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The MSc in Real Estate Management is an interdisciplinary Master’s programme that fuses economic, social and environmental perspectives within a framework for identifying, assessing, designing, delivering and evaluating effective real estate interventions and responses. Read more
The MSc in Real Estate Management is an interdisciplinary Master’s programme that fuses economic, social and environmental perspectives within a framework for identifying, assessing, designing, delivering and evaluating effective real estate interventions and responses.

What's covered in the course?

Our programme reflects synergies with the Master’s courses in Planning Built Environments and Environmental Surveying in order to create a programme that works across the whole built environment profession and disciplines.

The programme focuses on the interaction between business and legal processes on property ownership and management. It integrates technological, financial, legal and management issues as they relate to property matters.

The theoretical underpinning of the course is rooted in real estate which stresses the need for interdisciplinary approaches and solutions.

This course will help you to connect the theory and practice of real estate to a range of real life case study challenges. It will give you a framework of knowledge, skills and tools to start understanding the complex world of property, whilst supporting you to become an independent learner and reflective practitioner.

Our programme builds on applied academic research and contemporary real estate practice. The course design and delivery utilises our expertise across real estate, sustainability and planning and also brings in external experts and practitioners to address key challenges and opportunities within practice.

Our courses are designed and developed with support from relevant professional bodies (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) and local professional individuals and practices. Owing to the need to meet these professionally-set learning outcomes, there is little choice in modules within these programmes, although it is possible to begin to specialise with dissertation and project topics.

Why Choose Us?

-This course aims to develop the real estate professional of the future who is equipped with the knowledge, tools and skills to operate efficiently, effectively and confidently within an ever-changing environment.
-The programme focuses on the interaction between business and legal processes on property ownership and management. The course integrates technological, financial, legal and management issues as they relate to property matters.
-The course design and delivery uses our expertise across the School to address key challenges and opportunities within practice.

Course in depth

Elements of the course are closely related to real-world scenarios. These build upon current practice issues identified through, for example, Parliamentary debates, revised planning documents and government guidance. We make significant use of professionals as Visiting Lecturers to ensure both continuing professional relevance and that you have direct access to people in current professional practice.

Every student on the programme is allocated a personal tutor and our students are invited to both group and individual meetings throughout the year. We provide set times (known as office hours) during the week where academic staff are available to see students, and staff also frequently arrange to see students by appointment outside these times if additional help or support is needed.

We invite you (normally by making individual appointments) to discuss assessment feedback/feedforward with the marking tutor to ensure that the detailed comments provided are supplemented verbally, and that they are understood, so that you can use comments to enhance future submissions. We collaborate closely with the Centre for Academic Success which offers workshops, individual advice sessions and small group tutorials to all University students on a variety of subjects including use of English, study skills, maths and other technical topics.

Modules
-Valuation 20 credits
-Commercial Inspection and Surveying 20 credits
-Development Project 20 credits
-Law 20 credits
-Property Management 20 credits
-Professional Practice 20 credits
-Dissertation 40 credits

Enhancing your employability skills

Staff from the professional bodies at local and regional levels visit on a regular basis to promote the professions, explain routes of access to full professional membership, and respond to your questions about employability.

Our long-standing links with the professions mean that we are informed about, and so able to advertise, details of relevant job opportunities, and ensure that you are well prepared for application and interview processes.

Key employment skills and career planning are embedded into modules through real life scenarios, local case studies, and a wide range of assessment methods that replicate typical workplace requirements, helping grow your skillset and confidence. The skills and attributes you develop throughout the course are highly transferable to the context of professional employment, helping you to set goals and to enhance your employability in a wide range of professional and business contexts.

The course also prepares you for professional membership APC (Assessment of Professional Competence) processes, which require individual reflection and personal development planning.

Birmingham City University programmes aim to provide graduates with a set of attributes which prepare them for their future careers. The BCU Graduate:
-Is professional and work ready
-Is a creative problem solver
-Is enterprising
-Has a global outlook

The University has introduced the Birmingham City University Graduate+ programme, which is an extra-curricular awards framework that is designed to augment the subject based skills that you develop through your programme with broader employability skills and techniques that will enhance your employment options when you leave university.

