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Creating pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' participation in planning education and community and regional planning initiatives in Northern Australia. Read more
Creating pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' participation in planning education and community and regional planning initiatives in Northern Australia.
This course addresses a large void in the education market place, namely how the planning system can support the range of 'Close the Gap’ initiatives and will educate practicing planners on how to plan with, for and in Indigenous Communities, and provide an insight into the planning system for Indigenous people.

Who is it for?

This course is well placed to support the Aboriginal and Islander Councils in Queensland, and Aboriginal Organisations and Shire Councils in the Northern Territory, and will support International Development initiatives in the Pacific and South East Asia.
On completion of this you will have gained an understanding of, and an appreciation for:
*The political, legal and institutional contexts of planning in, with and for Indigenous communities;
*The importance of Indigenous knowledge, culture and perspectives in planning processes;
*Place based planning theory and methods that legitimises and respects Indigenous people’s connection to land, flora, fauna and water;
*Indigenous peoples’ property rights and the procedures and institutions established pursuant to legislation developed by both Commonwealth and State or Territory jurisdictions;
*The concept of cultural heritage, what it means to Indigenous people;
*The involvement of Indigenous people in making decisions about cultural heritage and intellectual property rights;
*The main ethical issues and principles involved in the conduct of decision making and planning in indigenous communities.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Planning and Indigenous Communities (GCertPlanIndigComm)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Students of non-English speaking backgrounds must have an adequate English language capacity assessed under the Australian International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The IELTS score required for admission to this course is 6 (with no component lower than 5.5) or Band 1. The scores associated with each band at JCU can be found in Schedule II of the JCU Admissions policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The Department of Linguistics maintains strong links between teaching and research, with emphasis on data-driven, theoretically informed inquiry into aboriginal languages, language variation and change, and language acquisition. Read more
The Department of Linguistics maintains strong links between teaching and research, with emphasis on data-driven, theoretically informed inquiry into aboriginal languages, language variation and change, and language acquisition. Our graduate programs provide a strong foundation in core theoretical areas (phonology, syntax, morphology, etc.) and build from there. Research expertise and supervision are offered in first and second language acquisition, speech disorders as well as acoustic and articulatory phonetics, from both theoretical and experimental perspectives.

Languages of specialization include aboriginal languages of eastern Canada (Algonquian, Inuktitut, Iroquoian), as well as local varieties of English and French and their British/European origins. The department is home to several unique research projects, which students are encouraged to consider joining. The Chisasibi Child Language Acquisition Study (CCLAS), focuses on how Cree is acquired as a first language, and details of ongoing research on Cayuga can be viewed at cayugalanguage.ca. Allophony in Newfoundland English, a project focusing on speech perception and production across varieties of Newfoundland English, studies the local effects of urbanization and rapid social change. MUSL (Memorial University Sociolinguistics Laboratory) provides information about current research projects on language variation and the relationships between language and society. Three dedicated laboratories (MUSL, the Aboriginal Languages Research Laboratory and the Speech Sciences and Language Acquisition Laboratory provide space and resources needed to conduct cutting-edge research in the areas in which we offer expertise.

Languages taught within the Linguistics Department, and on which the department particularly encourages graduate research, include Algonquian (Montagnais/Naskapi, Cree), Inuktitut and Iroquoian (Cayuga). Memorial also offers a full range of courses in English, French, German, Russian and Spanish. Courses in Irish and Japanese are offered within the Linguistics Department.

The MA program offers both course and thesis options. Both can be completed in two years.

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Skillful social researchers are in high demand around the world, as organisations and government alike seek an understanding of public opinion relating to current issues or proposed changes that may affect society. Read more

Introduction

Skillful social researchers are in high demand around the world, as organisations and government alike seek an understanding of public opinion relating to current issues or proposed changes that may affect society.

