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Master the theory and practice of international business law. Further your knowledge of the latest legal issues, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international law firms or other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international business law. Further your knowledge of the latest legal issues, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international law firms or other high-level international careers.

Overview

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Business Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how international laws are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of transnational business.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international trade law, and allow you to examine, and critically reflect upon, the choices businesses must make about the methods of resolving commercial disputes. On our optional modules, you can specialise in areas such as competition law in the international context, corporate governance, or comparative company law.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international business law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek (an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Master international law in the English language

English Law provides the basis for many legal traditions and principles worldwide, particularly in America and Commonwealth countries such as India, Malaysia and Nigeria. Studying International Law in the English Language will give you a unique insight into how the grammar of law was shaped, as well as advanced skills in a language used all over the world.

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as legal departments of international corporations, government departments and other international agencies.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



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Master the theory and practice of international commercial law. Further your knowledge of the principles of international contracts relating to commercial activities, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international legal practice or other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international commercial law. Further your knowledge of the principles of international contracts relating to commercial activities, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international legal practice or other high-level international careers.

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Commercial Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how laws relating to international commercial practice are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of commercial undertakings.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international commercial law, such as commercial contracts, transnational commercial law and international commercial arbitration. On our optional modules, you can choose to study either corporate governance or comparative company law.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international commercial law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek (an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Master international law in the English language

English Law provides the basis for many legal traditions and principles worldwide, particularly in America and Commonwealth countries such as India, Malaysia and Nigeria. Studying International Law in the English Language will give you a unique insight into how the grammar of law was shaped, as well as advanced skills in a language used all over the world.

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as legal departments of international corporations, government departments and other international agencies.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



Read less
Master the theory and practice of international law, both private and public. Develop advanced analytic and research skills for professional practice and other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international law, both private and public. Develop advanced analytic and research skills for professional practice and other high-level international careers.

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

*The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how international laws are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of transnational commercial, political and social interactions.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international law, the key principles of private and public international law, and an overview of international human rights and criminal law. On our optional modules, you can specialise in areas such as legal frameworks for media industries, synergies between European and international law, or more traditional topics such as comparative company law and international arbitration.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek(an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as working for international NGOs and other agencies, or public service.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



Read less
The. Practice Teacher programme. aims to prepare and develop practitioners who will be able to facilitate, supervise and assess students transferring knowledge and competence to a new context of practice. Read more

The Practice Teacher programme aims to prepare and develop practitioners who will be able to facilitate, supervise and assess students transferring knowledge and competence to a new context of practice. In addition to this, the course will provide the opportunity for you to critically appraise and evaluate practice teaching from operational and strategic perspectives.

The course is designed to encompass key themes including establishing effective working relationships, creating and maintaining a learning environment, facilitating learning and assessment and evaluating learning by utilising evidence-based practice and leadership strategies within the context of contemporary practice. The course is available for practitioners working in Health and Social Care environments who wish to enhance their knowledge in order to ensure evidence based practice.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT & ASSESSMENT

Teaching and learning strategies reflect a range of approaches, eg key lectures, group discussion, seminars, reflection and analysis. In addition action learning sets are used to allow students to actively engage in problem solving activities particularly in relation to work based learning. Module materials are also available on the University’s Virtual Learning Environment - eLearn.

The course is assessed through the completion of module specific assignments and production of a course portfolio which contains evidence from both the Preparation of Mentors module (or equivalent) and the Practice Teacher Preparation module.

The Preparation of Mentors module includes an assignment and the Practice Teacher Preparation module assessment includes the analysis of a learning plan, critical reflection upon the practice teacher’s role and the completion of action learning set documentation.

Confirmation of achievement of NMC Practice Teacher standards will be required for those candidates who are required to support learning of Community Specialist Practitioner or Specialist Community Public Health Nurse students.

ACADEMIC EXPERTISE

We are committed to delivering academic learning of the highest quality, helping you to stretch your mind and fulfil your university ambitions.

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

We aim to create the perfect blend of knowledge, practical experience and relevance to equip UCLan graduates with the confidence and skills they need to get ahead in the world of work.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

Nursing Midwifery Council, Higher Education Academy.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.