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The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. Read more
The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. The programme places a strong emphasis on language training, on theoretically informed approaches to Classical texts, and on practical engagement with your chosen specialism. The course is composed of a core research training module, a module in a relevant language (ancient or modern), a 15,000 word dissertation, and two elective modules, which are offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please see our department web pages (https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9532&title=Classics&code=Q8K307&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent)
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)

In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Classics is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern). All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

Other admission details

*Note that this need not be 'Classics' (so named). If your plan is to specialise in ancient history, literature, or philosophy, for example, it might be perfectly natural to apply with a first degree in History, or English, or Philosophy; or you might just have taken a substantial range of Classical options along the course of your previous studies.

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Our degree offers a unique opportunity to learn about anthropological approaches to the study of health drawing on both sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives. Read more
Our degree offers a unique opportunity to learn about anthropological approaches to the study of health drawing on both sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives. The course provides a strong grounding in ethnographic approaches to the study of health, the political ecology of health and the application of anthropology to contemporary public health concerns, as well as a diverse range of options in areas such as theories of the body and evolutionary medicine. We aim to provide strong training in both theory and methods.

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Full-time students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with further teaching and assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. Core modules introduce the Anthropology of Global Health and Public Health Anthropology, and anthropological methods. Students can choose to focus on qualitative or quantitative methods or to train in both.

Each module we offer has a credit value. To obtain a Master’s degree you must register for and pass modules to the value of 180 credits. In recognition of the emphasis we place on independent research skills, the dissertation is a 60 credit module.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Public Health Anthropology
-Anthropology of Global Health.
Student choose at least one of the following:
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology

Students will then choose 180 credits from a selection of the following.

Previous optional modules have included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Advanced Anthropology of Mental Health and Illness
-Science, Culture and Ethics: Advanced Perspectives
-Evolutionary Perspective on Reproductive and Infant Health
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Anthropology and Development
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Interrogating Ethnography
-Key issues in Socio-Cultural Theory
-Foreign language option

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation course leader.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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This course is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than anthropology who would like to prepare for research in socio-cultural anthropology or for a career requiring expertise in anthropology. Read more
This course is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than anthropology who would like to prepare for research in socio-cultural anthropology or for a career requiring expertise in anthropology.

High profile social anthropologist researchers at Durham, with experience of conducting fieldwork all around the world, introduce students to both classical and contemporary writing and research in the discipline. There is equal emphasis on theoretical and methodological questions, and plenty of opportunity to apply this new knowledge to issues of pressing social concern.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Compulsory modules:
-Dissertation
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Interrogating Ethnography

Previous optional modules have included:
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Anthropology and Development
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Cultural Evolution
-Religion, Contention and Public Controversy
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Thinking Anthropologically.
-Advanced Anthropology of Mental Health and Illness
-Science, Culture and Ethics: Advanced Perspectives
-Foreign language option

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Students take required taught modules worth a total of 60 credits, and four optional modules, also totalling 60 credits. Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and the dissertation coordinator.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with their degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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This course provides students with the skills to apply anthropological theory and methods to the study of development. Read more
This course provides students with the skills to apply anthropological theory and methods to the study of development. The programme is taught by an active, interdisciplinary team involved in world-class research on development issues with a focus on achieving environmental and social sustainability through participatory approaches and active collaborations with projects for empowerment in the Global South. Geographical areas of expertise include Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Melanesia.

The MSc is based around core modules focusing on sustainability, culture and development. Options allow you to pursue special interests. The dissertation offers the opportunity to conduct independent research under the supervision of an expert in your chosen topic.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Anthropology and Development

Students will then choose 60 credits from a selection of the following (previous optional modules have included):
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Context and Challenges in Energy and Society
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Public Health Anthropology
-Religion, Contention and Public Controversy
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Energy Society and Energy Practices
-Interrogating Ethnography
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Foreign language option

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/sustainability for further information on modules.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Sustainability, Culture and Development (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research networks and projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, film showings and discussion, workshops, and optional fieldtrips, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lecture formats deliver key concepts and case study comparisons on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Research seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in modules and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

As a Level 4 course we place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Full-time students take required taught modules worth a total of 60 credits (av 1.5 hours per week per module), and two or more optional modules, also totalling 60 credits (average 2.3 hours per week). Thus, they have on average 6.1 hours of formal contact per week (a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops). Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. From week 10, students begin formal supervision for their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor (10 hours, representing approximately monthly meetings December-September), the degree director (as necessary), and other relevant members of staff (e.g. regional specialists).

