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Masters Degrees (Actor Training)

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The MA/MFA Actor Training and Coaching course offers specialists of appropriate disciplines – actors or other performers, movement or voice teachers, directors or emerging directors in film, theatre and television – the opportunity to diversify by following a specialised study in the education and support of professional actors. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTOR TRAINING AND COACHING

The MA/MFA Actor Training and Coaching course offers specialists of appropriate disciplines – actors or other performers, movement or voice teachers, directors or emerging directors in film, theatre and television – the opportunity to diversify by following a specialised study in the education and support of professional actors.

The course joins Central’s MA Voice Studies and MA Movement Studies to create a cluster of postgraduate degrees aimed at high-level training practices for theatre and performance. Please note the course does not offer training to become an actor, but enables students to work effectively as an educator, coach or director of actors.

Students are introduced to the principles and practices behind the training, education and support of actors. The course addresses various practice and theory interfaces of contemporary acting and brings a variety of methods into creative fusion.

Students may expect to encounter work associated with, for example, Chekhov, Lecoq, Grotowski, Meisner, Stanislavski, Meyerhold, Suzuki, Viewpoints and some methodologies appropriate for acting for screen. Students will also explore ways of developing aptitude in the fundamentals of performance and relate these to a range of production contexts.

Teaching methods include tutorials, group seminars and workshops. Practical sessions are designed to enhance understanding of acting processes and skills in pedagogy, together with associated study of acting techniques and issues of performance including theatre, film and television.

Students will develop advanced interpersonal, facilitation, coaching and pedagogy skills. These include: how to research, plan and deliver courses; knowledge of a wide-range of acting methodologies and practices, as well as some movement and voice; education and support of actors; research skills – both as an individual and through group research; presentation skills; and an ability to plan, conduct and critically reflect on their own practice as an actor trainer.

Students undertake a teaching/coaching placement whilst on the course, as well as placements to engage with different acting and production contexts, with duration ranging from eight hours to three months. Placements are a vital part of the course and enable students to develop pedagogic experience and hone their skills as an educator.

ASSESSMENT

This includes practical assignments, essay, and presentation and submission of a Practitioner Portfolio addressing specialist development and understanding, or a dissertation.

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Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations. Read more
Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations.

As a student of this programme, you will develop strong relationships with active professionals in your discipline and learn within a leading theatrical conservatoire that benefits from the intellectual stimulus of a major research-led university.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This unique programme is aimed at creative producers and directors and those who train and work with actors and performers to develop and direct their skills.

The programme offers five specialist pathways, including actor training, choreography and movement direction, directing, musical theatre creation, and practices of voice and singing, and you will also have the opportunity to develop a specialist practice within your chosen pathway.

The programme is primarily designed for graduates in drama, theatre and dance from universities and conservatoires, but will also appeal to those who have established themselves professionally and wish to refresh their skills and perspectives and take on leadership, coaching, creative or directing roles.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an Advanced Creative Practice module.

Students enter the MA Creative Practices and Direction to a specified pathway, personally supervised by their pathway leader, an expert in the subject area.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Facilitating Creativity
-Interdisciplinary Pedagogies
-Dramaturgy
-The Performing Body
-Body
-Research Methods for Practice
-Integrated Practice
-Specialist Techniques
-Personal Profile Development
-Technology
-Advanced Creative Practice

Pathways

Actor Training pathway
The specialist modules for this pathway are designed to produce a versatile and effective actor trainer with the strategies and skills required to enhance and facilitate an actor’s progress. Students will examine and contextualise a number of acting methodologies to develop their own comprehensive approach to professional practice.

Movement Direction and Choreography pathway
Students on this pathway follow and practically investigate a number of techniques and ideas dealing with onstage physicality. The focus is also on the development of movement language, through the investigation of the ideas and practices of seminal dance-based ideas (Laban, Bausch, Cunningham, Fosse, Graham, Horton, etc.) and methods for working with music and sound.

Practices of Voice and Singing pathway
This pathway brings together study and practice in both singing and voice, in order to create a new paradigm for teaching and coaching in these fields, enabling students to expand, develop and reflect on their coaching styles.

Directing pathway
This programme is a practice-led pathway incorporating methodologies and techniques that focus on approaches to theatre directing, dramaturgy, collaboration with other practitioners.

