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This course is for people who are. - active in social movement struggles but need space to stand back, reflect, recharge;. Read more

Overview

This course is for people who are:
- active in social movement struggles but need space to stand back, reflect, recharge;

- involved in community and voluntary activism but feel trapped by the structures;

- politically minded but don’t know how to turn that into an effective and radical practice;

- clear that social change is central to them but unsure how to build a life around it;

- interested in spending a year with their peers and experienced practitioners;

Around the world today, movements and communities are making history – or trying to. The need for change is huge and the outcome is still all to play for. We see apparently-unstoppable movements squashed and apparently-hopeless ideas winning against all the odds. What makes the difference, and how can our movements find a way forward and even change the world?

The MA in Community Education, Equality and Social Activism (CEESA) at Maynooth University responds to the crisis by helping us learn from each other’s struggles in dialogue between different movements, different communities, different generations. The course is not tied to any single movement and participants come from many different communities and countries. Some are experienced activists who want to go back to education; others are less experienced people who are keen to get involved in movements. This mixture of ages, backgrounds, experiences and questions is an integral part of what makes the course so rewarding. Together we are building a diverse network of movement activists, radical educators and campaigners for equality and creating new alliances for change.

The course team are experienced practitioners and engaged scholars working on equality, radical education and movement struggles. The course combines social analysis, bottom-up organising methods and political strategy with a wide range of pedagogies and a focus on knowledge for change, taking a practical but radical look at the problems facing movements today. Our small-group classes run on Mondays and Tuesdays to facilitate participants, over two 12-week terms followed by work on a project aimed at developing your own movement practice.

Often we are told that we have to choose between our politics and “real life”. This course shows how to integrate the two with confidence, practicality, solidarity, emotional resilience, seeing the bigger picture, taking time out to reflect and supporting each other for the long haul. Participants go back to their own movements refreshed, set up new projects, find work in movement organisations, go on to further education - and bring back what they have learned to their own struggles.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/sociology/our-courses/ma-community-ed-equality-social-activism

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/international/study-maynooth/postgraduate ) for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

Students will complete the Thesis and Research Module (30 credits), four core modules (10 credit) and select 20 credits from the rest of the programme of elective modules. The course will offer a choice of elective modules in each semester. The course involves two days a week on campus along with independent reading and study which you should expect to take another two days equivalent during the rest of the week.

Career Options

Some students will find employment as researchers, policy workers, campaign coordinators or educators within community, social movement or civil society groups; others will find the tools to create new organisations which are sustainable within the dramatically changed political and economic landscape.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/sociology/our-courses/ma-community-ed-equality-social-activism#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Our approach to Visual Cultures frames it in terms of what it can do alongside what it can know. Read more
Our approach to Visual Cultures frames it in terms of what it can do alongside what it can know. Be inspired by a team of world-renowned teaching and research staff, who will challenge you to explore existing paradigms, develop an individual approach to visual culture research, and articulate your thinking as you develop your 'manifesto' and portfolio.

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This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-theatre/. Read more
This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-theatre/

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embraces: theatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sue Mayo

Structure

Full time students are in Goldsmiths Monday to Wednesday in terms 1 & 2.

Part time students are in Goldsmiths Tuesday and Wednesday in terms 1 & 2 of year 1, and Mondays only in year 2.

In the summer term, for both years, there are 5 days of teaching in April and May, dates to be confirmed.

Assessment

The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
a 12,000-word research project/dissertation
These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.

Skills
The MA aims to equip you with the appropriate background knowledge and understanding to work creatively and critically within the broad remit of applied theatre. Recent research identified three core skills for participatory artists working in socially engaged theatre practice. These are:

critical thinking (the ability to contextualise and interrogate practice in the light of current thinking and practice)
creativity (the ability to take creative risks based on a strong skill base)
responsiveness (the ability to reflect and adapt)
The course works with these core skills threaded through its methodology, while also offering opportunities to look at the hard skills of planning, documenting and evaluating work.

Careers

Our students go on to work in a range of roles including setting up and running community/participatory theatre companies, as freelance drama workshop facilitators, lecturers, heads of education or participation producers within established theatre companies.

