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Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses. Read more
Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses.

Visit the website http://cce.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/civil-engineering/

Research Thesis Option (Plan I)

The thesis option is a research-focused program that includes conducting original research, writing a research thesis and defending the thesis to the student’s graduate supervisory committee. The research thesis option degree requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

21 credit hours of approved coursework, including
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses

- A minimum of 15 hours of CE-prefix courses

3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor

6 hours of CE 599 Thesis Research
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Once taken, CE 599 must be taken every term until graduation

Paper/Report Option (Plan II)

The paper/report, or non-thesis, option requires a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent culminating experience, which is graded by the student’s graduate advisor. The paper/report option requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

27 credit hours of approved coursework:
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses

- A maximum of 3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum

- A minimum of 18 hours of CE-prefix courses

3 credit hours of CE 501 Masters Capstone Project – Plan II
- Taken with permission under the direction of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Requires completion a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent report with the topic, scope, and format pre-approved by the student’s advisor

- Must be taken the semester the student plans to graduate

Core Graduate Course Requirements

The faculty has defined core course requirements in four areas. Each student’s plan of study is required to include one of the following sets of core graduate courses:

- Construction Engineering and Management Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 567 Construction Accounting and Finance
CE 568 Construction Scheduling

- Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, MSEnvE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 575 Hydrology
CE 626 Physical and Chemical Processes

- Structural Engineering and Materials Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 534 Advanced Structural Mechanics
CE 531 Structural Dynamics

- Transportation Systems Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 559 Pavement Design and Rehabilitation
CE 655 Sustainable Transportation

Notes

- University Scholars (BS/MS) students are allowed 9 credit hours of coursework to double count between the BS and MS degrees.

- Students on graduate assistantships must register for a minimum of 1 credit hour of CE 593/693 each semester they are supported.

- Only 400-level courses without 500-level counterparts are allowed and must be approved prior to taking the class.

- Students are responsible for all forms and must route all forms through the Department prior to submission to UA’s Graduate School.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses. Read more
Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses.

Visit the website http://cce.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/engineering-environmental/

Research Thesis Option (Plan I)

The thesis option is a research-focused program, which includes conducting original research, writing a research thesis, and defending the thesis to the student’s graduate supervisory committee. The research thesis option degree requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including

21 credit hours of approved coursework, including
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework
(See later section for additional information regarding the graduate core)

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses
(Use Graduate School’s “Approval of 400-Level Cours for Master’s Credit” form)

- A minimum of 15 hours of CE-prefix courses
(See Appendix I for a schedule for all CE-prefix courses offered by the department)

3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor
(See later section for additional information regarding Practicum)

6 hours of CE 599 Thesis Research
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor
- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty
- Once taken, CE 599 must be taken every term until graduation

Paper/Report Option (Plan II)

The paper/report, or non-thesis, option requires a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent culminating experience, which is graded by the student’s graduate advisor. The paper/report option requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including

27 credit hours of approved coursework
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework
(See later section for additional information regarding the graduate core.)

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses
(Use Graduate School’s “Approval of 400-Level Course for Master’s Credit” form.)

- A maximum of 3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
(See later section for additional information regarding Practicum.)

- A minimum of 18 hours of CE-prefix courses
(See Appendix I for a schedule for all CE-prefix courses offered by the department.)

3 credit hours of CE 501 Masters Capstone Project – Plan II
- Taken with permission under the direction of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Requires completion a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent report with the topic, scope, and format preapproved by the student’s advisor

- Must be taken the semester the student plans to graduate

EWR Core Course

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, MSEnvE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 575 Hydrology
CE 626 Physical and Chemical Processes

Additional Course Requirements for Students Without an ABET/EAC-Accredited Degree

AEM 201, AEM 264, AEM 250, AEM 311

Notes

- University Scholars (BS/MS) students are allowed 9 credit hours of coursework to double count between the BS and MS degrees.

