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Masters Degrees (Abuse Studies)

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If you have a background in psychology, sociology or criminology, our course is ideal for gaining greater insight into the effects of being abusive or being abused. Read more
If you have a background in psychology, sociology or criminology, our course is ideal for gaining greater insight into the effects of being abusive or being abused. You'll develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of a broad range of topics pertinent to interpersonal violence and abuse. We look at the impact of abuse in different international, cultural and social contexts, and you'll have the chance to examine practice and research from theoretical perspectives. To learn more about how violence and abuse affects our lives, sign up for our programme!

Course outline

We offer a stimulating and challenging environment where you can build on your existing learning experiences to advance your academic and professional development. You will gain specialised knowledge and a critical awareness of issues at the forefront of interpersonal violence and abuse studies. Teaching is done through a variety of blended learning and campus-based activities explicitly designed to meet the needs of learners working in a range of contexts.

Graduate destinations

This course can lead to careers in social work, mental health contexts and the children's workforce.

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Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches. Read more
Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches.

The course is ideal for those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence, in policymaking or delivery at local, regional or national levels, or are wishing to establish careers in these sectors.

More about this course

This course provides a comprehensive grounding in theoretical frameworks, research, policy and practice approaches to woman and child abuse.

The MA content covers all forms of violence against women and child abuse, including sexual violence, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, trafficking and harmful practices. Reflecting the work of the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, a specialist research unit, the MA focuses on what we know about these forms of abuse, the contexts in which they occur and the connections between them. While the main focus will be on the UK, intellectual, policy and practice approaches from across the globe will be discussed.

The course content will be cross-disciplinary, mainly drawing on sociology and including social policy, criminology and psychology.

Assessment approaches vary according to the aims of each module and how it is delivered. Examples include essays or other written coursework and individual presentations.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Researching Communities (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Violence: Causes, Consequences and Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (core, 20 credits)
-Woman and Child Abuse Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Community Development (option, 20 credits)
-Crime and Offender Patterns (option, 20 credits)
-Doing Evaluation: Skills and Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-International Child and Human Rights Law (option, 20 credits)
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Social Research: Principles, Practice and Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Women, Gender and Human Rights (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is particularly suited to those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence. It is also excellent preparation for those who are wishing to establish careers in this sector.

Our graduates have gone on to key roles in policymaking or service delivery at local, regional and national levels, and some pursue further studies to PhD level, including with the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This is a highly applied degree which lets you obtain the knowledge and skills relevant to forensic psychology. An ideal course for anyone who wishes to work in an applied legal or criminological setting. Read more
This is a highly applied degree which lets you obtain the knowledge and skills relevant to forensic psychology. An ideal course for anyone who wishes to work in an applied legal or criminological setting.

More about this course

Through a combination of lectures, workshops, exercises and field trips, this course will give you the skills and knowledge relevant to forensic psychology as well as many other allied areas.

The course is informed by current developments within the field, as well as practical experience. In addition to a comprehensive understanding of forensic psychology theory, we aim to give you practical skills. This is shown in our strong focus on applied assessment and intervention (within a variety of settings and with a range of different clients).

You can further develop your understanding of different client groups by choosing from a range of optional modules. These cover working with children, victims of sexual offences, individuals in secure settings and legal professionals. Alternatively you may wish to study alongside students from America on our International Perspectives on Forensic Psychology Module (delivered alternately in the States and the UK).

We discuss how psychological theory and research is relevant to a range of professional practice settings. This helps you to consider different career options following completion of your studies. A further strength of our course is the opportunity to study alongside other disciplines and areas of psychology. This gives you an understanding of the breadth and range of applied psychology, as well as some of the skills required to work in multidisciplinary teams.

The course is assessed through both coursework and open book examination. Assessment requirements vary according to each module and are designed to allow students to demonstrate their theoretical knowledge in applied ways. Therefore example assessments include professional reports, portfolios, oral presentations, case studies and reflective accounts.

All of the assessments have been designed to enhance students’ academic, professional and employability skills.

