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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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The MA Postproduction course equips you with creative and technical skills required to work within a range of postproduction sectors such as offline editing, sound design, grading and visual effects. Read more
The MA Postproduction course equips you with creative and technical skills required to work within a range of postproduction sectors such as offline editing, sound design, grading and visual effects. During your studies you’ll do a unique industry project that will give you real-life experience with external clients.

- Practical. Master the key postproduction software such Avid Media Composer, DaVinci Resolve, Adobe Premiere, Audition, Prelude & After Effects and gain access to our high-end grading, sound mixing and recording facilities

- Industry-standard. Receive Protools audio platform training, essential for any sound postproduction career in film and TV

- Real-life. Put your knowledge into practice by completing a project for an industry client and receiving professional feedback

- Creative. Learn from award-winning tutors and guest speakers with Oscars, Emmys and BAFTAs, including legendary directors, cinematographers, editors, producers and other creative screen specialists

Based at London campus in Ealing Studios.

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The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the skills and professional level expertise in the industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. Read more
The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the skills and professional level expertise in the industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. As a student with a first degree in a discipline other than a technically-based media subject, you will learn to operate digital equipment and manipulate data to produce finished products for the creative industries.

This course covers video and audio production, computer graphics and animation, and the making of interactive products for distribution via new media platforms, as well as the longer established media of television, video and audio. You will work on the award-winning Brookes TV, making and producing broadcasts. There are also opportunities to work on live projects for external clients, producing promotional materials, a fast expanding area of employment.

Why choose this course?

This course will enhance your career prospects and offer you the opportunity to acquire the skills needed to work in the media industry. We have excellent facilities to support your learning and use the latest industry standard tools, such as Avid, Maya, After Effects, DaVinci Resolve and ProTools.

You will learn practical skills that will enhance your portfolio and improve your employment prospects. You have the opportunity to be part of the award-winning Brookes TV and learn the art of news production. You will benefit from being part of a large faculty with a variety of research interests and extensive industrial experience and connections.

This course is open to students from any academic background. Students join us from first studies in areas such as arts, literature, business, computing and engineering, among others.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period runs through until the end of September.

To qualify for a master’s degree you must pass all taught modules and the dissertation, together with the research and study methods module. The modules are as follows:
-Video Production
-Web Media
-Creating Character Models
-Creating Digital Animation and Visual Effects
-Newsroom Operation
-Professional Media Production
-Research and Study Methods
-The Dissertation

The course benefits from the rigorous validation and review processes at the University, and the external examiners are very positive about the course.

Please note, as courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the module lists you choose from may vary from the ones shown here.

Teaching and learning

Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, presentations, seminars, and practical and project work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, involving approximately 200 hours of student input and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through a weekly three-hour teaching block over a 12-week period.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, class tests, project work, design and oral presentations, workshops, simulations, and practical exercises.

Teaching and learning also draws on the diverse professional backgrounds, experience and knowledge of academics and visiting lecturers from industry.

Careers and professional development

Students graduate from the course with a broad skill set that equips them to move into a career in film and television post production, the computer games industry or live television production. Our graduates may work as freelance movie producers, graphic or games designers, but also find successful careers in international companies, such as Google, Microsoft, Discovery Channel and the BBC.

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This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. Read more

This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. The emphasis is firmly on practical film-making and television production work, underpinned with contextual theory throughout, engaging with contemporary issues and emerging trends in film and television production, as well as established film/television theories and practices.

The first two semesters of study provide a range of modules which will allow you to develop your film/television “craft skills” – this may include work with camera, lighting, sound, editing, directing and producing – while working on short film/TV projects of your own devising. There will be opportunities to collaborate with other students, and you will be encouraged to make contact with, and work with, contributors (e.g. interviewees, actors) from outside of the university. You will also develop your skills as an academic researcher by carrying out research which feeds directly into your film projects.

The course culminates in the Masters Project, where you will be the key creative leader of a film or television production, taking on the role of producer or director.

What happens on the course?

In a typical week, a full-time student on this course will have up to ten hours of class time which will be a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical workshop sessions. Most course modules will blend these different teaching methods within a given timetabled session, so there will be plenty of variety.

In lectures, you will typically be given ‘food for thought’ in relation to your own project ideas. In workshop sessions you will get to practice film-making techniques related to your own project work needs. In seminars you will share ideas and discuss with tutors and fellow students. In tutorials you will have one-to-one or small group discussion about your works in progress.

The general flow of the course for a full time student is to start with production skills, research skills and scriptwriting in the first semester. In the second semester you move on to a small personal project which will combine all that you have learned from these three areas. In the final semester, you bring it all together in a personal film/TV production project which is seen as the culmination of your studies.

Part-time students experience exactly the same course modules and course content, but necessarily broken down into smaller groups of modules.

Opportunities:

The course is built upon negotiated production work, which means you get to propose and develop your own ideas for film and television. The teaching staff are experienced with production across documentary, drama and social action production, and will guide you according to your ambitions, skills and needs.