- Students on graduate assistantships must register for a minimum of 1 credit hour of CE 593 each semester they are supported.

- Only 400-level courses without 500-level counterparts are allowed and must be approved prior to taking the class.

- Students are responsible for all forms and must route all forms through the Department prior to submission to the Graduate School.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success. Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. Read more
Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success
Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. As new discoveries are made, so are new industries — and new opportunities. Whether you’re currently a chemistry professional or seeking to enter the field, Penn’s rigorous Master of Chemical Sciences (MCS) builds on your level of expertise to prepare you to take advantage of the myriad career possibilities available in the chemical sciences. With a faculty of leading academic researchers and experienced industry consultants, we provide the academic and professional opportunities you need to achieve your unique goals.

The Penn Master of Chemical Sciences connects you with the resources of an Ivy League institution and provides you with theoretical and technical expertise in biological chemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, environmental chemistry and materials. In our various seminar series, you will also regularly hear from chemistry professionals who work in a variety of research and applied settings, allowing you to consider new paths and how best to take advantage of the program itself to prepare for your ideal career.

Preparation for professional success
If you’ve recently graduated from college and have a strong background in chemistry, the Master of Chemical Sciences offers you a exceptional preparation to enter a chemistry profession. In our program, you will gain the skills and confidence to become a competitive candidate for potential employers as you discover and pursue your individual interests within the field of chemistry. Our faculty members bring a wealth of research expertise and industry knowledge to help you define your career direction.

For working professionals in the chemical or pharmaceutical industries, the Master of Chemical Sciences accelerates your career by expanding and refreshing your expertise and enhancing your research experiences. We provide full- and part-time options so you can pursue your education without interrupting your career. You can complete the 10-course program in one and a half to four years, depending on course load.

The culminating element of our curriculum, the capstone project, both tests and defines your program mastery. During the capstone exercise, you will propose and defend a complex project of your choice, that allows you to stake out a new professional niche and demonstrate your abilities to current or prospective employers.

Graduates will pursue fulfilling careers in a variety of cutting-edge jobs across government, education and corporate sectors. As part of the Penn Alumni network, you’ll join a group of professionals that spans the globe and expands your professional horizons.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Chemical Sciences degree is designed to give you a well-rounded, mechanistic foundation in a blend of chemistry topics. To that end, the curriculum is structured with a combination of core concentration courses and electives, which allow you to focus on topics best suited to your interests and goals.

As a new student in the Master of Chemical Sciences program, you will meet with your academic advisor to review your previous experiences and your future goals. Based on this discussion, you will create an individualized academic schedule.

The Master of Chemical Sciences requires the minimum completion of 10 course units (c.u.)* as follows:

Pro-Seminar (1 c.u.)
Core concentration courses (4-6 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Elective courses in Chemistry, such as computational chemistry, environmental chemistry, medicinal chemistry, catalysis and energy (2-4 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Optional Independent Studies (1 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
Pro-Seminar course (CHEM 599: 1 c.u.)
The Pro-Seminar will review fundamental concepts regarding research design, the scientific method and professional scientific communication. The course will also familiarize students with techniques for searching scientific databases and with the basis of ethical conduct in science.

Concentration courses
The concentration courses allow you to develop specific expertise and also signify your mastery of a field to potential employers.

The number of elective courses you take will depend upon the requirements for your area of concentration, and upon the curriculum that you plan with your academic advisor. These concentration courses allow you to acquire the skills and the critical perspective necessary to master a chemical sciences subdiscipline, and will help prepare you to pursue the final capstone project (below).

You may choose from the following six chemical sciences concentrations:

Biological Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Environmental Chemistry
Materials
Independent Studies
The optional Independent Studies course will be offered each fall and spring semester, giving you an opportunity to participate in one of the research projects being conducted in one of our chemistry laboratories. During the study, you will also learn analytical skills relevant to your capstone research project and career goals. You can participate in the Independent Studies course during your first year in the program as a one-course unit elective course option. (CHEM 910: 1 c.u. maximum)

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Chemical Sciences program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will develop a project drawing from your learning in and outside of the classroom to demonstrate mastery of an area in the chemical sciences.