Previous students have gone on to carry out:

work with people with learning disabilities
theatre work with early years
creative work in pupil referral units
cross-arts projects in a range of educational, community and social contexts
theatre education and outreach
community theatre
museum education and theatre in prisons
Previous graduates from the programme have also continued with research study towards the MPhil or PhD qualification.

We have graduates working at the Southbank Centre, the Royal National Theatre, The Young Vic, Brighton Dome, Pan Arts, Rewrite, Ovalhouse, Battersea Arts Centre, the Albany and Talawa Theatre; with MIND, Tender, Magic Me, and Headway.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MA looks at contemporary changes in media and communications, by putting into perspective the transformations that affect the way people live and work, national and international institutions evolve, and how cultural practices develop- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-global-media-transnational-communications/. Read more
This MA looks at contemporary changes in media and communications, by putting into perspective the transformations that affect the way people live and work, national and international institutions evolve, and how cultural practices develop- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-global-media-transnational-communications/

This programme's internationally acclaimed and comparative approach to the events, issues and debates of our times is particularly suited for those interested in exploring the bigger picture as well as the nitty-gritty of transformations in media and communications and their impact on culture, society and politics.

Its cutting-edge and interdisciplinary approach to postgraduate learning, independent study, and life skills provides you with the analytical skills, conceptual knowledge and practical understanding of the real and imagined shifts that are taking place in – and through – the media industries, everyday life online and on the ground at home and abroad.

The Masters attracts budding scholars, media practitioners, activists, and advocates from many regions, with a variety of educational and professional backgrounds.

It's particularly suitable for those wanting to move their knowledge and analytical skills up a level for further study as well as for those who have experience of studying or working in the media and cultural sectors, non-profits and other third sector organisations, alternative media, the arts, grassroots and international advocacy and activism.

The programme achieves these goals by:

-exploring the challenges traditional media sectors face as news, entertainment, and services go global and converge on the web
-critically studying the past, present, and future of the internet and information and communications technologies
-examining changes to communicative cultures, media production, and services in a ‘post-Web 2.0’ context
-thinking about how ordinary people, businesses, governments, and multilateral institutions (mis)use ICT
-looking more closely at how local communities, governments, and transnational corporations look to influence media futures
-researching differences in how people, cultures, and countries access and use media and communicate across borders
-debating the implications of the digital divide, media censorship, and digital surveillance by governmental and commercial agencies
-reading, watching, and hearing how artists, creative entrepreneurs, power elites and ordinary people respond to technological and social change

The Programme Director is Professor Marianne Franklin. Lecturers, guest speakers, and research students on this programme are affiliated to the Centre for the Study of Global Media and Democracy, the School of Mass Communications at Texas Tech University (USA), the United Nations Internet Governance Forum, Edinburgh Law School, Le Monde diplomatique, a number of international NGOs, activist and advocacy groups, international academic and media networks.

Follow us on Twitter @GloComm ‌

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor Marianne Franklin.

Modules & Structure

The programme is broken into three parts:

-core modules
-option modules (where students can devise their own specialisations)
-dissertation

The themes covered may vary from year to year, depending on research developments and staff availability.

Along with two compulsory (core) modules, research skills module, and a research dissertation, you can choose from a range of theory and practice option modules from Media & Communications as well as other Goldsmiths departments.

Distinguishing Features: this programme's content, structure, and assessment takes an interdisciplinary and innovative approach to:

-reading, thinking and articulating challenging ideas
-conducting individual and collaborative research
-accessing and contributing to current debates
-incorporating practitioner and activist perspectives
-teaching and learning that is both research-led and student-inspired
-supporting excellence in individual and group projects

Activities: Based on an interactive communication model of learning and teaching, the core programme is organised around lectures, participatory workshops, student presentations, written work, informed debates.