Course description, features and facilities

As such, a social research degree is the perfect capstone to any undergraduate degree, or the ideal complement to any professional working across fields that use information about people. Some research applications include: how to change unhealthy behaviours; why some groups are seen as deviant; the social patterns of violence; how people are using social media; people’s feelings about immigration; the impact a new business/industry may have; how relationships have changed over time, and, of course, much more.

This course delivers highly transferrable and much sought after social research skills with a ‘hands on’ approach, giving students the skills to find information and solutions to pressing social questions. It also provides the skills needed to prepare and present much needed research findings in ways that have an impact.

Students will gain an advanced understanding of a range of research methods, as well as the skills to conduct and present research. They will obtain first-hand experience in understanding, critiquing and undertaking social research and writing up results, including crafting a research project, understanding the ethical implications, identifying sources of funding and writing funding proposals. As well as core units on methods and ethics, students can take options in cultural/ethnographic research, biostatistics, gender research, social impact assessments, Aboriginal health research, historical research, geographical information systems and much more.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

Take all units (66 points):

NS, OS EDUC5633 Quantitative Inquiry
N/A SOCS5003 Research Design and Resourcing
N/A SOCS5005 Social Research Ethics
N/A SOCS5006 Master of Social Science Research Methods Dissertation (24 points)
N/A SOCS5007 Research Paradigms
N/A SOCS5008 Qualitative Methods and Analysis
N/A SOCS5009 Innovative Social Research Methods
N/A SOCS5501 Evaluation

Take unit(s) to the value of 30 points:

S1, S2 AHEA5801 Aboriginal Health Research and Ethics
S1 ASIA4102 Issues in Researching Asia
N/A COMM4104 Strategic Communication
NS ENVT4411 Geographic Information Systems Applications
NS MGMT5514 Demonstrating Social Impact
NS MGMT5516 Social Impact: Entrepreneurs and Social Innovation
NS MGMT5517 Leadership for Social Impact
S1, S2 PUBH4401 Biostatistics I
N/A SOCS5001 Engaging Cultural Difference
N/A SOCS5002 Ethnography
N/A SOCS5004 Doing Gendered Research

Career opportunities

This course can lead to exciting careers in a range of sectors including industry, community, government, NGO and more. It is relevant for work in all areas related to business, sociology, anthropology, political science, archaeology, linguistics, communications, geography, psychology, education, community development, history, public health, tourism and other social sciences.

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This Master of Public Health course is offered by coursework and dissertation. Students can choose to pursue one of two specialisations offered - Public Health Practice, or Research Methods. Read more

Introduction

This Master of Public Health course is offered by coursework and dissertation. Students can choose to pursue one of two specialisations offered - Public Health Practice, or Research Methods.

Course description, features and facilities

Both specialisations offered within this course will provide graduates with a suitable background and generalist qualification for a career in public health research or practice.

The course provides a foundation in the research discipline of epidemiology, biostatistics, qualitative research methods, health economics and health promotion, as well as the broader social context in which public health programs are planned, delivered and evaluated.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Take all units (30 points):

S1, S2 PUBH4401 Biostatistics I
S1 PUBH4403 Epidemiology I
S2 PUBH5749 Foundations of Public Health
S2 PUBH5752 Health Systems and Economics
S1 PUBH5754 Health Promotion I

Practice specialisation

Take all units (24 points):

S2 PUBH5758 Public Health Practicum (24 points)

Take unit(s) to the value of 24 points:

Group A

S1, S2 PUBH5712 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5714 Dissertation (part-time) (24 points)

Take unit(s) to the value of 18 points:

Group B

NS AHEA5755 Aboriginal Health
S2 PAED4401 Research Conduct and Ethics
S1 PUBH5751 Disease Prevention in Population Health
NS PUBH5757 Clinical Epidemiology
NS PUBH5759 Epidemiology II
NS PUBH5761 Epidemiology and Control of Communicable Diseases
S1 PUBH5763 Leadership and Management of Health Services
S2 PUBH5769 Biostatistics II
S1 PUBH5783 Health in an Era of Environmental Change
N/A PUBH5784 Special Topics in Public Health
NS PUBH5785 Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS PUBH5802 Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5804 Food and Nutrition in Population Health
N/A PUBH5805 Qualitative Research Methods in Health
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

