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The Master of Arts in American Studies (MAS) at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) is a preeminent interdisciplinary program aimed at talented and ambitious graduate students from around the world. Read more

Master of Arts in American Studies

The Master of Arts in American Studies (MAS) at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) is a preeminent interdisciplinary program aimed at talented and ambitious graduate students from around the world. The MAS is a three semester program, however, a performance-related fast track option (two semesters) is available.
The program offers exemplary and interdisciplinary teaching that provides students with in-depth cultural knowledge about the United States of America, combined with a unique outside perspective. The curriculum includes a selection of courses from economics, geography, history, law, literature, political science, religious studies, and sociology. MAS students will benefit both from excellent academic teaching by internationally renowned scholars and from an interdisciplinary approach that meets the needs of future leaders. The MAS program is taught in English.

Application deadline is March 31st.

Study at a world-class research university

Become part of a premier institute for interdisciplinary research at Germany‘s oldest university; an ideal combination of innovation and tradition. Heidelberg was recently declared one of Germany‘s elite institutions of higher learning.

Enjoy our beautiful campus

The University is spread across the 800-year-old historic city center and a newer campus area north of the Neckar River. The HCA is located in a 300-year-old baroque townhouse just steps away from the University Library and the main lecture halls. This setting offers perfect working conditions as well as a welcoming atmosphere for students, scholars, and the public.

Join an international learning community

Heidelberg is home to over 30,000 full-time students, including more than 6,000 international students. Students from almost 44 countries have participated in the MAS program over the past four years. Heidelberg University also attracts aound 250 international scholars as Visiting Professors each academic year.

Benefit from faculty expertise

First-class academics from various disciplines teach in the MAS. You will have access to distinguished scholars from the departments of English and American Literature, Geography, History, Law, Philosophy, Political Science, Theology, and Religious Studies, as well as their departmental libraries.

Enjoy a first-rate library

Along with 6.2 million books, the university library system boasts over 8,000 journals in print, more than 100,000 electronic journals, almost 400,000 E-books, more than 900,000 dissertations, and offers access more than 3,000 databases.

Access outstanding research facilities

Our students conduct research at globally renowned institutions such as the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, a United Nations depository library, and the Schurman Library for American History.

Experience Heidelberg

There is no better place to spend your year abroad! Set in the picturesque Neckar Valley Heidelberg’s beautiful historic center offers a romantic small town atmosphere with a cosmopolitan appeal. Enjoy easy access to the nearby cultural and recreational offerings such as the Black Forest and spectacular castles. With the new express train, Paris is only three hours away. A trip to Strasbourg and the Alsace takes less than an hour. Switzerland and the Alps are a mere two hours to the south.

For further information on the MAS program and the application procedure, please check out website: http://www.hca.uni-heidelberg.de/ma/index_en.html

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This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations. Read more

MAS in International and European Security

09 October 2017 - 25 May 2018

This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations.

Participants will benefit from the expertise of over 100 highly qualified academics, experienced diplomats, government officials and distinguished practitioners from around the world. It is designed to advance participants' knowledge base and through practical application demonstrates its relevance to the implementation of effective and sustainable policies, which contribute to global peace and stability.

Programme Aims:

Enhance participant understandings of peace and stability in national, ‘world-regional’ and global contexts by:
• Identifying and characterizing strategic threats to peace and stability;
• Analysing the changing nature of actors that seek to manage existing and emergent threats;
• Assessing the efficiency and effectiveness of current policy responses and debating possible future alternative policy options

The MAS provides not just space for academic reflection, but also provides participants with skills, knowledge and networksenabling participants to constructively and critically inform policy debates and discourse by:
• Engaging in and influencing decision-making,
• Enhancing their professional development and institutional capacity,
• Leveraging their strengthened skills, knowledge and networks for collaborative leadership and cooperative solutions

Full Accreditation

Participants who complete the programme successfully will be awarded a 60 ECTS Master of Advanced Studies in International and European Security by the University of Geneva and the GCSP. It has also received the highest level of accreditation awarded to degrees in Switzerland by the AAQ. As a result, the MAS degree receives automatic equivalence in most countries worldwide.

Module 1: The Foundations of International Security

This module will provide an introduction and analysis of challenges and actors that shape the security context, such as the growing environment, economy and energy nexus, international law, human security and globalisation. It will enable participants to identify the range of structural and systemic dynamics that shape our understanding of the strategic context, linking different schools of thought and levels of analysis to practice.

Module 2: Actors and Issues in International Security

This module enhances participant understanding of security policy through a focus on the evolving role of traditional and emerging international security leaders, in addition to conflict management and transnational security challenges. These will be considered both from a hard and human security perspective. It will also expose them to a wide range of readings and specialist speakers, both scholars and practitioners.

Module 3: Regional & Global Security

This module will concentrate on cooperative and competitive dynamics in emerging regions such as sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; conditions in South Asia; and developments in China and the Asia-Pacific region. It will build upon the analysis of challenges,actors and responses in the first two modules within the context of emerging regions.

Module 4: Issues and Concepts in International Security

This interdisciplinary module consists of a number of lectures and research methods seminars held throughout the entire nine-month period. Issues in international security are theoretically analysed within a multidisciplinary approach i.e. history, economics, law, political science and political philosophy. The conceptual lectures academically complement and reinforce the more practical and policy-orientated teaching and seminar work of the first three Modules. They broaden and deepen participant appreciation of the relationships between International Relations as an academic discipline and international relations as a daily practice.