-It features guest speakers from around the world and various media and communications domains.
-It involves students in creating their own media-based projects, such as our prize-winning live Video Conference event with international partners.
-It looks to foster original research dissertation work, formal presentation and collaborative skills.
-It provides instruction in the fundamentals of designing and successfully completing an independent research dissertation project alongside one to one supervision and workshops

On completing this programme you will be able to (re)enter the workplace, return to your creative pursuits, activism, or advocacy project or, if you wish, continue onto further research with up-to-date knowledge about the facts and fictions around these trends.

Assessment

Individual and group presentations; live video/web conferences, examined essays and research papers; qualitatively assessed assignments and discussion leading; dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from this programme find work and excel in a number of domains:

national and global media corporations
government departments
global news & broadcasting
online media
PR and advertising
NGOs and non-profits
intergovernmental organizations
the entertainment industry
the arts and cultural sectors
Alumni have found work with the BBC world service, Globo corporation, Carnegie Foundation, European parliament and European Commission, CCTV, NBC, Google, Microsoft, NGOs (eg Greenpeace, Global Partners) and charities (eg Dementia UK), newspapers (eg in South Korea, Brazil, Slovenia, China), alternative media and advocacy networks, museums, theatres and art gallerires, online national and international media outlets (eg Chinese, indigenous Taiwanese), PR and marketing around the world.

Other alumni have continued on to PhD programmes, at Goldsmiths and elsewhere. Many have been successful in gaining research scholarships and funding to further their academic and practitioner careers.

The ethos of the department is one which looks to achieve a healthy balance between scholarly pursuits and practical skills; we look to develop all-round thinkers and doers who can – and do – contribute to the cultural and professional life of their communities and countries. Graduates from this programme excel in their analytical skills, range of knowledge, flexibility, and adaptability.

Skills

At Goldsmiths we support and develop students to express themselves creatively and self-critically in theoretical, creative, practical and/or professional pursuits.

You will be equipped with new insights and ideas, analytical skills and practical knowledge about how both traditional and newer media, familiar and cutting-edge information and communication technologies, and computer-mediated communications actually operate and contribute to society, culture, and politics in contemporary settings.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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This qualification opens up a challenging and rewarding career in social work, social justice and political activism within the diverse field of social care. Read more
This qualification opens up a challenging and rewarding career in social work, social justice and political activism within the diverse field of social care. This nationally and internationally recognised qualification equips graduates to work in the voluntary, statutory and private sector within fields such as policy, therapeutic intervention, research and management.

Key benefits:

• Qualify as a professional social worker while gaining a Masters degree
• Responsive part-time route with evening study
• Designed with input from service users, practitioners, carers, students and academic staff.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/social-work

Suitable for

We welcome students of all backgrounds who seek an MA in Social Work that develops critical analysis, open debate, questioning and dismantling of conceptual frameworks.

If you want professional social work training founded on principles of empowerment and social justice for the liberation of the oppressed look no further.

Programme details

This course comprises 50% academic study and 50% practice learning in a social work/care workplace setting.

The University makes every effort to assist students in finding a placement but is unable to guarantee that a placement opportunity will be available or that students will have access to the placement of their choice. There is a nationally recognised shortage of placements and availability is dependent upon external providers who are able to offer a limited number of placements opportunities. If you are unable to take up a placement opportunity you will need to return any funding that you receive from the Student Loan Company if you are not actively attending the programme.

Format

The course is delivered using an action learning approach which places the emphasis on group work and individual responsibility for researching and collaborating.

Module titles

• Introduction to Professional Social Work
• Individuals, Communities and Societies
• Critical Professional Practice
• Professional Capability in Practice 1 (70 day practice placement)
• Developing Critical Professional Practice
• Understanding Social Work Research
• Research in Practice
• Professional Capability in Practice 2 (100 day practical placement)

Assessment

• Assignments
• Practice Portfolio
• Independent Project

Career potential

This programme opens up a challenging and rewarding career in social work, social justice and political activism in the diverse field of social care. This nationally and internationally recognized qualification equips graduates to work in the voluntary, statutory and public sector within field such as policy, therapeutic intervention, research and management.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017. Read more
If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017.
http://www.shu.ac.uk/VCAwardJanuary2017

Study on a course designed for social sciences graduates who plan to work or complete research in sociology, social policy, and governmental and commercial organisations. The fundamental research methodologies you learn give you the skills to develop or start your career as a researcher in these areas. Our staff offer a wide range of research specialisms for you to benefit from, encompassing sociology, social policy, politics, criminology, education studies, urban studies, youth studies and cultural studies.