Research Methods specialisation

Take all units (24 points):

S2 PAED4401 Research Conduct and Ethics
NS PUBH5759 Epidemiology II
S2 PUBH5769 Biostatistics II
N/A PUBH5805 Qualitative Research Methods in Health

Take unit(s) to the value of 24 points:

Group A

S1, S2 PUBH5712 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5714 Dissertation (part-time) (24 points)

Take unit(s) to the value of 18 points:

Group B

NS AHEA5755 Aboriginal Health
S1 PUBH5751 Disease Prevention in Population Health
NS PUBH5757 Clinical Epidemiology
NS PUBH5761 Epidemiology and Control of Communicable Diseases
S1 PUBH5763 Leadership and Management of Health Services
S1 PUBH5783 Health in an Era of Environmental Change
N/A PUBH5784 Special Topics in Public Health
NS PUBH5785 Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS PUBH5802 Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5804 Food and Nutrition in Population Health
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

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This course addresses a large void in the education market place, namely how the planning system can support the range of 'Close the Gap’ initiatives and will educate practicing planners on how to plan with, for and in Indigenous Communities, and provide an insight into the planning system for Indigenous people. Read more
This course addresses a large void in the education market place, namely how the planning system can support the range of 'Close the Gap’ initiatives and will educate practicing planners on how to plan with, for and in Indigenous Communities, and provide an insight into the planning system for Indigenous people.

Who is it for?

This course is well placed to support the Aboriginal and Islander Councils in Queensland, and Aboriginal Organisations and Shire Councils in the Northern Territory, and will support International Development initiatives in the Pacific and South East Asia.
On completion of this you will have gained an understanding of, and an appreciation for:
*The political, legal and institutional contexts of planning in, with and for Indigenous communities;
*The importance of Indigenous knowledge, culture and perspectives in planning processes;
*Place based planning theory and methods that legitimises and respects Indigenous people’s connection to land, flora, fauna and water;
*Indigenous peoples’ property rights and the procedures and institutions established pursuant to legislation developed by both Commonwealth and State or Territory jurisdictions;
*The concept of cultural heritage, what it means to Indigenous people;
*The involvement of Indigenous people in making decisions about cultural heritage and intellectual property rights;
*The main ethical issues and principles involved in the conduct of decision making and planning in indigenous communities.

This course is available to International students via distance or external education only.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Planning and Indigenous Communities (GCertPlanIndigComm)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Students of non-English speaking backgrounds must have an adequate English language capacity assessed under the Australian International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The IELTS score required for admission to this course is 6 (with no component lower than 5.5) or Band 1. The scores associated with each band at JCU can be found in Schedule II of the JCU Admissions policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

Read less
This course addresses a large void in the education market place, namely how the planning system can support the range of 'Close the Gap’ initiatives and will educate practicing planners on how to plan with, for and in Indigenous Communities, and provide an insight into the planning system for Indigenous people. Read more
This course addresses a large void in the education market place, namely how the planning system can support the range of 'Close the Gap’ initiatives and will educate practicing planners on how to plan with, for and in Indigenous Communities, and provide an insight into the planning system for Indigenous people.

Who is it for?

This course is well placed to support the Aboriginal and Islander Councils in Queensland, and Aboriginal Organisations and Shire Councils in the Northern Territory, and will support International Development initiatives in the Pacific and South East Asia.
On completion of this you will have gained an understanding of, and an appreciation for:
*The political, legal and institutional contexts of planning in, with and for Indigenous communities;
*The importance of Indigenous knowledge, culture and perspectives in planning processes;
*Place based planning theory and methods that legitimises and respects Indigenous people’s connection to land, flora, fauna and water;
*Indigenous peoples’ property rights and the procedures and institutions established pursuant to legislation developed by both Commonwealth and State or Territory jurisdictions;
*The concept of cultural heritage, what it means to Indigenous people;
*The involvement of Indigenous people in making decisions about cultural heritage and intellectual property rights;
*The main ethical issues and principles involved in the conduct of decision making and planning in indigenous communities.