Module 5: Research Paper (10-12000 words)

Under the supervision of professors from both the University and the GCSP, participants will write a research paper on a security policy-related topic. This module allows participants to develop their ability to write a research paper incorporating the lessons learned during the first four modules, and from individual and group analytical work. To provide the opportunity to demonstrate an ability to select useful sources and literature for structured research through pertinent and scientifically valid arguments, in accordance with academic standards.

Please note the themes addressed in the modules may be subject to revision.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Candidates will be selected on the basis of an application which should consist of the following:

•A letter of motivation (800 words max).
•An up-to-date Curriculum Vitae.
•A copy of relevant university degree(s).
•Two letters of recommendation.
•A writing sample of 1500 words (verified with an anti-plagiarism software) on either:
What is the purpose and relevance of reforming the United Nations Security Council? Or
Has the world’s global transformation of authoritarian regimes reached a turning point?”

DEADLINE: 01 May 2017

Please note that places are limited.

For additional information, please contact:

http://www.unige.ch/formcont/mas-security.html

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The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a 21 month programme that prepares graduates for professional social work practice with children and families, and with adult service users. Read more
The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a 21 month programme that prepares graduates for professional social work practice with children and families, and with adult service users. It is run in partnership with local service providers in the statutory and voluntary sectors, and with service users and carers who contribute to all stages of the programme. Following successful completion of the MSW students are eligible to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration as a social worker, a protected title in the UK.

The Durham MSW offers excellent learning experiences facilitated by leading social work researchers and educators, including academics and social work practitioners as well as children, young people and adults who have experience of accessing social work services. The first year of the programme includes opportunities for joint learning with students undertaking MAs in ‘International Social Work and Community Development’ and ‘Community and Youth Work’. We have strong partnerships with a wide range of practice agencies offering high quality placements. Durham MSW graduates have excellent employment prospects.

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1

-Social Work in Practice (40 credits)
-Social Work in Context (40 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Social Work in Practice 1(50 credits)

Year 2

-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Advanced Social Work (30 credits)
-Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits)

Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There is approximately twelve weeks vacation including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice with children and adults, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment
Modules are assessed through essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, all students undergo a practical assessment of their readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by a practice educator and through critically reflective accounts of case studies of work with individuals, groups or communities. Research in Professional Practice is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements
Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.

Other admission requirements

-GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English grade C or above, or equivalent, at the time of application.
-Applicants must have sufficient recent experience (in employment, as a volunteer, as a service user or carer) in a social care, health care or related voluntary setting to be able to demonstrate an understanding of the capabilities of a social worker as indicated at the entry level of the Professional Capabilities Framework. As a guideline, this period of experience is unlikely to be less than six months.
-Applicants for whom English is not a first language will be required to demonstrate evidence of English Language Competence equivalent to IELTS 7 with no element less than 6.5.

You will also be required to:
-Attend an interview*.
-Demonstrate fitness to undergo social work training.

A. At the interview stage you are asked to declare any health conditions or disabilities that may affect your ability to undertake a practice placement safely and effectively.
B. Upon acceptance of a firm offer on the course, you are asked to complete an occupational health screening in line with national guidelines agreed with relevant professional bodies.
C. Provide evidence that you do not have a criminal record that might restrict your opportunities to work with children or vulnerable adults. Candidates will be required as a condition of admission to undertake, or provide evidence of, a current DBS check.

*Candidates who are based overseas and cannot attend an interview in person may be interviewed remotely and should contact the admissions secretary if necessary to seek advice.

The Admissions Tutor gives equal consideration to all applications received before the UCAS January deadline, in accordance with UCAS regulations and University policy. However, we start assessing applications and interviewing from November onwards, in order to meet the required timescales. It is, therefore, advisable to make an early application.

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This MA will develop your skills and creative vision in documentary production. It enhances your understanding of the historical context and contemporary modes of documentary production against a backdrop of the wider issues in media production- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-filmmaking-screen-documentary/. Read more
This MA will develop your skills and creative vision in documentary production. It enhances your understanding of the historical context and contemporary modes of documentary production against a backdrop of the wider issues in media production- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-filmmaking-screen-documentary/

This Masters, a pathway of the MA Filmmaking, will encourage your understanding of the politics, aesthetics and ethics of documentary production, and the nature and diversity of documentary practice in contemporary society.

What we offer

The programme is housed in a new purpose-built media facility equipped with state-of-the art teaching spaces including a range of digital cameras, Avid Media Composer, Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Film Editing suites, Animation, Digital Special Effects, Pro Tools Audio Postproduction suites.

You will be able to make your own documentaries, learning and refining research, interviewing, self-shooting and editing techniques – but also have the unique opportunity to be part of a programme that includes specialised producers, cinematographers, editors, sound recordists and sound designers, so that you can develop the scope and range of your filmmaking by collaborating with them.

You work on at least two films during the year, culminating in a major production towards the end of the degree. In addition you can attend classes in related disciplines such as Cinematography and Editing and may collaborate with students across other specialisations on film projects. This framework is designed to provide you with a breadth of filmmaking knowledge combined with a high level of expertise in your chosen filmmaking discipline.

The MA encourages you to develop:

an awareness of documentary production techniques, ethics and aesthetics
specific filmmaking and production management skills
technical skills (including camera, lighting and sound editing)
an understanding of the workings of the media and their broad cultural and social impacts

Our former students have gone on to win awards including:

Best Documentary at the Exposures Film Festival
Postgraduate Factual Prize at the Royal Television Society Student Awards
Student Award at the One World Media Awards
They've also launched their own film festivals, worked on critically acclaimed films and documentaries, and have had their work screened at the London International Documentary Festival, National Geographic's All Roads Film Festival and Open City, the London Documentary Festival.

Our students say...

