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This course has a strong student-centred focus. This is reflected both in the curriculum content but also in the tailored approach to your studies that you will take as a student on the programme. Read more
This course has a strong student-centred focus. This is reflected both in the curriculum content but also in the tailored approach to your studies that you will take as a student on the programme. You will develop a personal learning journey, with the support of your tutor, suited to your career stage and practice context. This approach will allow you to select the topics that you would like to study and to create a programme that meets your own professional development needs.

How you will be taught

The course is delivered by blended learning to local students and fully online to those studying at a distance. Distance learners will be supported in identifying and learning from opportunities local to them as part of their learning journey on the programme. Programme materials, resources and structured activities will be available through the University’s virtual learning environment, My Dundee, and students will be supported in developing an online portfolio for their assessment materials using a social media platform relevant to their practice context. Opportunities for discussion, sharing and learning with peers will also form part of the programme and each module will provide an opportunity for peer review of practice.

How you will be assessed

Associate Module

Facilitating Learning assessment patch (500 words)
Developing and Evaluating Your Teaching assessment patch (500 words)
Assessment and Feedback assessment patch (500 words)
Fourth Topic Unit choice assessment patch (500 words)
Peer review of teaching commentary patch (500 words)

Final reflexive commentary assessment patch considering the ways in which you have enhanced your practice through study, learning and assessment on the module (1,000 words)

Fellowship Module 1

Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Peer review of teaching commentary patch (500 words)

Final reflexive commentary assessment patch considering the ways in which you have extended your practice through study, learning and assessment on the module (1,000 words) (1,000 words)

Fellowship Module 2

Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Peer review of teaching commentary patch (500 words)

Final reflexive commentary assessment patch considering the ways in which you have empowered your practice through study, learning and assessment on the module (1,000 words)

What you will study

You will work with a tutor to develop your personal learning journey through the programme. The course is structured as three modules, each based on the standards required by the UKPSF (2011):

The Associate Module
The Fellowship Module part 1
The Fellowship Module part 2

Each module comprises four Topic Units which provide the curriculum content, and you can choose the Topic Units which best meet the needs of your career stage and practice context. The first module – the Associate Module – is the core module and as such it has partly defined content of three Topic Units:

Facilitating Learning
Developing and Evaluating your Teaching
Assessment and Feedback

plus

a fourth Topic Unit from the list of options.

You then choose your Topic Units for the following two modules – the Fellowship Modules 1 & 2 – to complete your individualised programme. The currently available Topic Units are as follows:

The Flexible Learner (defined content for The Associate Module)
Developing and Evaluating your Teaching (defined content for The Associate Module
Assessment and Feedback (defined content for The Associate Module)
Inter-Professional Learning
Internationalising the Curriculum
Developing as a Supervisor
Leadership in Learning & Teaching
Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)
Collaborative Working
Nursing & Midwifery option
Negotiated Study

The Negotiated Study Topic Unit can take the form of:

a project on an agreed topic
a reflective commentary based on experiential learning drawn from engagement with continuing professional development activities
a paper prepared for submission to a teaching & learning journal.

You can also ‘double up’ on a Topic Unit to allow for more in-depth study.

Employability

As a graduate of the programme you will have gained a valuable Masters level qualification that is increasingly viewed as an essential requirement for university staff who teach and/ or support learning. Additionally, you will have gained professional recognition as a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy which is also increasingly seen as a requirement in the higher education sector both in the UK and internationally.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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IN BRIEF. Maintain your CPD for professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. Flexible access to modules which equip you with the critical skills needed for contemporary practice to improve the lives of service users. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Maintain your CPD for professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.
  • Flexible access to modules which equip you with the critical skills needed for contemporary practice to improve the lives of service users
  • Enhance your career, professional credibility and employability with the scope to take one module or progress to the awards of PgCert, PgDip or master's
  • A part-time only course

COURSE SUMMARY

Social Workers are required to intervene in the lives of vulnerable people and people in crisis making decisions which impact directly on individuals, families and society. The emphasis in this course is on the application of skills (practical, critical and intellectual), knowledge and research to social work practice, with the aim of improving opportunity and outcomes for service users and communities.