Musical Theatre Creation pathway
This pathway is designed for those who wish to study writing, and creative roles specifically in Musical Theatre. These might be as a director, choreographer, composer, librettist, musical director or creative producer.

Educational aims of the programme

-Provide advanced study and practice in creative leadership and direction in theatre-making and/or the training of theatre artists, specific to the pathway chosen
-Equip students for employment in the theatre industry and/or related performing arts industries as specialist practitioners in one of the following areas: Actor Training; Directing; Movement Direction and Choreography; Musical Theatre Creation; Practices of Voice and Singing
-Provide students with integrated practical and theoretical knowledge of specialist creative and/or pedagogic practices relevant to their chosen pathway; contemporary technical and scholarly contexts; and industry-specific contexts
-Enable students to develop intellectual and practical skills to inform and articulate self-reflection and critical awareness, through specialist study and practice, and work with other students in cognate fields
-Develop critical and independent practitioners imbued with a sense of learning as a lifetime pursuit via a commitment to professional and personal development

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Understand critical, contextual, conceptual and ethical dimensions of creative practices, leadership and facilitation in theatre and performance practices
-Articulate the practitioner’s relationship with key creative and production colleagues, performers, industry professionals and audiences
-Comprehend the implications and potential for theatre and wider performing arts practices presented by key developments in creative processes, training and producing regimes, and contexts for preparation and production
-Demonstrate an awareness of recent developments and specific techniques in the relevant specialist pathway
-Generate ideas, concepts, proposals, processes, solutions and/or perspectives independently and/or collaboratively in response to set briefs and/or as self-initiated activity
-Employ both convergent and divergent thinking in processes of observation, investigation, speculative enquiry, conceptualisation, facilitation and/or making
-Critically evaluate one’s knowledge and understanding of relevant performance/pedagogic practice
-Interact effectively with others through collaboration, collective endeavour and negotiation
-Demonstrate leadership skills, providing clarity and direction for others
-Demonstrate competence with specialist creative/facilitative theatre and performing arts practices (specific to the pathway followed)

Knowledge and understanding
-Understand critical, contextual, conceptual and ethical dimensions of creative practices, leadership and facilitation in theatre and performance practices
-Articulate the practitioner’s relationship with key creative and production colleagues, performers, industry professionals and audiences
-Comprehend the implications and potential for theatre and wider performing arts practices presented by key developments in creative processes, training and producing regimes, and contexts for preparation and production
-Demonstrate an awareness of recent developments and specific techniques in the relevant specialist pathway
Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Generate ideas, concepts, proposals, processes, solutions and/or perspectives independently and/or collaboratively in response to set briefs and/or as self-initiated activity
-Employ both convergent and divergent thinking in processes of observation, investigation, speculative enquiry, conceptualisation, facilitation and/or making
-Critically evaluate one’s knowledge and understanding of relevant performance/pedagogic practice
-Manage and make appropriate use of the interaction between context, brief, planning, process, outcome and critical reflection.
-Analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgments, and articulate reasoned arguments through reflection, review and evaluation
-Source and research relevant material, assimilating and articulating relevant findings
-Formulate reasoned responses to the critical judgments of others
-Identify personal strengths and needs, and reflect on personal development, adapting plans accordingly

Professional practical skills
-Select, evaluate, adapt and make appropriate use of techniques, materials, processes and partnerships
-Develop ideas through to outcomes
-Demonstrate skills in communication, expression and facilitation
-Utilise appropriate discipline-specific languages to investigate, analyse, articulate and apply ideas and information
-Demonstrate competence with specialist creative/facilitative theatre and performing arts practices (specific to the pathway followed)
-Present ideas and work to co-creators, performers, audiences and other stakeholders, as appropriate, in a range of situations
-Seek and respond to the views of others in the development or enhancement of their work
-Work in combination with others in relevant performing arts settings, demonstrating skills in teamwork, negotiation, organization, and decision-making

Key / transferable skills
-Interact effectively with others through collaboration, collective endeavor and negotiation
-Demonstrate leadership skills, providing clarity and direction for others
-Work effectively as part of a team and in pursuit of shared goals
-Study independently, set goals, manage own workloads and meet deadlines
-Anticipate and accommodate change, and work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty and unfamiliarity
-Source, navigate, select, retrieve, evaluate, manipulate and manage information from a variety of sources
-Select and employ communication and information technologies
-Demonstrate resourcefulness and entrepreneurship

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT

The School of Arts facilities include the 200-seat theatre in the Ivy Arts Centre, dark and light studios, digital creation stations and editing facilities, scenic, props and costume workshops, and interconnected sound recording and music facilities.