Modular structure

The course consists of six core modules, a substantial empirical research project (equivalent to three modules) and an option or designate module.

The main areas of study are:
-Psychology and Criminal Behaviour
-The Investigation and Prosecution of Criminal Offences
-Introduction of Assessment and Intervention
-Applied Assessment and Intervention
-Professional Context and Practice of Forensic Psychology
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology
-Forensic Psychology Project

You should also pick one of the following designate modules:
-Applied Legal Psychology
-Psychology and the Penal System
-Psychology and Sexual Violence - In conjunction with the Child and Women Abuse Studies Unit (CWASU), London Metropolitan University
-Psychology and the Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People – Also in conjunction with the Child and Women Abuse Studies Unit (CWASU)
-International Perspectives in Forensic Psychology - We are very pleased to be able to offer students the opportunity to meet and work alongside US forensic psychology students during the course of this module. This is a joint teaching programme offered in conjunction with Marymount University, Virginia. This module has proved extremely popular and is run alternatively in the UK and in Arlington, near Washington DC. The module consists of a series of site visits and workshops facilitated by UK and American practicing forensic professionals.

We strive to offer a full range of designates. However we cannot guarantee to run all designates every year.

After the course

Our graduates go on to work in a variety of settings and with a range of clients (eg offenders, victims, police, and probation). A such, our graduates have gone on to work as police officers, offender treatment providers, within victim services and in probation departments.

We have graduates that work in the Home Office, HM Prison Service, the NHS, Youth Offending Teams and relevant government departments. Other students have focused on working with forensic psychiatric residents in secure settings (eg Medium or Regional Secure Units).

We have also had a number of our students obtain work with charities (such as NACRO) and go on to do further research.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Examine the impact of being abusive or being abused. You will look at theoretical perspectives considering abusiveness and its impact in different international, cultural and social contexts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-understanding-domestic-violence-and-sexual-abuse/. Read more
Examine the impact of being abusive or being abused. You will look at theoretical perspectives considering abusiveness and its impact in different international, cultural and social contexts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-understanding-domestic-violence-and-sexual-abuse/

This MA in Understanding Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse is unique and represents the first psychologically informed programme of its kind.

It is particularly suitable for people wanting to increase their grasp of the interplay between mental distress, domestic violence and sexual abuse. The programme will offer a blended learning approach with a mixture of online and face to face contact. The online components will be largely focused on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge through computer mediated activities via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The classroom-based content of the programme will have an emphasis on experiential and reflective learning which will help you understand the process of identifying, assessing and managing both perpetrators and victims. This aspect of the programme will be delivered in blocks preferably over weekends to make the study more accessible to working adults.

Individual modules on the programme are likely to be valued as part of a continuing professional development plan for psychological therapists and other workers in the field.

You may take individual modules separately or exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma.

You can keep up to date with everything that's happening on the programme by following us on Twitter.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Suzanne Martin.

Modules & Structure

Your learning will be underpinned by a unique synthesising of psychodynamic, systemic, cognitive behavioural and social theories to examine the impact of being abusive or of being abused. The programme focuses on looking at practice and research from these theoretical perspectives and will consider abusiveness and its impact in different cultural and social contexts from childhood to older age.

The learning will be provided by a cross-disciplinary team that covers approaches from the social work, community and youth work, cross-sectoral arts, and therapeutic approaches including art and dance psychotherapy, psychodynamic, counselling and cognitive behavioural approaches.

You'll be assessed through a mix of coursework, presentations, and a final dissertation.

Skills

The MA will develop skills including:

a knowledge various theoretical perspectives
an understanding of cross-disciplinary work within the field
an understanding of the different international, cultural and social contexts from childhood to older age within the field

Careers

It is expected that a number of professionals will use either the course credit or the degree to supplement their CPD portfolios, which are a requirement for the majority of these professionals.

For workers with extensive experience this programme (or its constituent courses) will provide a sound basis in theoretical knowledge and current research which will help them develop their current work and increase their potential for further advancement in the field.