During this course we introduce you to social research methods and strategies, and the supporting theories and philosophies. You can also develop areas of specialist interests and integrate these into your methodological training. On a number of the modules, you meet and discuss research issues with students from our other MRes courses and doctoral level researchers.

This course is for you if you have a first degree in any discipline within social sciences and plan to
-Work in areas of social policy and sociology.
-Carry out research in these and related subject areas such as health, crime and policing, leisure and education policy, town planning or environmental studies.

If you are already working in the field, you and your current employer may see this course as a professional development opportunity, giving you the skills to further your career and current practice.

Our staff are currently involved in research areas including
-Labour market and occupational studies.
-Public health.
-Discourse and identities.
-European, international and comparative politics and policy.
-Social statistics.
-Policing studies.
-Criminology.
-Urban studies.
-Labour history.
-Drug use and rehabilitation.
-Housing studies.
-Environment and sustainability.
-Visual ethnography.
-Education and social class.
-Poverty and inclusion.
-Ethnicity and religion.
-Media and impact on diversity and equality.
-Social activism.
-Sexualities and gender.
-Teenage pregnancy and parenting.
-Youth studies, youth work and volunteering.
-Work and family life.
-Charities, volunteering and the non-profit sector.

You study a range of research methodologies throughout the course including:
-Interview-based narrative and biographical research.
-Case study and ethnography.
-Media analysis.
-Surveying and sampling.
-Statistical analysis of large data sets.

You critique current developments in research methodology then design and conduct your own pieces of original research.
The MRes includes a research-based dissertation, which may become a pilot study towards a PhD. Several recent MRes students have gone onto doctoral level study, in fields such as education and inequality, and activism and sport.

For an informal discussion about this course, please contact Dr Bob Jeffery by e-mail at

This course is hosted by the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School. The Graduate School website provides a communication hub for students and staff engaged in research, information about our research work, and useful contact information.

You can take individual modules as short courses or combine them towards a PgDip/PgCert Research Methods in Sociology, Planning and Policy.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mres-sociology-planning-and-policy

Course structure

Full time – 1 year
Part time – typically 3 years
Depending on your route and start date (September or January), classes run in the evenings and/or in blocks of study during the day. Please contact us for more details.

Course design
You need 180 credits for the MRes
You choose up to 120 credits from the following modules:
-Qualitative methodologies and interviewing skills
-Qualitative research designs and ethnography
-Discourse and linguistic theory and analysis
-Survey design
-Introduction to survey analysis
-Multivariate statistical analysis
-Philosophies of research and design
-Research philosophies in today's sociology

You may choose to substitute 30 credits from another course within our MRes programme.

To gain the MRes you must present a 60-credit research-based dissertation in an area of your choice. This piece of work is supervised by our staff and gives you the opportunity to demonstrate the skills you have learned and your understanding of the research process and philosophies.

Assessment
Includes: essays, research projects, presentations, research proposals.

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There can be little doubt that film, creative media and performance do not just reflect but produce particular political realities and can be used for political ends. Read more
There can be little doubt that film, creative media and performance do not just reflect but produce particular political realities and can be used for political ends: for example, the recent events of the Arab Spring demonstrated the role that digital media play in the form and conduct of political activism, and the events of 9/11 ten years ago showed how spectacle impacts on politics and may be manipulated for various ends. All this highlights the need for informed and critical scholarship that is not constrained by any disciplinary divide between performance, media and politics, and that goes beyond a framework that equates theatre with politics or sees politics as a performance.