Teaching and workshop activity takes place largely in GSA’s dedicated rehearsal rooms, performance studios and design workshops. Lectures, presentations and seminars will occur in rooms across campus.

The University Library contains the majority of set texts, key journals, scripts, play texts and video materials necessary for the programme. Students have access to extensive facilities through the virtual learning environment, SurreyLearn, and IT Services.

Additional support is available in the Learning Resource Centre in the University Library.

Equipment is provided on a project-by-project basis according to the nature of the work in hand and the parameters of the project, which are negotiated with the tutor.

Facilities and equipment for production work will be booked by students according to specific project briefings and advertised resource parameters.

Academic support is provided by way of ongoing contact with the programme director and module leaders, group briefings and feedback, individual tutorials, and mentoring.

The programme makes use of a peer feedback system designed to provide a useful and supportive account of areas of strength and effectiveness, along with areas for improvement.

You are encouraged to identify personal learning and creative objectives that can be pursued in alignment with group project work.

RESEARCH

The School of Arts includes study in dance, digital arts, film, music, sound and theatre, with research activity in all areas, often with significant interdisciplinary connections.

With an integrated approach that comprises documentation, analysis and performance, Surrey’s agenda for research aims to engage critically with the past and present, while rigorously articulating new frameworks for understanding and practising the arts and culture in the twenty-first century.

Research infrastructure includes the Digital World Research Centre and the Laban Archive in the National Resource Centre for Dance (NRCD).

The School of Arts hosts and supports established research centres, research groupings and networks as well as individual research projects. Our research extends to partnerships with the artistic community, for instance, in support of public debates or in the dissemination of documentation for arts practice through the digital and print media.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The MA Acting offers a unique postgraduate programme to combine academic study in performance with a practice-based approach to performance. Read more
The MA Acting offers a unique postgraduate programme to combine academic study in performance with a practice-based approach to performance. In collaboration with the MA Theatre Directing programme, students will produce and perform a range of work during the MA while undergoing a professional programme in actor training. The programme is taught in the evenings and on Saturdays and is available for both full- and part-time study.

Modules include:
Actor Training
Performance Laboratory
Staging Performance
Research Methods
Dissertation/Production

The Acting Master’s programme benefits from the inclusion of a wide range of visiting practitioners – both directors and actors. In addition to giving ‘masterclasses’, these practitioners deliver some of the modules on the programme. Each year, a different theatre company acts as a mentor for the Staging Performance module taking students through the whole process of putting a production together from its inception right up to the performance.

The programme is taught in the evenings and on Saturdays and is available for both full- and part-time study.



Students will study at University Square Stratford (USS), our brand new campus in the heart of Stratford and benefit from facilities including:

State of the art performing arts spaces, with over £750,000 of brand new specialist equipment
3 performance studios, kitted out with advanced lighting rigs and AV equipment
72 person capacity Harvard Lecture Theatre with live lecture capture technology
The Weston Learning Centre, a multi media space open 24/7 in term time, where students can study, engage in group
work and take advantage of the learning facilities USS has to offer

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The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:
> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask
> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte
> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance
> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

CONTEMPORARY STRAND

The Contemporary strand addresses the actor’s relationship with the writer, from Early Modern times to the present day through the exploration of:
> Shakespeare and his legacy
> Chekhov, Stanislavski and the birth of naturalism
> the actor and 20th century playwriting
> new writing and the development of new work.

The Contemporary strand combines teaching in practical voice, movement and acting techniques with an exploration of some of the key playwrights that have helped forge the canon of Western theatre, from the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists to Chekhov and from Beckett to Kane. Uniquely, it explores the relationship between the two artists at the core of much Western theatre: the actor and the writer.
From Shakespeare and the King’s Men to the work of modern day producing houses, plays are frequently developed in collaboration between actors and writers, sometimes directly and sometimes mediated by a director. Students are encouraged to explore their role as creative artists in relation to writers and the written word. Throughout the course you will have the chance to work with, and alongside, writers on plays in development, both the next generation of playwrights on the MA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media, and established playwrights with a track record of produced plays.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage
of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa
Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools
Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.

