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Masters Degrees (Affective)

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The Affective Disorders course has been created for a broad spectrum of students and mental health professionals who are interested in specialist training from world-class experts. Read more
The Affective Disorders course has been created for a broad spectrum of students and mental health professionals who are interested in specialist training from world-class experts. You will study all aspects of affective disorders, ranging from their characterisation and assessment to the challenges of treating these debilitating conditions.

Come along to our Postgraduate Open Evening in Psychology, Mental Health and Neuroscience on Wed 1 Feb to discuss your study options with world-leaders in the field. Book your place now https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/postgraduate-taught-open-evening-health-subjects-tickets-29980971894

Key benefits

- Specialist careers for those interested in studying or researching the affective disorders.
- Valuable insight from those working in the field and those involved in internationally-acclaimed research on the causes and treatment of affective disorders.
- Clinical placements in key clinical services that treat patients with affective disorders.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/affective-disorders-msc.aspx

Course details

- Description

Affective disorders are also known as mood disorders and the main types include depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorder.

This course will adopt a multidisciplinary approach by capitalising on the most recent findings from a range of clinical and non-clinical disciplines, such as psychiatry, psychology, genetics, neuroscience, epidemiology and biostatistics. You will be trained in the key scientific and methodological aspects of affective disorders, their care and related research. You will also gain transferable skills through a variety of tutorials and exercises.

- Contact time -

The expectation is that students should be available to attend throughout the working week.

- Course purpose

The purpose of our course is to meet the growing need for a graduate training programme that focuses exclusively on affective disorders. Affective Disorders course is accessible to a wide audience, but would be of particular interest to psychiatrists, GPs, psychologists, related medical professionals and pharmaceutical scientists. It is especially suitable for health professionals who wish to refocus their career and specialise in Affective Disorders. It is equally suitable for health professionals who already work in a relevant field and wish to gain recognition for their expertise. Graduates who wish to pursue clinical psychology training, or research on the affective disorders may also be interested.

- Course format and assessment

For a full list of required and optional modules, study time and assessment criteria please visit the course details section of our website http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/affective-disorders-msc.aspx

Career prospects

Upon completion, you will have a solid understanding of the concepts, theories and practicalities, which are relevant to affective disorders. You may go on to enhanced careers in mental health as clinicians and/or policy makers, conduct further full-time study in an academic research environment (e.g. PhD) or in a taught clinical programme (e.g. Doctorate in Clinical Psychology), gain employment in an academic, clinical or pharmaceutical organisation. You may also enter scientific publishing.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/study/prospective-students/Masters-Scholarships.aspx

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Postgraduate Diploma is designed for those who work with young people in educational or other settings who have either satisfactorily completed the Introduction to Child and Adolescent Counselling Skills (60-hour PAES course) or have an equivalent qualification in counselling and psychotherapy. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma is designed for those who work with young people in educational or other settings who have either satisfactorily completed the Introduction to Child and Adolescent Counselling Skills (60-hour PAES course) or have an equivalent qualification in counselling and psychotherapy.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16022

Course detail

The programme is designed to enable participants to:

- work therapeutically with children and young people especially through communication using the arts and play;
- develop the skills of counselling in one-to-one and group settings through the use of practicums, experiential, active learning methods and practical work with other students;
- gain a grounding in the theoretical base of counselling and group work;
- increase their understanding of the development of young people personally, socially and emotionally;
- explore the ethical and professional aspects of working with children and adolescents in schools and other settings.

Format

The diploma comprises three core units:

- Unit 1: Working through the therapeutic relationship and developing counselling skills: practicum and theory sessions
- Unit 2: Communication through images: the use of the creative arts in counselling and affective education
- Unit 3: Working with and understanding groups

Unit 1

Three main areas will be explored:

- Counselling theory and psychology - including a detailed look at the main approaches to counselling children and adolescents, the theory of human development and motivation and the psychology of change.

- Working with the therapeutic relationship - where participants will explore the role of the relationship in therapeutic work and have an opportunity to develop relational qualities including the core processes. There will also be discussions of transference and counter-transference and the use of self.

- Counselling skills and their application - where participants will study and practise the skills of listening, reflecting, observation and attunement, questioning, summarising, communicating empathy and challenging, which will involve the use of a practicum (working on skills in the group).

The unit also covers the social and professional content of counselling, where the ethical and professional issues of working with children and in organisations will be explored, which involves an exploration of issues such as confidentiality and working with colleagues, other professionals and children’s networks.