This course is available to International students via distance or external education only.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Planning and Indigenous Communities (GCertPlanIndigComm)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Students of non-English speaking backgrounds must have an adequate English language capacity assessed under the Australian International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The IELTS score required for admission to this course is 6 (with no component lower than 5.5) or Band 1. The scores associated with each band at JCU can be found in Schedule II of the JCU Admissions policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development. A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). Read more
Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development.

A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). The only MBA program in the Americas with community at its core; one that delivers advanced business knowledge and skills to make a difference in the local and global community.

Our one-of-a kind MBA in CED is designed for a new generation of leaders; for learners who aspire to be instruments of change in the public and corporate sectors and in not-for-profit organizations. Our MBA in CED offers a leading edge curriculum that includes all business subjects found in traditional MBA programs, with an emphasis on economic development, leadership, governance, and management of change. Specializing options include electives in Strategic Leadership, Peace Building, Public Administration, First Nations, Sustainability or International Business.

About Our MBA

Flexible delivery: Our MBA in CED fits with your busy life. We offer flexible delivery formats including short, on campus residencies in July and weekend classes in Toronto, Kingston, Saskatoon, Edmonton, or Whitehorse. Full time students can complete the program at our Sydney campus over a 12-month period.

Accessible: Cape Breton University’s MBA in CED is flexible. It is open to those starting their careers and to experienced managers. Our program works well for those who have completed an undergrad program, (not just business) and for those who have extensive business and community experience, but without formal academic credentials. For those who already have a degree in business or commerce, credits may be applied for as many as four foundation courses.

Nationally Recognized Faculty: Faculty members have strong backgrounds in teaching, business and community economic development, in addition to holding high academic credentials. Our faculty are award-winning teachers and includes honorees of the prestigious Order of Canada.

Research Focus: CBU’s MBA program includes a core Research Methodology course and the completion of an applied research project. Preparing this research component enables our students to compete for the coveted $17.5K SSHRC Canada Graduate Studies scholarships or continue their studies in a PhD program. A number of our full-time students have been successful in winning scholarships while others are now enrolled in a PhD program.

Diversity: Our MBA in CED attracts a large number of women, aboriginals and non-business graduates from Canada and around the world.

At the core of this unique program is community. Cape Breton Island is rooted in community-based efforts that overcome obstacles, face difficulties with creativity and use innovation to solve age-old problems. The island heritage includes community economic development giants like Father Jimmy Tompkins, founder of the co-operative and credit union movement in English Canada and is home to growing community ventures like New Dawn Enterprises – the oldest community economic development corporation in Canada.

It is a heritage Cape Breton University is proud to continue.

Options

Strategic Leadership Option
Leadership techniques for advancing organizations and communities; challenges in making changes in an existing organization and understanding the dynamics with various leadership theories and styles.
-MBAC6219 Social Dynamics of Leadership
-MBAC6233 Contemporary Issues: Change Management and Governance

First Nations Option
Delves into community economic development issues facing Indigenous communities across the country. For Aboriginal and non-aboriginal learners.
-MBAC6209 Land Claims, Self-Government and CED
-MBAC6211 The Dynamics of Community Economic Development in First Nations

International Business Option
Advanced content and strategies needed to grow the global organization; builds on modules in the core International Business course.
-MBAC6228 International Marketing
-MBAC6226 International Finance

Peace-Building, Reconstruction and Good-Governance Option
These courses are designed to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the role of CED in dealing with local and national emergencies and the role of CED in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict restoration activities.
-MBAC6215 Emergency Management
-MBAC6217 Conflict Resolution and Community Reconstruction