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Voice Studies courses at Central are nationally and internationally renowned, giving a specialised education in the study and practice of the spoken voice. Read more

ABOUT MA/MFA VOICE STUDIES

Voice Studies courses at Central are nationally and internationally renowned, giving a specialised education in the study and practice of the spoken voice. They have a close relationship with the celebrated International Centre for Voice, based at Central.

These courses are for graduates of appropriate disciplines who wish to follow a career in voice teaching and who seek specialised study and practice in voice and speech. They are particularly likely to appeal to professionals who already have an interest in, and knowledge
of, the voice and for applying it to the fields of performance practice, performance training or other related pedagogies, for example actors, directors, drama teachers, trained singers and speech therapists.

The MFA offers a further embedding of skills and concepts learnt during its second year. In some countries, the MFA is more recognised, particularly for those interested in teaching, or research in a higher education environment.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

Workshops are provided with leading British, American, Swiss and New Zealand based voice practitioners, including Kristin Linklater, Catherine Fitzmaurice, Meribeth Bunch Dayme, Frankie Armstrong, Annie Ruth, and Jacob Lieberman.

For students studying the MFA Voice Studies, Central are delighted to announce our association with the University of Cincinnati, CCM Drama programmes under Professor Rocco Dal Vera and with the University of Minnesota’s Guthrie Theatre BFA Actor training programme, under D’Arcy Smith. Both of these influential and highly respected performance training organisations have offered on-going opportunities for Central students to engage with them during their second year MFA attachments in voice.

ASSESSMENT

During the first three terms of both courses, assessment is through written work, practical projects and teaching practice. In the fourth term of the MA, students complete a dissertation or portfolio focusing on their specialist area of enquiry arising from the work of the course. In the MFA second year, assessment is by means of documents based on field experience and related research.

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This programme gives students the opportunity to closely explore a topic in an area of drama, theatre and contemporary performance at the highest level of academic study. Read more
This programme gives students the opportunity to closely explore a topic in an area of drama, theatre and contemporary performance at the highest level of academic study.

The programme draws on the Drama Department and School of Arts’ longstanding international reputation in the development of practice as research and brings students into a research environment of excellence.

Key areas of focus within the department include cognition and performance, applied and socially engaged theatre, popular performance and European theatre. Practice focuses on dance, physical actor training, puppetry, live art, autobiographical and documentary performance, providing a rich context for postgraduate study.

Our two drama-based research centres actively involve postgraduate students - the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance and the European Theatre Research Network. Research students attend and support the many seminars these centres offer each term and a selection of School seminars. There are dedicated postgraduate events where students can present their research in a constructive atmosphere. Discipline-specific methodology training is provided through one-to-one supervision and/or group workshops.

The department also facilitates Work in Progress meetings to help foster the research culture, improve students’ research skills and bring together members of the postgraduate research community.

Individual staff research interests cover a wide range of both historical and contemporary aspects of the theory and practice of theatre, and supervision is available in all these areas.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/351/drama-by-thesis-practice

About the Department of Drama and Theatre

Postgraduate Drama and Theatre studies at Kent has a very strong reputation for research and supervision in contemporary theatre and performance. We are the home of two renowned international research centres, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) and the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (CKP).

The wide-ranging interests of our international team of leading and emerging researchers (from the UK, Australia, Italy, Greece, Germany, France and other countries) include research strengths in contemporary performance, applied theatre, Shakespeare, 18th-century theatre, multimedia performance, popular performance, directing and dramaturgy, and physical performer training.

Our distinctive focus at Kent is on theatre as practice, whatever the topic, area, mode and methodology of research, and we encourage postgraduate students to make use of our close links and contacts with local, national and international (especially European) theatre companies, venues, schools and artists, both for research and to encourage professional postgraduate development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The School of Arts’ award-winning Jarman Building offers professional standard drama facilities, along with social spaces and a dedicated centre for postgraduate students.