"From first-hand coaching from industry experts, access to the newest facilities and cameras, to fantastic mentoring – it was the perfect course to develop my skills and prepare me for a career in documentary filmmaking."
"The different theory courses provided both the history and ethics when filming documentary as well as providing artistic inspiration to approach reality in an innovative way."

Quality

The MA is one of only two MAs in the UK to receive the Creative Skillset tick. The tick is a kitemark of quality that identifies a course that will effectively prepare you for a career in the creative industries, and which benefits from strong links with industry.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Daisy Asquith.

Modules & Structure

How you will learn

You will be taught the skills to be able to self-shoot and edit, but will also have the chance to work with specialised camera-people, editors and producers. You complete several short films and exercises, then make your own 15-25 minute documentary, during which you will fully explore research methods, visual and thematic storytelling, experimental and multi-platform formats and much more.

For two terms you will spend a full day a week in specialised contact with your specific programme convenor, plus a further day in Screen Lab working with colleagues across the programme in a Talent Campus-style project-led learning structure with:

Masterclasses
Pitches
Role-plays
Exercises aimed at using your skills specialism in a variety of live shoot situations
You will also have a variety of research projects to undertake, as well as other module options.

Screen Lab

You will also advance your collaborative skills by working in teams with both fiction and documentary producers and cinematography, sound and edit students, on a variety of projects and at least three scheduled films across the year.

You will leave the programme with a diverse portfolio of work that may span a variety of formats – essay or diary film, web and multi-platform content, activist or campaign film, longer form feature-documentary

Screen School options

As well as your Screen Documentary specialism, you will undertake three short courses to enhance your other skills and critical approaches.

Skills & Careers

If you are passionate about fashioning an exciting career for yourself as a filmmaker in an environment that promotes innovative filmmaking, this course is for you.

Our alumni are active in the film, media and cultural industries around the world, working and winning awards as documentary producers and directors.

Other entry requirements

Please note that unless you are exempted (Please check your status with our Admissions Team: ) overseas students require an English language qualification of IELTS 7.0 in order to be considered for a place on the MA Filmmaking programme.

If you have not yet achieved IELTS 7.0, we advise you to sit your IELTS exam at the earliest opportunity and to submit your application immediately after receiving your result. The annual IELTS deadline for the programme is April 30th.

Because funding deadlines and requirements vary around the world, applications are considered on a rolling basis and places on the programme fill up across the recruitment cycle. For this reason, we strongly advise you to submit your completed application as early as you can.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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All PGCE applicants for 2014 entry will need to pass pre-entry Professional Skills Tests in Numeracy and Literacy. The Department of Education have indicated there will be notable changes to the structure and content of 2013 tests, but have not yet confirmed details of these changes. Read more
All PGCE applicants for 2014 entry will need to pass pre-entry Professional Skills Tests in Numeracy and Literacy. The Department of Education have indicated there will be notable changes to the structure and content of 2013 tests, but have not yet confirmed details of these changes. We advise applicants to monitor http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into-teaching for updates.

Some experience of observation in a mainstream secondary state school (For further information go to http://www.tda.org.uk)

Knowledge of physics in the science curriculum and a capability in mathematics.

The ability to communicate clearly, fluently and accurately in spoken and standard written English.

A Disclosure and Barring Service Check and DfE Fitness to Teach test are also required.


The Faculty of Education has a national reputation for high quality initial teacher training which was rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted in their last inspection. We work with over 1,500 schools, colleges and educational organisations and offer a wide range of of secondary specialisms.

Our PGCE Physics with Mathematics is aimed at students who show an aptitude in both subjects and who wish to combine the skills of two shortage areas. The course is delivered by both the Science and Mathematics faculties and, on completion, trainees will be able to teach Physics 11-19 and Mathematics to at least KS3.

We particularly welcome applicants from a variety of Science and Engineering backgrounds who feel that they have the skills to inspire young people and teach successfully in a very important area of the curriculum.

Physics and Maths teaching are stated government priorities nationally and therefore attractive bursaries are available to support your training.

This course will be based at our £139 million new academic building at Birley Fields, All Saints campus in Manchester city centre. Further details at http://www.mmu.ac.uk/education/birleyfields


We will offer a range of teaching opportunities which we believe will enhance the training experience. Support throughout is provided through a university tutor as well as a school mentor and the delivery will be by a combination of school based training and classroom experience.

Subject knowledge enhancement courses in Physics (6 months and 2 week booster) will be available to ensure that trainees are fully familiar with the content of the school curriculum.

We aim to develop analytical, successful and enthusiastic beginning teachers who are fully aware of the excitement and challenges which lie ahead and who can work effectively in a variety of educational settings.

Trainees will engage with current educational issues and recent and relevant research in order to further develop their understanding and to generate challenging and lively debate. There will be a focus on:

Promoting an inclusive learning and teaching environment
Working in multi-professional teams
Creating a climate for learning in the classroom
Learning and teaching strategies
Managing students' behaviour
Planning and evaluating students' learning
Developing knowledge and understanding of teachers' professional responsibilities

Over 85 per cent of our trainees have secured a post within six months of completing their PGCE. Science and Maths are nationally recognised shortage subjects, therefore 'in demand'. Trainees receive sustained support in their attempts to secure employment. Many of our ex-trainees now hold positions of responsibility in our partnership schools. An effective Partnership structure and commitment to life-long learning are integral to our teacher training. Post PGCE we offer ongoing support via our Alumni networks and a flexible continuing development programme.

We offer a broad range of opportunities for postgraduate study, including MSc STEM, MAs in Education, Educational Leadership and Management and Inclusive Education and SEN. Our Education and Social Research Institute, ranked in the UK top 10, provides opportunities to study to PhD level.