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The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course enables students who have acquired a non-law undergraduate degree to complete the academic stage of legal professional education (CPE) in one year (full time) or two years (part time), in order to then begin the vocational stage of training as either a solicitor (Legal Practice Course) or barrister (Bar Professional Training Course). Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course enables students who have acquired a non-law undergraduate degree to complete the academic stage of legal professional education (CPE) in one year (full time) or two years (part time), in order to then begin the vocational stage of training as either a solicitor (Legal Practice Course) or barrister (Bar Professional Training Course).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/law-gdl/

Why choose this course?

- Expert and highly-qualified teaching team, with over 20 years' experience of delivering the GDL

- An active student law society, and a course intake limited to 100 students, which promotes a friendly, personal and supportive learning environment

- A 99%+ pass rate, and 20% above national average rate for number of merit awards and above

- Access to the excellent Bodleian Law Library

- Strong links with law firms and barristers' chambers in both London and Oxford and members of staff provide practical advice and guidance as you begin your career

- Opportunities to boost employability skills through participation in internal and national mooting and client interviewing competitions as well as a national award winning pro bono scheme

Teaching and learning

Diverse teaching methods (predominantly two hour lectures and one-and-a-half hour workshops) are employed throughout the GDL programme in order to give you the best opportunity to acquire legal knowledge and skills.

A number of those teaching on the GDL have qualifications and experience as barristers or solicitors, and a significant number of others hold research degrees.

Assessments (both coursework and exams) are spread throughout the course so that you will have an ongoing awareness of your progress. These teaching and assessment methods are described in the course handbook, and their effectiveness is monitored and analysed by students and staff in the module feedback system and the GDL annual review process.

Practical skills

In recognition of the professional nature of the course, our GDL places special emphasis on helping you to gain the legal skills you need to acquire to be a successful lawyer.

- Mooting
Mooting is a must on the CV of any aspiring barrister, and for many aspiring solicitors. Mooting gives you the chance to test your advocacy skills in a safe but exciting environment, and the opportunity to hear other students argue and learn from the questioning of the judges.
The School of Law runs a mooting competition each year and enters its champion mooting team into the English Speaking Union/Essex Court Chambers National Mooting Competition. In 2012 the Oxford Brookes GDL Mooting Team won the national final of the English Speaking Union/Essex Court National Mooting Competition, and went on to win the Commonwealth Mooting Championship in Cape Town in April 2013.

- Client Interviewing
Client interviewing is one of the key skills which every lawyer needs. GDL students, coached by members of staff, have the opportunity to take part in an annual internal Client Interviewing Competition here at Oxford Brookes.

The winners of the internal competition go on to take part in the regional and national finals of the Client Interviewing Competition of England and Wales. The winning team from the national finals has the opportunity to go forward to the International Client Consultation Competition which is hosted internationally and which includes students from around the world.

In recent years Brookes GDL students have had great success in the National Client Interviewing Competition. They achieved third place in the National Final in both 2009 and 2011, and won the National Final in 2010, going on to be overall runners-up in the International Client Consultation Competition 2010 in Hong Kong. In 2012 the Brookes student team were overall runners-up in the national final and won the trophy for best GDL team.

- Pro Bono Activity
Pro Bono offers students a valuable introduction to the world of legal practice, and involvement in pro bono work helps to demonstrate to potential employers a student's commitment to the law.

Students wishing to be involved in pro bono work can do so through our established pro bono scheme, winner of the Solicitors Pro Bono group national award.

In 2010 and 2013, GDL students were shortlisted for the Attorney General's National Student Pro Bono Awards for 'Best Contribution by an Individual Student' and attended the awards ceremonies at the houses of parliament.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford Brookes has strong links with law firms and barristers' chambers in both London and Oxford and members of staff provide practical advice and guidance as you begin your career in law.

Events such as the annual Oxford Law Fair further enhance opportunities for professional networking.

Careers

Having completed the GDL most students go on to become solicitors or barristers by taking the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

- Training contracts
Many of our students come to the GDL having already obtained training contracts with solicitors’ firms, and their GDL studies are funded by these firms.