Unit 2

This unit aims to work in an experiential way and to explore the following:

- the use of non-verbal methods in counselling and affective education (this is important because many participants will be working with students who are either young or unable to express themselves with ease verbally);
- the theory behind the use of play and arts media in counselling;
- the satisfactory expression of an experience through metaphor;
- exploring working with key emotional themes and feelings;
- the use of the creative arts in counselling and affective education in schools.

Practicum work will continue through the use of video with opportunity for peer review and tutor supervision

Unit 3

The final unit aims to provide an opportunity for participants to:

- develop an understanding and awareness of how they experience and behave in a group;
- increase their knowledge and understanding of the theory of group psychology and psychotherapy and the application of this to therapeutic group work with children.

It will be structured around four components:

- the theory of group and group processes;
- application in the workplace, which looks at ways of integrating knowledge and awareness of groups and group processes into the work setting;
- personal growth and awareness, in which activities will be used to engage participants in reflection on themselves and their communication;
- the personal development group, which offers participants the opportunity to develop self-awareness by sharing their thoughts and feelings with each other and the effect they have on each other.

This is an essential process for future counsellors as otherwise their own preconceptions, anxiety and distress may distort their attempts to help the client.

In addition participants are required to complete a minimum of 40 hours of self-funded personal therapy during the course of the Postgraduate Diploma year.

Assessment

- 2 x 4,000-word essays
- 1 x 8,000-word essay

Participants receive formal feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course (including through supervision).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Hoxter bursary (deadline 31 July annually) http://www.bacp.co.uk/crs/Training/bursary.php

Sources of government funding and financial support (including Professional and Career Development Loans) https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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This successful BPS accredited programme, drawing on a multidisciplinary approach to health, covers the main areas of sickness and health psychology, as well as the methodologies for conducting research in primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare settings. Read more

Overview

This successful BPS accredited programme, drawing on a multidisciplinary approach to health, covers the main areas of sickness and health psychology, as well as the methodologies for conducting research in primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare settings.

The course is one of the only accredited MSc Health Psychology programmes offering a placement. Our placement is 4-months in duration, and students are fully supported before and during their placement. Our dedicated placements team ensure students are not only allocated placements, but are prepared before starting their placement through seminars and meetings with their placement tutor. This support continues over the 4-months, making sure students are happy and getting the most from their placement experience. Watch our placement video to find out more about the MSc Health Psychology placement and what our students think.

Units include: introduction to health and health beliefs; biopsychosocial mechanisms in health; health, communication and context; managing ill-health; health psychology in practice; research design and statistics in health; and a dissertation.

For more information: http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/postgraduate/health

Further information can be found in the Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ps/ps-proglist-pg.html#A).

About the department

The rapidly expanding Department of Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/) has a distinctive research profile and a long-standing record of cutting-edge, theoretically-informed research in applied aspects of psychology. It has a strong tradition of interdisciplinary work and collaborates with other departments in the University of Bath, local and national institutions, and international networks.

Facilities and equipment:
The Department of Psychology is part of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. We currently have 300 undergraduates and 90 postgraduates in our department who benefit from:

- an enthusiastic and approachable staff team with 21 academics, 9 administrative or technical support staff and 2 research officers;
- a lively research environment; and
- outstanding computing facilities;
- regular seminar programmes establish a sense of community.

The Department of Psychology (the main foyer, Department Office and Reception Hatch) is based in building 2 South where most lecturers and support staff have offices. Student pigeonholes, assignment submission boxes and noticeboards are also in this building. Some staff and our postgraduate research students are located in 6 West (mainly level 0), 5 South (not open to visitors) and 1 West 3.12 (for MPhil/PhD queries).

International and industrial links:
The Cognition, Affective Science and Technology Laboratories (CASTL) group has collaborative links with human computer interaction groups within the UK (e.g. London Knowledge Lab and The Mixed Reality Lab at Nottingham) with education groups in America (at Harvard) and with industrial partners on collaborative research projects including Sciencescope (an educational sensor design company), Vodafone and BT.

The Social and Cultural Psychology group is allied with the Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment and the National Children's Bureau. All groups are supported by research grants from research councils such as the ESRC and EPSRC.