Scholars of politics have recognised the importance of examining, and indeed employing, cultural and media forms in their work. Equally, scholars of film, media and performance are examining the relevance of critical conceptualisations of the political in their practice. This MA taught Masters combines the research strengths and longstanding collaboration of two world-leading departments to allow students from either background to develop an advanced understanding of the place of media, film and performance in contemporary politics, and vice versa. Students from politics and international politics will have the opportunity to develop skills in media analysis and practice, and specialise in film, performance, or creative media, and those from film, performance and media will gain a deeper understanding of contemporary theories and practices of politics, and specialise in a particular area, for example, Latin America, Africa, or the Middle East, or in a particular aspect of international politics, for example, postcolonialism, or critical international relations. Those from other disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, philosophy will have the opportunity to engage with these exciting and intensely political synergies.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/politics-media-performance-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you have a specific interest in Politics, Media and Performance
- If you want a highly innovative masters course
- If you want to develop your research skills
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind media, performance and politics
- If you want to develop creative interventions into political debates through the use of media and performance

Course detail

Aberystwyth University’s Masters in Politics, Media and Performance is the first course in the UK (and one of the few in the world) to study the interrelationships between these crucial areas. Working across disciplines in innovative and invigorating ways, you will examine the means through which film, media and performance do not just reflect but produce particular political realities and how they can be used for political ends.

As a student on Aberystwyth University’s Masters in Politics, Media and Performance, you will benefit from the experience and guidance of two of the world’s leading departments in their respective subject areas. Our Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies will provide you with a thorough theoretical and practical understanding of media and performance. Our Department of International Politics will help you to gain a deeper understanding of contemporary theories and practices of politics and to engage with a range of exciting and intensely political new synergies. Together the departments offer you a comprehensive range of teaching and learning facilities and extensive computing and library resources. Amongst the library resources are those of National Library of Wales, one of the world’s great libraries with over 6 million volumes available to you.

The Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at Aberystwyth is the highest rated Arts and Humanities Department in Wales, according to the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, with 60% of research submitted being rated world-leading.

There can be little doubt that film, creative media and performance do not just reflect but produce particular political realities and can be used for political ends. The recent events of the Arab Spring demonstrated the role that digital media play in the form and conduct of political activism, and the events of 9/11 in 2011 showed how spectacle impacts on politics and may be manipulated for various ends. All this highlights the need for informed, critical and creative scholarship that is not constrained by any disciplinary divide between performance, media and politics, and that goes beyond a framework that equates theatre with politics or sees politics as a performance. Scholars of politics have recognised the importance of examining, and indeed employing, cultural and media forms in their work. Equally, scholars of film, media and performance are examining the relevance of critical conceptualisations of the political in their practice.

Format

This programme will be jointly taught by International Politics and Theatre, Film and Television Studies staff and administered by the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies within the Faculty of Arts.

This taught Masters combines the research strengths and longstanding collaboration of two world-leading departments to allow students from either background to develop an advanced understanding of the place of media, film and performance in contemporary politics, and vice versa. Students from politics and international politics will have the opportunity to develop skills in media analysis and practice, and specialise in film, performance, or creative media, and those from film, performance and media will gain a deeper understanding of contemporary theories and practices of politics, and specialise in a particular area, for example, Latin America, Africa, or the Middle East, or in a particular aspect of international politics, for example, postcolonialism, or critical international relations. Graduates from other disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, cultural studies and philosophy will also have the opportunity to engage with these exciting and intensely political new synergies.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part 1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, tutorials and essay projects. Successful completion of your dissertation (Part 2) leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

The transferable skills you will acquire on the course, such as presentational skills, information building and analysis, critical thinking, writing skills, and practical and creative skills are vital for a broad range of employers. An MA in Politics, Media and Performance shows an in-depth knowledge of these topics which are particularly beneficial if you choose to apply for PhD study. The Aberystwyth MA in Politics, Media and Performance provides you with skills essential in several fields of work. Modules and assessments are aimed towards giving you experiences which will benefit you in the working world. Graduates from the Departments of International Politics and Theatre, Film and Television Studies have entered careers in the creative industries, administration and the public and private sectors.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in these fields and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at Masters Level is a very independent process. You will be guided and aided by University staff, but you will also be expected to conduct your own scholarly and/ or creative research work. The final dissertation in particular, teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected of you in the working world.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA in Politics, Media and Performance provides you with key skills which are transferable to several fields, thus increasing your employability. Upon graduation from this Masters course, you will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, develop practical initiatives, work effectively with others, work within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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This new Masters degree from the world ranking Department of Journalism and Mass Communications aims to equip students with the skills, knowledge and strategic approach to develop and analyse social change campaigns, with a particular focus on the role of communications and the media. Read more
This new Masters degree from the world ranking Department of Journalism and Mass Communications aims to equip students with the skills, knowledge and strategic approach to develop and analyse social change campaigns, with a particular focus on the role of communications and the media. Now in its second year, this is the only MA of its kind in the UK.