- Scholarships for barristers
Oxford Brookes GDL students going to the bar are exceptionally successful in securing much sought-after funding and scholarships. Each year a significant proportion of Brookes students gain prestigious scholarships through the Inns of Court.

- Further careers options with law
A small number of our students use the legal knowledge and analytical skills gained through the GDL course to pursue a business, public sector or financial career, or continue on to further academic study.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

There is a wide range of research interests among staff, with particular strengths in the areas of public law, international law and human rights, employment, religion and the law, criminal justice, and IT and the law. In the latest government research rating exercise, the 2014 REF, 85% of staff research output is internationally recognised.

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

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This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Critically engage with an international development studies topic of choice, assembling information from a variety of sources to compose clear detailed and logical argument;
Learn to formulate a systematic and methodologically sound research process through undertaking a literature review and empirical research;
Where applicable, justify ethical considerations surrounding research carried out.

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities. You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

Dissertation:
Demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole, through the production of a 15,000-word research project on a topic of your choice, informed by the optional units you have selected, under the advice and guidance of a personal supervisor.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The course is designed to support the needs of those who hope to be, or are already, engaged in the international development sector. It offers highly desirable transferable skills such as communication, qualitative data collection, quantitative data manipulation and data analysis and writing skills. Additionally, the applied nature of this course means that students will be working within ‘live’ development contexts from the start. This will ensure that they are able to develop their professional networks and identify career opportunities. Additionally students will benefit from the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by the experts and development practitioners who teach on this course.

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UCLan’s. Advanced Certificate in Counselling for Depression. offers professional development for counsellors who are already trained in Person-centred or Humanistic approaches and who have significant clinical experience. Read more

UCLan’s Advanced Certificate in Counselling for Depression offers professional development for counsellors who are already trained in Person-centred or Humanistic approaches and who have significant clinical experience. Hence Counselling for Depression (CfD) training intends to both build upon existing knowledge and, more particularly, to align counsellors’ practice with a competence framework which has strong links to research evidence and follows the Curriculum for Counselling for Depression produced by the National IAPT Team. In sum, this course provides you with a thorough grounding in the theory, evidence base and practice of CfD, allowing you to develop your knowledge and competence in psychological clinical assessment and CfD interventions in accordance with national guidelines.

COURSE OUTLINE

CfD is a manualised form of psychological therapy as recommended by NICE (NICE, 20094) for the treatment of depression. It is a form of psychological therapy derived from the Skills for Health humanistic competence framework devised by Roth, Hill and Pilling (2009), which provided the basis for the National Occupational Standards (NOS) for psychological therapists. This modality targets the emotional problems underlying depression along with the intrapersonal processes, such as low self-esteem and excessive self-criticism, which often maintain depressed mood. The therapy aims to help patients contact underlying feelings, make sense of them and reflect on the new meanings which emerge. This, in turn, provides a basis for psychological and behavioural change. You will attend for 7 taught days at the university, complete 80 hours supervised clinical practice, and attend for a minimum of 6 hours of clinical supervision.

ACADEMIC EXPERTISE

We are committed to delivering academic learning of the highest quality, helping you to stretch your mind and fulfil your university ambitions.

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

We aim to create the perfect blend of knowledge, practical experience and relevance to equip UCLan graduates with the confidence and skills they need to get ahead in the world of work.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.



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This course. aims to provide a therapeutic base for professionals who are working with children and adolescents. It will provide both the strategies and the underpinning theory for working with children and adolescents appealing to all professionals in this sector, e.g. Read more

This course aims to provide a therapeutic base for professionals who are working with children and adolescents. It will provide both the strategies and the underpinning theory for working with children and adolescents appealing to all professionals in this sector, e.g. teachers, counsellors, nursery nurses, social workers, youth workers etc. The course supports employability and career development in these fields. The theory will include developmental psychology attachment theory and the theoretical back ground to play therapy. It is a course that is suitable for CPD and carries 20 credits at the postgraduate level in Counselling/Psychotherapy and other areas. Teaching and learning methods are diverse and include seminars, group discussions, experiential exercises, and lectures. There are two assignments an essay and a case study or a critique of a relevant research paper.

COURSE OUTLINE

The module is part-time and so is particularly suited to those in employment. It is also a course that carries twenty credits at Level 7, which can contribute to further study at Level 7.