The Health Psychology group benefits from both a theoretical, methodological and applied focus and has strong interdisciplinary research links with the Department of Pharmacy (research on psychoneuroimmunology and stress, pain and pain management, well-being and quality of life) and the Department of Social & Policy Sciences (work on coping responses and substance abuse). They are supported by links with: the Royal United Hospital (RUH); Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (RNHRD); Transition to School Research Project-funded by the Economic and Social Reseach Council (ESRC); the WHO Field Centre for the Study of Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) (based within the department); Wellbeing in Developing Countries Research group; Centre of Death and Society; Department for Health (incorporating the Mental Health Research & Development Unit (MHRDU), the Centre for Pain Reseach (CPR) and the Division of Sport & Exercise Science).

Main areas of research

- Behaviour Change and Mental Health Interventions (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/behaviour-change-mental-health-interventions/)
- BioSocial, Cognitive-Affective Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/biosocial-cognitive-affective-psychology/)
- Digital Behaviour and Change (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/digital-behaviour-change/)
- Identities in Social and Digital Contexts (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/identities-social-digital-contexts/)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more
Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.
At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.
Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.
At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:
- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly
Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:
- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction
- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry
- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions
- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones
- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays
- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

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This programme equips students with a wide range of theoretical knowledge of research methods and the ability to apply this knowledge within the field of psychology or other areas of social science. Read more

Overview

This programme equips students with a wide range of theoretical knowledge of research methods and the ability to apply this knowledge within the field of psychology or other areas of social science. Our students leave with a tool kit of methods to use in their future research projects. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop their practical skills in specific research methods; to develop their theoretical thinking about research; and to work closely on several of their own projects with an academic who is an active and leading researcher in their field. The objective is to equip students with the skills to design, conduct, analyse and report a wide range of research projects and make themselves efficient consumers of other people’s research. Students also acquire the communication skills and other key skills necessary to become an excellent researcher.

Further information can be found in the Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ps/ps-proglist-pg.html#B).

The MRes has ESRC recognition and can be taken as a course in its own right or as part of the ESRC 1+3 PhD structure. Students attend both Faculty-wide and Psychology-specific classes. Applications are welcome from students for any of the Department of Psychology’s three main research areas.

- South West Doctoral Training Centre
This MRes is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC). It forms part of the Psychology Discipline-specific Pathway.

The MRes can be taken as a course in its own right, or as part of the 1 + 3 (MRes + PhD) pathway, where successful graduates could proceed onto a PhD in the Department of Psychology.

If applying for an MRes + PhD (the 1 + 3 programme) you should indicate on the Application Form, your preferred PhD route.

Progression from the MRes to the MPhil or PhD stage is dependent on achieving an acceptable level of achievement (typically an overall average of 60% on at least the taught component of the MRes).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mast-of-rese-psyc/

Research proposal

Applicants must provide a short research proposal. This is so we can see what fields of research interest you and match you to an appropriate supervisor. In your proposal, please describe a study or experiment that you might carry out during your MRes. This plan won't be binding, and might well change later in discussion with your supervisor, but it is valuable for showing us what interests you and what research methods you favour. Please also list in your proposal at least two supervisors who you think may be interested in your application. You should describe how your research interests match theirs; please also mention whether or not you have already been in contact with them. Also state how your undergraduate qualifications, postgraduate qualifications and work experience have prepared you for the research you wish to carry out and why you are seeking a place at Bath. Your proposal will ideally be 2 to 4 pages in length and will include a brief description of your proposed objectives and methods of investigation, the historical background to the project, and how it will contribute to the field (who will benefit from this research; how will they benefit; what will be done to ensure that they have the opportunity to benefit).

View guidance on how to develop your research proposal (http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/).

About the department

The rapidly expanding Department of Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/) has a distinctive research profile and a long-standing record of cutting-edge, theoretically-informed research in applied aspects of psychology. It has a strong tradition of interdisciplinary work and collaborates with other departments in the University of Bath, local and national institutions, and international networks.

Main areas of research

- Behaviour Change and Mental Health Interventions (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/behaviour-change-mental-health-interventions/)
- BioSocial, Cognitive-Affective Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/biosocial-cognitive-affective-psychology/)
- Digital Behaviour and Change (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/digital-behaviour-change/)
- Identities in Social and Digital Contexts (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/identities-social-digital-contexts/)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. Read more
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary degree programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two compulsory 30 credit core modules, four 15 credit optional modules and a 60 credit research project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30 credit core modules and four 15 credit optional modules. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30 credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Core modules
-Interaction Science
-Interaction Design

Optional modules
-Accessibility and Assistive Technologies
-Affective Interaction
-Future Interfaces
-Human Factors for Digital Health
-Persuasive Games
-Physical Computing and Prototyping
-Socio-technical Systems

Dissertation/report
The MSc project gives you the opportunity to conduct research in the area of human-computer interaction under the supervision of a member of UCLIC staff. A broad range of topics and questions are offered and you will work closely with your supervisor in selecting and carrying out your project. Many former projects have contributed to publications at leading international conferences, such as the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Teaching and learning
Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, reflective reports, and online peer learning tasks as well as more traditional academic essays.