There is always the opportunity to work on ‘live’ project briefs, which can be used as the basis of a module project, or alternatively as an extra-curricular experience which informs your development on the course and allows you to network with students on related courses.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course is taught in the School of Media, which houses a three-camera live television studio, fifteen editing suites with Premiere Pro, After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and other professional software packages, and a sound-recording/foley production suite. It also has an equipment store from which you can borrow all the camera, sound, lighting and other equipment you need to produce your work.

Who will teach you on this course?

The course teaching team includes four active doctoral or postdoctoral researchers – Adam Kossoff, Tracy McCoy, Phil Nichols and Gavin Wilson – whose interests include documentary film, social action video, screenwriting and adaptation, and cinematography. They are all qualified higher education teachers, and have many years of experience of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. They are also experienced film and programme makers.

Our students and graduates have a track-record of success in competitions and festivals, such as the prestigious Royal Television Society Student Awards, the Midland Movies awards, and the Business Disability Forum's Technology Taskforce Film Festival.

What our students think

Film-maker and editor Andrew Webber has had his films screened at international festivals in the UK, Jamaica and West Africa. He says, “The University has been extremely supportive, through my studies and after graduation.”

Niki Gandy has pursued a teaching career, and now teaches photography and art in a High School. Calling herself a “proud graduate” of our related undergraduate course, she says, “I chose it for its practical content and which helped furnish me with numerous transferable skills necessary to forge my career in teaching. Almost a decade on, my lecturers continue to provide me with support and guidance - I feel certain that my relationship with the university will continue for many years to come.”

Actor and director Brian Duffy, creator of TV series Small World – a comedy series about a group of deaf flatmates which has been shown on TV and online – says, “Studying at the University of Wolverhampton helped me with networking and organisation – especially as filmmakers came to Wolverhampton for Deaffest, the UK’s leading deaf film and arts festival. My lecturer could also sign which was a great help and a huge weight off my shoulders – I could talk to her one-to-one. That’s something I never had the pleasure of pre-university.”

Lauren Shinner has been working in media production ever since graduating. She says, “My time at the University was invaluable, I wouldn't be where I am today without it. The tutors were always helpful and push students to do their best with plenty of support and understanding and the course prepares you well for your prospective career. I've gone on to work as a video editor in education, ran my own media business and have done videos for high end charities and new bands, and am now working in media in another area. Without my degree, none of this would have been possible.”



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Immediately after a natural disaster a critical need is for safe shelter. The aim of the programme is to develop reflective practitioners who combine understanding of practical and strategic issues of development and emergency practice with an appreciation of the wider political context in which they operate. Read more
Immediately after a natural disaster a critical need is for safe shelter. The aim of the programme is to develop reflective practitioners who combine understanding of practical and strategic issues of development and emergency practice with an appreciation of the wider political context in which they operate.

This is a programme that combines development, humanitarian practice and the role of the practitioner intervening in post disaster reconstruction.

Why choose this course?

This course will provide you with background knowledge to be able to understand and discuss the essential components of shelter response after a disaster. The decisions made very early on in a shelter programme have far reaching effects and can affect the subsequent success or failure of permanent housing; they can enhance or hinder the building of community resilience and its preparedness in the face of future disasters.

The course is equally valid for students with technical as well as non-technical backgrounds. There is no need to have any previous knowledge in building, construction, architecture or engineering. The course delivery is designed to be flexible to allow you to study if you are working, or between deployments, or want to study in Oxford full time. We have developed good relationships with agencies working in the shelter field, and we occasionally are able to offer students internship possibilities within these organisations.

As a student in Oxford you'll be at the heart of the UK's most successful economic region. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, you will have access to the world-renowned Bodleian Library, the Bodleian Law Library and the Radcliffe Science Library.

This course in detail

The course is organised on a modular credit system. Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study. 60 credits are required to complete the PG Cert. Of these the core module accounts for 20 credits, while the extra 40 credits are achieved through a combination of 10 and 20 credit modules. An introduction on the first day of the programme will enable you to make a more informed choice of modules to take. The timetable is structured to minimise the likelihood that two related modules will run at the same time but clashes are not always avoidable.

The Modules on the course are:
-Shelter after Disaster (20 Credits) - core module
-Practice of Theory: Tools and Methods (20 Credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (20 Credits)
-Learning Practice Masterclass (10 Credits)
-Working with Conflict: Practical Skills and Strategies (10 Credits).

Please note: all our courses are reviewed regularly and are responsive to the needs and priorities of shelter practice. The list of modules may not be exactly as above but will be covering areas of study relevant to shelter.

Courses run by some of our partners which Brookes credit rates, can be used as credit towards this programme. RedR and IFRC courses are currently credit rated and we are working on similar partnerships. You can be exempted for up to 40 out of the 60 modules if you have taken these courses. Please get in touch with us if you would like further details

In addition to modules the programme organises many optional events, including PhD research seminars within the School of Architecture, student-led seminar series and occasional lectures. As well as the formal teaching content, the high quality of the student experience is an essential aspect of the programme. Students usually keep in touch after the course has ended via alumni links, where job opportunities are often shared. The PG Cert in Shelter after Disaster is offered as a standalone award wherein you take joint modules also available to students attending the Master's degree in Development and Emergency Practice (DEP). The programme has an average of 35-40 students, usually from over 20 countries, with a wide diversity of backgrounds. You will also benefit from interacting with a wider cohort of development and emergency practitioners.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods on the taught part of the programme are largely class-based. Learning is driven by a mixture of lecturing, one to one and group tutorials, whole group discussion, workshop format, small group work, personal reading, individual written assignments and project design. Wherever possible the programme invites visiting practitioners from humanitarian agencies to contribute to the programme by leading sessions and commenting on student work.