Public Policy
-MBAC 6221 Public Policy
-MBAC 6223 Government, Business and Third Sector Relations

Sustainability
-MBAC 6227 Environment, Energy, and the Economy: strategies for sustainable futures
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing

Marketing (2 courses)
-MBAC 6206 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6228 International Marketing
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing
-MBAC 6231 Marketing Strategy

Tourism
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6206 Tourism Management & Planning

What to Expect

As a career professional, you have developed an expertise in your field. You have a comprehensive understanding, study the trends and see opportunities that others with less experience, often miss.

An MBA in CED from the Shannon School of Business at Cape Breton University will highlight the interaction between community and business and expose you to development practices and advanced management concepts and skills in a whole new way.

Our graduates are prepared for senior leadership roles. Utilizing their previously acquired professional expertise blended with a new, broad, general management perspective, means decision-making skills are integrated across their entire organization. Courses demand critical analysis and include deliverables, such as marketing plans, business models and plans, development of community plans and organizational strategy.

Program depth-and-breadth characteristics:
-Program requires completion of 16 courses, including an individual research project, 48 credits in total
-Program curriculum focuses on the critical areas for performance of organizations: accounting, marketing, strategy, finance, organizational behavior, leadership, venture analysis
-Core curriculum includes subjects that provide insights in community economic development, such as comparative development, business and community development, economic geography
-Core program has an intense research component, typically found in social science graduate programs, requiring completion of a research methods course and an individual applied research project, accompanied by a mini-thesis of 70-90 pages.
-Curriculum allows for 2 elective courses that provide specialization in First Nations urban and rural economic development, peace-building and community reconstruction, strategic leadership or international business.
-Courses require application of theory and concepts into practical objectives such as marketing plans and business models.
-The classes are often a mixture of early career and mid-career managers. This provides for a unique experience of enriching exchanges of knowledge and ideas. In-class and after-class interaction among students and faculty creates an environment of critical reflection.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.
- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.
- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.
- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.
- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.
- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Quality label

This programme was recently awarded the quality label ‘Top Programme' in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:
- Scientific research career (academia)
The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career
Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More
Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science
For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:
- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.
- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.
- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

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This Master of Public Health program is offered by coursework only. The Public Health Practice specialisation offered provides graduates with the skills and knowledge required to move into a wide range of health related industries. Read more

Introduction

This Master of Public Health program is offered by coursework only. The Public Health Practice specialisation offered provides graduates with the skills and knowledge required to move into a wide range of health related industries.

Course description, features and facilities

This course provides a foundation in the research discipline of epidemiology, biostatistics, health economics and health promotion, as well as the broader social context in which public health programs are planned, delivered and evaluated.

It also provides an opportunity for the student to undertake a period of supervised practice within a public health context.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Take all units (54 points):

Group A

S1, S2 PUBH4401 Biostatistics I
S1 PUBH4403 Epidemiology I
S2 PUBH5749 Foundations of Public Health
S2 PUBH5752 Health Systems and Economics
S1 PUBH5754 Health Promotion I
S2 PUBH5758 Public Health Practicum (24 points)

Take unit(s) to a value of 12 points from Group B and unit(s) to a value of 30 points from Group C; or take unit(s) to a value of 42 points from Group C:

Group B

S1, S2 PUBH5701 Public Health Project (full-time) (12 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5703 Public Health Project (part-time) (12 points)

Group C

NS AHEA5755 Aboriginal Health
S2 PAED4401 Research Conduct and Ethics
S1 PUBH5751 Disease Prevention in Population Health
NS PUBH5757 Clinical Epidemiology
NS PUBH5759 Epidemiology II
NS PUBH5761 Epidemiology and Control of Communicable Diseases
S1 PUBH5763 Leadership and Management of Health Services
S2 PUBH5769 Biostatistics II
S1 PUBH5783 Health in an Era of Environmental Change
N/A PUBH5784 Special Topics in Public Health
NS PUBH5785 Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS PUBH5802 Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5804 Food and Nutrition in Population Health
N/A PUBH5805 Qualitative Research Methods in Health
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

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This degree offers people the opportunity to move into a wide range of health-related industries. Read more

Introduction

This degree offers people the opportunity to move into a wide range of health-related industries.