This innovative course builds on our close links with leading campaigners and communicators in London's vibrant social change sector. An advisory panel, with representatives from Amnesty UK, Campaign Bootcamp, FairSay, Friends of the Earth, NCVO, RIBA, WaterAid and The National Council of Voluntary Organisations among others, will ensure we always reflect the skill sets in demand and deliver an exciting learning experience. A limited number of work placements and internships will be available.

The course is aimed at those with some experience or interest in social change, the media, and communications or campaigns within not for profit organisations. The course will help you improve your practical skills, develop a deep understanding of the theories and frameworks that underpin and shape campaign communications, and enjoy the space to reflect critically on current and past practice. It is designed to help you start, or progress, a career in charity, pressure group or public sector campaign communications. It may also be of interest to those working in corporate social responsibility.

The course team has extensive experience both in developing social change campaigns and in academic research into the connections between media and social change. The course is jointly led by Michaela O’Brien and Dr. Anastasia Kavada with additional teaching by practitioners and members of CAMRI. It is taught at our campuses in the West End of London, and also at the Harrow campus.

The course offers a number of delivery modes to suit the different needs of students and can be taken as either part-time or full-time.

There are three core modules. The first develops practical planning and campaign communications skills; the second considers media and activism theories; and the third combines theory with practice, reflecting on applying concepts like power and ethics within the setting of campaign communications. Each module has assessments – e.g. essays, campaign plans, reflective blogs, debates and presentations - rather than exams.

These three core modules make up the Postgraduate Certificate.

Students can take another three modules - chosen from a very wide range of options including practical media and content production skills; diversity issues; development and policy; social media; theories of communication and more - to complete a Postgraduate Diploma.

Students wanting to take the Masters course also complete either a 15,000-word research dissertation, or a professional practice project (which can be work-based).

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core module semester one
-CRITICAL ISSUES IN CAMPAIGNING

Core modules semester two
-MEDIA, ACTIVISM AND POLITICS
-PLANNING CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATIONS

Option modules - You choose three option modules from the following menu. You may choose to focus on practical skills, on new technologies, on diversity or development, or on media audiences and industries.

Semester one - Choose two of the following in addition to the core module:
-Approaches to Social and Cultural Diversity
-Global Media
-Media Management and Content Production (PR and the Media)
-Media Production
-Political Economy of Communication
-Reporting Diversity: Gender, Sexuality, Age, Disability
-Social Media and e-Marketing
-Social Media: Creativity, Sharing, Visibility
-Technology and Communications Policy
-Theories of Communication.

Semester two - Choose one of the following in addition to the core modules:
-Approaches to Media and Communications Research
-Critical Theory of Social Media and the Internet
-Development and Communications Policy
-Media Audiences
-Online Journalism
-Reporting Diversity: Faith and Religion
-Reporting Migration, Race and Ethnicity
-Sociology of News
-Web Production: Westminster News Online

Associated careers

This course is particularly relevant if you want to start, or to progress, a career in communications and campaigning for social change, whether in a charity or non-governmental organisation; in a public sector body; in a political party or election campaigning setting; or even in a corporate social responsibility role. It could also be a stepping-stone towards a PhD and an academic career in this growing field of study.

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This Masters considers ‘development’ as a widely desired goal, but also an arena of contestation. You will explore new forms of politics, especially those emerging in the non-Western world, and have the opportunity to undertake an internship. Read more
This Masters considers ‘development’ as a widely desired goal, but also an arena of contestation. You will explore new forms of politics, especially those emerging in the non-Western world, and have the opportunity to undertake an internship.