The programme entails hands-on workshops with live problems, sometimes field-based, working with communities, practitioners and development agencies. The emphasis is on action methods and reflection on one’s own role as an activist and practitioner. The objective is to enable students to build both knowledge and skills more suited to the urgency and complexity of people’s changing demands and environmental conditions.

The assessment pattern reflects the programme’s learning outcomes and is intended to demonstrate that graduates possess the skills and knowledge required in practice. Coursework involves a variety of different methods of assessment, including:
-Essay and report writing
-Individual and group presentations in class
-Personal attendance and participation in class
-Case study reports

Careers and professional development

A good number of our former students have found work in the shelter sector and we are building an alumni network to help current students get in contact with organisations who work in the shelter sector.

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How can we prevent another financial crisis? Is it by better understanding risk in financial securities? Can improving the way we measure and manage risk create stability in the financial world?. Read more
How can we prevent another financial crisis? Is it by better understanding risk in financial securities? Can improving the way we measure and manage risk create stability in the financial world?

The after effects of the 2008 financial meltdown are still being felt across the globe. We need knowledgeable financial professionals who can evaluate risk, act rationally and understand the economic impact of their actions in order to find solutions. If you can rise to the challenge of making ethical, sound financial decisions in pressurised environments, MSc Financial Engineering and Risk Management is for you.

You follow advanced, contemporary study in financial engineering and risk management and develop a deeper understanding of the risks within modern financial securities. You also become skilled in the design of robust management systems to measure risk. Upon graduation, you should possess the skills and knowledge for a successful career in commercial, investment and central banks, hedge funds, regulatory authorities and rating agencies.

You master areas including:
-Asset pricing
-Derivative securities
-Financial modelling
-Mathematical research techniques using Matlab

MSc Financial Engineering and Risk Management is taught at Essex Business School, home to one of the largest, and most respected, finance groups in the UK. Our teaching is grounded in contemporary issues and professional practice, supported by industry-standard facilities, such as our Bloomberg virtual trading floor.

We’re ranked in the top 25 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014) and are home to an international community of scholars, practitioners and academics; our current Masters students join us from more than 40 countries.

This course is also available to study part-time and you may be able to apply for scholarships and discounts offered by the University of Essex. Essex Business School also offers a limited number of scholarships for the CFA level one exam and IMC level one and two exams to exceptional Masters students.

Essex Business School is an IMC Advantage Partner and a Recognised Partner of the CFA.

Postgraduate loans for Masters courses are now available from the Student Loans Company, worth up to £10,000, for students from the UK and EU.

Our expert staff

We’re home to Essex Finance Centre, which produces research at the cutting-edge of financial debate.

Work by our expert staff has been discussed in the Bank of England, the European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve, so you join a business school that seeks to make a real difference to solving financial challenges around the world.

We combine academic experience with industry expertise and are renowned for research into:
-Business ethics and corporate social responsibility
-Organisation studies
-Leadership and strategy
-Finance and banking
-Risk management
-International management

Specialist facilities

You’re based at our Colchester Campus, in our landmark zero carbon building.

Our Colchester home is an example of our dedication to sustainable and ethical business practices. Its design is both environmentally friendly and architecturally stunning, with a winter garden and sun terrace contributing to the building’s own micro-climate and providing a tranquil environment for group working and socialising. Our Bonds café is located on site, making a great space for reviewing course notes before lectures.

Our virtual trading floor, complete with Bloomberg Financial Market Labs, enables you to practice dealing stocks and securities using industry-standard equipment. You can also benefit from our study skills workshops, designed to help you excel in your academic work.

Our building is also located on the University’s Knowledge Gateway, providing potential opportunities to network with inspiring SMEs who locate their businesses on our Colchester Campus.

Your future

An Essex Business School education is founded on creativity, innovation and ethical awareness to prepare you for the challenges of the global marketplace. In 2015, 78% of our postgraduate taught students were in work or further study (DLHE).

Our course provides you with the opportunity to develop a career in financial analysis, management, public administration and accountancy, as well as fostering your entrepreneurial spirit.

We provide plenty of support along the way to help you secure your dream job. Our dedicated employability team work closely with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MSc Finance and Investment: Dissertation
-Finance Research Techniques Using Matlab
-Research Methods in Finance: Empirical Methods in Finance
-Postgraduate Mathematics Preparation
-Risk Management
-Financial Modelling
-Asset Pricing
-Derivative Securities
-Trading Global Financial Markets (optional)

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MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. Read more
MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. The project work undertaken is underpinned with research, analysis and evidence of strategic thinking as well as self reflection.