School placements are central to this course. As an intending teacher you will begin by developing professional awareness, understanding and skills common to learning and teaching in a variety of settings. You will begin to understand the inter-relationship between the school and its community.

Placements will be in at least two different schools or colleges and will range from inner city to rural settings, mixed and single gender schools, City Academies, Comprehensives and Selective Schools, 11-16, 11-18, sixth form and further education colleges. The Enrichment Phase also offers placements in settings other than schools.

Special Features

. PGCE Secondary programmes rated 'outstanding' in 2011 Ofsted Inspection.
. Training tailored across diverse educational settings
. National reputation in secondary teacher education based on a wide range of subject disciplines and an effective partnership structure.
. Includes 60 M-level CAT points, or one third of a Masters degree - we offer an MSc Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics (STEM)
. Subject enhancement/boosters available - see http://www.mmu.ac.uk/education/pgce
. Range of bursaries available - see http://www.education.gov.uk for details
. Access to NQT alumni support in your first year of teaching

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The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Read more
The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Within the field of musicology, students can slant their studies towards one or several of the following: music in nineteenth-century culture, opera studies, popular music studies or film music. The composition pathway, meanwhile, provides a practice-based contemporary composition curriculum that encourages students to push the boundaries of their practice and develop a voice as an engaged and creative composer.

This course is unusual in combining a rigorous academic education with the opportunity to acquire vocational skills through our innovative Professional Experience module. Students take up work placements with a wide range of external arts organisations or undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. The course therefore offers rich opportunities for career development and can pave the way for further study at PhD level if so required.

Why choose this course?

-The flexible structure of the MA Music allows you to tailor the course to your particular interests. The course is one of very few Music MAs in the UK to offer professional experience as part of the course; you can undertake a work placement with an external organisation such as a radio station, opera house, museum, music publisher, magazine, concert promoter or school. Alternatively, you can undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. Recent students, for example, worked at the Handel-Hendrix House Museum, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Audiograft festival.

The course is taught by experts who are internationally renowned in their fields. Our research informs the content and methodology of our modules, ensuring that teaching is at the cutting edge of the discipline. Following REF 2014 Music has been singled out as an area of particular research strength within the University.Our staff disseminate their research to wider audiences via appearances on BBC Radio 3, articles in the national press and talks for major performing organisations. The activities of our research units in opera (OBERTO), popular music (PMRU), or sonic art (SARU) complement the programme of formal study. MA students can contribute to the research units' activities, for instance by participating in listening groups and helping to organise study days and conferences. Student composers have an opportunity to showcase their work through the annual Audiograft festival. Opera students go on a field trip to hear a live opera, usually in London.

Oxford is a fabulous city in which to study music, with a very lively concert scene and excellent research facilities. You will have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library and the new Brookes library also offers substantial collections centring on the specialist areas of the MA.

The course provides an excellent foundation for doctoral study for those who wish to continue into a career in academia.

This course in detail

Students studying for the MA/PG Dip in Music are required to complete the following compulsory modules* (30 credits):
-Research Skills and Applied Research
-Professional Experience

MA students are also required to complete the following (60 credits):
-Dissertation / Major Project

You will then take two of the following modules depending on your chosen specialism (30 credits each):
Composition Pathway
-Approaches to Experimental Composition and Sound Arts
-Electroacoustic and Live Electronic Composition

Musicology pathway
-Advanced Musicology 1: 19th-Century Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 1: Film Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2: Popular Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2:Opera Studies

*As our courses are reviewed regularly for quality assurance purposes, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

The MA in Music is taught through a combination of seminars, tutorials and skills-based workshops. Those taking a work placement will also receive mentoring and formative feedback from an individual at the placement organisation.

During your time here you will engage in lively discussions and original research. We aim to give you an in-depth understanding of recent critical debates, scholarship and practice in your chosen field, as well as to broaden your knowledge of musical repertoire.

Our pathways are original, exciting and flexible and one of the most striking features of the Music Department is its breadth of subject expertise. All staff members in Music are actively engaged in research and we have published our work in top journals and with the most highly respected publishers: our research in popular music, opera and sonic art was identified as 'world-leading' in the 2014 REF.

You will have an opportunity to work closely with staff members not only through the course modules but also through our specialist research units in popular music, opera and sonic art. Membership of these units allows you to attend conferences, workshops and talks by visiting speakers that will complement your formal studies.

Careers and professional development

Having an MA will make you stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the course straight after graduating from undergraduate study or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in music or to improve your current position. The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA in Music can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including management, law, journalism, media and the heritage industry.

Career destinations of our recent graduates include:
-Professional composition
-Performance
-Sound engineering
-Arts administration
-HE administration
-Teaching (secondary and FE)
-Retail management
-Youth work

Our programme provides the necessary research training for doctoral work and many MA students continue on into further research and pursue careers in academia. Our students have an excellent success rate in securing funded PhD places.

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The Faculty of Education has a national reputation for high quality initial teacher training which was rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted in their last inspection. Read more
The Faculty of Education has a national reputation for high quality initial teacher training which was rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted in their last inspection. We work with over 1,500 schools, colleges and educational organisations and offer a wide range of of secondary specialisms.

Our PGCE Science has an outstanding reputation for producing high quality science teachers. Science teaching is a stated government priority nationally and therefore attractive bursaries are available to support your training. Attractive bursaries are available, also enhancement and booster courses (subject to confirmation of PGCE place).

As science is still a national shortage subject and government priority, successful trainees are very employable.