Careers

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Employability
This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly indsutry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

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This part time postgraduate programme in Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy enables mental health professionals/practitioners develop specialist skills and competencies in CBP to provide effective psychological interventions for variety of clinical disorders. Read more
This part time postgraduate programme in Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy enables mental health professionals/practitioners develop specialist skills and competencies in CBP to provide effective psychological interventions for variety of clinical disorders.

The course was established in 1995 and alumni includes a wide range of professionals who have developed their knowledge and skills in CBT. In 2008 the programme was granted Level 1 and 2 accreditation by the British Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Psychotherapies (BABCP).

The programme will enable participants to teach basic CBP skills, supervise other practitioners, critically appraise research in CBP and conduct basic audit and clinical research.

Successful completion at the Cert and Dip levels of the programme allows participants to apply for personal accreditation by the lead organisation for CBT in the UK, the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP).

Modules

◦Fundamental Principles and basis therapeutic competencies (cert yr)
◦Core Treatment Strategies (cert Yr)
◦CBP and specific disorders (dip year)
◦Critical Appraisal and Meaning from Data (dip year)

Content

The main focus of this programme is on common mental disorders in adults such as depression, anxiety,eating disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder but also considers CBP in more complex areas such as chronic depression.

Flexibility for career and study

The programme allows students to combine work and study : participants attend teaching in Dundee one day a week from September to May whilst remaining in practice a vital component in allowing them to develop and apply the knowledge and skills gained on the programme.

The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, workshops, clinical demonstrations and peer-learning through group discussion as well as the completion of case studies within the students’ own workplace.

A distinct benefit for students is the teaching of skills through structured role-playing exercises to develop clinical /counselling skills. In addition all students undertake supervised clinical practice with a range of different disorders.

Teaching Faculty

The programme is a collaborative venture between the University of Dundee and NHS Tayside. All staff teaching on the programme are experienced practicing CBP practitioners.The programme also draws on specialist clinical contributors from elsewhere in Scotland.

Dundee University has a broad portfolio of research activities in clinical and neurobiological research in the affective disorders, including the effectiveness of CBP with affective disorders and generalised anxiety disorders.

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Qualifications and durations. - Full-time MRes 1 year. - Part-time MRes 2-3 years. The Master of Research (MRes) in Environment, Energy and Resilience engages the latest critical thinking on risk management, critical infrastructure, public regulation, policy studies and the environmental sciences. Read more
Qualifications and durations
- Full-time MRes 1 year
- Part-time MRes 2-3 years

Overview

The Master of Research (MRes) in Environment, Energy and Resilience engages the latest critical thinking on risk management, critical infrastructure, public regulation, policy studies and the environmental sciences.

On completion of this programme, students will be able to demonstrate:

- A critical understanding of research-based literature on environment and energy across a range of disciplines.
- Comprehension of the relationships between theory and practice in the related fields of environment, energy and resilience.
- Thorough and in depth understanding of key debates relating to environmental challenges, energy resource use and security, and the resilience and adaptability of human systems.
- Detailed and comprehensive understanding of current issues in the disciplines within the theme of environment and energy studies.

The programme aims to equip students for careers as professional researchers in either academic or non-academic environments, by developing core research skills. Students will be encouraged to review and critically evaluate approaches to research and their application, and to identify and investigate their own original research questions.

- South West Doctoral Training Centre
This MRes is accredited by the Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC), specifically, as part of the larger South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC). It is a collaborative, interdisciplinary programme, delivered by all three universities (Bath, Bristol and Exeter), building on the research strengths of each institution through the inclusion of collaborative units (delivered jointly by the three institutions).

The MRes can be taken as a course in its own right, or as part of the 1 + 3 (MRes + MPhil/PhD) pathway, which includes further collaborative elements with the universities of Bristol and Exeter.