On this course you will be able to devise new means of attracting audiences, whether in the areas of promotion and advertising or within the exhibition and corporate sector, moving image for mobile devices, the web, and in every area of motion design and the world of moving image.

The course has been designed for those looking for innovative, creative and critical learning, as you will engage with video, environmental, digital editing, sound and animation to develop your creative ideas and build a strong conceptual and technical basis for your development.

As well as providing opportunities to engage with more traditional areas of moving image such as short narrative film, promotions and branding, animation, motion graphics and broadcast design, the pathway also covers areas such as 3D projection and video mapping and CGI.

You will be expected to respond to new ideas, where the screen is not confined to the movie theatre or the living room. You will be encouraged to extend your knowledge of creative, interpretative and critical approaches to moving image practices. MA Moving Image provides an intensive arena for the discussion, development and production of high quality original audio-visual work. You will also be encouraged to engage with the wider context of moving image practice, for instance through submitting work to festivals and competitions.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

In the Technology Issues unit, and Concept and Prototyping unit, you will have the opportunity to engage with industry standard software (for example: After Effects, Cinema 4D, Final Cut Pro, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop).

Supported in particular by the Research Process and Technology Issues units, the pathway will enable you to deepen your conceptual thinking and technical application through the development of your individual practice.

New technologies have transformed the relationships between traditional film, video and digital formats, offering new opportunities for experimentation and the business context of this is explored through the Business and Innovation unit.

In the Concept and Prototyping unit you will develop your main concepts with reference to theoretical and business contexts; and this work will culminate in the Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. Read more
The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. If you are a filmmaker, freelance media producer, or an independent media artist seeking to develop advanced skills and learn key industry practices for building your career, the MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts has been specifically designed for you. Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and world leading academics in film, television and digital media theory.

Why this programme

-Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and academics in film, television and digital media theory.
-Glasgow offers a vibrant context for filmmaking and media arts practice. Key cultural events include the Glasgow Film Festival and Glasgow International(a biennial international festival of contemporary art).
-This broad-based and flexible programme allows you to work across a variety of platforms.
-Recognising that the programme will attract a diverse range of creative individuals, we offer a variety of software and hardware options. Our purpose designed Media Lab is equipped with Avid, Adobe Creative Cloud (including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Dreamweaver) and Final Cut Pro. We are able to equip students for projects with a range of cameras and sound and lighting equipment.
-The city is the home of BBC Scotland, STV and a lively community of independent media producers (television companies, sound studios and design companies) and numerous micro-businesses in the creative industries. It is also home to the internationally significant Glasgow Museum of Modern Art as well as venues renowned for exhibitions of emerging and established screen-based artists such as Tramway, The Centre for Contemporary Art and The Arches. In addition, the city is famous for its live music venues, galleries and artist run studio spaces offering an excellent and supportive environment for creative artists.
-The programme is taught in the Gilmorehill Centre which offers a purpose built Media Lab, its own cinema as well as a Media Archive which has more than 6,000 holdings, complementing the Library’s extensive collection of film, television and media art books and periodicals. The Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the journal’s annual conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year.

Programme structure

The programme will offer a combination of formal lectures, practitioner led workshops, seminar discussions, screenings and one-on-one tutorials.

The practical elements of the course will feature high levels of support and direction in relation to pre-production materials, including developing pitches and storyboards as well as hands on support in relation to delivery of the individual film/media art projects.

Industry workshops are designed to give you the skills and knowledge needed in contemporary screen-based media contexts, while history and theory courses are offered to link industry practice with cutting edge theory in the field.

The programme has 4 components:
-Two core practical workshops: Running in Semester 1 and Semester 2, these are led by a practitioner in our purpose built Media Lab and are designed to provide hands on support in the production of your film or media art projects. They also incorporate sessions led by industry professional that are designed to pass on key industry experiences and skills vital to a successful career in the industry.
-The core academic option Experimental Art and Media: This course covers the history and theory of experimental art and filmmaking, including the topic of practice-as-research. It is designed to provide a critical foundation for your filmmaking and/or media arts practice.
-You will also choose one course, selected from a range of academic options that draw on the research expertise of the subject team.
-A practice-based dissertation, where you have the opportunity to develop, with support from technical and academic supervisors, a large-scale film or media arts self-directed project.

Career prospects

The programme will equip you with the ability to develop a career as a media producer, with a particular focus on low-budget productions for film and television. You will have the opportunity to explore and develop freelance industry practices and a portfolio of skills enabling you to work as an independent practitioner in today’s creative industries.

It is an innovative programme that teaches artistic, technical and professional skills and is designed to support graduates that are interested in working for large media companies or who may wish to pursue their own independent filmmaking and/or media arts practice. The programme also offers the research preparation necessary to successfully pursue a practice-based PhD.

You will learn things such as how to make films or media art pieces on low-budgets, how to take an idea from pitch to production, how to manage and sustain workflows, the processes involved in applying for arts funding, how to enhance your public profile and the processes involved in administering a start-up company.

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Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory. Read more
Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory.