The subject of this project is related to your professional concentration and may be selected to complement or further develop a work-related interest. It's an opportunity to showcase your specialization and your unique perspective within the field.

Your capstone component may be a Penn laboratory research project, an off-campus laboratory research project or a literature-based review project. All components will require a completed scientific report. It is expected that the capstone project will take an average of six months to complete. Most students are expected to start at the end of the first academic year in the summer and conclude at the end of fall semester of the second year. Depending on the capstone option selected, students may begin to work on the capstone as early as the spring semester of their first year in the program.

All capstone project proposals must be pre-approved by your concentration advisor, Master of Chemical Sciences Program Director and if applicable, your off-campus project supervisor. If necessary, nondisclosure agreements will be signed by students securing projects with private companies. Additionally, students from private industry may be able to complete a defined capstone project at their current place of employment. All capstone projects culminate in a final written report, to be graded by the student's concentration advisor who is a member of the standing faculty or staff instructor in the Chemistry Department.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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'Public Policy' (formerly. Socio-Economic Policy) is one of the specialized tracks of the Master's program in Economics. The track focuses on how governments can achieve their domestic policy objectives, design effective policies, and finance their activities. Read more
'Public Policy' (formerly: Socio-Economic Policy) is one of the specialized tracks of the Master's program in Economics. The track focuses on how governments can achieve their domestic policy objectives, design effective policies, and finance their activities.

Tilburg University is ranked #11 worldwide in Business and Economics (Times Higher Education, 2016).

Important domestic public policy objectives range from reduced income inequality and job security, to an affordable health care and pension system. Effective public policy requires the balancing of public services provision and individual incentives to makes use of these services. In this track you study how public policies and tax schemes can be designed to create the right incentives and nudges and make societal goals within reach.

Career perspectives

This track is advised to you if you wish to pursue a career as policy advisor in national governments (Ministry of Social Affairs, or other Ministries) or in international organizations such as the EU, as a researcher in applied research institutes (e.g., Netherlands Bureau of Economic Research (CPB)), or as a consultant with nationally or internationally oriented consultancy firms.

Examples of functions of recent graduates of this track:
•Data-Analyst at the Municipality of Amsterdam
•Statistical Researcher labor and mobility at Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek
•Policy advisor Decentralisations at the Municipality of Culemborg
•Policy Advisor at the Ministry of Finance
•Doctoral Student at the University of Oxford
•Junior Pensions Specialist at Syntrus Achmea
•Economic Adviser at VÖB Bundesverband Öffentlicher Banken Deutschlands
•Policy Advisor at Ministry of Economic Affairs
•Consumer Finance Associate at De Lage Landen
•Policy Advisor at Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment
•Statistical Analyst at De Nederlandsche Bank
•Market Mitigation and Analysis at NYISO

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Duration. 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time (there is usually no viva examination). Ideal for those seeking research training for progressing to a PhD. Read more

MSc by research

Duration: 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time (there is usually no viva examination)

Ideal for those seeking research training for progressing to a PhD. For professionals working in a clinical setting, this degree can provide the support you need to:
-Undertake research that will improve your health care practice.
-Understand your patients' needs better, improve their health outcomes and your decision-making, change care pathways and improve service organisation.
-Enable others to learn from you.

If you enjoy the research and make excellent progress, it is possible to convert to studying for a PhD.

Other admission requirements

-Candidates should submit their full CV.
-Candidates should submit 3 - 8 publications for consideration.
-Submission should include further contextual information regarding the publications, including, but not limited to, the profile of journals that articles have been published in, the number of citations, and their significance to the field.