Given the interdisciplinary nature of this programme, successful graduates could proceed onto an MPhil/PhD in one of several areas/departments, specifically:

- Department of Economics
- Department of Education
- School of Management
- Department of Psychology

If applying for an MRes/PhD (the 1 + 3 programme) applicants should indicate on the Application Form, their preferred MPhil/PhD route.

Progression from the MRes to the MPhil/PhD stage is dependent on achieving an acceptable level of achievement (typically an overall average of 60% on at least the taught component of the MRes).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mres-envi-ener-resi/

Programme structure

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ps/ps-proglist-pg.html) for further information.

About the department

The rapidly expanding Department of Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/) has a distinctive research profile and a long-standing record of cutting-edge, theoretically-informed research in applied aspects of psychology. It has a strong tradition of interdisciplinary work and collaborates with other departments in the University of Bath, local and national institutions, and international networks.

Main areas of research

- Behaviour Change and Mental Health Interventions (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/behaviour-change-mental-health-interventions/)
- BioSocial, Cognitive-Affective Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/biosocial-cognitive-affective-psychology/)
- Digital Behaviour and Change (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/digital-behaviour-change/)
- Identities in Social and Digital Contexts (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/identities-social-digital-contexts/)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Read more
This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Students will spend their first year at one of the EIT's partner universities in Europe, and can elect to spend their second year at UCL.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/ict-innovation-msc

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 15 February 2016
Fees note: UK/EU full-time fee available on request from the department

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The thematic core foundations together with modules on Innovation and Entrepreneurship will be taught during the first year. In the second year at UCL, the programme focuses on the two thesis projects and on specialised taught modules. Students at UCL will choose either Human Computer Interaction and Design (HCID) or Digital Media Technology (DMT) as their major specialisation.

This two year dual masters degree has an overall credit value of 120 ECTS.

Students take modules to the value of 60 ECTS (150 Credits) in their second year at UCL, consisting of four taught modules (60 credits), a minor thesis (15 credits) and a master's thesis (75 credits).

- Core Modules
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Ergonomics for Design
Affective Interaction
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Virtual Environments
Advanced Modelling, Rendering and Animation
Computational Photography and Capture
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

- Options
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Affective Computing and Human-robot Interaction
Societechnical Systems: IT and the Future of Work
Interfaces and Interactivity
Qualitative Research Methods
Virtual Environments

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Machine Vision
Geometry of Images
Image Processing
Computational Modelling for Biomedical Imaging
Acquisition and Processing of 3D Geometry
Multimedia Systems
Network and Application Programming
Interaction Design
Professional Practice

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake a minor thesis and a master's thesis, in collaboration with an external partner. For the master's thesis, students will spend at least two months in the external partner's environment.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, practical sessions, case studies, problem-based learning and project work. Assessment is through coursework assignments, unseen examinations and the two thesis projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site ICT Innovation MSc http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/admissions/msc_ict_innovation/

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Brown Family Bursary - NOW CLOSED FOR 2015/16 ENTRY
Value: £15,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK students
Criteria: Based on both academic merit and financial need

- Computer Science Excellence Scholarships
Value: £4,000 (1)
Eligibility: UK, EU students
Criteria:

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme will have the key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship necessary for the international market, together with a solid foundation in the technical topics that drive the modern technological economy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The EIT Digital Master School is a European initiative designed to turn Europe into a global leader in ICT innovation, fostering a partnership between leading companies, research centres and technical universities in Europe.

The school offers two-year programmes where you can choose two universities in two different European institutes to build a curriculum of your choice based on your skills and interest. We offer double degrees, which combine technical competence with a set of skills in innovation and entrepreneurship. While you get an excellent theoretical education, you also get the opportunity to work with leading European research institutes and leading business partners.

Student / staff ratios › 200 staff including 120 postdocs › 650 taught students › 175 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
This programme is suitable for students with a relevant degree who wish to develop key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship together with an advanced education in ICT engineering, for a future career or further study in this field.

The admission procedure for the EIT ICT Labs Master's programme is organised centrally from Sweden by the KTH Admissions Office. Please read the admission requirements and application instructions before sending your documents. For further details of how to apply please visit http://www.eitictlabs.masterschool.eu/programme/application-admission/application-instructions.
Please note that applications after the deadline may be accepted. Late applications will be processed subject to time, availability and resources.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Qualifications and durations. The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) programme will enable you to conduct supervised research into your chosen topic and produce a written thesis (typically up to 70,000 words). Read more
Qualifications and durations
The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) programme will enable you to conduct supervised research into your chosen topic and produce a written thesis (typically up to 70,000 words). You can complete the MPhil in 1 to 3 years (full-time) or up to 4 years (part-time).