Your course will have a new home in Compass House, which will extend our campus along East Road. You’ll have the latest technology at your fingertips and be able to collaborate with other students on innovative projects to hone your skills.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

If you have a degree in an art and design or computer games-related subject, our course will allow you to specialise in games art at Master's level.

Based in the inspiring environment of our new Compass House Games Centre, you’ll learn all about best practice in the games industry. We’ll encourage you to work in design production teams, tackling a series of creative and technical challenges with programmers and industry professionals. You'll develop your design skills and learn how to create and publish successful games across a range of platforms.

Cambridge accounts for nearly 20% of the UK computer games industry, so it's a great place to study as we enjoy excellent links with the major games developers in the area. What's more, our Computer Games Centre offers studio space to local indie developers, who'll share their knowledge and experience with you.

We're partners with the Global Science & Technology Forum, allowing our students access to cutting-edge research materials.

While you're studying, we'll encourage you to take on work placements and collaborate on live projects with the games industry. You’ll also have the chance to enter games events, such as Brains Eden, which Anglia Ruskin hosts every year.

This course runs in parallel with our MSc Computer Games Development (Computing), reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of games creation.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

Careers

Our MA gives you the chance to specialise in the design and technical implementation of computer games, whether you already have a games-related degree, or you're a recent graduate of a non-games-related degree who's looking to move into this area. Our course is also suitable if you work in another creative industry and are looking to move into games design and creation.

The skills you'll learn on this course are relevant to other forms of games - including board games and educational games - allowing you to consider a number of career options.

Interactive computer games is a relatively new medium; as the industry grows, you’ll find more and more opportunities to use the computing and creative skills you'll hone while studying here.

Modules & assessment

Core modules:
Process and Practice as Research
Games Development 1
Games Development 2
Digital Arts - Experimental Practice
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written and practical work, carried out individually and as part of a team.

What you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Facilities

Based at the new Compass House Computer Games Centre, a three-minute walk from our main Cambridge campus, you’ll have 24-hour access to a hub space with group work naturally forming a part of your studies.

The centre includes a start-up lab for small games companies, supported by Games Eden, the Cambridge Computer Games industry network. This will give you excellent opportunities to work in an entrepreneurial games environment.

All students on our Computer Games courses – undergraduate and postgraduate – have access to industry-standard PCs running Maya, 3DS Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, Motion Builder, After Effects, Unity 3D, and UDK. You’ll be able to use motion capture equipment, 3D monitors, VR equipment, graphics tablets, a render farm, HD cameras and digital SLRs (for HDRI capture).

Links with industry

Cambridge is home to nearly 20% of the UK’s computer games industry, including Sony’s Guerrilla Studios, ARM, Jagex, Ninja Theory, Frontier, Geomerics and a host of smaller indie developers. Our Computer Games Art department is a member of TIGA, the Business & University Games Syndicate, and a partner of the Global Science & Technology Forum, giving you access to cutting-edge research materials.

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The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. Read more

The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. If you are a filmmaker, freelance media producer, or an independent media artist seeking to develop advanced skills and learn key industry practices for building your career, the MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts has been specifically designed for you. Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and world leading academics in film, television and digital media theory.

Why this programme

  • Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and academics in film, television and digital media theory.
  • Glasgow offers a vibrant context for filmmaking and media arts practice. Key cultural events include the Glasgow Film Festival and Glasgow International(a biennial international festival of contemporary art).
  • This broad-based and flexible programme allows you to work across a variety of platforms.
  • Recognising that the programme will attract a diverse range of creative individuals, we offer a variety of software and hardware options. Our purpose designed Media Lab is equipped with Avid, Adobe Creative Cloud (including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Dreamweaver) and Final Cut Pro. We are able to equip students for projects with a range of cameras and sound and lighting equipment.
  • The city is the home of BBC Scotland, STV and a lively community of independent media producers (television companies, sound studios and design companies) and numerous micro-businesses in the creative industries. It is also home to the internationally significant Glasgow Museum of Modern Art as well as venues renowned for exhibitions of emerging and established screen-based artists such as Tramway, The Centre for Contemporary Art and The Arches. In addition, the city is famous for its live music venues, galleries and artist run studio spaces offering an excellent and supportive environment for creative artists.
  • The programme is taught in the Gilmorehill Centre which offers a purpose built Media Lab, its own cinema as well as a Media Archive which has more than 6,000 holdings, complementing the Library’s extensive collection of film, television and media art books and periodicals. The Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the journal’s annual conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year. 

Programme structure

The programme will offer a combination of formal lectures, practitioner led workshops, seminar discussions, screenings and one-on-one tutorials.

The practical elements of the course will feature high levels of support and direction in relation to pre-production materials, including developing pitches and storyboards as well as hands on support in relation to delivery of the individual film/media art projects.

Industry workshops are designed to give you the skills and knowledge needed in contemporary screen-based media contexts, while history and theory courses are offered to link industry practice with cutting edge theory in the field.