Throughout the programme, all students have access to the degree director and deputy director who provide them with academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences, such as the RAI and ASA.

Before the academic year starts, we make contact with incoming students via the postgraduate office. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an 'Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology', as well as a specific introduction to the Anthropology in Development Research Group. This allows students to identify key staff.

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This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. Read more
This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

Many of our former students have gone on to do PhDs, but the course also provides advanced training for those wishing to prepare for a career working in fields such as primate conservation or in museum or educational contexts.

The course is designed for those with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology, zoology or a related discipline.

Course content

This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

All students take the following modules, which provide an essential foundation in theory and methods for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Compulsory modules:
-Dissertation
-Evolutionary Theory
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology.

Student will then choose 90 credits from a selection of the following:

Previous optional modules have included:
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Primate Behaviour
-Cultural Evolution
-Evolutionary Psychology
-Palaeoanthropology and Palaeoecology
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Foreign language option.

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/evolutionaryanthropology for further information.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Students take required taught modules worth a total of 30 credits, and four optional modules, totalling 90 credits plus a 60-credit dissertation. Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation leader.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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This Economic and Social Research Council approved MA provides training in research methods with a focus on methods used by researchers in anthropology. Read more
This Economic and Social Research Council approved MA provides training in research methods with a focus on methods used by researchers in anthropology. At the end of this course you will have the skills to go on to do research in Anthropology or a related discipline. Most students expect to move on to a PhD. The course includes training in qualitative and quantitative methods needed by researchers in social sciences, and draws on expertise within the Department of Anthropology to provide specialised training in sociocultural anthropology, medical anthropology, the anthropology of development or cultural evolution. It is affiliated to the North East Doctoral Training Centre, which offers funding to British and European Union students interested in taking the course preparatory to moving on to a PhD at Durham.

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. This is often a pilot project for a PhD project.

Students take core modules on qualitative and quantitative methods. Further modules are chosen from within each specialist pathway, as outlined below.

Each module we offer has a credit value. To obtain a Master’s degree you must register for and pass modules to the value of 180 credits. In recognition of the emphasis we place on independent research skills, the dissertation is a 60 credit module.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Perspectives on Social Research
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
Either:
-Applied Statistics or
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning and
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science.

Previous pathway modules

Modules to the value of 60 credits, must come from only one pathway. Modules marked * are compulsory for that pathway.

Sociocultural Pathway:
-Thinking Anthropologically*
-Interrogating Ethnography*
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Religion, Contention and Public Controversy
-Anthropology and Development
-Body, Politics and Experience

Development Anthropology Pathway
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience*
-Thinking Anthropologically*
-Anthropology and Development*
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Interrogating Ethnography

Medical Anthropology Pathway
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Public Health Anthropology
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Body, Politics and Experience

Cultural Evolution Pathway
-Evolutionary Theory*
-Cultural Evolution*
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Primate Behaviour
-Evolutionary Psychology
-Palaeoanthropology and Palaeoecology

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Students take required taught modules worth a total of 60 credits, and four optional modules, also totaling 60 credits. Full-time students have on average 8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation leader (13 direct contact hours).

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with their degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we make provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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This is a specialist programme geared towards preparing students for higher research in ancient philosophy - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more
This is a specialist programme geared towards preparing students for higher research in ancient philosophy - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Durham has a longstanding tradition of international excellence in the field of ancient philosophy, with several recent doctoral students having gone on to take up academic positions in the UK and abroad. The programme lasts for one year (two years part-time), and centres around a core module on a topic in ancient philosophy.

Other key elements of the course include a core research training module, a 15,000 word dissertation, and one elective module, which is offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please view our website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9536&title=Ancient+Philosophy&code=Q8K707&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent

Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
-Forms After Plato or Ancient Philosophers on Origins or Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will.

Optional Modules
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches.
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesara and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also be substitute modules offered in other departments such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MA in Ancient Philosophy is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern), and one dealing directly with research on ancient philosophy. All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

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This is a programme geared towards preparing students for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more
This is a programme geared towards preparing students for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars.