-Child and adolescent development, including attachment theory (Bowlby), Eriksson and other developmental psychologists

-The theoretical background to play therapy, including Melanie Klein and Carl Jung

-Methods of working with children and adolescents that stem from the theoretical frameworks

-Current research into this area

-Legal and ethical issues involved in working with children and adolescents

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT & ASSESSMENT

A diverse range of learning and teaching strategies will be used including seminars, group discussion, case studies and case discussion experiential exercises, lectures. The experiential exercises will follow Kolb's Learning cycle.

A negotiated essay on a related topic. A case study or critique of a research paper.

ACADEMIC EXPERTISE

We are committed to delivering academic learning of the highest quality, helping you to stretch your mind and fulfil your university ambitions.

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

We aim to create the perfect blend of knowledge, practical experience and relevance to equip UCLan graduates with the confidence and skills they need to get ahead in the world of work.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

We have great links with employers including household names such as Sony, BAE Systems and Apple. We also have links with the smaller companies in the region and offer help and assistance to more than 1,000 of these – with many of our graduates staying in the region it is important we develop these relationships.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.



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Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Read more
Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people.

A range of modules are available to enhance your knowledge, develop skills and further your CPD. Credits can be gained on a standalone modular basis or used to achieve one of the School of Social Work, Care and Community’s CPD target awards.

COURSE OUTLINE

The module adopts an experiential learning approach which gives students the opportunity to participate in shared reflective activities through a variety of methods such as group problem-solving tasks.

Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Students will be supported to consider how a focus on the social relations between and among staff and service users; and how the use of dialogue and critical reflection can help us understand events and interactions in practice. The module will also enable students to explore the value of practical and creative approaches to engage with service users.

The module covers topics including:
-Relationships
-Social learning
-Social justice
-Practical and creative approaches
-Developing risk competence
-Reflection
-The history of social pedagogy

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:
-Critically appraise concepts of social pedagogy and how they are relevant to social care and social work
-Consider critically the benefits of adopting a social pedagogical approach to working with people
-Demonstrate an ability to apply social pedagogy’s core values and skills in their work
-Critically explain how the theoretical approaches taught can be applied to the understanding of individuals
-Critically consider how ideas about, and understanding of social pedagogy can be used to inform practice with different service user groups.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

We have great links with employers including household names such as Sony, BAE Systems and Apple. We also have links with the smaller companies in the region and offer help and assistance to more than 1,000 of these – with many of our graduates staying in the region it is important we develop these relationships.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.

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This Certificate. is primarily aimed at health and social care professionals from the multi-disciplinary team who work with stroke patients and their families. Read more

This Certificate is primarily aimed at health and social care professionals from the multi-disciplinary team who work with stroke patients and their families. The curriculum will enable students to develop an emerging specialist knowledge in stroke care. The National Clinical Guidelines for Stroke provide the bedrock for the course, to ensure that students are fully up to date with the best available evidence. The course follows the stroke patient pathway, ensuring that the focus of teaching and learning is inter-disciplinary. Delivery of this course is facilitated by the stroke research team comprising senior research staff and research students/associates, drawing on their multi-professional expertise. The team have a breadth of knowledge in both stroke practice and research. Our research is driven by the needs of stroke services, clinicians and patients.

COURSE OUTLINE

This course aims to provide students with a specialist knowledge of the theory and research underpinning current inter-professional practice in stroke care. Specifically, students will explore stroke-related anatomy and physiology, together with stroke symptomology and epidemiology. Stroke policy documents will be used to guide current stroke practice, ensuring that a multi-disciplinary perspective is maintained throughout the module.

  • The development and role of the National Clinical Guidelines for Stroke (Intercollegiate Working Party, 2008).
  • Stroke related anatomy, physiology and biochemistry.
  • The epidemiology of stroke, including the classification, incidence and prevalence of different stroke types.
  • An overview of stroke symptomology.
  • Approaches to the diagnosis of stroke.
  • The social and psychological context of stroke.
  • Public health and stroke, including best practice in primary stroke prevention.
  • Issues around the rehabilitation and stroke patients.
  • Evidence-based stroke service design.
  • Evidence-based practice in relation to stroke assessment, acute care, rehabilitation and long-term support.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT & ASSESSMENT

This module will be assessed by the production of a 3000 word assignment that reconstructs the evidence-base for an aspect of stroke care relevant to the student’s field of work within the context of a case study.