The programme has 4 components:

  • Two core practical workshops: Running in Semester 1 and Semester 2, these are led by a practitioner in our purpose built Media Lab and are designed to provide hands on support in the production of your film or media art projects. They also incorporate sessions led by industry professional that are designed to pass on key industry experiences and skills vital to a successful career in the industry.
  • The core academic option Experimental Art and Media: This course covers the history and theory of experimental art and filmmaking, including the topic of practice-as-research. It is designed to provide a critical foundation for your filmmaking and/or media arts practice.
  • You will also choose one course, selected from a range of academic options that draw on the research expertise of the subject team.
  • A practice-based dissertation, where you have the opportunity to develop, with support from technical and academic supervisors, a large-scale film or media arts self-directed project.

Career prospects

The programme will equip you with the ability to develop a career as a media producer, with a particular focus on low-budget productions for film and television. You will have the opportunity to explore and develop freelance industry practices and a portfolio of skills enabling you to work as an independent practitioner in today’s creative industries.

It is an innovative programme that teaches artistic, technical and professional skills and is designed to support graduates that are interested in working for large media companies or who may wish to pursue their own independent filmmaking and/or media arts practice. The programme also offers the research preparation necessary to successfully pursue a practice-based PhD. 

You will learn things such as how to make films or media art pieces on low-budgets, how to take an idea from pitch to production, how to manage and sustain workflows, the processes involved in applying for arts funding, how to enhance your public profile and the processes involved in administering a start-up company. 



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Project Objectives. To determine the optimal dosage for Self MWM and MWM to improve rotational movement in the shoulder. To establish the longitudinal effects of the optimal dosage of MWM and Self MWM on shoulder rotational range of motion. Read more

Project Objectives

  1. To determine the optimal dosage for Self MWM and MWM to improve rotational movement in the shoulder.
  2. To establish the longitudinal effects of the optimal dosage of MWM and Self MWM on shoulder rotational range of motion.
  3. To establish if the optimum dosage of MWM and self MWM have any impact on shoulder strength.

Methodology proposed

Our research to date has established that MWM and SMWM are effective at improving shoulder internal rotation range of motion. Previous research however only looked at one particular dosage, 30 repetitions. The aim of this study is to examine if different dosages of MWM and SMWM’s have differing effects on the obtained range of shoulder, i.e. Is more better or worse? We will also establish if dosage also has an impact of the strength of the shoulder muscles.

The design will be set as a single-blind, randomized controlled study. In the first study sixty subjects with limited shoulder internal rotation will be randomly divided into three groups: 10 rep x MWM group, 30 rep x MWM group and 60 rep MWM group. Two outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, after the treatment session, 48hrs, 72hrs and 120hrs later. The outcome measures will consist of shoulder internal rotation range of motion and isokinetic testing of shoulder rotational strength. In the second study sixty subjects with limited shoulder internal rotation will be randomly divided into three groups: 10 rep x Self MWM group, 30 rep x Self MWM group and 60 rep Self MWM group. Two outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, after the treatment session and. 48hrs, 72hrs and 120hrs later. The outcome measures will consist of shoulder internal rotation range of motion and isokinetic testing of shoulder rotational strength. A repeated measures ANOVA will be used to compare differences before and after intervention and among groups at each time-point.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

The results of this study will be highly relevant to anyone involved in sports medicine. Shoulder pathology in sports people is very common and normally results in a decreased internal rotation of the shoulder. The results of this study may be able to provide the sports medicine profession with a successful treatment method to improve and maintain the deficit of internal rotation. The results of this study will be published in peer reviewed journals and presented at international conferences.



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Project Objectives. To examine if shockwave therapy is an effective treatment to improve the pain and muscle weakness associated with exercise inducted muscle damage. Read more

Project Objectives

  1. To examine if shockwave therapy is an effective treatment to improve the pain and muscle weakness associated with exercise inducted muscle damage
  2. To determine the optimum timing for the delivery of shockwave following the induction of exercise induced muscle damage to improve the associated pain and muscle weakness.

Methodology proposed

The aim of this study is to evaluate and optimise the use of shockwave therapy in improving the symptoms of ex ercise inducted muscle damage, namely pain and muscle weakness. The use of shockwave to aid in the recovery following exercise inducted muscle damage is a relatively new concept and has not been as yet explored to a great extent in the literature. The study will consist of 2 phases.

In phase 1 a single-blind, randomized controlled study will be conducted. Thirty subjects with will be randomly divided into three groups: shockwave therapy, placebo shockwave therapy and a control group. Muscle damage will be induced to the gastrocnemius muscle. 24 hours later each group will receive their assigned treatment, shockwave, placebo shockwave or no treatment. Prior to the induction of the muscle damage, 24 hrs post, 48 hrs post and 96 hrs post induction, the strength of the gastrocnemius will be measured isokinetically and point tenderness in the muscle will be assessed by measuring the pain pressure threshold in these points.