Course description, features and facilities

The Master of Public Health provides a foundation in the research disciplines of epidemiology, biostatistics, health economics and health promotion, as well as the broader social context in which public health programs are planned, delivered and evaluated.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

Students in the course by coursework and dissertation take units to the value of 24 points from Group A and units to the value of 18 points from Group C.

Students in the course by coursework take:
(a) units to the value of 12 points from Group B and units to the value of 30 points from Group C; or
(b) units to the value of 42 points from Group C.

Take all units (30 points):

S1, S2 PUBH4401 Biostatistics I
S1 PUBH4403 Epidemiology I
S2 PUBH5749 Foundations of Public Health
S2 PUBH5752 Health Systems and Economics
S1 PUBH5754 Health Promotion I

Group A

S1, S2 PUBH5712 Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5714 Dissertation (part-time) (24 points)

Group B

S1, S2 PUBH5701 Public Health Project (full-time) (12 points)
S1, S2 PUBH5703 Public Health Project (part-time) (12 points)

Group C

NS AHEA5755 Aboriginal Health
N/A PUBH5742 Fundamentals of Genetic Epidemiology
S1 PUBH5751 Disease Prevention in Population Health
NS PUBH5757 Clinical Epidemiology
NS PUBH5761 Epidemiology and Control of Communicable Diseases
S1 PUBH5763 Leadership and Management of Health Services
N/A PUBH5765 Health Promotion II
N/A PUBH5766 Health Survey Research Methods
S2 PUBH5769 Biostatistics II
S1 PUBH5783 Health in an Era of Environmental Change
N/A PUBH5784 Special Topics in Public Health
NS PUBH5785 Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5801 Economic Evaluation of Health Care
NS PUBH5802 Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data
NS PUBH5804 Food and Nutrition in Population Health
N/A PUBH5805 Qualitative Research Methods in Health
NS RMED4403 Health Program Evaluation

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Audiology is the clinical science involving the prevention, assessment and rehabilitation of hearing loss and associated communication disorders. Read more

Introduction

Audiology is the clinical science involving the prevention, assessment and rehabilitation of hearing loss and associated communication disorders.

UWA's Master of Clinical Audiology course is one of only five university audiology programs offered in Australia. The course provides students with extensive supervised clinical placements in a variety of workplace settings. Employment prospects for Audiologists who graduate from UWA are excellent both within Australia and overseas. Graduates are eligible for full membership of the Audiological Society of Australia.

The Master of Clinical Audiology has an intake every second year, in even years. The next intake of students will commence in January 2016. Applications will open in September 2015.

Course description, features and facilities

UWA's Auditory Laboratory has been internationally recognised for more than 30 years for the excellence of its research into the fundamental physiological processes of both normal hearing and hearing impairment.

Students taking the Master of Clinical Audiology at UWA will be taught by highly trained and skilled staff with first hand experience of the latest developments in hearing science. All students will have the opportunity to carry out audiology research in this exciting environment. The staff are world-renowned researchers in this field and have a great deal of experience in teaching at the undergraduate and postgraduate level.

The Faculty of Science offers Master's by Coursework bursaries for domestic students and Postgraduate Merit scholarships for international students. Please visit the Faculty of Science website for details.

Professional recognition

The Master of Clinical Audiology is accredited by the Audiological Australia and graduates are eligible for membership.

Career opportunities

Audiologists are hearing health care professionals responsible for the assessment and management of individuals with hearing, communication and balance problems. They provide clinical services in hospitals, community health centres, hearing aid clinics, and in some medical practices.