ACADEMIC EXPERTISE

We are committed to delivering academic learning of the highest quality, helping you to stretch your mind and fulfil your university ambitions.

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

We aim to create the perfect blend of knowledge, practical experience and relevance to equip UCLan graduates with the confidence and skills they need to get ahead in the world of work.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

We have great links with employers including household names such as Sony, BAE Systems and Apple. We also have links with the smaller companies in the region and offer help and assistance to more than 1,000 of these – with many of our graduates staying in the region it is important we develop these relationships.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.



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With placement opportunities available our MSc Career Guidance & Development qualifies you to work as a career guidance practitioner. Read more

With placement opportunities available our MSc Career Guidance & Development qualifies you to work as a career guidance practitioner.

As a practitioner you will provide accurate and relevant advice on employment, education and training opportunities to an ever-widening client group.

Our course focuses on professional practice, personal reflection and critical analysis of practice. It also allows you to undertake research and work evaluation as part of your ongoing professional development.

The Postgraduate Diploma can include completion of the Qualification in Career Guidance and Development (QCGD) which is professionally accredited by the Career Development Institute UK.

98% overall student satisfaction - Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey 2017

Course Details

The Certificate consists of three modules and the Diploma six. The core module is Reflective Guidance Practice. Additional modules include:

  • Models of Professional Practice
  • Career Coaching and Development 
  • Career Related Policy 
  • Career Development Theory 
  • Reflective Guidance Practice
  • Labour Market Studies

Postgraduate Diploma students learning on-campus undertake placements and practical experience, with opportunities to experience how career guidance practitioners operate in organisations and as training providers. If you are already working in the sector then you can study part-time or online.

You can take up to two years of further part-time study towards a Masters award.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching and learning methods on our Career Guidance and Development course include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • One-to-one tutorials
  • Interview 
  • Group work practice
  • Work-based learning

The combination of theory, policy and practice means that you are able to put learning into practice as you study and reflect this in each of the summative assessment in each of your modules.

Practice-based learning opportunities means our course has a professional focus and enables you to engage in real world inquiry which is again reflected in the summative assessment in each module.



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The MRes in Educational Studies is a combined programme consisting of a taught element and a research element. The taught element consists of a number of core modules which are taken from the Doctoral Research Training programme. You will then complete a 20,000 words research dissertation. Read more

The MRes in Educational Studies is a combined programme consisting of a taught element and a research element. The taught element consists of a number of core modules which are taken from the Doctoral Research Training programme. You will then complete a 20,000 words research dissertation.

With over 100 lecturing and research staff and dedicated research centres, our School of Education is one of the largest research-led schools of education in the UK with a distinguished reputation for excellence in our research and teaching practice both nationally and internationally. More than 82% of its research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*) in the 2014 REF. In addition, the University is one of only 12 UK institutions to have been awarded 'Doctoral Training Centre' status by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the UK funding body for social sciences. 

Course details

The MRes in Educational Studies is a combined programme consisting of a taught element and a research element with a dissertation of 20,000 words.

The taught element consists of the following core modules which are taken from the Doctoral Research Training programme.   

Programme content

The core modules you will take are:

  • Philosophy of Social Research 
  • Research Design, Practice and Ethics
  • Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods
  • Foundations in Qualitative Research

You will then complete a 20,000 words research dissertation.

Learning and teaching

You will undertake advanced research under the supervision and guidance of an experienced member of the School of Education staff. 

Research Facilities 

The School of Education is equipped with the facilities to suit your needs, whatever programme you may be studying with us. As a doctoral researcher you will have 24-hour access to work space in our research suite, where there are computer and telephone facilities. You also have access to University libraries and computer facilities, as well as other entitlements such as grants towards conference attendance and photocopying. Many research students work with supervisors in publishing articles and making their work public.  

