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Masters Degrees (African)

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The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. Read more
The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. The programme is unique in the way it encourages exploration of relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. The module ‘Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature’ provides theoretical and methodological skills while the programme’s other units focus on specific areas such as literatures in African languages and contemporary African literature in English.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/

Structure

All students are required to write a 10,000-word dissertation in the field of their major course, which allows them to carry out a substantial piece of independent academic work on a selected topic. The dissertation is taken in either the core module or in the module ‘Selected Topics’.

Students must take the core module plus two modules from list A or B. List B modules assume a linguistic competence in the chosen language equivalent to that acquired in a first degree.

Not all modules listed below may be offered every year, and new modules may become available. For an up-to-date list of modules on offer, please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Some modules may be taught in other departments of the School.

- Core Module
Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year

- List A: Pan-African Modules
Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017

- List B: Language-specific Modules
Practical translation from and into Swahili - 15PAFC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Directed Readings in an African Langauage - 15PAFC147 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 26kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/file80692.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks:

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse
range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the
problems that contemporary societies now face. The MA African Literature can lead to further study and research, however there is also a range of opportunities in fields such as:

- Education
- Publishing
- Archive work
- Arts Management
- Media

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. Read more
The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. It is designed for students who wish to enhance their historical and contemporary understanding of Africa’s societies, politics, economies, and cultures, as well as for those who wish to apply for advanced research degrees. The degree thus offers a highly regarded postgraduate qualification relevant to a wide range of professional careers, as well as intensive research and language training for students planning to prepare a doctoral dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsafmpafs

Course detail

The course introduces the latest research approaches and methodologies in African studies at an advanced level. Students have the advantage of developing an interdisciplinary approach to critical thinking and academic writing, the opportunity to develop skills in an African language, and also receive specialist research training.

By the end of the course, students should have acquired:

1. A deeper knowledge and understanding of African studies and its critical debates.
2. A conceptual and contextual understanding enabling the evaluation of past and present research on Africa and its methodologies.
3. The knowledge and technical skills required for pursuing original research in their chosen area.
4. The ability to situate their own research within current and past methodological and interpretative developments in the field.
5. Increased proficiency in speaking an African language and/or in using an African language for academic purposes.

Format

The MPhil in African Studies is structured by four key elements: a core course, an option course, a dissertation and language training.

African Language Training is also not a formal part of the degree assessment, but all students are required to demonstrate that they have attended language teaching and have made good progress at language acquisition. The language element of the MPhil course is jointly managed by the University of Cambridge Language Centre and the Centre of African Studies. All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent terms.

Assessment

Formal assessment consists of two parts: coursework essays (submitted for the Core Course and the Option Course) and a dissertation (submitted at the end of the course). You are also required to submit a ‘practice essay’ on a topic related to your dissertation research, and also a formal dissertation proposal, but these are not formally assessed.

The dissertation must be submitted on the last day of Easter full term, and should be between 15,000 and 20,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). It counts for 60% of the final mark. If the examiners consider it necessary, they may conduct an oral examination on the dissertation before the final MPhil Examiners' meeting in early July.

The Core Course is assessed by means of an essay of no more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) on a topic chosen from a prescribed list of questions, which is distributed by the MPhil Office in the first week of Lent Term. The Option Courses are also assessed by means of an essay of not more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). The Core Course essay and Option Course essay each count for 20% of the final mark and are submitted in Lent Term.
A compulsory practice essay on a topic related to the dissertation is to be submitted in Lent term. This essay does not count towards the final mark but a 'pass' mark is a progression requirement.

All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Formal assessment consists of coursework (2 pieces of homework, 10% each) and two exams at the end of the course in Reading Comprehension (30%) and Listening Comprehension (20%) as well as one Oral Presentation (30%).

Progression requirement to proceed to examined coursework essays: 'Pass' mark for the compulsory practice essay submitted in Lent term (candidates are permitted one resubmission of the practice essay).