The UK has developed recognised forms of intervention in this field that have an international application and relevance. Issues regarding domestic violence and sexual abuse have an international public health and human rights dimension, which makes the programme internationally relevant.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc by Research in Counselling Studies provides students with a comprehensive understanding of research design, data collection and data analysis for research in the field of counselling and psychotherapy. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Counselling Studies provides students with a comprehensive understanding of research design, data collection and data analysis for research in the field of counselling and psychotherapy.

It offers an advanced education to students interested in developing research skills, including qualified counselling and psychotherapy practitioners and social science researchers.

Counselling and psychotherapy specialise in qualitative, reflexive and critical approaches to research, and have particular expertise in practice-based research that draws directly on practitioners' own therapeutic work, on the client's experience of therapy, and in narrative, reflexive and auto-ethnographic methods.

We are especially keen to encourage research concerned with the interface between counselling, psychotherapy and social, cultural and political life.

Our research portfolio is highly interdisciplinary, integrating concepts, practices and scholarship from counselling and psychotherapy, psychology, sociology, philosophy, education, cultural studies, health and social care, and other social sciences.

Our interests include disability, gender, trauma, abuse, counselling children and young people, and sexualities.

Training and support

You will complete a programme of research training courses and submit a dissertation on an approved topic. The MSc by Research can be taken as a stand-alone qualification or as a foundation for PhD study.

Programme structure

The programme aims to provide students with advanced understandings of research design, data collection and data analysis issues in counselling research.

The programme enables students to develop their understandings of debates about research, evidence and practice in relation to counselling and related practices.

Distinctive features of this degree include:

integration of generic social science and discipline-specific counselling research training
social science approaches to research training in counselling
close links with social science research concerned with counselling and society
close links with social science research concerned with health, illness and health services
The degree may be taken as a free-standing MSc or as a foundation for PhD studies. Candidates must complete a programme of research training courses and submit a dissertation on an approved topic.

Teaching and learning methods
Teaching and learning methods include lectures, theory seminars, discussion groups and independent study.

Assessment is through essays and the dissertation.

Individual courses may have other learning and assessment methods such as student presentations, research projects and web-based learning.

Learning outcomes

The programme provides research training in counselling, opportunities to design research, a research-based appreciation of key elements of counselling practice, a critical appreciation of approaches to research in counselling and psychotherapy, and the ability to work across disciplinary boundaries.

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The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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This pioneering course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. Read more

Summary

This pioneering course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. It is designed for health and social care professionals, who wish to broaden their skills in assessing attachment, improve the outcome of interventions and want to conduct small or large scale research projects.

This unique programme draws on Patricia Crittenden’s Dynamic Maturational Model of attachment and we pride ourselves in taking a systemic, non- blaming culturally aware approach to the contribution attachment studies can make to alleviating human suffering. Our aim is to prepare you to be at the forefront of the next generation of attachment scholars.

You will also learn to conduct a wide range of assessment procedures and achieve clinical or research levels of reliability in analysing the results. Assessment includes physiological measures such as cortisol, EEG and heart rate variability. You will also be able to formulate intervention and treatment plans and select the therapeutic approach which is most likely to help your client.

You will develop sound foundations in attachment theory, current developments in neuro-science, research and practice, and broaden your observation and assessment skills, which are crucial to both research and practice. For example, you will observe and record human attachment in natural settings, where you will need to be aware of your own impact on the subjects you are studying. You will also be trained in the infant CARE-Index, and other procedures for screening for risk in children’s development. While attachment theory is traditionally focused on children, this course incorporates assessments of attachment applicable to older children, adults, families and wider social networks.

There is an integrated focus on practice and research, making this course invaluable for students interested in a research career in the field of attachment studies. Examples of PhD student’s research areas include the physiology of developmental trauma (PTSD) in children, attachment and family systems, the effectiveness of play therapy with traumatised children, the impact of early trauma on parents who abuse or neglect their children, and attachment in chimpanzees that are reared by humans.