Employability

Over the last five years, an impressive 98.3 % of Education postgraduates have been in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

Birmingham’s Education graduates choose to work in variety of education roles in schools and administrative roles in public and private sector organisations. Work in retail, sales and administration are also popular options. Some chose to continue their education and apply for professional courses such as teacher training. It will also appeal to applicants with teaching and research interests in this area.

What type of career assistance is available to postgraduate researchers in Education? 

The College of Social Sciences, to which the School of Education belongs, has specially designated careers advisors and careers consultants who can provide guidance for postgraduate researchers on career paths, CVs, training opportunities, application and interviews. The University’s central Careers’ Service also runs workshops and offers personally tailored advice and guidance including 1-1 careers advice and 1-1 CV advice. The Career’s Service runs CV writing workshops especially for postgraduates in the College of Social Sciences, giving advice on how to compile CVs for both employment and for academic roles. 

The University also has dedicated careers advisors who run workshops and provide networking opportunities with potential employers. These are especially popular with international postgraduate researchers.



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The School of Education provides wide and varied opportunities for students to undertake research. More than 82% of its research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*) in the . Read more

The School of Education provides wide and varied opportunities for students to undertake research. More than 82% of its research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*) in the 2014 REF

The MA by Research is research-based Masters programme. It is assessed by a thesis of 40,000 words maximum. Students are encouraged to participate in a research training programme, but they are not required to complete assignments for research training modules they attend.

This programme is suitable for applicants who are interested in developing their independent research skills and many students who complete this course progress onto PhD study afterwards.

Course details

We have a national and international reputation as a centre of excellence and provide wide and varied opportunities for students to undertake research. Our academic expertise covers a broad range of disciplines grouped into three main departments:

We also have a number of highly successful research centres which reflect the diversity of our research activity

The interdependence of research with development and professional practice means that we particularly welcome the contribution of research students to our work. We provide a comprehensive programme of research training, together with opportunities to take part in research seminars where speakers with national and international reputations present work that is at the forefront of current debates within the field. 

The Education MA by Research 

The MA by Research is a pure masters level research course. Students will need to complete a thesis of 40,000 words maximum and a research training programme.

This programme is suitable for applicants who are interested in developing their independent research skills and many students who complete this course progress onto PhD study afterwards.

Please view our postgraduate research webpage to find out more about the type of research degrees on offer in the School of Education.

Research interests

Perhaps the most important step in the formulation of your research project is to identify a member of academic staff with appropriate expertise to supervise your area of interest. Your supervisor will act as the main source of academic supervisory support and research mentoring during your time as a doctoral researcher at the University and as such, it is vital that you ensure that the department to which you are applying is able to offer appropriate supervisory support in your relevant research area. Before submitting your application to the University you will need to identify potential supervisors in your desired field of research and contact them directly about your research proposal.

Applicants are encouraged to view the research activity within each school department as well as on the individual staff profiles. You may also download a summary of staff research interests (PDF, opens new window).

Employability

Over the last five years, an impressive 98.3 % of Education postgraduates have been in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

Birmingham’s Education graduates choose to work in variety of education roles in schools and administrative roles in public and private sector organisations. Work in retail, sales and administration are also popular options. Some chose to continue their education and apply for professional courses such as teacher training. Some of our graduates are attracted to careers in education such as teaching, community and youth work or other public sector occupations such as social work, police, housing and probation. New opportunities in partnership enterprises within sport, leisure, education and community schemes appeal. Some graduates also consider work in the private sector such as retail, finance or marketing.

What type of career assistance is available to those who complete the Education MA by Research?

The College of Social Sciences, to which the School of Education belongs, has specially designated careers advisors and careers consultants who can provide guidance for students on career paths, CVs, training opportunities, application and interviews. The University’s central Careers’ Service also runs workshops and offers personally tailored advice and guidance including 1-1 careers advice and 1-1 CV advice. The Career’s Service runs CV writing workshops especially for postgraduates in the College of Social Sciences, giving advice on how to compile CVs for both employment and for academic roles. 

The University also has dedicated careers advisors who run workshops and provide networking opportunities with potential employers. These are especially popular with international postgraduate students.