Consideration process

-The relevant Divisional Academic Lead for Research Degrees will initially consider the submission. The Academic Lead will appoint an Academic Advisor (supervisor) to provide guidance to the candidate on the presentation of the published work.
-The Academic Advisor (supervisor) will assess the papers and use their judgement to decide whether an interview is required. If an interview is necessary, the Academic Advisor and Academic Lead should form part of the interview panel. The Academic Advisor and Academic Lead will decide whether to accept the student.
-Be accompanied by a statement by the proposed Academic Advisor, outlining the candidate's suitability for admission to a PhD programme and any further relevant details regarding the candidate including their employment (current or past), area of expertise and profile within their discipline/field of research.
-The submission will then be considered by the Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Medicine. If the Chair of the relevant Faculty Board is of the view that the Works are of the appropriate standard, they will make a recommendation to the Chair of the Board of Graduate Studies that the candidate be admitted to the PhD.
-An offer can only be made once the Chair of the Board of Graduate Studies has given his/her approval following consideration of the aforementioned recommendation.

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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Modern economics is an increasingly rigorous discipline and advanced degrees are now essential for careers in international institutions, government and industry. Read more
Modern economics is an increasingly rigorous discipline and advanced degrees are now essential for careers in international institutions, government and industry. The Economics MSc at UCL will equip the professional economist with the powerful tools required to understand the rapidly changing, complex and uncertain modern world economy.

Degree information

The programme aims to provide all students with a sound and worthwhile education in modern economics and econometrics, developing important transferable skills of problem-definition, analysis and self-motivation. Students will learn to use the formal tools that are necessary to understand and conduct cutting-edge research in both theoretical and applied economics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Microeconomics
-Macroeconomics
-Econometrics
-Research Methods

Optional modules - at least two of the following advanced core modules:
-Advanced Macroeconomic Theory
-Advanced Microeconometrics
-Advanced Microeconomic Theory
-Time Series Econometrics

Remaining applied options (taking the total to four) from a list including:
-Public Microeconomics
-Economics of Development
-The Economics of Migration
-Health Economics
-Programme Evaluation for Users
-Behavioural Economics
-Macroeconomic Policy
-Ethics in Welfare Economics
-Empirical Industrial Organisation
-Topics in Labour Economics
-Topics in Money and Finance
-Economics of Households
-Environmental Economics: Principle and Policy

Dissertation/report
The dissertation of 10,000 words will be a piece of lightly supervised research, including a brief critical review of the literature in the relevant area.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, and practical and problem classes. The MSc degree is awarded on the basis of written, final examination papers and the research dissertation.

Careers

Graduates go on to a variety of roles, including those in the civil service, research, finance and political sectors. First destinations of recent graduates include:
-Department of Health: assistant economist
-Department of Energy and Climate Change: economic advisor
-Government Economic Service: economic advisor
-HM Treasury: analyst
-Cabinet Office: chief advisor
-Oxera: consultant
-Oxford Economics: economist
-Credit Suisse: economist
-British Airways: analyst
-ING Bank: analyst
-Deloitte: associate economist
-KPMG: economist
-European Central Bank: trainee
-International Growth Centre Country Offices (Myanmar, Rwanda)
-ODI Fellowships (Burundi, Rwanda and others)
-PhD programmes: Recent graduates have been admitted to PhD programmes at UCL, Barcelona, Bologna, Cambridge, Berlin, Birkbeck, EUI (European University Institute)

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Macro Research Intern, Threadneedle Investments
-Business Analyst, Sriram Mahendran Economics
-Research Assistant, Overseas Development Institute
-Civil Services Examination, Union Public Service Commission (UPSC)
-PhD Game Theory, LSE (The London School of Economics and Political