Continuing

The Centre of African Studies does not offer a PhD course, but every year several of our MPhil students go on to study for a PhD in Cambridge or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

UAC Nigeria Fund (departmental grant for fieldwork)

Centre for History and Economics Prize Research Grant (grant for fieldwork)

The Charlie Bayne Travel Trust (travel grants for students with a disability)

For more information http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/fellowship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme explores the nature, dynamics and complexity of the links between peace, conflict, security, development, and democratisation in Africa, with a focus on cross-cutting thematic issues including armed conflict, poverty and underdevelopment, HIV/AIDS, resources and terrorism, among others. Read more
This programme explores the nature, dynamics and complexity of the links between peace, conflict, security, development, and democratisation in Africa, with a focus on cross-cutting thematic issues including armed conflict, poverty and underdevelopment, HIV/AIDS, resources and terrorism, among others. Delivered by staff with a high profile in academic and policy circles, the programme promotes an advanced understanding of the competing theories, concepts, interpretations, discourses and policies on history, politics, conflict and development in Africa, and their application to contemporary issues in a global, regional and local context (humanitarian, developmental, peace and security related) that underlie interventions in Africa, and their consequences.

You will also acquire subject-specific knowledge and understanding of methodologies of conflict analysis, management, resolution and peace-building in an African context.

No prior knowledge of Africa or African issues is assumed.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/african-peace-and-conflict-studies-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

The MA is located in Peace Studies, a Rotary International recognised centre of expertise for teaching and research on peace and conflict issues.

This degree programme is delivered by staff from the John and Elnora Ferguson Centre for African Studies (JEFCAS), our Research Centre that offers a forward-looking environment where academics, researchers, students and public and private sector entities come to gain and share knowledge of contemporary African issues.

Modules

Core modules
-Introduction to African Politics
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-African Security Studies
-Dissertation project in a topic of your choice (related to African Peace and Conflict Studies)

Option modules
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-International Politics and Security Studies
-Religions, Conflict and Peacemaking in a Post-secular World
-Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
-Africa Study Visit
-Applied Conflict Resolutions Skills
-Gender, Conflict and Development
-Natural Resource Governance, Conflict and Co-operation
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy
-Sustainable Tourism Development
-Regional and Global Security Politics
-Political Violence and Terrorism

You have the opportunity to define your own engagement with the discipline by choosing from the full range of modules offered by Peace Studies. It is therefore up to you to decide what specific dimensions of peace you wish to focus on, with possible options in Christianity and politics, African politics, nationalism, international political economy, international politics and security studies, conflict resolution, East Asia, Latin America and the Middle East.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates typically follow careers in education, diplomacy, development, government, with non-governmental organisations, in journalism and in peace and conflict-related work.

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. The African Studies with Heritage MA draws on UCL's expertise in archaeology, anthropology and heritage studies to provide an essential background to African pasts and provides a critical framework for assessing the management and protection of heritage resources in Africa.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present, together with training in research methods. In addition, the Heritage pathway offers a range of optional modules drawn from the Departments of Anthropology, Archaeology and Geography, and includes research into museums and sites, intangible heritage, local community histories, archaeology, and the presentation and preservation of cultural materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
-Debating Africa's Future
-Research Methods in African Studies

Optional modules - students choose three from a range of options including the following:
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Critical Perspectives of Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Historical Geographies of the African Diaspora in Britain
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up positions with national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, within national ministries and in the heritage/museums sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, archival work, ethnographic field techniques, presentation, and knowledge of key heritage issues (including resource management, African material culture and conservation issues).

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree.

The programme interweaves the study of the pre-colonial past, the colonial era, and the post-colonial present, with an eye to the future. Modules are arranged thematically around ‘debates’, with lectures presenting a long-term view of issues to frame subsequent seminar discussions.