Content

Initial modules will give you a historical and contemporary understanding of attachment theory, laying the groundwork for you to be able to critically evaluate the conclusions and therapeutic outcomes. You will also look at one of the most common practical procedures using attachment theory, the infant CARE-Index. This module will give you the knowledge to assesses the relationship between children, aged from 1 day to 15 months, and their carer (usually a parent or legal guardian), through a play-based framework. This procedure provides a screening tool for clinicians working with at risk families and gives a thorough grounding in the development of attachment and exploration.

In the second part of the course you learn to code the Adult Attachment Interview which assesses how adults process information about their childhood and how this impacts on their behaviour in the present. You also have the opportunity on the course to learn to implement and analyse the Strange Situation procedure, Pre-school Assessment of Attachment; Narrative Story Stems using the Child Attachment and Play Assessment and the Meaning of the Child to the Parent (a central part of parenting assessments).

Another key module will introduce you to the importance of naturalistic observation, which is the practice of observing naturally occurring behaviour, as a means of understanding human attachment. This module will focus not only on the traditional mother-child relationship, but encourage you to observe behaviour in older children, adults, family and wider systems including institutions, local and more complex communities. In building your practical observation skills, you will learn about the development of attachment in safe or typical children, and how these skills are used for the purpose of clinical assessment.

Other modules, for example the Clinical Intervention Seminars, are designed to help you understand the application of attachment theory and research in forensic settings, for example, helping you to be able to produce assessment reports, which are increasingly used in courts.

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This course is designed for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach. Read more
This course is designed for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach.

This very flexible distance learning course can be studied part-time or full-time. It attracts staff from across the UK from a variety
of settings such as parenting education, youth work, children’s centres, sexual health roles, drug abuse, housing and homelessness, youth offending, mental health, community development and domestic violence. It is also suitable for youth work and community development work practitioners seeking to explore health related topics prevalent in both generic work and
specialist health education and development projects.

Students must complete a dissertation in a health-related topic identified in discussion with academic staff. This course enables the development of innovative, progressive practitioners to reflectively engage with concepts and practices of social justice and equality.

•Suitable for qualified practitioners, with a flexible study course allowing study alongside work
•DMU holds an international reputation in the field of youth and community development
•Staff are engaged in professional practice, research, consultancy and teaching, providing you with teaching that is relevant, current and applicable to recent initiatives
•Provides an opportunity to study at an advanced academic and professional level
•High quality practice-related modules enabling practitioners and clients to achieve planned change through the process of education, development and practice-orientated research

Course modules:

The course comprises of three core modules:
•Issues of Health and Well-being (15 credits)
•Health and Social Research Methods (15 credits)
•Theory and Practice of Community Development (15 credits)

You will study up to five other modules depending on your chosen pathway. There are three pathways:
•The Generic pathway
•The Research pathway
•The Management pathway

There is plenty of opportunity to specialise on a chosen theme within modules and by using the Negotiated Module and the
Dissertation/Practice-Related Project to pursue themes in depth. A number of specialist modules are taken, these include:

First semester 15 credit modules:
•Negotiated Module
•Managing Services and People
•Anti-Oppressive Practice

Second semester modules:
•Health and Social Research Methods 2 (15 credits)
•Optional modules x 2 (select from a varied list of specialist modules)
•Dissertation (60 or 90 credits)

There are a several specialist optional modules available in each of the semesters, although some are only available biennially.

Teaching and Assessment :

The core module and most specialist modules are launched during one of two block teaching weeks held each year. These modules are supported by a wide variety of written material, individual and corporate tasks. You are required to engage in a number of online seminars in each module which is compulsory.

The course works to build a learning community, from the initial contact on selection day and in the induction periods onwards. Assessment is usually by written assignment of 4,000 words per15 credit module. Contributions to online seminars are compulsory and also an attendance requirement.

International students come to study in the UK because the quality of our teaching is among the best in the world, offering a varied selection of teaching methods to suit all learning requirements.

Expertise:

Staff in the department have more than 50 years’ experience and are one of the largest teams in the UK. They continue to work for a range of organisations that work with young people including charities, voluntary and statutory agencies at local,
national and international levels.

