with the approval of the Programme Convenor

Research component:

- Dissertation
- Research Methods

Strengthening quantitative skills:
It is recommended that students whose basic quantitative analysis skills are weak should also take a non-examined module:Quantitative methods (CF04) at or near the start of their studies. Study materials may be obtained from CeDEP’s online learning environment.

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?:
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for four core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Typically, graduates of this programme will find work as applied economists in the following fields:

- government ministries undertaking work in agricultural policy analysis
- public and private sector companies involved in upstream and downstream agricultural industries
- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the economic analysis of agricultural sector issues
- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich providing research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. Read more
The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich providing research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. NRI has a rapidly growing programme of research at MPhil and PhD level on social-scientific and interdisciplinary topics relating to development in the South and in Europe. The institute provides a vibrant research environment for MPhil and PhD students in development studies with students from a number of countries and a variety of backgrounds in research, government and non-governmental organisations. Students are also actively encouraged to network with peers from other universities in the UK.

The Livelihoods and Institutions Department works on a number of themes related to natural resources, environment and development. Particular interests include participatory and client-oriented methods of agricultural research and their institutionalisation, agricultural service delivery, performance and impact assessment methodologies, community based natural resource management, land tenure, urban agriculture and rural-urban linkages, pastoralism, vulnerability to disasters and climate change. The Food and Markets Department works on many economics-based development issues. Important themes include the performance of agricultural markets, value chains, international standards and agricultural trade, micro-finance, enterprise development and poverty reduction, ethical trade and corporate social responsibility.

We welcome applications from potential students from either a social or natural scientific background. We can offer full-time or part-time registration, with students based on our campus in Medway or in their home countries, or some combination of the two.

Recent research project topics include:

- Forbidden (Sacred) Lakes and Conservation: The Role of Indigenous Beliefs in the Management of Wetland Resources in the Niger Delta, Nigeria

- Farmer organisations and their impacts for pro-poor growth among smallholder farmers in Malawi

- Understanding the influence of livelihood features on cassava value chains

- Rural territorial dynamics in North East Brazil: the Jiquiriçá Valley in Bahia

- Pro-poor market-based approaches for economic recovery in post-conflict countries: the case of Liberia

- Cross-borrowing and its impact on microentrepreneurs' repayment performance and well-being in Peru.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries.

- To strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/devstudies

What you'll study

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries.

- To strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through their thesis and oral examination.

Career options

Postgraduate research students from NRI have a good record of finding employment within their specific technical discipline or in the field of international development.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Home to the Walker Institute – a world-leading authority on climate change. Taught by academics working at the forefront of research and policy development. Read more
  • Home to the Walker Institute – a world-leading authority on climate change
  • Taught by academics working at the forefront of research and policy development
  • Analyse issues at the interface of climate change and development
  • Integrates the natural and social science of climate change
  • Excellent preparation for work in aid and development agencies, NGOs and government departments
  • Climate-KIC affiliated

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Energy, climate change and development
  • The science of climate change
  • Global environmental change and development
  • Theories and practices of development
  • Addressing poverty and inequality

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Applied understanding of the theory and practice of international development. Placement programme to gain experience in the research and practice of development. Read more
  • Applied understanding of the theory and practice of international development
  • Placement programme to gain experience in the research and practice of development
  • Suitable for graduates from any discipline
  • Active learning in a diverse, international student and staff environment
  • Study pathways allow you to design your own programme based on personal and professional interests

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Gender and development
  • Participatory approaches to development
  • Addressing poverty and inequality
  • Theories and practices of development
  • Project planning and development

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. Read more
Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. These programmes will give you the scientific, technological and economic knowledge and the skills to analyse and tackle the poverty suffered by these people. You will be able to work on real issues, using the specialist expertise gained from your course.

The programmes integrate theory and practice and provide an understanding of how to manage organisations within their own cultural, political, technological, social, and institutional contexts, with the ultimate aim of solving problems of poverty reduction.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/poverty-reduction-policy-and-practice/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all specialisms

- Specialisms:
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you may choose elective modules within a particular specialism. Choosing a specialism creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core modules:

- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Understanding Poverty [compulsory]
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- Climate Change and Development

Elective Modules:
Specialisms
Development Management:
- Rural Finance
- Rural Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning and Management
- Gender and Social Inequality
- Management in Rural Development

Inclusive Growth:
- Agricultural Policy and Trade
- Energy and Development
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Political Economy of Public Policy
- Rural Finance

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Environmental Science and Management
- Natural Resource Economics
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- International Environmental Law

Research Modules:
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary)contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

- Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.
Assessment of the Research Component

The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- P506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541 through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

As with all CeDEP programmes, the Poverty Reduction programme is designed to assist both existing development professionals and people moving into the field of international development. For the former, the programme offers a chance to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature. It is anticipated that most graduates of this programme will find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis and implementation for poverty reduction

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with issues of poverty reduction

- consultancies and development projects involved in activities promoting poverty reduction

Particular opportunities may be related to the choice of specialisms in natural resources management, agricultural and rural development, or development management

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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Multidisciplinary learning about the theory and practice of communication in development . Work with practitioners and academics to gain practical skills in designing communication strategies and media interventions . Read more
  • Multidisciplinary learning about the theory and practice of communication in development 
  • Work with practitioners and academics to gain practical skills in designing communication strategies and media interventions 
  • Develop research skills for communication activities in development 
  • Supportive learning in a diverse, international environment 
  • In-class support in career building, networking and taking the next steps after graduation

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Concepts and practices of communication
  • Participatory interventions in development
  • Theories and practices of development
  • Addressing poverty and inequality
  • Gender and development

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

Our programmes are excellent preparation for careers in international and rural development, agricultural economics, and marketing within the food chain and policy. Some 96% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduating.

Engagement with a wide variety of visiting speakers and field trips provides many opportunities for networking. In addition, competitive internships and placements, and research dissertations are an opportunity to showcase your skills, undertake overseas field research or link with organisations in the development sector. For examples of organisations our graduates go on to, please visit: http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae" target="_blank">http://www.reading.ac.uk/giidae



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