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The Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (Adult Guidance Counselling) is designed to serve as a training course for people working with adults in a guidance/counselling setting, providing information, advice and placement services. Read more

Overview

The Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (Adult Guidance Counselling) is designed to serve as a training course for people working with adults in a guidance/counselling setting, providing information, advice and placement services. The course aims to work towards the development of an understanding of core concepts and ideas concerning sociology, marginalisation, exclusion and adult career development.

This course is also offered at Diploma Level for candidates who have appropriate experience and who do not have an initial degree. Please go to http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity and click on Code MHA57 to make application. When applying for MHA57 through http://www.pac.ie please ensure that you select the undergraduate button before making application for this course. For further details please go to: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/adult-and-community-education

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

Course Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma extends over two academic years and is delivered Part-time in an open learning format, incorporating e-learning materials and workshops. (Computer access is vital). Participants will be expected to be in a position to attend on average one workshop per month. Modules include adult guidance and counselling skills, case review and professional development, integrating theory and practice, and research methodologies.

Career Options

Since its inception in 1997, this two-year course has played a key role in the professionalisation of adult guidance in Ireland. Graduates from this programme are eligible for membership of the Institute Guidance Counsellors.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHA55 PGrad Dip Arts (Adult Guidance Counselling)
MHA57 Dip Arts (Adult Guidance Counselling) is offered at undergraduate level to people who have significant experience working in the field of adult guidance and must be seeing clients on a regular basis - for further details please email or call Breda Gibney at 01- 7083752

For both courses please ensure you complete the supplementary questionnaire on PAC.

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The University of Birmingham’s School of Education is one of the best schools in the UK to study social research as can be seen by its results in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 which shows that more than 81 per cent of all its research was rated as internationally excellent (3*) or world leading (4*). Read more

The University of Birmingham’s School of Education is one of the best schools in the UK to study social research as can be seen by its results in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 which shows that more than 81 per cent of all its research was rated as internationally excellent (3*) or world leading (4*). It was also ranked 25th in the World and joint 6th in Europe in the 2017 QS World Rankings.

The MA in Social Research will provide you with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Download information on all the postgraduate study programmes in the School of Education (PDF)

Course details

On this course you will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. You will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of your research within and beyond academia.

Learning and teaching

Many core elements of the programme are delivered by the College of Social Sciences, so you will be undertaking the modules with other students from across the College. However, your dissertation will be undertaken and supervised within the Department. In addition, there is an induction programme during the first two weeks of the term, which is compulsory, but non-assessed and a programme of skills training which is delivered at University-level, mainly by the Staff Development Unit, throughout the year. You are encouraged to attend all the modules in the programme which are appropriate to you. You must discuss your skills training needs with your designated supervisor in the first week of the first term.

This MA is recognised by the ESRC for the provision of research methods training as Year 1 of a '1+3' programme of doctoral study. It is also available as a stand-alone Masters. Home/EU students may enter into a departmental competition to be nominated for the ESRC open competition for '1+3' or '+3' funding (the '1+3' award covers the MA and provides three years' further funding for PhD research; for '+3' funding you must already have an ESRC-recognised research methods MA degree or equivalent).

Employability

The University of Birmingham has recently been ranked 9th in the UK, and 55th in the world, for post-qualification employability in a global survey of universities commissioned by the International Herald Tribune. Over the last five years, an impressive 98.3 % of Education postgraduates have been in work and/or further study six months after graduation. 

Birmingham’s Education graduates choose to work in variety of education roles in schools and administrative roles in public and private sector organisations. Work in retail, sales and administration are also popular options. Some chose to continue their education and apply for professional courses such as teacher training or undertake a PhD.

What type of career assistance is available to postgraduate researchers in Education? 

The College of Social Sciences, to which the School of Education belongs, has specially designated careers advisors and careers consultants who can provide guidance for postgraduate researchers on career paths, CVs, training opportunities, application and interviews. The University’s central Careers’ Service also runs workshops and offers personally tailored advice and guidance including 1-1 careers advice and 1-1 CV advice. The Career’s Service runs CV writing workshops especially for postgraduates in the College of Social Sciences, giving advice on how to compile CVs for both employment and for academic roles. 

The University also has dedicated careers advisors who run workshops and provide networking opportunities with potential employers. These are especially popular with international postgraduate researchers.



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