Many audiologists are involved in research, helping to develop new behavioural and electrophysiological test techniques, cochlear implants, hearing aids and hearing health therapies. Some audiologists work in community and workplace settings including programs aimed at reducing the prevalence and impact of middle ear disease in rural and remote aboriginal communities, newborn hearing screening programs and hearing conservation programs in industry.

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The Master of Social Work (Professional Qualifying) enables students with an existing undergraduate degree to undertake study leading to a professionally accredited social work degree, recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers. Read more
The Master of Social Work (Professional Qualifying) enables students with an existing undergraduate degree to undertake study leading to a professionally accredited social work degree, recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers.
Students will develop knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice in a range of practice fields, and the course has a very strong practical component, with students completing two field education placements.
The course offers maximum study flexibility with a range of delivery modes. Students studying in limited attendance mode are supported through print and online materials as well as annual, compulsory, on-campus residential workshops.
Students with significant social welfare and human services experience may be eligible for Recognition of Prior Learning for one field education placement.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Social Work (PQ), graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate understanding of an advanced and integrated body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying values, ethics, theories, research principles and methods, professional practice and workplace contexts in the social work discipline
*Reflect critically on the unique, complex and contemporary relationships between social work and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and their diverse histories and cultures
*Reflect critically on the impact of complex social, political and historical issues on environmental and social sustainability in Australia and internationally, with a focus on the tropics
*Investigate, analyse critically and transform complex social systems, institutions, structures, processes, practices and inequities
*Consolidate, synthesise, research and evaluate recent developments in social policy and evidence to devise practical and knowledge solutions that reduce social barriers, inequalities and injustice
*Interpret and communicate, to specialist and non-specialist audiences, theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions in the social work discipline through advanced literacy, numeracy and technological skills
*Design, plan and execute a substantial research based project
*Manage service provision and professional practice to engage with and enable individuals, groups and communities to achieve social and environmental justice
*Apply and adapt expert and specialised professional practice knowledge and skills, autonomously and in collaboration with others, to address social barriers, inequity and injustice across diverse contexts
*Demonstrate creativity and initiative, and expert judgement and adaptability in engagement, planning, decision-making, problem-solving, provision and evaluation of specialist advice and functions, to achieve practice, organisational, policy and/or system level outcomes
*Demonstrate high-level responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional development.

Award title

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (PROFESSIONAL QUALIFYING) MSW(PQ)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3c - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 7.0), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3c – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

Students will have access to The Cairns Institute – an important centre for national and international scholars. It brings together the expertise and intellectual resources of more than 20 academic disciplines, creating a uniquely robust and relevant research, consulting, training and teaching hub for Northern Australia, South and South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Learn how to critically analyse financial and economic data and plan fiscal activity. Subjects successfully completed in this flexible program can be credited towards the Master of Professional Accounting. Read more
Learn how to critically analyse financial and economic data and plan fiscal activity. Subjects successfully completed in this flexible program can be credited towards the Master of Professional Accounting.
Accounting is a vital function within all organisations, and provides the key financial information that enables private and public sector organisations to take economic decisions and plan their activities effectively.
Our postgraduate accounting courses provide training in the key areas of accounting and finance, while the addition of subjects such as business law and economics arms you with the expertise required for a modern accounting career.
Subjects successfully completed can be credited towards the Master of Professional Accounting.