The relationship between the classical world and neighbouring civilisations is among the most important and most rapidly expanding areas of classical scholarship, and we have particular strength in this field: we offer tuition in Akkadian, and can draw on the resources of the Oriental Museum in Durham and the expertise pooled in the recently inaugurated Centre for the Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. The programme lasts for one year (two years part-time), and centres around a core module on cultural contact in the Ancient World.

Other key elements of the course include a core research training module, a 15,000 word dissertation, and one elective module, which is offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

Information on the structure of the course.
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
-Religious Life in the Roman Near East or Akkadian

Optional Modules:
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Greece, Rome and the Near East is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern), and one dealing directly with research on interaction between the ancient Mediterranean and the ancient Near East. All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

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TESOL with Applied Linguistics will enable you to develop the solid foundation of knowledge and the practical skills you need to teach English to non-native speakers of the language. Read more
TESOL with Applied Linguistics will enable you to develop the solid foundation of knowledge and the practical skills you need to teach English to non-native speakers of the language.

This postgraduate degree course will equip you with a thorough grounding in teaching methodology, classroom management, an in-depth knowledge of lexis, grammar and phonology, and the way in which language is learned. It will also help you to develop the analytical and reflective skills you need to continue to develop as a professional.

English is the world’s foremost language, and literally millions are learning it. Teaching English is a truly rewarding and fulfilling career, and one which will enable you to travel widely and come into contact with other cultures. There is an increasing demand for well-qualified TESOL professionals around the world.

INDUSTRY LINKS

We have great links with employers within the world of ELT and regularly advertise jobs and job fairs. Employers also visit the campus on a regular basis.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

You will have a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops, with approximately eight hours of class contact per week. A student-centred approach is emphasised in the teaching and learning process. You will be expected to prepare thoroughly for all classes.

The course combines a focus on principles and theories with a concern to help you develop practical skills. It is taught by people who are both academic researchers, practitioners and teacher-trainers in their own right. We have a range of experience in a number of teaching contexts around the world.

You will complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic which you have a desire to investigate and will be encouraged to present your findings at UCLan postgraduate conferences, in refereed journals and at international conferences in the field, such as IATEFL and NATESOL.

We regularly host internationally-renowned guest speakers for talks and conferences on campus. See the video of Professor Rod Ellis below for an example.

FURTHER INFORMATION

TESOL with Applied Linguistics combines a focus on principles and theories with a concern to help you develop practical skills, and is taught by people who are both academic researchers, practitioners and teacher-trainers in their own right. It covers methodology, second language learning and acquisition, and language analysis.

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*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?. *How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?. *Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?. Read more
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?
*How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?
*Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?
*How can people be persuaded to change their energy habits?

The MSc in Energy and Society investigates energy systems from all angles. On this course you will look at energy in practice, what it means to make an energy transition, what we mean by energy justice, and how energy practices change.

The programme brings in leading experts in energy studies at Durham from Anthropology, Engineering, Economics, Law, Geography, Geosciences and many other departments. It is taught through intensive block-teaching, field-study, original dissertation research and a range of optional modules that complement the core teaching. You will learn about current and new energy technologies, histories of energy, how to understand energy policy, and how to study energy practices.

A broad range of optional subjects enables you to tailor the course according to your particular interests – you can take modules in law, international politics, advanced engineering, geography, risk, development or resilience, depending on your prior qualifications. In your fully supported personal research project you will deepen your expertise in your chosen area.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Energy in Practice (Field Study)
-Context and Challenges in Energy
-Energy Society and Energy Practices

Optional modules from across the University and have previously included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Group Renewable Energy Design Project
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Anthropology and Development
-Negotiating the Human
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Energy, Markets and Risk
-Renewable Energy and the Environment
-Risk Frontiers

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/mscenergyandsociety for further information on modules.

Dissertation

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

The dissertation is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and the dissertation coordinator.

Previous dissertations and research projects as part of the course have been undertaken in partnership with DONG Energy UK, Haringey Borough of London, National Energy Action, Durham County Council, energy enterprises and community energy schemes.

Careers

This course attracts high quality applicants from all over the world and delivers highly-skilled graduates who are able to communicate across disciplines and countries to further environmental progress and energy justice. Graduates of the MSc will be in demand from industry, community organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations and governments around the world. Graduates have gone on to work in Energy justice organisations, local authorities, energy consultancies and further Doctoral study.