Additional facilities across the Canterbury campus include two theatres: the 113-seat Aphra Theatre (a courtyard-type gallery theatre space); and the Lumley Theatre, which is a flexible and adaptable white room space. Drama students also benefit from an additional rehearsal studio, a sound studio, a theatre design suite and an extensively equipped construction workshop.

The University’s Templeman Library is well resourced in our subject area and houses special collections of 19th-century manuscripts – playbills, programmes, prints and other theatre ephemera – theatrical biography and the history of the stage in the 19th and 20th centuries. It also has particular strengths as a research resource in English Renaissance drama, Russian and French theatre, and British theatre since 1900. We also house the Jacques Copeau Archive and the British Grotowski collection.

Conferences and seminars
We have strong links with organisations such as the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR) and the Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA), and encourage postgraduates to present work within national and international conferences. Also, we run regular research seminars, workshops, and performance-related events led by members of staff, students, and invited experts and practitioners.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: New Theatre Quarterly; Contemporary Theatre Review; TDR: The Drama Review; Performance Research; Shakespeare Survey.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

- European Theatre

At Kent, the UK’s European university, we have set up the European Theatre Research Network to facilitate and foster the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on the near European continent and also in the new European states. We invite postgraduate research students to contribute to and play a part in this expanding network. For further information, please see http://www.europeantheatre.org.uk

- Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course is rooted in practice, designed with international graduates in mind. Studying here will help you to develop a conceptual understanding of the practice of the British tradition, providing you with a progression route to an acting career or to further study at MPhil or PhD level. Read more

MFA Acting (The British Tradition)

This course is rooted in practice, designed with international graduates in mind. Studying here will help you to develop a conceptual understanding of the practice of the British tradition, providing you with a progression route to an acting career or to further study at MPhil or PhD level.

It is delivered through various modes of study, such as research through practice, practice-based learning, workshops, performances, lectures and seminars as well as private study. This provides you with the experience of working in a range of styles and genres.

You will study modules taking you through the British tradition of theatre from the Middle Ages to the modern day exploring a range of acting techniques.

Modules include:

• Acting, Movement, and Voice Skills
• Shakespeare/Jacobean
• Contextual Studies
• Well-made play
• Contemporary Playwrights
• Professional development

There will also be a final research project which may be either practice or dissertation based.
This professionally oriented course has a high number of contact hours and requires students to be highly motivated and committed.

Employability

Graduates of the course will return to careers in the performance industry or in education with additional skills and a clearer understanding of British actor training and style, which will increase employment opportunities and give graduates a competitive edge in a highly competitive field.

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This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills. Read more
This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills.

GSA is one of the UK’s leading accredited drama schools, providing dedicated conservatoire training within a purpose built environment on the University of Surrey campus.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Acting programme is specifically designed for those seeking a career in the performing arts, and who already have an undergraduate degree or have a minimum of five years’ professional experience.

This intensive programme offers practical training which focusses on the acquisition of technical skills in acting, voice and movement.

These support a range of rehearsal projects, screen acting projects and public performances. Students also take professional development workshops and classes in audition technique.

Cohorts are kept small to ensure that students receive the maximum amount of personal attention and contact.

Performance opportunities include a devised project, a final public production led by a production team of industry professionals, and a West End Showcase.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Advanced Practice module. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Industry Practice 1
-The Integrated Body 1
-Acting
-Contextual Practice 1
-Industry Practice 2
-The Integrated Body 2
-Contextual Practice 2
-Public Production
-Advanced Practice

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-To deepen experiential knowledge and critical understanding of the practice of acting
-To develop a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and methodologies that constitute a personally evolved rehearsal process
-To develop an integrated technical approach to the practice of acting in rehearsal and performance
-To provide an ensemble training context for the development of professional acting skills based on practical and theoretical understanding and reflective practice

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
-An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
-A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
-An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
-A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
-Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
-Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
-Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
-Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills
-Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
-Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
-Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
-Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
-Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills
-Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
-Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
-Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
-Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
-Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
-Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

TESTIMONIALS

"I am really pleased that I came to GSA as it has given me the ideal grounding to work across the industry with not only a high level of quality to my work but also a distinguished level of professionalism that never goes unnoticed. I put these things down to the excellent training that I received at GSA." - Marina Waters, MA Acting 2010-2011