Thematic areas of interest include a specialist expertise and interest in global youth and community development work (resulting
in numerous conferences and publications by Dr Momodou Sallah, a leading expert in this area); work with black young
people (again, resulting in key conferences and texts by Carlton Howson and Momodou Sallah); youth participation and citizenship (including an evaluation of a Beacon Councils initiative and ongoing partnership work with the Centre for Social Action); anti-oppressive practice (Dr Jagdish Chouhan); hospital and other health-related youth work; (Dr Scott Yates) and the
context, management and operation of children and young people’s services; (Mary Tyler, and recent high profile work undertaken by visiting professors Bernard Davies and Bryan Merton). In the last five years seven books have been published by
authors in the division with a further two forthcoming titles.

Graduate Careers:

Many of our graduates go into a wide range of senior posts in community health, youth work and community development work in
both the statutory and voluntary sector, all over the world. An MA is a recommended qualification for workers who want
to hold senior positions. The MA is recognised internationally as a valid postgraduate level of study and its content is relevant for issues relating to a developing country’s health and community provision.

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This course is for experienced youth and community development work practitioners seeking to further develop their knowledge and understanding of their practice and the rapidly changing contexts in which they work. Read more
This course is for experienced youth and community development work practitioners seeking to further develop their knowledge and understanding of their practice and the rapidly changing contexts in which they work. It is also suitable for staff in local authorities, the NHS, voluntary and third sector who use group work, informal learning and activity, outreach and community work, especially those working with young people and adults often labelled as hard to reach. This very flexible distance learning course can be studied part-time or full-time. It attracts staff from across the UK from a variety of settings such as parenting education, youth work, children’s centres, sexual health roles, drug abuse, housing and homelessness, youth offending, mental health, community development and domestic violence.

This course enables the development of innovative, progressive practitioners to reflectively engage with concepts and practices of social justice and equality.
•Suitable for qualified practitioners, with a flexible study course allowing study alongside work
•D MU holds an international reputation in the field of youth and community development
•Staff are engaged in professional practice, research, consultancy and teaching, providing you with teaching that is relevant, current and applicable to recent initiatives
•Provides an opportunity to study at an advanced academic and professional level
•High quality practice-related modules enabling practitioners and clients to achieve planned change through the process of education, development and practice-orientated research
The course consists of three core modules:
•Health and Social Research Methods;
•Theory and Practice of Community Development;
•Theory and Practice of Youth Work

You will study up to five other modules depending on your chosen pathway. There are three pathways:
•The generic pathway offers the greatest flexibility
•The research pathway includes taught modules in research methods and advanced research methods, plus a 90 credit dissertation. You will consider practice-based, evaluative and academic modes of research
•On the management pathway you are required to take three management modules and complete a management-focused dissertation

You will take a number of specialist modules, these include:
First semester modules:
•Negotiated Module (15 credits) allows you to formulate, present and implement an individual proposal in an area of professional relevance and interest
•Managing Services and People (15 credits) increases self-confidence and performance as a manager of people and projects within a youth work and community development environment
•Anti-Oppressive Practice (15 credits) analyses concepts of oppression, discrimination and inequality and develops effective anti-oppressive and anti-discriminatory practice
•Health and Social Research Methods 2 (15 credits) is focused on critical deconstruction of approaches to research and evaluation.
Second semester modules:
•Health and Well-being (15 credits) introduces key concepts of health and well-being in the context of youth work and community development
•Optional modules x 2 (select from a varied list of specialist modules)
•Dissertation (60 or 90 credits)
•There are several specialist optional modules available in each of the semesters, although some are only available biennially.

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The challenges of youth and community work are constantly changing. We will help you engage with the policies and ideologies associated with this dynamic area. Read more
The challenges of youth and community work are constantly changing. We will help you engage with the policies and ideologies associated with this dynamic area.

You will examine topics such as the London riots, youth crime and alcohol and drug abuse, allowing you to understand the impact of Government policy on the lives of young people. You will study different approaches to community work and the importance of studying international issues and applying them to situations closer to home.