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The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. Read more
The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. The opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the continent is a particular advantage of the degree. Students can choose from a range of about 30 modules in fourteen disciplines. Our former students have chosen to study Africa at this level for a wide range of reasons. For some a deep interest in the history and culture or political economy of a particular region is sufficient motivation, but for many students the programme has, in addition, been followed with the intention of furthering their career opportunities. Some go on to work either in Africa or in fields related to Africa. The opportunity to combine study of particular African subjects with an African language is very useful, although some evidence of competence in learning a foreign language is usually required.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/

Structure

Students take three taught module units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three module units from more than one subject. One module unit may be made up of two 0.5 unit modules. The subjects of the programme are: Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Media, Politics, Religious Studies, and Language.

The two minor module units can be taken in the same subject (but different to that of the major), or two different ones.

A language module can only be taken as a minor, and only one language module can be taken.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of term to determine which is the most appropriate level of study.

When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major and minor subjects, and asked to give alternative choices as practical considerations such as time tabling and availability of modules may limit freedom of choice.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc.

All modules are subject to availability.

MA African Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 31kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/file80693.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Teaching is normally provided by lecture or seminar and students are required to attend such classes. Each student will be assigned a supervisor in connection with his or her dissertation.

- Lectures and Seminars
Most modules involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation
The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African studies from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Some MA African Studies graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include: Academia; Charity; Community; Government; NGOs; Media; Publishing and UN Agencies.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:
BBC News
British Embassy
Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa
Goal Nigeria
Government of Canada
Hogan Lovells International LLP
International Institute for Environment and Development
Kenyan Government
Mercy Corps
Migrant Resource Centre
Mo Ibrahim Foundation
The London MENA Film Festival
The University of Tokyo
The World Bank
Think Africa Press
U.S. Embassy
United Nations
University of Namibia
World Vision UK
Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:
Development Producer
Africa Editor
Copywriter
Director of Trade and Investment
Projects and Fundraising Manager
Head of Desk, Africa
Senior Investment Manager
Sports Writer
Knowledge Management Projects Coordinator
Project Director
Presidential Advisor
Commodity Manager
Publisher
Tutor
Creative Consultant
Lecturer in African Arts and Cultures
East Africa Analyst
Youth Volunteer Advisor
Southern Region Educational Manager
Head Specialists Giving + Insights

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university, and offer a unique opportunity to choose one of three distinct pathways. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university, and offer a unique opportunity to choose one of three distinct pathways. In the African Studies with Education MA students will come to understand some of the challenges surrounding education in contemporary Africa - including poverty, inequality, gender, education and employment, education and technology; vernacular education and the diaspora.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present. In addition, the Education pathway explores aspects of education and learning, through a bespoke 'African Studies and Education' core module and a range of advanced optional modules drawn from the UCL Institute of Education and other UCL departments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
- Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
- Debating Africa's Future
- African Studies and Education

Optional modules:
Students choose three from a range of optional modules including the following:
- Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
- Planning for Education and Development
- Education, Conflict and Fragility
- Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
- Education in Muslim Communities
- Gender, Education and Development
- Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation
- Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
- Cultural Memory and Identity
- Research Methods in African Studies
- Performance, Visual Media and Popular Culture in Africa
- Archaeology and Education

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up diverse positions within education-related organisations, national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, or within national ministries and the public sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, environmental data analysis and GIS, archival work, ethnographic field techniques and presentation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study education as it relates to the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent. This expertise is combined with that of the world-leading UCL Institute of Education to provide unparralleled insight into education policy and practice.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree. The new African Studies and Education pathway has been co-developped with the UCL Institute of Education and draws on the University's core stregths in teaching and reseach on education in Africa.

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The Conservation Management of African Ecosystems programme is a unique, double Masters Programme implemented jointly with the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology in Arusha, Tanzania. Read more
The Conservation Management of African Ecosystems programme is a unique, double Masters Programme implemented jointly with the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology in Arusha, Tanzania. A key feature of the programme will be, following a taught component in Glasgow, the opportunity to carry out an in-depth research project over 15 months in one of the major conservation areas of Tanzania. Successful students will qualify with a Masters degree from the University of Glasgow and a Masters degree from the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology.