This course will be based at our £139 million new academic building at Birley Fields, All Saints campus, in Manchester city centre. Further details at http://www.mmu.ac.uk/education/birleyfields


During the first term you will learn how to plan lessons, how to organise and manage classrooms and laboratories, how to create and maintain a positive learning atmosphere and how to evaluate your progress. You will also carry out an audit of your subject knowledge and use this to develop identified areas of your scientific understanding. Based in one of our placement schools, you will observe effective classroom practice first hand, engage in shared and individual teaching and complete a range of school-based training tasks that will begin to develop your understanding of your role as a science teacher.

In the second term, the focus of training will shift to the assessment of pupils' attainment and progress, the use of ICT in science teaching, teaching post-16 aspects of your specialism and looking at transition from primary to secondary schools. You will transfer to a second placement school, where you will take on an enhanced teaching role which has a greater emphasis on your ability to ue your assessment according to pupils' needs. At the end of this placement, you will be assessed against the classroom based aspects of the standards required for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

In the third term you will follow a personalised agenda that has been agreed with your tutors and mentors. This will allow you to address any remaining QTS standards and to further develop your subject knowledge, both within and beyond your science specialism, to Key Stage 4 and Post-16 level. There will also be scope for individually negotiated project work within this term.

We aim to develop analytical, successful and enthusiastic beginning teachers who are fully aware of the excitement and challenges which lie ahead and who can work effectively in a variety of educational settings.

Trainees will engage with current educational issues and recent and relevant research in order to further develop their understanding and to generate challenging and lively debate. There will be a focus on:

Promoting an inclusive learning and teaching environment
Working in multi-professional teams
Creating a climate for learning in the classroom
Learning and teaching strategies
Managing students' behaviour
Planning and evaluating students' learning
Developing knowledge and understanding of teachers' professional responsibilities

These courses have a high reputation within the region for producing very good science teachers. Successful trainees are highly employable; you will meet many of our former trainees in our placement schools.

As part of this PGCE you will gain 60 Masters Level credits (one third of a Masters Degree) which can be used as a stepping stone to higher academic and professional awards and career development.

Our flexible, part-time continuing professional development programme includes:

STEM Masters, specially designed for Newly Qualified Teachers and those in their first five years of teaching]
MAs available in Education, Educational Leadership and Management and Inclusive Education and Special Educational Needs.

School placements are central to the course. As an intending teacher you will begin by developing professional awareness, understanding and skills common to learning and teaching in a variety of settings. You will begin to understand the inter-relationship between the school and its community.

Placements will be in at least two different schools or colleges and will range from inner city to rural settings, mixed and single gender schools, City Academies, Comprehensives and Selective Schools, 11-16, 11-18, sixth form and further education colleges. The Enrichment Phase also offers placements in settings other than schools.

Special Features

. A fully funded 6 month Physics enhancement course is available for early applicants - see http://www.mmu.ac.uk/education/pgce
. Short booster courses available (subject to confirmation of place), details at http://www.mmu.ac.uk/education/pgce
. Eligibility for bursary - see http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into-teaching for details
. Course includes 60 Masters Level CAT points (one third of a Masters degree) - we offer an MSc in Science, Engineering, Technology and Maths (STEM)
. Close links with our STEM Education North West centre and Education and Social Research Institute (ESRI)
. Access to NQT alumni support in your first year of teaching

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The broadcast pathway of this course will equip you with all the practical and intellectual skills you need to work as a multi-platform journalist, at the same time allowing you gain a deeper grounding in the abilities of broadcast journalism. Read more
The broadcast pathway of this course will equip you with all the practical and intellectual skills you need to work as a multi-platform journalist, at the same time allowing you gain a deeper grounding in the abilities of broadcast journalism. All students learn the basic skills of audio, video and digital reporting. The course has a very practical focus, so you are expected to develop story ideas and gather your own material through research and reporting for journalistic course work. You will be given full training in using our up-to-date media resources, ensuring that you graduate from the course as a multi-skilled journalist being competent in digital and broadcast journalism. Both the MA and the Postgraduate Diploma can be taken as a part-time course (daytime) over two years studying two days a week.

The PG Diploma and MA have been accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) which means we provide industry backed journalism training for online, TV & radio. The organisation accredits a number of British journalism courses, providing the syllabus meets their requirements. Our students regularly win BJTC awards, and the course has been awarded the BJTC award for excellence in teaching.

The University of Westminster itself is designated a Skillset Media Academy, Skillset being the UK skills body for the Creative Industries ensuring excellence and quality for education and skills training in television and interactive media.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced journalism professionals, and our graduates go on to work with a variety of leading media organisations including BBC TV and Radio, BBC News Online, ITN, Russia Today, Al Jazeera, the Financial Times and The Guardian, Conde Nast, and many other media houses in Britain and around the world.

Course content

There's a strong emphasis on learning through 'hands-on' practice, in small class groups, using our professional standard facilities. Most of your assessed course-work will be 'real' journalism assignments, a preparation for the world of contemporary journalism.

As well as regular classes taught by experienced journalists on our staff, we also invite other media professionals as guest speakers or to critique student work. We support you in applying for work placements, encourage you go to journalism events and network with professionals, and to pursue other journalism experiences. We work closely together with the charity One World Media, for example. One World Media promotes coverage of the wider world and offers bursaries for students who wish to cover a story in a developing country for their final project.

You will have the chance to air your work on Smoke Radio, the University's multi-award-winning internet radio station, or post items onto the MA's own news site, Westminster World.