Part-time enrolment for the MPhil programmes is possible but you must either be resident in the UK or be available in person for face-to-face supervision at least twice in semester 1 and three times in semester 2 (i.e. make a minimum of 5 visits per year and preferably more). Failure to keep to this condition may result in your registration being discontinued.

Overview

The MPhil programme in Psychology covers four broad research areas:applied cognition and technology; health psychology; social processes; and Clinical Psychology/Psychopathology. Students are expected to carry out supervised research at the leading edge of their chosen subject in just one of these areas (some students combine two areas) - for further details see the section "Our Research". The research must be written up as a substantial thesis.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/mphi-psyc/

South West Doctoral Training Centre

This programme is recognised as being part of the following ESRC-funded South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/study-with-us/south-west-doctoral-training-centre/) pathways:

- Health & Wellbeing (interdisciplinary pathway)
- Environment, Energy & Resilience (interdisciplinary pathway)
- Psychology (discipline-specific pathway)

About the department

The rapidly expanding Department of Psychology (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/) has a distinctive research profile and a long-standing record of cutting-edge, theoretically-informed research in applied aspects of psychology. It has a strong tradition of interdisciplinary work and collaborates with other departments in the University of Bath, local and national institutions, and international networks.

Facilities and equipment
The Department of Psychology is part of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. We currently have 300 undergraduates and 90 postgraduates in our department who benefit from:

- an enthusiastic and approachable staff team with 21 academics, 9 administrative or technical support staff and 2 research officers;
- a lively research environment; and
- outstanding computing facilities;
- regular seminar programmes establish a sense of community.

The Department of Psychology (the main foyer, Department Office and Reception Hatch) is based in building 2 South where most lecturers and support staff have offices. Student pigeonholes, assignment submission boxes and noticeboards are also in this building. Some staff and our postgraduate research students are located in 6 West (mainly level 0), 5 South (not open to visitors) and 1 West 3.12 (for MPhil/PhD queries).

International and industrial links
The Cognition, Affective Science and Technology Laboratories (CASTL) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/groups/castl/) group has collaborative links with human computer interaction groups within the UK (e.g. London Knowledge Lab and The Mixed Reality Lab at Nottingham) with education groups in America (at Harvard) and with industrial partners on collaborative research projects including Sciencescope (an educational sensor design company), Vodafone and BT.

The Social and Cultural Psychology group is allied with the Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environment and the National Children's Bureau. All groups are supported by research grants from research councils such as the ESRC and EPSRC.

The Health Psychology group benefits from both a theoretical, methodological and applied focus and has strong interdisciplinary research links with the Department of Pharmacy (research on psychoneuroimmunology and stress, pain and pain management, well-being and quality of life) and the Department of Social & Policy Sciences (work on coping responses and substance abuse). They are supported by links with: the Royal United Hospital (RUH); Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (RNHRD); Transition to School Research Project-funded by the Economic and Social Reseach Council (ESRC); the WHO Field Centre for the Study of Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) (based within the department); Wellbeing in Developing Countries Research group; Centre of Death and Society; Department for Health (incorporating the Mental Health Research & Development Unit (MHRDU), the Centre for Pain Reseach (CPR) and the Division of Sport & Exercise Science).

Careers Information
For free information about careers and postgraduate training in psychology contact:

The British Psychological Society,
48 Princess Road East, Leicester LE1 7DR
http://www.bps.org.uk/

You are strongly advised to become acquainted with the different career options in Psychology, so that you can make an informed choice about which degree programme, in which University, will best suit your interests.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/

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An MSc-level conversion programme for those with first degrees in numerate disciplines (e.g. Maths, Physics, others with some mathematics to pre-university level should enquire). Read more
An MSc-level conversion programme for those with first degrees in numerate disciplines (e.g. Maths, Physics, others with some mathematics to pre-university level should enquire). The programme targets producing engineers with the knowledge and skills required for working in the communications industry on programmable hardware, in particular. There is a high demand for people to fill such roles in communications and test & measure equipment vendors, and in many smaller companies developing devices for the internet of things.

The huge growth of interconnected devices expected in the Internet of Things and the goals of flexible, high-speed wireless connections for 5G mobile networks and beyond, require programmable, embedded electronics to play a vital role. From the development of small, intelligence sensors to the design of large-scale network hardware that can be functionally adaptive in software-defined networking, there is a huge demand for advanced embedded electronics knowledge and skills in the communications sector.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1223/embedded-communications-engineering

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media.