Student support

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Postgraduate study at Durham University

The MSc Energy and Society is based in Durham University’s Department of Anthropology in association with the Durham Energy Institute. Durham has one of the largest Anthropology departments in the world with 40 research active academic teaching staff working across the full range of the discipline. Our Anthropology department is ranked in the top 50 of the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings. The overall QS rankings also placed Durham 54th in the world for citations, recognising the impact and influence of its research among other academics, and 31st globally for employer reputation, giving recognition to the quality of, and international demand for, Durham’s graduates.

Students on this course can become members of the Durham Energy Institute (DEI) community and can attend its wide range of seminars and events, benefitting from its extensive network of contacts in the energy sector. DEI ( http://www.durham.ac.uk/dei/ ) covers the spectrum of energy research from technological innovation, to the social, political and economic dimensions of energy. DEI addresses energy challenges collaboratively through strong partnerships with industry, international partners, governments, community groups and other academic institutions. This ensures our research is relevant, timely and effective.

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The MA TESOL with Applied Linguistics (E-Learning) will provide you with an internationally recognised master’s degree that will enable you to progress to the next level in your career in language education. Read more
The MA TESOL with Applied Linguistics (E-Learning) will provide you with an internationally recognised master’s degree that will enable you to progress to the next level in your career in language education.

While you will study the same modules as you would on the full-time campus-based version of the course, you will be able to pursue the online route as a part-time student. The online format provides you with the flexibility to blend your career and postgraduate studies in a complimentary way. While this is a rigorous course which we expect you to complete within 2-5 years, it has been designed with the part-time adult learner in mind and incorporates a paced delivery method in which you will progress through each module as a group over a 12-week period.

INDUSTRY LINKS

We have built up strong links with key employers within the world of ELT over a number of years and regularly advertise jobs and job fairs. Employers also visit the campus on a regular basis.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Using a state-of-the-art virtual learning environment incorporating a range of collaborative Web 2.0 tools and a model of social learning, learners are provided with weekly activities that require self-directed study and structured team activities. Each module is based on a core textbook and you will have access to video input from your instructors and engage with reflective discussions and collaborative tasks where appropriate.

You will study the course entirely online using a virtual learning environment. Each module is structured and you will progress through the 12 weeks of input as a group. You are provided with weekly audio/video lectures, engage in structured discussion-based activities, as collaborative activities within your group as appropriate.

We use a variety of assessment procedures including essays, portfolios, presentations, practical projects, online discussions and group activities. Assessment in all cases is designed to promote deep learning and to aid your reflective, analytical and problem-solving skills.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA aims to equip you with an in-depth understanding of teaching methodology, lexis, grammar and phonology, and the way in which language is learned. You will also have the opportunity to study for a range of optional modules in EAP, course and materials design, and computer-assisted language learning among others. Following the e-learning path will help you to develop the analytical and reflective skills you need, while also giving you the flexibility to study where you want, when you want.

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A distinctive feature of the MA (Autism) Education is the focus on learning from the authentic voices of people with personal experience of autism and the expectation that students will engage critically with received wisdom about autism. Read more
A distinctive feature of the MA (Autism) Education is the focus on learning from the authentic voices of people with personal experience of autism and the expectation that students will engage critically with received wisdom about autism.

The MA engages with education across the age range from early years to adulthood, and is relevant to a wide diversity of settings. Students on the programme include experienced professionals, people who identify with autism and parents /allies of people on the spectrum.

The close association between the Centre for Educational Research and the MA provides opportunities to work with like-minded research-active peers within a lively and supportive learning community. LSBU is currently partnering with Research Autism and the University of Cambridge on a study which explores the value of mentoring from the perspective of young adults on the autism spectrum.

Opportunities for accreditation of prior learning are available to students with an appropriate background and this should be discussed with the course director who will also explain the CPD processes on request. Individual MA modules and sessions can be taken as Continued Professional Development (CPD).

National Award for SEN Co-ordinator

You can choose to take the recognised 'National Award for SEN Co-ordination' or options that will further deepen your understanding of autism.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/ma-education-autism

Modules

All modules are assessed by a mix of assignments, presentations, research projects and portfolio development.