The course is taught over two semesters, and for the Master's students followed by the largely self-directed final project in the summer. Unlike many other journalism MAs, you can undertake an extensive practical Final Project. This could be a TV or radio documentary or a digital project. Students usually undertake their placements in the period from the Easter break to the end of the course.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

CORE MODULES - SEMESTER ONE:
-Documentary Skills
-Multimedia Journalism Skills
-Issues in journalism

CORE MODULE - SEMESTER TWO:
-Digital Journalism

OPTIONAL MODULES - SEMESTER TWO:
-Investigative Journalism
-Travel Journalism
-Online Journalism
-Sociology of News
-Specialist Journalism

Final Projects (MA only)
These are all individual projects:
-Final Radio or Video Documentary Project
-Final Journalism Project
-Online Journalism Final Project

Associated careers

Though designed to prepare you for a career in journalism, this course could also lead to a career in public relations, communications, or any other professional pathway which requires effective communication skills, and the use of convergent media.

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in English Literature offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in English Literature

The MA in English Literature allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA in English Literature is openly structured. As a student enrolled in the English Literature programme, you define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

As a MA in English Literature student, you develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The full-time English Literature course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing in English Literature. Part-time study is available for the MA in English Literature.

Students of the MA in English Literature will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in English Literature typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advnaced Research Skills
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• Women Writing India
• The Romantic Sublime
• Gender and Culture: An Introduction
• The Modernist Novel: James Joyce
• Angela Carter
• Dylan Thomas and the Idea of Welsh Writing in English
• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives
• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic
• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Fin’Amor and Marriage in the Medieval English Secular Lyric
• Gender and Humour in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
• Lost in Europe: History, Biography, Ideology through the Short twentieth Century (1914-89)
• Neo-Victorian Mutinies: Gender & Racial Trauma in Neo-Victorian Fiction (& Film)
• Writing Poetry
• Writing the Self

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for English Literature graduates. Our Graduates enter careers in education, professional and creative writing, publishing, global marketing and advertising, media, international and national recruitment, heritage and tourism, and relief/humanitarian organisations. Some Graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Research Interests

The Department of English Language and Literature is home to three research centres and groupings:

• the Centre for the Research in the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW)
• the Centre for the Research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS)
• the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO)

All staff in the Department are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. Books published by staff in recent years include studies of medieval women’s writing, William Blake, Dylan Thomas, American fiction, Walt Whitman, narratives of the European border, Angela Carter, contemporary English language studies and many other areas. Regular research seminars
and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

"The MA in English Literature at Swansea offers students a unique opportunity to expand their intellectual horizons in an environment that brings people together from across the globe. I've had the chance to study with people from Ireland, England, America, and Germany and the differing views and experiences that each of us bring to our classroom discussions have been an invaluable part of my education here. One of the other enormous benefits of studying in Swansea is its location. In few other places can a student read a poem by Dylan Thomas or William Wordsworth and then walk through the same streets and countryside that inspired that poet. At Swansea University a student can find a learning experience that breaks free of the confines of the classroom and that may lead them out into all the beauty and history of the city and its surrounding areas. To top it off the small class sizes create an intimate and informal atmosphere where passionate professors challenge you to make the most of your love of literature. In all I'd describe my time here at Swansea as an experience that has both deepened my love of literature while allowing me to come to view it from a more global perspective."


Robert Tretin, English Literature, MA

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The print and online pathways of this course will equip you with all the practical and intellectual skills you need to work as a multi-platform journalist. Read more
The print and online pathways of this course will equip you with all the practical and intellectual skills you need to work as a multi-platform journalist. While gaining insights into contemporary digital news production and storytelling, this course is allowing you to gain a deeper grounding in the abilities of written journalism. For this all students learn the basic skills of audio, video. The course has a very practical focus, so you are expected to develop story ideas and gather your own material through research and reporting for journalistic course work. You will be given full training in using our up-to-date media resources, ensuring that you graduate from the course as a multi-skilled journalist being competent in digital and print journalism. Both the MA and the Postgraduate Diploma can be taken as a part-time course (daytime) over two years studying two days a week.

The University of Westminster itself is designated a Skillset Media Academy, Skillset being the UK skills body for the Creative Industries ensuring excellence and quality for education and skills training in interactive media. The PG Diploma and MA have been accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) which means we provide industry backed journalism training for online, TV & radio. The organisation accredits a number of British journalism courses, providing the syllabus meets their requirements. Our students regularly win BJTC awards, and the course has been awarded the BJTC award for excellence in teaching.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced journalism professionals, and our graduates go on to work with a variety of leading media organisations including BBC TV and Radio, national and local, and BBC News Online, ITN, Russia Today, Al Jazeera, the Financial Times and The Guardian, Conde Nast, and many other media houses in Britain and around the world.

Many of our students have won journalism awards, the most recent being the Best Radio News item for 2014, awarded by the BJTC. We have twice been awarded a BJTC award for excellence in teaching.

Course content

There's a strong emphasis on learning through 'hands-on' practice, in small class groups, using our professional standard facilities. Most of your assessed course-work will be 'real' journalism assignments, a preparation for the world of contemporary journalism.

As well as regular classes taught by experienced journalists on our staff, we also invite other media professionals as guest speakers or to critique student work. We support you in applying for work placements, encourage you go to journalism events and network with professionals, and to pursue other journalism experiences. We work closely together with the charity One World Media, for example. One World Media promotes coverage of the wider world and offers bursaries for students who wish to cover a story in a developing country for their final project.

You will have the chance to air your work on Smoke Radio, the University's multi-award-winning internet radio station, or post items onto the MA's own news site, Westminster World.