You will gain practical experience as you bid for funding for a real project and choose a wide variety of option modules to tailor your course to your needs.

Expert guest lecturers and staff will offer insights into the evolving nature of youth work in the UK and overseas. You will also study alongside students from a range of backgrounds, giving you a fresh perspective on every day issues.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/communityandyouth_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With an in-depth understanding of youth and community issues, you'll be able to continue your career development in a management role. Graduates from similar subjects have gone on to work with children who have been excluded from school, refugees, the homeless and in hostels. You could consider mentoring, becoming a youth worker or pursuing a role as a case worker for a charity.

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will benefit from the expertise of our staff and a range of guest lecturers. Previous speakers have included international academics who provided an insight into the differences between youth and community work here and overseas, and a member of OFSTED who spoke about the changing shape of youth work.

The broad scope of our course means you choose your own option modules from across our University, so you can tailor your course to your interests. Whether you want to find out more about criminology, spirituality, cognitive therapy, working with difference or special education needs, we'll endeavour to meet your requirements.

As an added bonus, you'll be studying alongside students from a range of different backgrounds - from new graduates to those who are already working in the community. With this exposure to different views and methods of problem solving, you'll gain a fresh perspective on the issues you deal with day to day.

Core Modules

Historical Perspectives on Youth and Community Work (Policy, Ideology & Practice)
You will get an overview of recent Government policy and its impact on professional practice, then critically analyse this in relation to the values and ethics of youth and community development.

Understanding Social Research and Evaluation
You will gain a theoretical, methodological and practical foundation for social research, enabling you to act as a social researcher to resolve practice based problems.

Management: Current Issues in Practice
Gain an understanding of the challenges faced by managers and leaders in a complex and changing professional context by understanding the tensions that exist between the values of youth and community work and approaches to management and leadership.

Dissertation
An independent piece of original advanced research that you will be expected to plan, implement and report with guidance from a supervisor.

Community Development and Learning
Explore the various models and approaches to community work, and locate them within a historical, ideological and global context. You will study key theorists and critically analyse their application to a range of practice contexts.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. Read more
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business options. You will gain practical insight and skills in a range of financial, legal and strategic management topics in the supply of international financial services as well as key Law subjects which have a direct impact on Banking practice. Case studies and contemporary issues figure prominently in the programme, particularly focusing on the lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘credit crunch’ and the issues for international financing and regulation that this has thrown up.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013. Read more
Pharmacy at Sunderland is ranked sixth in the country, according to The Guardian University Guide 2013.

Course overview

Do you want to contribute to the discovery and development of drugs that could potentially improve the health and well-being of millions of people? The UK has long been a leader in this complex technical area, in which each new drug requires around $1 billion of development work.

Our research-led teaching and state-of-the-art facilities make the University of Sunderland one of the UK's top locations for pharmaceutical science. Our strong links with the pharmaceutical industry ensure a flow of guest speakers and good contacts for your chosen Masters project/dissertation. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

The course covers advanced pharmaceutics, pharmaceutical analysis, drug design, pharmacology, proteomics and pharmacogenomics. You will also cover regulatory processes for medicines, in line with ICH guidelines. The course is a direct response to employers’ search for postgraduates who have a mix of theoretical and practical skills and who will push boundaries in drug development.

With a Masters course, it’s important to consider the relevance of the research interests of tutors who will supervise your dissertation. At Sunderland, our interests include pharmaceutical analysis, process chemistry, various drug discovery programmes, and drug delivery systems, including those for large biological pharmaceuticals. Our academic team have produced some ‘world-leading’ research, according to the latest Research Excellence Framework (2014).