Employability
The UCL Economics MSc is a passport to a career in major national and international institutions that demand the deeper, more rigorous analytical reasoning in economics. In these roles, MSc graduates draw on a theoretical grounding and wealth of practical analytical tools to formulate relevant questions in economics and produce high-quality economic analysis valued by employers and prestigious PhD programmes. Students benefit from the international reputations of the programme’s academic staff and the academic excellence and international perspectives of their fellow MSc students. Major employers invite UCL MSc graduates to apply for roles.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Economics has an outstanding international reputation in the areas of game theory, macroeconomics, industrial organisation, econometrics, applied microeconomics, development and labour economics. The department is a global leader in policy-oriented research, with members directing and holding senior positions in research centres involved in policy design and evaluation. The Research Excellence Framework 2014 ranked the UCL Economics first in the UK for economics and econometrics, as well as the leading department in the UK in any field in any university. This reflects the high quality of policy-relevant academic research being undertaken by staff, and the excellent research and teaching environment for graduate students.

UCL is located in central London at the heart of the UK centre of government. Recognised as the world's best connected city, 75% of the Fortune 500 companies have offices in London.

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A multidisciplinary perspective on the most relevant local and global issues regarding solidarity, including citizenship, poverty, sustainability, migration, welfare reform, social movements and private initiatives. Read more

Overview

A multidisciplinary perspective on the most relevant local and global issues regarding solidarity, including citizenship, poverty, sustainability, migration, welfare reform, social movements and private initiatives.
Solidarity is one of today’s main challenges. Highly volatile flows of people, goods and ideas, as well as the restructuring of markets and governing institutions have led to a high degree of globalization. Global links crisscross national borders and challenge established conceptions and structures. In addition, neoliberal reforms of state and society across the globe rewrite social contracts between people and states. How is solidarity imagined and practiced in this contemporary context?
The Master’s programme in Anthropology and Development Studies – with the theme of Shifting Solidarities – is at the cutting-edge of both social and cultural anthropology and development studies. The issue of solidarity in a neoliberal, postcolonial world encompasses a wide array of anthropological and development questions. By developing your own research questions, you'll be encouraged to delve deeper into the most relevant local and global challenges of solidarity.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ads

Why study Anthropology and Development Studies at Radboud University?

- This programme is at the cutting edge of both social and cultural anthropology and development studies. Joint classes with students from anthropology and development studies will give you a great opportunity to see all the global challenges from the other discipline as well as your own.
- Using a multidisciplinary perspective this programme also draws on knowledge from other disciplines including sociology, political sciences, economics and geography.
- This programme will prepare you for a wide array of jobs. From policy officer in the public sector or at (international) aid organisations to consultant at an engineering or consultancy firm.
- You can choose to go abroad for the research for your Master's programme.
- The Master's programme is run by the chair of Anthropology and the chair of Development Studies, both of whom have a wide network of international contacts that extends from China to Chile and from South Africa to the Pacific . This means you’ll have plenty of opportunities for arranging internships internationally.
- Radboud University offers a unique one-year Advanced Master in International Development (AMID) that you could apply for after completing your Master's. During this postgraduate programme, you'll combine real-life work at an aid organisation or a government department with practice-based instruction at the university.

Quality label

This programme was recently rated number one in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Current programme (2015-2016)

The programme (including courses, reading requirements and course schedule) for the current academic year 2015-2016 can be found in the online prospectus http://www.studiegids.science.ru.nl/2015/en/socsci/prospectus/caos2

Career prospects

Studying Anthropology and Development Studies constitutes excellent preparation for a wide range of jobs. You're not limited to the career-path of becoming an aid worker, but are also trained for research and policy-making jobs. Many of our students therefore find work in the public sector or at international organisations, as well as in in education. After studying Anthropology and Development Studies at Radboud University, you'll have a broad array of options in the job market.