‘Development’ has been a long desired as a goal for societies and peoples, and the pursuit of it has been decisive in shaping the world, especially since the mid-20th century. However major changes in recent decades, including the emergence of new geopolitical powers on the international stage, growing challenges to neoliberal dogmas, heightened concern with increasing global inequality, and recognition of the danger of ecological devastation, mean that ‘development’ – what it means and how it is to be achieved – has become the site of contestation, where new forms of politics and struggle have emerged.

This Masters surveys these changes and this contestation, and asks, how can (and should) we talk about the challenges and possibilities for development in the 21st century?

The programme considers ‘development’ as a central political question to map out the world today. The MA will trace the murky contours that separate politics from lawlessness, political ideas and ideals from empty rhetorical gestures, international cooperation from imperialism, and political activism from violence.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Francisco Carballo or David Martin or Sanjay Seth

Modules & Structure

In this innovative and interdisciplinary course of study you’ll be able to explore:
•The defining features of contemporary forms of capitalism
•The emergence of geopolitical powers over the past 20 years
•The interplay between informal and illegal economies
•The connections between violence, politics and religion
•Patterns of immigration worldwide
•The slum as a fundamental site of the contemporary world
•The current debates on globalisation from below
•The prospects for radical politics

There will also be the opportunity to take an internship option, and to get involved in a student-led speaker and event series, where you’ll be encouraged to approach ‘industry partners’ including journalists, activists, senior staff in NGOs, politicians, and public intellectuals, who can offer differing perspectives and expose you to current debates in the professional community.

Core modules
•Development in the 21st Century (30 credits)
•Understanding Global Politics (15 credits)
•Student-Led Curriculum Development (15 credits)
•Dissertation (60 credits)

Option modules

You’ll also choose options from a wide range of courses available through the Department of Politics and other departments at Goldsmiths, including Anthropology, Cultural Studies, History, Media and Communications, and Sociology.

Skills & Careers

You’ll consider a range of debates and approaches that are pertinent to the development sector, and so it’s an ideal programme for anyone thinking of pursuing a career in this area – whether you’re interested in working for high profile charities, grass-roots organisations, social enterprises, or global activism.

It’s also an ideal foundation for a career in research or policy, or if you’re thinking of pursuing a research degree in the future.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Sustainable Design MA is a solution-focused course, for a post-awareness-raising era of change, redirection and activism through design. Read more
The Sustainable Design MA is a solution-focused course, for a post-awareness-raising era of change, redirection and activism through design. It engenders within students a confidence, aptitude and dynamism with which to situate their practice at the very forefront of the sustainable design debate. Students come from a broad range of creative contexts, including product design, furniture and lighting, interior and architectural practice, fashion and textiles, media and journalism, conservation and planning, for example. The Sustainable Design MA embraces current practices, whilst stepping forward to pioneer new and provocative means through which sustainability may be more fully achieved.

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This MA is a unique, interdisciplinary course in queer studies. It trains you to bring a radical, contemporary and global approach to the study of sexuality. Read more
This MA is a unique, interdisciplinary course in queer studies. It trains you to bring a radical, contemporary and global approach to the study of sexuality.

Jointly taught by the Schools of English and Global Studies, the course provides a firm foundation in queer theory and allows you to tailor your studies to your own interests.

The MA has been running since 1991 and continues to bring together dynamic, engaged students and faculty to develop cutting-edge work on sexuality. The course is associated with the Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence, a hub for research on sexuality and queer studies.

How will I study?

You will study core modules and options. You can also attend research and arts events, such as our film club, reading group and visiting speaker series. Over the summer, you work on your supervised dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

The MA is relevant to number of career directions, including:
-Policy, activism and international development, such as research and interventions in sexuality, rights and health
-Academic research related to queer studies in a wide range of fields, including literature, cultural studies, media studies, film studies, -Development, international relations and anthropology
-Teaching, including in higher education
-Media, writing and the arts, in particular queer representation, difference and diversity

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Sussex is an internationally recognised centre for teaching and research in international development in the UK. Sussex Anthropology pioneered the anthropological critique of development. Read more
Sussex is an internationally recognised centre for teaching and research in international development in the UK. Sussex Anthropology pioneered the anthropological critique of development.