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with self-directed research. The topic of the project / dissertation is negotiated to fit both your personal interests and the expertise of Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Essential Research and Study Skills (20 Credits)
-Fundamentals for Pharmaceutical Science (20 Credits)
-The Pharmaceutical R&D Cycle and its Regulation (20 Credits)

Choose four out of the five following modules
-Advanced Pharmacology (15 Credits)
-Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis (15 Credits)
-Advanced Drug Design (15 Credits)
-Advanced Pharmaceutics (15 Credits)

Choose one Masters option
-Double Project (60 Credits)
Or
-Double Dissertation (60 Credits)
Or
-Single Project (30 Credits) and Single Dissertation (30 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, open learning, laboratory work and group work.

The Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company. Previous projects have involved collaborations with companies such as AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Helena Biosciences.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working and problem solving. Assessment methods include laboratory reports, oral presentations, case studies, critical reviews, examinations and the Masters project.

Facilities & location

This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which boasts multi-disciplinary laboratories and cutting-edge equipment thanks to multi-million pound investments.

Facilities for Pharmaceutics
We have pharmaceutical-related equipment for wet granulation, spray drying, capsule filling, tablet making, mixing inhalation, film coating and freeze drying. As well as standard pharmacopoeial test methods, such as dissolution testing, friability and disintegration, we also offer highly sophisticated test methods. These include rheometry, thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy), tests for powder flow, laser diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, image analysis and laser confocal microscopy.

Facilities for Medicinal Chemistry
Our state-of-the-art spectroscopic facility allows us to confirm the structures of new molecules that could be potential pharmaceutical products and to investigate the structures of potential medicinal substances that have been isolated from plants. We are equipped with Liquid Chromatography-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy (LC-NMR/MS) platforms; this is an exceptional facility for a university. We also have low and high resolution mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and elemental analysis equipment. Our facilities allow you to gain hands-on experience of a wide range of analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy, which are of great importance in determining both ionic/metal content of pharmaceuticals and simple chemical structures respectively. You will also gain experience of revolutionary protein and DNA separation techniques, as well as Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (x8) and Gas Chromatography for separating all kinds of samples of pharmaceutical or biomedical interest.

Facilities for Pharmacology
Our highly technical apparatus will give you first-hand experience of the principles of drug action and the effects of drugs on pharmacological and cellular models. As a result, you gain a better understanding of the effects of drugs on specific receptors located throughout the human body and related physiological effects.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on pharmaceutical and biomedical science, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your studies include:
-Embase, which is a complex database covering drug research, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, toxicology, clinical and experimental human medicine, health policy and management, public health, occupational health, environmental health, drug dependence and abuse, psychiatry, forensic medicine and biomedical engineering/instrumentation
-PsycINF, which includes information about the psychological aspects of medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, pharmacology and physiology
-PubMed, which contains life science journals, online books and abstracts that cover fields such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and health care
-Science Direct, which offers more than 18,000 full-text journals published by Elsevier
-Web of Science, which covers a broad range of science areas

Learning Environment
Sunderland Pharmacy School has a rich heritage in scientific studies and our degree courses are extremely well respected in the industry. We are fully plugged into relevant medical and pharmaceutical industry bodies, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people. Your Masters project may involve collaboration with a pharmaceutical company, including working at their sites.

Employment & careers

Graduates from this course can pursue a variety of careers in the following areas; Drug Design, Pharmaceutical Analysis and Research, Pre-clinical Research in Experimental and Biological Studies, Formulation and Product Development, Pharmacogenomics and Proteomics, Clinical Research, Product Registration, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

Previous Sunderland graduates have been employed in companies such as GSK, Eisai, Reckitt Benckiser, Merck, Sharp & Dohme and Norbrook Laboratories.

Some students may apply for a PhD programme or those who already hold a Pharmacy degree can pursue MSc/PG Pharmaceutical Sciences for the Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) and go through one-year pre-registration training.

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Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record. We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests that align with those of our staff- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-social-work/. Read more
Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record. We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests that align with those of our staff- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-social-work/

We provide a thriving research environment in which the research interests of staff are enormously varied, including:

child protection
learning disability
mental health
the interconnections between domestic violence and child abuse
explorations of gender and sexuality in social care

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Jennifer Mayo-Deman.

Department

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies has human relationships at its heart

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

-understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
-become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
-change people’s lives through dance, drama and music

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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