"The MA Acting course has been an intensely rigorous journey which has endlessly flexed my creative muscles, heightened my self-awareness and deepened my understanding of what it means to nurture an individual's body, spirit and mind through an ensemble, while remaining true to one's self." - Rebecca Yeo, MA Acting 2011-2012

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MA Acting is an intensive 45 week conservatoire Actor training course. Eight weeks of the course are spent studying in Moscow. Read more

Introduction

MA Acting is an intensive 45 week conservatoire Actor training course. Eight weeks of the course are spent studying in Moscow. Skills classes in Voice, Movement, Neutral Mask, Ballet, Period Dance, Speech and Acting underpin a programme embracing the Greeks to Contemporary drama, with particular emphasis on Shakespeare and Chekhov.

Content

MA Acting is primarily a stage acting course which focuses on the techniques developed to address the demands posed by the great European classics.

MA Acting is a rewarding route to the general training of actors, offering a solid grounding in acting technique, rooted in the long-established traditions of England and Russia, which are widely considered to be the foremost exponents of the art of the actor.

Throughout, the postgraduate course emphasises theatrical approaches, in particular those relating to narrative structures, movement expression and the conveyance of complex texts by means of a rich, well-trained voice. Questions of text and subtext are explored in detail.

MA Acting approaches performance in ways specifically addressing the needs of the Jacobean stage: focusing on vocal accuracy with speed, expressivity on a large scale, engagement with the audience. In addition, the postgraduate course encourages you to develop skills required by the realist style: multi-layered characterisation, recognising the subtle rapport between text and sub-text, being ‘private in public’.

Structure

MA Acting is structured in 2 units over 45 weeks:

Unit 1 (weeks 1-15) "Skills and techniques of Acting"

Unit 2 (weeks 16-45) "The practice of Acting".

8 weeks are spent at the Boris Shchukin Theatre Institute, known as the Vakhtangov Institute, in Moscow - one of the foremost conservatoire Drama schools in Russia.

A typical week for MA Acting students will be:

3 hours Voice
3 hours Movement
1.5 hours Ballet
1.5 hours Speech
1.5 hours Period Dance
3 hours Neutral Mask
7 hours Acting Technique
12 hours Rehearsal.

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This highly distinctive MA course, run as a partnership between Birkbeck and RADA, brings together cutting-edge practice and scholarship in theatre and performance. Read more
This highly distinctive MA course, run as a partnership between Birkbeck and RADA, brings together cutting-edge practice and scholarship in theatre and performance. Join us and you will work with both Birkbeck's experts in theatre and performance studies and RADA's faculty and visiting theatre practitioners to experience both making and studying theatre. This course does not offer actor training, but will deepen your critical and practical understanding of theatre and performance practices in context and leads to a prestigious postgraduate qualification from the University of London.

What our students say

'Since finishing the MA course, I have worked on projects as a writer, director, and teacher - this is largely thanks to the way this course nurtures you as both artist and academic and helps you develop a diverse skill set.'

'Perhaps the best 2 years of my life.'

'The MA course allowed me to change my career path and gave me the skills and confidence to launch myself into an arts career.'

'The course helped to refine my approach as a theatre practitioner, while widening my scope for theatrical discourse and inspiration to create work. It encourages the intertwining of the creative and the academic, resulting in thought provoking and unique theatre. Most importantly, the course taught me to risk, to dare to create something new, to have an opinion and express it through my art.'

'Mature students can give at least as much and get as much out of this course as young people and taking the risk to do it was one of the best decisions I have ever made.'