- Entering the labour market as an ADS graduate
As an Anthropology and Development Studies graduate from Radboud University, you'll have excellent prospects on today's job market. Former student, Margriet Tolsma, found work as a regional coordinator at Amnesty International. Anoeshka Gehring continued in the field of research and commenced her PhD in legal anthropology and migration in February 2011. Other graduates found work as:
- a policy maker or executive at cultural institutions;
- an advisor at aid and welfare organisations such as the UN, Oxfam NOVIB, Cordaid or the Dutch Council for Refugees;
- a researcher at a university or NGO, trade union, consultancy firm or private institution;
- a policy officer, advisor or researcher at the central government (diplomat training, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Justice Department) and local government (provincial and municipal level) or non-profit organisations;
- a social studies teacher in secondary or vocational education;
- a journalist.

- Want to boost your chances of landing a job? Take the postgraduate course!
After completing your Master's you will have the option of doing the Advanced Master in International Development (AMID). This one-year postgraduate programme is offered by the chair of Development Studies and is unique in the Netherlands. During this programme, you will combine real-life work at an aid organisation or a government department with practice-based instruction at the university. This programme will significantly boost your chances on the labour market.

Meet Radboud University

- Information for international students
Radboud University would love to meet you in your country (http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/behavioural-science/meet-radboud/information-for) in order to give all the information you need and to answer any questions you might have about studying in the Netherlands. In the next few months, an advisor of Radboud University will be attending fairs in various countries, always accompanied by a current or former student.
Furthermore, we understand if you would like to see the Radboud Campus and the city of Nijmegen, which is why we organise an Master's Open Day for international students (http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/behavioural-science/meet-radboud/open-day-0/open-day) which will take place on 5 March 2016.

- Information for Dutch students
Radboud University offers students in the Netherlands plenty of opportunities to get more information on your programme of choice, or get answers to any questions you might have. Apart from a Master's Evening and a Master's Day, we also organise Orientation Days and a Master’s Afternoon for HBO students.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ads

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The two-year Master's programme is meant for students with a scientific fascination for sport. You will study athletic behaviour from multiple perspectives, using theories about cognition, psychology and physiology. Read more
The two-year Master's programme is meant for students with a scientific fascination for sport. You will study athletic behaviour from multiple perspectives, using theories about cognition, psychology and physiology.

As a student of this programme, you will acquire an advanced understanding of issues in the field of sport sciences, both applied and fundamental. You will practice in measuring and analyzing sports performance and gain familiarity with research methods and advanced statistics. Also, you will learn to develop optimal programmes to teach and train sport-related abilities and skills.

The programme is concentrated around four research areas. The first centres on physical activity, sports and cognition in children. The second deals with talent identification and development. Perception, action and decision making in sports is the third area. And in the fourth, you learn about performance analysis and optimization in sports.

It is possible to do a crossover between the Master's programmes in Sport Sciences and Human Movement Sciences.

Why in Groningen?

- Unique MSc Sport Sciences programme in the Netherlands
- Comprehensive 2-year program with a multidisciplinary approach to studying sport
- Strong link between fundamental and applied research in sports settings
- Possibility to apply for a Master-PhD position in Sport Sciences

Job perspectives

After graduation, you can continue your academic career in a PhD trajectory. You can also work as a scientist for a professional sport team or as a scientific advisor at sport associations such as the Olympic federation. In addition, you can develop training and exercise programmes for ergonomic, orthopaedic or educational institutions or develop sport, health and welfare policies for government agencies. With a teacher's certificate you can work as a lecturer in education.

Job examples

- Advisor
Scientific advisor at sport associations or Olympic federation

- Developer
Develop training and exercise programs for ergonomic, orthopaedic, or educational institutions

- Embedded scientist
Embedded scientist for a professional sport team/club

- Researcher
Teacher/lecturer
Teacher/Lecturer of sport and exercise courses in Higher Education

- Policy Officer
Government employee dealing with sport, health, and welfare policies

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The M.Litt. is a research degree, examined, usually after two or more years of research, by a dissertation of up to 60,000 words. Read more
The M.Litt. is a research degree, examined, usually after two or more years of research, by a dissertation of up to 60,000 words. The criteria for obtaining the degree are that the dissertation represent a 'substantial contribution to knowledge', but the criteria are adapted to take account of the fact that the course lasts only two years.