Course learning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
In the context of a JCU graduate on successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Accounting students will be able to:
*Critically analyse accounting-related knowledge and practice from both historical and recent perspectives
*Consolidate the application of differing accounting performance reporting and monitoring methods
*Synthesise sustainable economic, social and environmental practices and value systems
*Integrate theoretical and technical accounting knowledge which includes a selection of auditing and assurance, finance, economics, quantitative methods, information systems, commercial law, corporation law and taxation law
*Apply established concepts to provide solutions to complex business and professional practice problems
*Critically analyse contemporary business issues using appropriate models and make reasoned recommendations
*Present complex information appropriately to both accountants and non-accountants using:
*Effective oral presentation skills
*Clear and fluent written communication
*Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively and effectively in achieving common goals
*Adapt sustainable accounting constructs and skills to theoretical or practical situations
*Exercise independent judgment to solve routine accounting problems in diverse contexts using social, ethical, economic, regulatory and global perspectives
*Seek and reflect on performance feedback to identify and action learning opportunities and self-improvements.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Accounting (GCertAcc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the requirements for the Graduate Certificate of Accounting are eligible for entry to the Master of Professional Accounting or the Graduate Diploma of Accounting, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.
JCU awards used for articulation as outlined above will be required to be surrendered before the higher level award is conferred.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University professional programs are internationally recognised and teaching staff are often research leaders in their fields.
In an effort to offer you flexibility, the School’s accounting programs are offered after hours in Cairns and Townsville with intensive weekend workshops.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Our Graduate Certificate of Business Administration provides you with advanced knowledge, understanding and the analytical skills required for modern managing. Read more

Better equipped for modern managing

Our Graduate Certificate of Business Administration provides you with advanced knowledge, understanding and the analytical skills required for modern managing.
In this course disciplines of the following sectors are used to understand the key themes that confront all managers and organisations:
*Economics;
*Finance
*Marketing
*Human resource management
*Accounting
*Business law
*Information technology
*Strategy and leadership
*Statistics.

Who is this course for?

This program is ideal for those seeking a shorter course in Business Administration or for those who wish to progress to a Master of Business Administration incrementally.

Course learning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Business Administration, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Critically analyse business-related knowledge and practice from both historical and recent perspectives
*Consolidate the application of differing sustainable business performance methods
*Synthesise sustainable economic, social and environmental practices and value systems
*Apply established concepts to provide solutions to complex business and professional practice problems
*Critically analyse contemporary business issues using appropriate models and make reasoned recommendations
*Apply creative and innovative thinking effectively to business practice
*Present complex information appropriately to differing audiences using:
*Effective oral presentation skills
*Clear and fluent written communication
*Work effectively in achieving common goals, demonstrating both:
*Collaboration
*Leadership
*Adapt sustainable business constructs and skills to theoretical or practical situations
*Exercise independent ethical judgment in solving differing business problems creatively
*Demonstrate a capacity for personal reflection and self-development in relation to professional business learning and practice.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (GCertBusAdmin)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Business Administration are eligible for entry to the Master of Business Administration.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University professional programs are internationally recognised and teaching staff are often research leaders in their fields.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Become a qualified Information Technology professional and be part of one of the world's fastest growing industries. Advancing your skills and knowledge with our Graduate Certificate of Information Technology will give you the edge on other graduates embarking on a career in this exciting field. Read more
Become a qualified Information Technology professional and be part of one of the world's fastest growing industries.

Get the edge

Advancing your skills and knowledge with our Graduate Certificate of Information Technology will give you the edge on other graduates embarking on a career in this exciting field.

Who is this course for?

This course is for graduates from Information Technology, Computer Science or related fields who want to further their knowledge and skills.

Course l earning outcomes

JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Information Technology, JCU graduates will be able to:
*Analyse to select appropriate tools and technologies to meet project requirements
*Consolidate industry standard contexts for project management approaches
*Advance knowledge of technologies and networking methods
*Synthesise legal and ethical issues including scope of liability and digital rights management
*Communicate technical information clearly through presentations, demonstrations and documentation
*Use independent judgment to synthesise information to solving IT issues
*Demonstrate a capacity to reflect on progress to tailor self-learning goals for professional development.

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (GCertInfTech)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Information Technology are eligible for entry to the Master of Information Technology or joint Master of Information Technology-Master of Business Administration.

[[Entry requirements (Additional)
English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency r equirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University professional programs are internationally recognised and teaching staff are often research leaders in their fields.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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