● The Programme will provide insight into the principles of conservation management, biodiversity measurement, applied ecology, the human dimension of conservation and the epidemiology of diseases that threaten endangered species.
● It will develop students’ competence in study design, data analysis, scientific writing and communication skills in a quantitative and scientific context appropriate to enable independent research and publication of high quality outputs, as well as communicating to a broader range of audiences (eg. for government policy making and public outreach) and will train students in a range of specialised skills, techniques, practices and analyses required for state-of-the-art research and management in conservation biology.
● The Programme will provide the opportunity to study in-depth a choice of current issues in conservation management through an extended research project that involves setting their own results in the wider context through critical evaluation of the evidence base in that field, assimilation and synthesis of information relevant to their specific study, with reference to the latest literature and identification of the strengths and weaknesses in their own approach and results.
● The University of Glasgow has a wide range of experience, expertise and long-term cooperation with partners in northern Tanzania. This Programme offers students the opportunity to benefit from well-established teaching and support at the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow, and combine that with research work in one of the major conservation areas of Tanzania.

Programme Structure

The programme consists of two semesters of taught courses based at Glasgow: see ‘Core and optional courses’ below.

Following the Glasgow taught courses the student will travel to Tanzania to undertake training and research at one of the major conservation areas in Tanzania. During this time they will be registered with the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology in Arusha, northern Tanzania.

A final three months of the research period will be linked to the University of Glasgow but, by common agreement with the supervisors, the student may remain in Tanzania for this period, or study back at Glasgow.

Successful completion of the full course will lead to the award of two Masters Degree: one from the University of Glasgow, and one from the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology. The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, will recognise the credits from the taught courses at Glasgow as part of the NMAIST Masters degree. An exit point following successful completion of the taught parts of the course without completion of the research component may be awarded a PgDip from the University of Glasgow.

Core and optional courses

Please refer to the website for full options http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/conservationmanagementafricanecosystems/#/coreandoptionalcourses

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The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice (Asian and African Languages) combines training of practical translation skills with teaching of translation theories. Read more
The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice (Asian and African Languages) combines training of practical translation skills with teaching of translation theories. It is unique in terms of the range of Asian/African language specializations and in collaborative teaching with University College London (SLAIS) and Imperial College. The aim of the programme is to enhance students' methodological and practical skills in translation, preparing them for the professional market as (freelance) translators or other language professionals, while providing an intellectual perspective on the discipline of translation studies, which could be the foundation for further MPhil/PhD research. Students have access to a wealth of resources for the study and practice of translation available in the SOAS Library and nearby institutions such as the University of London Library, the UCL Library, the British Library, as well as the BBC World Service and many others.

Languages:
Drawing on the expertise of highly qualified teachers and researchers at SOAS, the programme offers a range of languages to work with, including

Arabic
Chinese,
Japanese
Korean
Persian
Swahili

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/

Structure

The programme may be taken over 12 months full-time, 24 months two-year part time, or 36 months three-year part time. The MA consists of taught courses and a dissertation. The assessment of most of the taught courses includes a written examination paper or papers, taken in June. The dissertation, of 10,000 words, is due by 15 September of the year in which it is taken.

The marking guidelines for MA Theory and Practice of Translation Studies dissertations are different to those for other programmes. Please refer to this PDF document. Marking Criteria for MA Translation Dissertations (pdf; 66kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/file71240.pdf)

Programme Specification

MA Theory and Practice of Translation (Asian and African Languages) - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/file80775.pdf

Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete the Programme will:

- have competence in the practice of translation
- be familiar with the major theories of translation
- have some understanding of translation research and methods

Employment

Our graduates find employment both in the United Kingdom and around the world. They will work with:

- Translation agencies
- Multinational companies
- International organizations
- Education institutions

They can also pursue further MPhil/PhD research in translation studies at SOAS or other academic institutions.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA African Studies is a multidisciplinary programme focusing on contemporary Africa. It provides you with an understanding of major social, cultural, political and economic developments in Africa and the Diaspora. Read more
The MA African Studies is a multidisciplinary programme focusing on contemporary Africa.