Year 1:
- Understanding autism and learning
- Option 1 or National SENCO award part 1

Year 2:
- Option 2 or National SENCO award part 2
- Researching special needs in education
- Commence dissertation

Year 3:
- Dissertation

Options:
- Teaching and learning: the needs of learners with special needs, autism and disability
- Autism, individuality and identity
- Special education needs and disability (SEND)

- Study hours
In year one you'll typically study two modules of 36 hours contact time each plus self-managed study hours.

Employability

This programme will contribute to your employability and the National SENco award may be a requirement of your workplace.

The Autism Act 2009 and The Adult Autism Strategy 2009 require professionals from a wide variety of disciplines to understand autism. The MA could open up opportunities in areas within and beyond educational settings. Professionals with an MA providing an in-depth and critical understanding of autism may achieve promotion or develop a career in education. Universities are beginning to advertise for autism specific posts within disability services.

Students wishing to achieve promotion or develop a career in education benefit from having a higher degree. Progression from the MA to the Doctorate in Education. further enhances employability and promotion prospects, particularly in academia and research. CVs are improved by having publications in refereed journals and this is encouraged and supported on the MA as well as the Doctorate in Education.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The department has wide professional links within and beyond the university and the UK. Examples include:
- The Equality Challenge Unit
- The Alliance for Inclusive Education
- Equality and Diversity Forum Research Network
- The Leadership Foundation
- Research Autism
- Theorising Autism Project
- Teacher Education for Equality and Sustainability Network (TEESNet)
- National Association of Disability Practitioners
- Commonworks (for a just and sustainable world)

Recent guest lectures have been given by researchers from Research Autism and The Theorising Autism Project.

Placements

Access to the workplace (including voluntary work) is essential for most of the modules within the MA. Prospective students who are not currently in (paid or unpaid) employment should talk to the course director.

Teaching and learning

You'll be taught by Dr Nicola Martin who has substantial experience in the field of autism including working with Professor Baron-Cohen on the Cambridge University Autism Project. She was also formerly director of the Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University. Dr Martin is currently a lecturer at LSBU and is a Principal Investigator for Research Autism.

You'll benefit from an up to date Virtual Learning Environment via Moodle and be actively encouraged to make use of the extensive range of support services across the university. You'll have access to a supervisor during the dissertation phase.

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Become a confident and competent Specialist Practitioner within Community Learning Disabilities Nursing! We'll teach you how to think, read and write critically around contemporary issues, combining the theory you learn with the skills you have developed in practice to ensure you have a successful career. Read more
Become a confident and competent Specialist Practitioner within Community Learning Disabilities Nursing! We'll teach you how to think, read and write critically around contemporary issues, combining the theory you learn with the skills you have developed in practice to ensure you have a successful career. Our expert training staff have plenty of experience in their field, and our excellent working relationships with partner trusts allow for a supportive learning environment, advancing your skills and knowledge in practice. We have everything you need to be a specialist practitioner, so work towards continuing your professional development and gaining new employment opportunities in this area.

Course outline

We provide a challenging and flexible learning environment for registered nurses to develop in community specialist practice. As well as a broad knowledge in relation to public health, you'll develop specialist skills in aspects such as health assessment, clinical care and case management. This course will last 40 weeks at full time study or 80 weeks part time.

Our course is half theory, half practice, facilitated in an area specific to your subject. There will also be opportunities to gain alternative practice experience in another relevant setting during the course - you will be encouraged to undertake five days alternative placement to provide a wide perspective of Community Learning Disabilities Nursing. Students are also actively encouraged to work with other health professionals to enhance their knowledge and understanding.

Graduate destinations

Successful completion of the course will allow you to apply for the NMC Nursing register, recording this qualification as a V100 Community Practitioner Nurse Prescriber. This will enable you to work as a Community Learning Disabilities Nurse and progress to work as a team leader in your field.

If you wish to take your learning further, you could use your qualification to study at a Masters level.

Other admission requirements

If you apply for this course you must be current on the NMC Nursing register and you will need to provide evidence of study at level 5/6 within the last five years or complete an approved study skills course. You will be interviewed for selection for this programme. The interview panel may include Trust staff, employers, mentors/practice teachers and university staff. During the interview you will be offered advice on the suitability of the award dependent on factors such as recent evidence of prior learning, and your personal and professional development needs.