The course is taught over two semesters, and for the Master's students followed by the largely self-directed final project in the summer. Unlike many other journalism MAs, you can undertake an extensive practical Final Project. Students usually undertake their placements in the period from the Easter break to the end of the course.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

CORE MODULES - SEMESTER ONE:
-News and Feature Writing
-Multimedia Journalism Skills
-Issues in journalism

OPTIONAL MODULES – SEMESTER TWO:
-Magazine Project
-Online Journalism
-Investigative Journalism
-Travel Journalism
-Sociology of News
-Specialist Journalism

Final Projects (MA only) - These are all individual projects:
-Final Journalism Project
-Online Journalism Final Project

Associated careers

Though designed to prepare you for a career in journalism, this course could also lead to a career in public relations, communications, or any other professional pathway which requires effective communication skills, and the use of convergent media.

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As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. Read more
As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. In addition to this, there are regular visits by other writers. The final taught module includes a session given by agents and editors. Staff are also willing to advise on professional issues of placing work.

The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. It is possible to write prose fiction (the novel or short story), poetry and drama. We are interested in literary fiction in all its forms.
Our MA Creative writing students 'read as writers', explore their reading in group discussions and engage in writing exercises designed to enlarge and stimulate their practice.
In the intensive MA workshops, students share work, learn to write to deadlines, learn how to redraft, polish, edit imaginatively and find the creative thread which, when followed, reveals how their own writing will achieve its optimum level.
All written assignments are accompanied by the writing of a commentary on the process; the commentary speeds and makes explicit a writer's discoveries, and so aids future practice.
Recent guest readers include: Simon Brett, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Vicki Feaver, Ed Hogan, Susanna Jones, Adam Marek, Bernard O'Donoghue, Michele Roberts, Jo Shapcott, Robert Shearman, Matthew Sweeney and Nick Warburton.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00


Many of our writers go on to publish and win prizes. For instance, Isabel Ashdown's novel Glasshopper, written during the MA, was hailed as one of the five best debut novels of 2009 in The Observer. MA graduate Wendy French won the £5000 2010 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. These are just two recent examples of the success of our graduates.

The annual Publishing Panel of six specialists has regularly welcomed literary agents from agencies such as David Godwin Associates, Rogers, Coleridge and White, United Artists, Greene & Heaton, Janklow and Nesbitt, RAFT and Lucy Luck Associates. Agents join literary editors for a discussion of the publishing world today and how to approach an agent or editor. We have welcomed literary editors from Penguin/Hamish Hamilton, Chatto&Windus, Myriad Editions, Simon & Schuster, Pighog Press, the Frogmore Papers and producers from BBC Radio.

Student Successes

Jane Rusbridge’s first novel, The Devil’s Music, was published by Bloomsbury in the summer of 2009. It is described as ‘a beautifully told story of family secrets and betrayal, involving knots, Harry Houdini and the shifting landscape of memory.’ The novel was started as part of her MA dissertation project. Jane's second novel, Rook, was published in 2012 and was a Guardian Readers' Book of the Year. Jane has won or been placed in several national and international short story competitions, including the WritersInc ‘Writer of the Year’ award (2005), the Ilkley literature Festival competition (2005), the Bluechrome Short Story competition (2005), the Bridport (2003, 2005) and the Fish Prize (2006). Jane's website can be found at http://janerusbridge.co.uk/

All these stories were written while studying on the MA. MA assignment poems have featured in The Interpreter's House, Red Hot Fiesta, New Beginnings, First Time, and the Surrey Poetry Competition anthology. Jane’s story ‘Sputnik’ was published in Mslexia (2006) and ‘The Devil’s Music’ – a chapter from the novel – was published by Route (2006).

On the Third Day by Kate Betts won Channel 4’s ‘The Play’s The Thing’ script-writing competition in 2006. The play was performed in The New Ambassadors Theatre, London. Michael Billington, renowned theatre critic for The Guardian, wrote, ‘Betts reveals a bold theatrical sense’ and ‘a gift for wry humour’ while Charles Spencer of The Telegraph praised the ‘emotional candour and generosity’ of the script. Kate featured each week in the major Channel 4 serial documentary, The Play’s The Thing.

Bethan Roberts' fourth novel, Mother Island (Chatto and Windus), was winner of Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Award in 2015. Bethan's first novel, The Pools, which evolved from her MA dissertation, was published by Serpent's Tail in the summer of 2007.

While on the MA, Bethan was selected for the prestigious Arvon/Jerwood mentoring scheme for writers under 35. Entry was highly competitive, with only 9 creative writers chosen from MA courses throughout the country. As part of the scheme, Bethan completed her novel under the guidance of an experienced novelist. Bethan has also published short stories, all written for the MA, including 'Family Portrait' (MsLexia, 16, 2003). She won The Olive Cook Award (Society of Awards) for another short story in 2006. Bethan's website can be found at http://bethanrobertswriter.co.uk/

Gabrielle Kimm wrote her first novel, My Last Duchess (Sphere 2010) on the MA in Creative Writing. Since then Sphere have gone on to publish The Courtesan’s Lover (2012) and The Girl with the Painted Face (2013). Gabrielle's website can be found at http://gabriellekimm.co.uk/

Indicative modules
The MA comprises four taught modules and a creative dissertation:

The Writing Studio enables writers to experiment in any genre prose, poetry or drama, while exploring key features of those genres. This first module also serves as induction to the MA and to the distinctive methods of the 'Chichester workshop'.

Metaphor and the Imagination encourages innovation and experimentation, pushing writers beyond their usual boundaries.

Sources and Transformations engages writers with the essential writerly skills of transforming both outer research and inner biographical concerns into fiction.

Launching the Manuscript encourages autonomy, sustaining the longer project, learning about the publishing industry and includes guest readers and the publishing panel.
The Manuscript (a creative dissertation of 20,000) allows writers to develop a longer piece of work through one to one tutorials with a tutor as a consultant reader.