It provides you with an understanding of major social, cultural, political and economic developments in Africa and the Diaspora. It also enables you to develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to current events in Africa, as well as your ability to approach contemporary African issues from interdisciplinary standpoints.

The programme provides you with the research training necessary to undertake a broad-based, multidisciplinary study of contemporary Africa.

It enhances your ability to prepare and present to an audience material you have researched.

To achieve Diploma level, you will need to complete six taught modules. MA students will need to complete six taught modules plus a 15,000-word dissertation.

You will study two core modules:

Research Skills and Methods in African Studies
Advanced Perspectives on Africa
You will also choose four optional modules from a range offered within African Studies and Anthropology. Subject to availability, it is also possible to choose one of your options from another discipline.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Master’s programme in African Studies at Leiden University is an advanced area studies qualification that combines world-class scholarship with practice-based learning. Read more

The Master’s programme in African Studies at Leiden University is an advanced area studies qualification that combines world-class scholarship with practice-based learning.

Customised learning

This multidisciplinary programme offers you the opportunity to explore the African continent from a wide range of perspectives: historical, literary, cultural, socio-economical and political. At Leiden, relevance and real-world issues are at the fore. During your programme you will analyse current events as they unfold and explore issues from a broad, comparative and global perspective. You will be able to pursue the issues and subject areas that interest you most by designing your own project and thesis.

Benefit from an international network

Taught by top scholars from the African Studies Centre (ASC), the Master’s programme in African Studies has a genuine area studies profile. During your studies you will gain access to the African Studies Centre’s extensive international network and high-profile events that will connect you to the leading researchers in the field. 

Internship in Africa

An important part of this Master's programme is a three-month internship at an organisation in Africa. This is your opportunity to test your new skills and ideas in practice while gaining invaluable cultural and professional experience. For your internship in Africa, you will receive funding from the Humanities Faculty’s Sustainable Humanities Internship Fund.




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The research master's programme in African Studies at Leiden University is unique in continental Europe for the interdisciplinary range of subjects offered and the variety of perspectives. Read more

The research master's programme in African Studies at Leiden University is unique in continental Europe for the interdisciplinary range of subjects offered and the variety of perspectives.

A multidisciplinary approach

The research master in African Studies at Leiden University bridges the often artificially drawn boundaries between the humanities and the social sciences. The programme combines disciplines from the humanities, such as history and literary studies, with disciplines from social sciences, in particular: political science; anthropology; and economics. As a result you have the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge about different aspects of the African continent and its peoples, at the same time you are not bound by boundary constraints of any of the more traditional disciplines focusing on Africa.

Develop your research skills

Within this research master you will focus on developing your research skills, and you will have an entire year (of which six months consists of fieldwork) to execute your own research project which offers you outstanding opportunities to get insights into working and conducting research in Africa and to enhance your job prospects. You will take in-depth courses that will guide you through social theory, methodology development, and proposal writing; you will write a scientific publication, and practice your debating and presentation skills. This will enable you, upon graduation, to initiate independent PhD or policy research, advise and participate in policy development and implementation, or offer training to businesses.

Choose your area of interest

During your studies you will gain knowledge on the different regions on the African continent and contextualise and embed your regional knowledge in a broad set of theoretical and thematic perspectives. This will make you well-prepared to subsequently design your own research project on a topic of your liking. The programme is taught by leading African Studies scholars from all the relevant institutions in the Netherlands, including the International Institute of Social History (IISH) and the Universities of Wageningen and Amsterdam (UvA and VU).