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Taking the dramatic text as a critical starting point, our course encompasses drama from the early modern period to the contemporary.
In the rehearsal room, you will create new theatre and performance work responding to set texts and themes. You will also engage with performance techniques to develop your skills as a playwright, director and dramaturg.
In academic lectures and seminars, you will encounter theoretical, historical, critical and philosophical writings. You will theorise live performance and write about the ways in which new performance work is informed by both contemporary concerns and older theatrical traditions and legacies.
In the final dissertation project, you will exercise your own creative voice as a director, dramaturg, playwright or scholar.
Student projects are tutored by a combination of faculty and visiting artists. In 2015-16, visiting artist tutors included A.C. Smith, David Slater, Karen Christopher, Peader Kirk and Rachel Mars.
We also offer informal, unassessed creative enhancement opportunities: RADA’s TheatreVision initiative, which brings together students from the MA Text and Performance and the MA Theatre Lab to explore writing for theatre; Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Theatre runs a postgraduate reading group and offers opportunities to show work in progress as part of the School of Arts summer festival Arts Week.
RADA and Birkbeck are just 3 minutes' walk apart so you will study in a campus-style environment. Our close proximity also allows us to draw on the rich range of resources available across both institutions, including: studio space; technical support for group and individual presentations; RADA’s excellent library of playtexts and theatre and performance literature; and Birkbeck’s world-class research resources in the arts and humanities.
The course incorporates visits to London theatre and both institutions are well placed for you to access the extraordinary array of theatre available in London.
The renowned British Library is also located nearby.

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The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CONTEMPORARY STRAND

The Contemporary strand addresses the actor’s relationship with the writer, from Early Modern times to the present day through the exploration of:
> Shakespeare and his legacy
> Chekhov, Stanislavski and the birth of naturalism
> the actor and 20th century playwriting
> new writing and the development of new work.

The Contemporary strand combines teaching in practical voice, movement and acting techniques with an exploration of some of the key playwrights that have helped forge the canon of Western theatre, from the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists to Chekhov and from Beckett to Kane. Uniquely, it explores the relationship between the two artists at the core of much Western theatre: the actor and the writer.
From Shakespeare and the King’s Men to the work of modern day producing houses, plays are frequently developed in collaboration between actors and writers, sometimes directly and sometimes mediated by a director. Students are encouraged to explore their role as creative artists in relation to writers and the written word. Throughout the course you will have the chance to work with, and alongside, writers on plays in development, both the next generation of playwrights on the MA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media, and established playwrights with a track record of produced plays.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage
of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa
Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools
Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.

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A Master's by Research (MA) allows you to undertake a one year (full-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. Read more
A Master's by Research (MA) allows you to undertake a one year (full-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. This type of study gives you the chance to explore a research topic over a shorter time than a more in-depth doctoral programme.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught Master's course.

You'll be expected to work to an approved programme of work which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies. Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events.

Your main supervisor will normally head a supervisory team which will comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.

At the end of the project you'll write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words, which will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

Our research specialisms:

Fundamental to our work, Drama research focuses on practical explorations and developing innovative ways of teaching and training. Our academic staff and postgraduate researchers conduct research around areas of:

• actor training

• psycho-physicality

• ensemble

• creativity and improvisation.

Other areas of interest include performance magic, theatre and learning disability, new writing forms and contemporary political theatre.

Our excellent facilities include three fully equipped performance studios together with workshops, costume stores, digital media suites and changing rooms.

You are advised to take time to investigate the University's website to find out more details about the research we conduct. Please visit the Research section of the website to take a look at the information there.

To find out about the staff in this subject area please visit the subject area page, or alternatively, to look at profiles of any of our academic staff, you can visit our academic staff profile page.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and when this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

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This taught Master's explores physical training for actors and performance practice. Based on an intensive, sustained and sophisticated engagement with this specialist aspect of theatre practice, the programme gives you the opportunity to work as individual practitioners and as an ensemble. Read more
This taught Master's explores physical training for actors and performance practice. Based on an intensive, sustained and sophisticated engagement with this specialist aspect of theatre practice, the programme gives you the opportunity to work as individual practitioners and as an ensemble.

The programme explores:
physical and vocal training processes for actors
acting processes for performers
autonomous and collaborative practice
interdisciplinary approaches
It also equips you with the ability to document research practices in an appropriate form that is viewed as an integral part of the process and outcomes of this MA.

You have the opportunity to work with internationally respected physical theatre and training specialists, including Professor Paul Allain and Kent colleagues, as well as participate in a professional workshop on actor training by a visiting practitioner working within the tradition of European experimental theatre. You can participate fully in the activities of the Department’s very active research centre, the ‘European Theatre Research Network’.

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MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. Read more
MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. On another level, it is a thought-provoking, life-changing reflection on the function and art of the actor – exploring techniques from some of Europe’s most influential practitioners as well as innovative professional practice from the UK and internationally.