You will need support from a NHS Health Trust or your employer and be able to secure a placement in your chosen area of practice, with access to a Practice Teacher. You will need to have completed a Disclosure Baring Service clearance, and this will be checked prior to your commencement on the course.

If you work in Cumbria, Lancashire or Blackpool areas, you may be eligible to apply for a place on the programme funded and supported by one of the local NHS Trusts. The NHS Trusts advertise places on the programme each year through NHS Jobs usually in spring/early summer. We advise you to contact your local NHS Health Trust and ask to speak with the manager for the specialist pathway that you are interested in, in order to express your interest and discuss opportunities.

Occasionally students self-fund a place on this programme. However, you will still need to talk to the relevant manager in your local NHS Health Trust in order to ask if they can provide you with a placement and a mentor/practice teacher in the relevant field of practice.

If you live further afield, you are able to undertake the programme with us if you can organise a practice placement with a mentor or practice teacher in the relevant field of practice. Your local NHS Health Trust will be able to advise you as to whether this is possible.

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If you work as a nurse and want to increase your job prospects, then why not specialise within Community Learning Disabilities? We'll provide you with everything you need to become a specialist practitioner in this field, combining the theory you learn with the skills you have developed in practice to ensure successful progression of your career. Read more
If you work as a nurse and want to increase your job prospects, then why not specialise within Community Learning Disabilities? We'll provide you with everything you need to become a specialist practitioner in this field, combining the theory you learn with the skills you have developed in practice to ensure successful progression of your career. You'll learn how to think, read and write critically around contemporary issues involving community learning disabilities, and thanks to our excellent working relationships with partner trusts, have the ability to put your studies to practice in a supportive learning environment. Our expert training staff are here to provide the benefit of their experience, so take advantage of our wealth of facilities and continue your professional development.

Course outline

We provide a challenging and flexible learning environment for registered nurses to develop in community specialist practice. As well as a broad knowledge in relation to public health, you'll develop specialist skills in aspects such as health assessment, clinical care and case management. This course will last 40 weeks at full time study or 80 weeks part time.

Our course is half theory, half practice, facilitated in an area specific to your subject. There will also be opportunities to gain alternative practice experience in another relevant setting during the course - you will be encouraged to undertake five days alternative placement to provide a wide perspective of Community Learning Disabilities Nursing. Students are also actively encouraged to work with other health professionals to enhance their knowledge and understanding.

Graduate destinations

Successful completion of the course will allow you to apply for the NMC Nursing register, recording this qualification as a V100 Community Practitioner Nurse Prescriber. This will enable you to work as a Community Learning Disabilities Nurse and progress to work as a team leader in your field.

If you wish to take your learning further, you could use your qualification to study at a Masters level.

Other admission requirements

If you apply for this course you must be current on the NMC Nursing register and you will need to provide evidence of study at level 5/6 within the last five years or complete an approved study skills course.

You will be interviewed for selection for this programme. The interview panel may include Trust staff, employers, mentors/practice teachers and university staff. During the interview you will be offered advice on the suitability of the award dependent on factors such as recent evidence of prior learning, and your personal and professional development needs.

You will need support from a NHS Health Trust or your employer and be able to secure a placement in your chosen area of practice, with access to a Practice Teacher. You will need to have completed a Disclosure Baring Service clearance, and this will be checked prior to your commencement on the course.

If you work in Cumbria, Lancashire or Blackpool areas, you may be eligible to apply for a place on the programme funded and supported by one of the local NHS Trusts. The NHS Trusts advertise places on the programme each year through NHS Jobs usually in spring/early summer. We advise you to contact your local NHS Health Trust and ask to speak with the manager for the specialist pathway that you are interested in, in order to express your interest and discuss opportunities.

Occasionally students self-fund a place on this programme. However, you will still need to talk to the relevant manager in your local NHS Health Trust in order to ask if they can provide you with a placement and a mentor/practice teacher in the relevant field of practice.

If you live further afield, you are able to undertake the programme with us if you can organise a practice placement with a mentor or practice teacher in the relevant field of practice. Your local NHS Health Trust will be able to advise you as to whether this is possible.

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