Access resources from the Africa Studies Centre Leiden

During your studies you will have access to the excellent facilities of Leiden University, and in particular those of the Africa Studies Centre Leiden (ASCL) and its research library. The network of the ASCL, regular seminars, conferences and projects on Africa will provide international orientation and embedding for your MA research.



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About the MSc programme. The MSc African Development programme aims to provide you with a high quality academic introduction to the study of politics, economic development and economic policy in Africa. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc African Development programme aims to provide you with a high quality academic introduction to the study of politics, economic development and economic policy in Africa.

The programme employs political economy approaches to understand the variegated national trajectories of African states, regionalism and localism in politics and economics, and the political and economic forces that shape Africa's insertion into the global economy.

The objective of the programme is to track the causes and effects of the shifts in development theory and practice since the mid-20th century. These have exerted powerful effects on public policy in Africa. A focus on specific events and places within the continent will be set within the global context of institutional, environmental and technological transformations shaping Africa's future. In addition to compulsory courses introducing African political economy and development policy, you will take a broad range of courses on topics including health, humanitarianism and development.

Graduate destinations

Many LSE International Development students go on to pursue PhDs in related disciplines, and we anticipate that many African Development students will follow this path. We also expect that MSc African Development students, like other International Development students, will find opportunities in international aid agencies, NGOs, government agencies, the media, and research positions that allow them to employ the skills gained on the programme.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

You’ll also undertake the African field course is based at Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia, Kenya. You’ll gain a first-hand appreciation of the ecology and conservation concerns of an African savannah community, both for the wildlife and the people who live in the area. As well as learning about the local environment, flora and fauna, s, you’ll spend most of the time designing and carrying out group research projects.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The independent research project is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A number of our students have been based overseas for their project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The course is made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 10 credits
  • African Field Ecology 20 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Advanced Statistics 10 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Practical Conservation with the National Trust 10 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MSc student, you’ll carry out one research project. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. Projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas: projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical skills through modules such as Practical Conservation with the National Trust, Insect Identification, Plant Identification, and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses) and research project work. You can also build your analytical skills, with modules in GIS and statistics.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area.



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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

You’ll also undertake the African field course is based at Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia, Kenya. You’ll gain a first-hand appreciation of the ecology and conservation concerns of an African savannah community, both for the wildlife and the people who live in the area. As well as learning about the local environment, flora and fauna, you’ll spend most of the time designing and carrying out group research projects.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The two independent research projects are one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and allow you to develop a range of research skills. A number of our students have been based overseas for their summer project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The programmes are made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • MRes Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 15 credits
  • African Field Ecology 20 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MRes Research Project 1 40 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MRes Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MRes Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MRes student, you’ll carry out two research projects. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. The first (winter) project is usually Leeds-based, while the second (summer) projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas. Projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical and analytical research skills through modules such as Insect Identification, Plant Identification, the GIS modules and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses). Statistical methods using R are a key component of the compulsory skills modules.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: multiple-choice testing, practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, discussion groups (face-to-face and online), computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area.



Read less
The MRes degree is a research programme with some provision for taught modules. It is aimed at those who wish to move beyond undergraduate work and to engage in research in depth for a postgraduate thesis, but who also wish to take modules that help develop research and related skills. Read more
The MRes degree is a research programme with some provision for taught modules.

It is aimed at those who wish to move beyond undergraduate work and to engage in research in depth for a postgraduate thesis, but who also wish to take modules that help develop research and related skills.

The course aims to develop your critical and analytical skills in relation to current ideas in African politics, history and anthropology or African and Caribbean literature. It provides you with the opportunity to identify, investigate in depth, and write up a research topic of your own, including the use of archival, oral media and internet sources.

You take three taught modules and write a dissertation of 20,000 words in the final term on a topic of your choice.

There are two compulsory modules: Research Skills and Methods in African Studies and Advanced Perspectives on Africa. In addition you choose a third module from a wide range of topics in literature, history, politics, development and anthropology.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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