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

The School undertakes high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EL829 - Embedded Real-Time Operating Systems (15 credits)
EL849 - Research Methods & Project Design (30 credits)
EL893 - Reconfigurable Architectures (15 credits)
EL896 - Computer and Microcontroller Architectures (15 credits)
EL822 - Communication Networks (15 credits)
EL827 - Signal & Communication Theory II (15 credits)
EL871 - Digital Signal Processing (DSP) (15 credits)
EL872 - Wireless/Mobile Communications (15 credits)
EL873 - Broadband Networks (15 credits)
EL890 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Research areas

- Communications

The Group’s activities cover system and component technologies from microwave to terahertz frequencies. These include photonics, antennae and wireless components for a broad range of communication systems. The Group has extensive software research tools together with antenna anechoic chambers, network and spectrum analysers to millimetre wave frequencies and optical signal generation, processing and measurement facilities. Current research themes include:

- photonic components
- networks/wireless systems
- microwave and millimetre-wave systems
- antenna systems
- radio-over-fibre systems
- electromagnetic bandgaps and metamaterials
- frequency selective surfaces.

- Intelligent Interactions:

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

- Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems:

The Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems Research Group comprises a mixture of highly experienced, young and vibrant academics working in three complementary research themes – embedded systems, instrumentation and control. The Group has established a major reputation in recent years for solving challenging scientific and technical problems across a range of industrial sectors, and has strong links with many European countries through EU-funded research programmes. The Group also has a history of industrial collaboration in the UK through Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

The Group’s main expertise lies primarily in image processing, signal processing, embedded systems, optical sensors, neural networks, and systems on chip and advanced control. It is currently working in the following areas:

- monitoring and characterisation of combustion flames
- flow measurement of particulate solids
- medical instrumentation
- control of autonomous vehicles
- control of time-delay systems
- high-speed architectures for real-time image processing
- novel signal processing architectures based on logarithmic arithmetic.

Careers

The programme targets producing engineers with the knowledge and skills required for working in the communications industry on programmable hardware, in particular. There is a high demand for people to fill such roles in communications and test & measure equipment vendors, and in many smaller companies developing devices for the internet of things.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Abnormal and Clinical Psychology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Abnormal and Clinical Psychology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Clinical psychology focuses on the challenges faced by people with clinical, mental or physical (neuropsychological) health conditions. The role of the clinical psychologist is to work with these individuals and attempt to improve their quality of life. The Master’s degree in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology at Swansea is designed to equip students with an advanced understanding of the theory and practice of clinical psychology in healthcare settings. The primary purpose of the Abnormal and Clinical Psychology course is to allow students to gain knowledge and experience to enhance their suitability for professional clinical training (i.e. a three year DCl in Clinical Psychology programme at a BPS accredited training centre; see http://careers.bps.org.uk/area/clinical).

Entry onto a clinical psychology doctorate training programme is extremely competitive, with candidates usually expected to have acquired training and experience beyond degree level. We have a proven track record of helping our students progress towards clinical psychology training, as well as roles in a range of other clinical mental health-related occupations. Our MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology alumni have also secured NHS clinical based placements, providing valuable experience for those seeking to attain Assistant Clinical Psychologist positions.

The majority of our teaching is carried out by practicing and/or qualified Clinical Psychologists and related professionals, ensuring that students are learning from those with direct experience of professional challenges.

Course modules are assessed using a range of different approaches, including written examinations, essays, presentations and clinical case studies.

Study on the course can be undertaken either full time (1 year) or part time (2 years) basis, with teaching condensed into two weekdays to more easily accommodate part-time students and for relevant experience to be gained alongside the degree. Taught modules are provided in the first two semesters, with the research project typically undertaken over the summer.

Students on the MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology typically include:

* UK and international psychology graduates seeking positions as Assistant Psychologists (both in the UK and abroad) as part of their journey towards becoming a BPS Chartered Clinical Psychologist.

* Psychology graduates aiming to work in related fields of applied psychology and other areas of clinical mental health.

* Healthcare and other clinical professionals looking to expand their understanding of particular areas of abnormal and clinical psychology.

* Psychology graduates who have relevant work experience to apply for further clinical training, but who need to enhance their academic and research skills.

* Psychology graduates aiming to secure a PhD by Research in a clinically applied area.

The MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology is unique in the range of modules the programme offers:

• Eating Disorders

• Psychosis

• Personality and Sexual Disorder

• Clinical Neuropsychology

• Psychotherapy

• Statistical and Research Methods

• Affective and Somatoform Disorders

• Applied Behaviour Analysis

• Coping with Chronic Disease

• Psychopharmacology for Clinical Psychologists

Students will also complete a substantial research project in their chosen field of study.

Here's what students had to say about the Abnormal and Clinical Psychology MSc:

“Completing the MSc has been very beneficial, as in addition to improving my academic knowledge and skills, as well as confidence, it has enabled me to quickly secure employment in this field”. Sam (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2013-14)

“The level of expertise of the lecturers is second to none” Katie (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2011-12)

“An outstanding and highly interesting MSc program” Vasilis, international student from Greece (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2009-10)

“Thanks to my masters, I am in such a good placement in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a multi-speciality hospital's Cardiology Unit” Phoram, international student from India (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2009-10)

“The MSc in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology provided me with an excellent theoretical knowledge of a wide variety of psychological approaches” – Ruth (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2008-09)

“I'm now an Assistant Psychologist in Cardiff, and I do not think I would have had a chance of getting such a post if I didn't have the MSc. I'm really glad I did it!” - Bryn (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2008-09)

“The MSc helped me to get my first assistant post and provided me with a good academic basis to pursue a career in clinical psychology. I am now undertaking the DClin Psych course in Oxford!” - Nicola (MSc Abnormal and Clinical Psychology, 2007-08)

The Department of Psychology at Swansea University is a thriving research led department that provides a friendly, supporting learning environment with instruction from world-class researchers. Our consistent ambition is to provide outstanding excellence of teaching and learning for all our students – as demonstrated by a recent Teaching Quality Assessment national audit that judged our teaching as ‘Excellent’. Moreover, the research caliber of our group has also been demonstrated. For example, in The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, we were one of only four psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work.



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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/. Read more
This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

Sociology
Media and Communications
Humanities
Science and Technology Studies
Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Convenors

Autumn term convener - Nirmal Puwar
Spring term convener - Sara Ahmed

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Programmes Officer.

Modules & Structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
gender and migration and the new international division of labour
feminism
You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms.

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Essays and dissertation.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This is a unique course for international and UK-based psychiatrists, paediatricians and psychologists, as well as allied professionals leading to enhanced clinical and research skills in child and adolescent mental health. Read more
This is a unique course for international and UK-based psychiatrists, paediatricians and psychologists, as well as allied professionals leading to enhanced clinical and research skills in child and adolescent mental health. The Child and Adolescent Mental Health course is taught by leading figures in the field and offers comprehensive content with strong research and clinical focus.

Students will be taught research methodology and statistics, issues relating to child development, aetiology of child and adolescent disorders, the psychological and physical treatments for emotional, behavioural and developmental disorders in children and young people. You will complete a research project, which could use quantitative or qualitative methodologies. You will also develop your skills in diagnosis, formulation and planning therapeutic interventions, service design, monitoring and evaluation. Clinical placements within CAMHS teams may also be arranged.

Come along to our Postgraduate Open Evening in Psychology, Mental Health and Neuroscience on Wed 1 Feb to discuss your study options with world-leaders in the field. Book your place now https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/postgraduate-taught-open-evening-health-subjects-tickets-29980971894

Key benefits

Taught by leading academics in the field.
- Opportunity to engage in innovative research.
- Work with a variety of specialist clinicians.
- Obtain a course qualification which is internationally recognised.
- Supervised clinical placement.
- Innovative web-based clinical learning to supplement direct experience.
- Optional teaching in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Therapeutic Assessment for Self-Harm and Kiddie Schedule for Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/child-and-adolescent-mental-health-msc.aspx

- Course purpose -

A programme for international and UK-based psychiatrists, paediatricians, and psychologists, as well as allied professionals which aims at developing knowledge, skills and research methodologies relating to child and adolescent psychiatry, child development, therapeutic interventions and service models. Students develop clinical skills, and are able to contribute to culturally sensitive and clinically effective services through relevant research, including health service development research.

- Course format and assessment -

A full list of required and optional modules, time spent on study and assessment criteria can be found in the course details section of our website http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/child-and-adolescent-mental-health-msc.aspx

Career prospects

UK and international graduates return to clinical practice with enhanced skills and knowledge in child mental health.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/study/prospective-students/Masters-Scholarships.aspx

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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