It should be noted that there is no formal taught element in this course of study. It does not provide a suitable foundation course from which to proceed to a higher research degree, for which the most appropriate course is an M.Phil. If you are looking for a course of this type you should return to the graduate admissions front page and find out about the Faculty's M.Phil. courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmlegl

Course detail

Candidates work closely with their supervisors, who will usually be assigned to them at the start of the course. It is possible to change supervisors with minimal formality, and it is often desirable to do so as the research project develops.

Although research students spend long hours working independently, they are also able to attend regular (usually fortnightly) seminars in their subject area. All graduate students are required to be members of a College, which offers a centre of social activity, as well as providing an opportunity to meet graduates who work in other fields.

All members of the University, including graduate students, are entitled to attend lectures in any Faculty.

In recent years the Faculty has admitted very few students for this degree. It is generally felt that many candidates would benefit more from a one-year, taught course such as an M.Phil., or from a full three year period of research for the Ph.D.

Format

The M.Litt. is a research based degree so there are no required teaching elements of the course, however, students must attend a minimum of ten sessions per year selected from the Graduate Research Seminars.

- One to one supervision: 8 hours per year

- Seminars & classes: 18 hours per year

Each M.Litt. student is assigned a supervisor and an advisor. The supervisor will assist in refining the research topic, oversee the general direction of work and give a clear indication of whether it is up to the standard normally expected for the degree sought.

The student has a formal advisory meeting with the supervisor and the advisor once a year. The advisor is also available for less formal consultation from the outset.

Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the students.

Assessment

Submission of a 60,000 word dissertation and an examination, conducted orally or in writing, on the subject of the dissertation.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Students entering the Structured Postgraduate Programme in Biology will be under the supervision of an experienced researcher. All academic staff members in the Biology Department are experienced and active researchers and can supervise research students. Read more

Overview

Students entering the Structured Postgraduate Programme in Biology will be under the supervision of an experienced researcher. All academic staff members in the Biology Department are experienced and active researchers and can supervise research students. Information about their research can be found on the Biology Department Website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-research) and interested students should initially contact researchers directly to discuss potential MSc projects.

In most but not all instances, your stipend, university fees, consumable, equipment and travel costs will be paid from a research grant from a national or international grant agency or charity. Your supervisor usually competitively obtains this grant, but students can also obtain their own scholarships.

Upon entering the programme each student will be assigned two additional mentors, an Advisor and an Assessor. The Advisor provides additional mentorship for the student throughout the programme and is someone the student can discuss issues with in addition to their supervisor. The Assessor is a member of staff who will provide an annual constructive critique of the students work programme and will aid, together with the Advisor, in outlining possible future research plans.
In addition to the research project, training is provided through compulsory attendance of a variety of generic and transferable skills as well as subject specific modules. For example, the established Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning will provide research students with experience in practical class demonstrating and teaching and learning methodologies. Training in subject specific skills is provided through modules offered either through the Biology Department or as part of the Dublin Region Higher Education Alliance (DRHEA). Advanced modules in many life science topics are already established within the Biomedical Sciences and Chemistry strands of the DRHEA provides a variety of to students on the programme. Finally, research students will be encouraged to attend at least one international conference during their programme, at which they will be expected to present an oral or poster presentation.

Course Structure

Students must take a minimum of 10 credits in taught modules (at least 5 in generic/ transferable modules and at least 5 in subject specific/advanced specialist modules).

Career Options

Career Options include PhD research in academic research labs in Ireland or worldwide, positions in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries, Teaching, Scientific writing, etc. Modules available for postgraduate students at Maynooth University provide transferrable skills for careers in both academic and industry settings.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHD04 Full-time
MHD05 Part-time

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all non-NUI Maynooth qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-NUI Maynooth students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Important: Before applying to PAC, you must contact the head of the laboratory you wish to apply to.
Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/biology/our-courses/msc-biology#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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