We examine the impact of economic and social change on local practices, meanings and identities.

This MA has a strong focus on issues of anthropological engagement, development policy and activism, and will be of interest to you if you have experience, or are considering a career, in the development field.

How will I study?

Modules are assessed by a range of methods, including coursework and essays. You also write a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Sussex is the largest centre for teaching and research in international development in the UK. Sussex Anthropology pioneered the anthropological critique of development, examining the impact of economic and social change on local practices, meanings and identities.

We have particular research expertise in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Europe, but also cover the Caribbean, Latin America, South-East Asia and China.

Our faculty and students are members of:
-Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
-Centre for World Environmental History
-Sussex Centre for Cultural Studies
-Centre for Cultures of Reproduction, Health and Technologies
-Africa Centre
-Asia Centre
-Sussex Centre for Migration Research
-Sussex Centre for Photography and Visual Culture
-Centre for Security and Conflict Research Centre for Global Political Economy
-Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence

Careers

This MA provides an entry into the anthropology of development and is for you if you have experience of, or are considering a career in, the development field.

Over half of our graduates since 2008 have gone on to work for NGOs and aid agencies, for example:
-International and national NGOs, such as Oxfam, Save the Children, Care International, Development Alternatives, ACTED, BRAC, Welthungerhilfe, and German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)
-UK Civil Service, UK’s Department for International Development, USAID, Peace Corps
-Independent filmmaking, freelance journalism, and socially responsible businesses
-Working as a researcher for government agencies, think tanks, or private consulting firms

A number of our graduates go on to study for a PhD.

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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues.http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-postcolonial-culture-global-policy/. Read more
Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues.http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-postcolonial-culture-global-policy/

We're witnessing today a tectonic shift in global geopolitics. The emergence of China, Brazil and India as global players, the development of global governance, the financial crisis, climate change – are all symptoms.

On this Masters you’ll grasp concepts like race, diaspora, hybridity, difference, grassroots development, HDI, multitude, immanence, and human rights.

These concepts are used to analyse practical, policy and activist issues arising from globalisation: global civil society, the role of international organisations (the IMF, WTO, UN and World Bank and global NGOs), intellectual property rights, social capital, financialisation, global governance and deep democracy.

You'll deal with issues like terrorism, microfinance, indigenous people, gender and sexuality, multiculturalism and environmental justice.

The MA is ideal for anyone pursuing careers in policy research, NGOs, advocacy, charities, international organisations, cultural and political activism, global media, art and curating, as well as for further academic work leading to a PhD.

Practical placement

The Masters includes a supervised and assessed practical placement. This may be with NGOs in India or Africa, arts and conservation organisations in China, indigenous activists in Latin America, London-based global NGOs, diasporic communities, think-tanks, environmental organisations, publishers or financial/microfinance organisations.

Leading theorists and visiting lecturers

You'll be taught by leading theorists and visiting lecturers drawn from a wide circle of activists, artists, film-makers, lawyers, economists, journalists and policy-makers.

Find out more about:

the Centre for Cultural Studies
our varied events programme
our staff

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Shela Sheikh.

Modules & Structure

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. Modules can be chosen from across Goldsmiths departments and centres. Option modules are subject to availability and approval by the module lecturer/convenor.

Globalisation: Politics, Policy and Critique- 30 credits
Postcolonial Theory- 30 credits
Policy Lab and Placement- 30 credits
MA in Postcolonial Culture and Global Policy Dissertation- 60 credits

Assessment

Essays and/or practical projects; dissertation.

Skills

The programme provides advanced training for labour market-relevant skills in transnational analysis of sovereignty, democracy, governmentality, financialisation, intellectual property rights, and the role of non-governmental organisations.

Careers

Suitable careers and areas of work for graduates of the programme include:

the academic sphere
government and non-government sectors
arts and art administration
publishing
journalism
media
the culture industry in general

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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