Example structure

We offer dynamic and unique course for actors, directors, technical theatre specialists and students of theatre practice. Training at East 15 draws upon 50 years of tradition combined with a keen sense of the world of stage and screen today.

First Term
In the first term, there are classes in movement, voice and singing, as well as contextual studies. The entire programme of teaching across the course coheres to lead the actor from an exploration of personal self to that of the body in time and space and from there to the creation of character and the realisation of text.

Acting classes promote the development of intuitive, creative responses which are then framed by the introduction of techniques to build character and play actions. Showings of short naturalistic scenes give opportunity to integrate and apply technical voice and movement work in the context of an acting exercise.

Second Term
In the second term, skills classes continue. The acting work begins with an intensive Shakespeare module which develops and strengthens the integration of technical skills with acting technique. This is followed by the Research Performance Project in which you engage with specific time in history and experience East 15’s distinctive Living History Project.

This signature project is a non-performed improvisation in which the actor can, through rigorous ‘actor-centric’ research and a residential period away from the campus environment, experience and identify with the practical and visceral realities, as well as the psychological and emotional attributes of the character.

Subsequent to this you devise a studio performance based on your intellectual, emotional and sensory experience. You are also given responsibilities in stage management and production to enhance your overall understanding of what it is to make theatre and to prepare you for the realities of the industry.

Towards the end of term two participants begin to research and develop their MA project.

Third Term
The first part of Term Three focuses on media. The film project teaches skills of acting for the camera and provides material for the actor’s show reel. The radio drama project teaches radio skills and microphone technique and provides material usable in a voice reel. At the same time, you begin work on your MA Projects. The MA Projects involve working in small groups on self-generated projects, in which participants are given independence and autonomy as company members. These are performed in East 15’s Corbett Theatre or in other venues as appropriate.

The second half of term 3 sees a full production of a text-based play usually in our on-campus Corbett Theatre.

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This intensive course gives you a unique insight into an actors conservatoire training, giving the director the intellectual and artistic tools to better communicate and stimulate a creative performance from actors on film. Read more

Introduction

This intensive course gives you a unique insight into an actors conservatoire training, giving the director the intellectual and artistic tools to better communicate and stimulate a creative performance from actors on film. Directing means working with performers and developing a methodology that balances the needs of the actor against the grinding pressure of the shooting process. This course equips and enables the director to find their own voice whilst developing the skills needed to balancing these difficult demands. During the course you will work closely with the acting cohort developing your directors voice and vision to tell story through narrative drama, focusing on an understanding on the importance of genre, casting and story telling with the actor.

Please note: recruitment to the Writing pathway is currently suspended.

Content

This postgraduate course prepares you for work in film and television and related fields by bringing together the key artistic disciplines and skills needed to make high quality filmed drama. You will explore in detail Stanilavisky's unique scene study methodology which lies at the heart of Drama Centre’s conservatoire training. From storyboard to working on the subtext with the actors on set you will be enabled to develop your own distinct artistic voice.

At the heart of MA Screen: Directing, Writing is the growth of individual creativity, achieved through constant opportunities for working on camera-based projects with colleagues from other pathways. You will work on two filmed productions, in our film studio and on location. Supported by a professional producer, director of photography and editor. You will take an active part in a Mike Leigh type devising project where you will help shape the story's stimulated by the characters that the actors develop over nine weeks of intense rehearsal. You will understand the rhythm of a working film set and develop the confidence to use your own voice on future projects, confident in the knowledge that you know how to work creatively with actors. You will be given in depth preparation for the profession including interview technics and wide range of lectures from visiting professionals, such as agents, casting directors, working producers and directors.

Distinctive features of MA Screen: Directing, Writing are:

An insight into actors' conservatoire training

A performance-led approach to recorded drama

A company operating model

The acquisition of a deep understanding of the processes leading to the creation of high quality films

A quasi-professional learning model that prepares you for direct entry to the world of work

The realisation of new writing or adaptations through performance-led models

A focus on the technical aspects of production

A mentoring scheme connecting students with experienced professionals.

Structure

MA Screen: Directing, Writing lasts 45 weeks over 12 months and is structured as units - class-based to begin with, but increasingly project-geared over time. This postgraduate course is intensive. You'll be expected to commit 40 hours per week to classes, rehearsals and shoots, and to your own independent preparation and learning.

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