The second phase of the study will examine the effects of the timing of the delivery of the shockwave treatment on pain and strength in the gastrocnemius following exercise inducted muscle damage. Thirty subjects with will be randomly divided into three groups: one group will receive shockwave therapy 24 hrs post the induction of the muscle damage, group 2 will receive it 48hrs post the induction of the muscle damage and the 3rd group will be a control group and receive no treatment. Muscle damage will be induced to the gastrocnemius muscle. Prior to the induction of the muscle damage, 24 hrs post, 48 hrs post and 96 hrs post induction, the strength of the gastrocnemius will be measured isokinetically and the point tenderness in the muscle will be assessed by measuring the pain pressure threshold in these points. A repeated measures ANOVA will be used to compare differences before and after the interventions and among groups at each time-point.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

This study is a continuation of a fourth year project. The results of the research would suggest that shockwave administered directly after the induction of muscle damage is effective at improving the pain experienced in the muscle 48hrs later. The results of this study will be highly relevant to clinicians and sport performers as it will firstly establish if shockwave is effective at eliminating some of the side effects of exercise inducted muscle damage and the optimum timing for same. The results of the study will be disseminated via peer reviewed journals and conferences.



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Introduction. MA Visual Effects (VFX) at London College of Communication is a practice-led course that will develop your technical computing skills, animation, lighting and editing capabilities. Read more

Introduction

MA Visual Effects (VFX) at London College of Communication is a practice-led course that will develop your technical computing skills, animation, lighting and editing capabilities. The course culminates in a collaborative project that will prepare you for integrated roles within the VFX industry.

Content

MA Visual Effects (VFX) at LCC is taught as a specialist subject within the broad and experimental visual practice of animated visual communication. The course explores the theoretical and historical contexts that inform how audiences perceive reality and photorealism.

You'll be introduced to a range of technical and conceptual approaches to VFX animation. You’ll also explore technologies and processes by producing short-form animation across the VFX spectrum, to set briefs. 

Structure

The course is delivered across four terms, starting in September and finishing in December the year after. Incorporating a summer break, this is a one-year full-time course (45 taught weeks), delivered over 15 months. 

Term 1

1.1 VFX Animation Fundamentals (40 Credits)

1.2 Design for Animation, Narrative Structures and Film Language (20 Credits)

Terms 2 and 3

2.1 Advanced and Experimental VFX Animation Techniques (40 Credits)

2.2 Collaborative Unit (20 Credits)

Term 4

3.1 Final Major Project VFX and Thesis (60 Credits)



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You will learn...…. Comprehensive knowledge of design processes. How to formulate creative strategies and develop them through self-assessment. Read more

You will learn...…

  1. Comprehensive knowledge of design processes.
  2. How to formulate creative strategies and develop them through self-assessment.
  3. How to independently research, master and integrate new design technologies and tools.
  4. To demonstrate effective group/team work skills and written and oral communication skills
  5. To demonstrate the professional and enterprise skills necessary for working effectively in visual effects related ICT organisations

Programme outline

This is a full-time, 180-point Master's programme. You will complete this qualification in three consecutive trimesters over 12 months, delivered at Victoria University's Miramar Creative Centre.

Trimester One

  • MDDN451 Creative Coding for Digital Content

Covers computer graphics techniques that are used as current practice in the film industry through a range of projects ranging from generating special effects to the algorithmic treatment of media.

And one of the following two courses MDDN421 or MDDN422

  • MDDN421 Compositing and Motion Graphics

Learn and practice skills relating to previsualisation, production planning and coordination for creating assets, effects and content for Visual Effects and Motion Graphics.

  • MDDN422 Creature Rigging and Simulation

Covers skills and techniques for creating and working with human, creature and mechanical rigs and controls for digital character animation.

Trimester Two

  • CCDN412 Mātauranga Design

Engage with toi (Māori creativity) and mātauranga (Māori understanding) in the production of both visual and material cultural design that honours our place and past in Aotearoa New Zealand. Guided by traditional Māori protocols and knowledge, students will learn how to understand and interact with Māori symbols and visual spatial strategies in ways that are culturally sound and appropriate.

  • CCDN422 Design professional Practice

Covers advanced investigations into topics relevant to professional practice for design today including branding, marketing, networking, presentation and portfolio.

And one of the following two courses MDDN431 or MDDN432

  • MDDN431 Lighting and Rendering

Learn about traditional applications of lighting such as portraiture, practical studio lighting, and cinematography and engage with digital tools to apply traditional lighting techniques to digital media.

  • MDDN432 Character Animation

Gain relevant skills for creating compelling and emotive animated sequences of digital characters.

Trimester Three: Research Practicum

  • MDDN541: Research Practicum Project - 60 points

This studio consists of a supervised practicum, working on a design studio based research and project, generally as a placement in the visual effects industry.

Your career options

Graduate with a sought-after combination of technical knowledge and experience appropriate for working in the Visual Effects industry or other creative digital fields.

Compositor

Combine footage and CG assets together to produce visual effects for film and media.

3D Animator

Bring digital characters to life with expressive movement and emotions.

Motion Graphics

Animate typography, graphical elements and imagery to produce compelling animations.



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We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments. Read more

We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments.