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Understanding journalism is crucial in today’s mediated world. The spread of the Internet, social media and the advent of comparatively cheap communications technology holds out the promise of enabling a more diverse range of actors to shape journalism. Read more
Understanding journalism is crucial in today’s mediated world. The spread of the Internet, social media and the advent of comparatively cheap communications technology holds out the promise of enabling a more diverse range of actors to shape journalism. The forms and practices involved in such journalism could also enable greater inclusivity, supporting a range of progressive aims such as advocacy, peace, development and greater intercultural understanding. At the same time, widespread cost-cutting in mainstream journalism and the speeded-up journalistic practices used to service multiple delivery platforms threaten to further entrench the norms and definitional advantages of the wealthy and powerful because of their greater ability to subsidise journalism through public relations material.

Course detail

You will develop specialist subject knowledge of media industries, media consumption and production, globally. Additionally, you will develop a range of research and analytical tools that will prepare you for a career in media or for PhD level research.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying international journalisms at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective that examines contemporary journalistic representations of the Global South and how they relate to different cultural, political, technological and historical contexts. Therefore this programme springs from a pluralistic critical perspective: seeking to analyse how others represent Southern countries and events and how Southern actors seek to represent themselves. This contrasts strongly with other Journalism MAs taught in the UK, which are usually constrained by the norms and priorities of British professional accreditation bodies.

Our non-Eurocentric approach offers fresh directions to examining the contemporary world and our location in the heart of London with access to global media centres, contributes to a valuable student experience.

Expert at where the world is changing

Our award-winning research spans a wealth of geographical areas and topics, including international political communication; cultural studies, new media and democracy; memory studies and oral history; Islamist movements; social movements and media; transnational movements and communications; development discourses; and digital technologies and development.

Our academics regularly appear in the media of different countries as guests and commentators on various contemporary issues.

Centre for Media Studies

The Centre for Media Studies is unique in the world in its focus on the media and communication landscapes of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. We study the contemporary world and its historical roots, and are committed to upend, theoretically and empirically, the Western-centric orientation that still pervades media studies scholarship. The research of our award-winning faculty spans media in the Arab world, critical theory and cultural studies, transnational news and India and digital technologies in the Global South.

Research underpins our teaching: students receive a rigorous grounding in their chosen MA and are encouraged to take optional courses across the School of Art and the university to build a degree that truly reflects their interests and goals.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/media-studies/programmes/

Teaching

• Classes are taught by research active instructors who focus on different aspects of communication, culture, and society in the Middle East, Asia and Africa

• Excellent teacher:student ratio and personal contact, and excellent student satisfaction rates

• Students study core classes in their chosen MA, and are encouraged to take classes across SOAS to create a unique degree with a regional, topical, or language focus that fits their needs.

Research

Our research spans a wealth of geographical areas (Palestine and the Middle East, India, China, Myanmar, Korea) and topics (international political communication; cultural studies; new media and democracy; memory studies and oral history; Islamist movements; social movements and media; diasporas; ethnic minorities; transnational movements and communications; development discourses; digital technologies and development; digital cultures in the Global South)

Careers

Alumni go onto high profile careers in the media, in NGO and Think Tanks and academic research.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our Medieval Studies MA draws on the expertise of a wide range of departments to enable you to study the period from a variety of perspectives. Read more
Our Medieval Studies MA draws on the expertise of a wide range of departments to enable you to study the period from a variety of perspectives. We offer a huge choice of optional modules and our core module provides the opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the multi-media Middle Ages. This wide-ranging course allows you to build a study pathway that reflects your own particular interests and to develop a specialism exploring a theme or topic in your master’s dissertation.

Key benefits

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

- Unrivalled location, gives students access to major libraries, institutes and societies for medievalists.

- Flexible combination of core skills and training modules.

- Unique range of specialist options, allowing interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medieval-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This Medieval Studies MA which draws on our strengths in medieval teaching in departments including Classics, Digital Humanities, English, French, German, History, Music and Theology. The required module Visual and Verbal in Medieval Culture, partly taught in the British Museum, offers the opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the multi-media Middle Ages, especially the relationship between text and image. You will also be able to choose taught modules from an extensive options list, including skills modules in languages, Palaeography and Digital Humanities. We are also able to draw on the expertise of Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies academics to offer you an exceptional geographical and historical range.

Our definition of the Middle Ages extends from the late antique to the early renaissance periods, and covers eastern as well as western Europe. You will study medieval literature, languages, history, art and philosophy within a historicist framework, which will train you in a range of methodologies, from the traditional skills of palaeography and codicology to the theoretical tools of gender, sexuality and postcolonial studies. With huge flexibility and choice of module, you will be able to tailor your degree to your own interests, to the extent that no two Medieval Studies MAs are alike. At the end of the programme you will bring all of the skills and knowledge you have developed to produce a 15,000-word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will automatically become a member of the Centre for Medieval Studies and you will be invited to take part in its activities, by attending and assisting at conferences and research events, and participating in staff-student study days.

- Course purpose -

To deepen subject knowledge and develop skills in research methods, critical analysis and judgement. To provide training in techniques required for advanced study and to offer opportunities for specialist work.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework and/or examination plus a compulsory dissertation on an agreed topic which accounts for 25 per cent of the total marks. The core modules are assessed by submitted essays or projects, and the specialist modules by written examination and/or essays. Written papers are taken in the May examination period, essays are normally submitted in early January and early May and the dissertation in early September.

Career Prospects:

Research in medieval studies; teaching, journalism or cultural administration.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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