As a student you will be registered with a University research institute, for many this is the Institute for Cellular Medicine (ICM). You will be supported in your studies through a structured programme of supervision and training via our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

We undertake the following areas of research and offer MPhil, PhD and MD supervision in:

Applied immunobiology (including organ and haematogenous stem cell transplantation)

Newcastle hosts one of the most comprehensive organ transplant programmes in the world. This clinical expertise has developed in parallel with the applied immunobiology and transplantation research group. We are investigating aspects of the immunology of autoimmune diseases and cancer therapy, in addition to transplant rejection. We have themes to understand the interplay of the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by a variety of pathways, and how these can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. Further research theme focusses on primary immunodeficiency diseases.

Dermatology

There is strong emphasis on the integration of clinical investigation with basic science. Our research include:

  • cell signalling in normal and diseased skin including mechanotransduction and response to ultraviolet radiation
  • dermatopharmacology including mechanisms of psoriatic plaque resolution in response to therapy
  • stem cell biology and gene therapy
  • regulation of apoptosis/autophagy
  • non-melanoma skin cancer/melanoma biology and therapy.

We also research the effects of UVR on the skin including mitochondrial DNA damage as a UV biomarker.

Diabetes

This area emphasises on translational research, linking clinical- and laboratory-based science. Key research include:

  • mechanisms of insulin action and glucose homeostasis
  • insulin secretion and pancreatic beta-cell function
  • diabetic complications
  • stem cell therapies
  • genetics and epidemiology of diabetes.

Diagnostic and therapeutic technologies

Focus is on applied research and aims to underpin future clinical applications. Technology-oriented and demand-driven research is conducted which relates directly to health priority areas such as:

  • bacterial infection
  • chronic liver failure
  • cardiovascular and degenerative diseases.

This research is sustained through extensive internal and external collaborations with leading UK and European academic and industrial groups, and has the ultimate goal of deploying next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic systems in the hospital and health-care environment.

Kidney disease

There is a number of research programmes into the genetics, immunology and physiology of kidney disease and kidney transplantation. We maintain close links between basic scientists and clinicians with many translational programmes of work, from the laboratory to first-in-man and phase III clinical trials. Specific areas:

  • haemolytic uraemic syndrome
  • renal inflammation and fibrosis
  • the immunology of transplant rejection
  • tubular disease
  • cystic kidney disease.

The liver

We have particular interests in:

  • primary biliary cirrhosis (epidemiology, immunobiology and genetics)
  • alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • fibrosis
  • the genetics of other autoimmune and viral liver diseases

Magnetic Resonance (MR), spectroscopy and imaging in clinical research

Novel non-invasive methodologies using magnetic resonance are developed and applied to clinical research. Our research falls into two categories:

  • MR physics projects involve development and testing of new MR techniques that make quantitative measurements of physiological properties using a safe, repeatable MR scan.
  • Clinical research projects involve the application of these novel biomarkers to investigation of human health and disease.

Our studies cover a broad range of topics (including diabetes, dementia, neuroscience, hepatology, cardiovascular, neuromuscular disease, metabolism, and respiratory research projects), but have a common theme of MR technical development and its application to clinical research.

Musculoskeletal disease (including auto-immune arthritis)

We focus on connective tissue diseases in three, overlapping research programmes. These programmes aim to understand:

  • what causes the destruction of joints (cell signalling, injury and repair)
  • how cells in the joints respond when tissue is lost (cellular interactions)
  • whether we can alter the immune system and ‘switch off’ auto-immune disease (targeted therapies and diagnostics)

This research theme links with other local, national and international centres of excellence and has close integration of basic and clinical researchers and hosts the only immunotherapy centre in the UK.

Pharmacogenomics (including complex disease genetics)

Genetic approaches to the individualisation of drug therapy, including anticoagulants and anti-cancer drugs, and in the genetics of diverse non-Mendelian diseases, from diabetes to periodontal disease, are a focus. A wide range of knowledge and experience in both genetics and clinical sciences is utilised, with access to high-throughput genotyping platforms.

Reproductive and vascular biology

Our scientists and clinicians use in situ cellular technologies and large-scale gene expression profiling to study the normal and pathophysiological remodelling of vascular and uteroplacental tissues. Novel approaches to cellular interactions have been developed using a unique human tissue resource. Our research themes include:

  • the regulation of trophoblast and uNk cells
  • transcriptional and post-translational features of uterine function
  • cardiac and vascular remodelling in pregnancy

We also have preclinical molecular biology projects in breast cancer research.

Respiratory disease

We conduct a broad range of research activities into acute and chronic lung diseases. As well as scientific studies into disease mechanisms, there is particular interest in translational medicine approaches to lung disease, studying human lung tissue and cells to explore potential for new treatments. Our current areas of research include:

  • acute lung injury - lung infections
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • fibrotic disease of the lung, both before and after lung transplantation.

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics

Our research projects are concerned with the harmful effects of chemicals, including prescribed drugs, and finding ways to prevent and minimise these effects. We are attempting to measure the effects of fairly small amounts of chemicals, to provide ways of giving early warning of the start of harmful effects. We also study the adverse side-effects of medicines, including how conditions such as liver disease and heart disease can develop in people taking medicines for completely different medical conditions. Our current interests include: environmental chemicals and organophosphate pesticides, warfarin, psychiatric drugs and anti-cancer drugs.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.



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