Modules are offered which are relevant at whatever stage of career you are at – from modules to support you at the outset of your social work career to modules which develop supervision and management skills. All modules have been developed in collaboration with regional stakeholders.

You may enter the course as sponsored student from your employer or may be self-funding.

COURSE DETAILS

If you are a newly qualified social worker you will usually come onto the course to undertake Professional Practice (ASYE) and/or Consolidation of Professional Practice and/or Applied Critical Reflection.

If you are more experienced social workers you may wish to access modules individually or you can undertake a number of modules in order to gain a PgCert, PgDip or MSc.

TEACHING

This course has an integrated approach to teaching and learning, focusing on lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as independent learning methods.

Teaching is usually over five weeks, one day per week.

You will be encouraged to critically analyse and reflect upon your own practice experiences.

Teaching modes include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Critical incident analysis
  • Presentations
  • Guided reading
  • Independent study
  • Participation on BB (virtual learning) site

ASSESSMENT

BY MODULE

  • Professional practice (ASYE)
  • Reflective assignment (50%) - 3,500 words and Professional discussion (50%) - 20 mins
  • Consolidation of Professional Practice
  • Case Analysis (70%) - 3,500 words and PCF analysis (30%) - 1,500 words
  • Applied Critical Reflection Assignment
  • Reflexive account(100%) - 5000 words
  • Working with Children and Young People
  • Critical Evaluation Report (100%) - 5,000 words
  • Personalisation in Practice
  • Case commentary (20%) - 1,500 words and Assignment (80%) - 3,500 words
  • Risk assessment and analysis in child care
  • Case Analysis (100%) - 5,000 words
  • Risk Assessment and Analysis in Adult social care
  • Case Analysis (100%) - 5000 words
  • Project Management and Methods of Inquiry for Health and Social Care Practice
  • Evidence based business plan (30%) - 2000 words and Oral presentation (70%): Justify and defend the business case via the via voce - 20 mins
  • Research Methods
  • Research proposal (100%) - 5000 words
  • Developmental Supervision
  • Critical Analysis of recorded (1hr max) supervision session (100%) - 4,500 words
  • The ‘Me ‘in leadership for health and social care practice
  • Patch Work Text equivalent to an assignment of 5,000 words (100%)
  • Leading Education in Practice
  • Poster presentation to peers (100%) - 30 minute (+ 10 minutes for discussion)
  • Dissertation
  • Dissertation (100%) - 15,000 words - either systematised literature review or practically orientated project

EMPLOYABILITY

  • Completing CPD is now an essential part of maintaining your professional registration.
  • By undertaking CPD modules and courses, students demonstrate to employers a commitment to the profession.
  • Undertaking modules leads to better career prospects and promotion.
  • Modules are aligned to the College of Social Work’s Professional Capabilities Framework ASYE, Social Worker, Experienced Social Worker, and Advanced social worker levels.
  • Successful completion of the course demonstrates your capability to become a Strategic level social worker.
  • The course supports The College of Social Work developmental pathways of Professional Social Work Educator, Advanced Social Work Practitioner and Social Work Manager.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Social work at the University of Salford has links with a wide variety of agencies in the Greater Manchester area. We work with local authorities, not-for-profit agencies and the voluntary sector. We work with over 300 agencies and are involved in collaborative training with our local authority partners.

This course and the modules have been designed with the involvement of local employers to support workforce development and the needs of stakeholders.



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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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The Master of Business Administration (Otago MBA) degree is an intensive two phase programme. Phase One comprises ten months of on-campus study of core papers. Read more

The Master of Business Administration (Otago MBA) degree is an intensive two phase programme. Phase One comprises ten months of on-campus study of core papers. This is followed by a highly flexible Phase Two of on-campus electives, international exchange or a business project. Phase Two can range from six to twelve months.

The programme takes on a strong global perspective. Together with the diversity of our classes and opportunities for international exchange to renowned universities worldwide, we prepare students for success in the highly competitive global economy. Our comprehensive MBA programme also goes well beyond the academic syllabus to include career development guidance, practical experience and networking activities.

Lecturers on the Otago MBA programme are drawn from three areas - the University, other reputable global business schools, and consultants or business practitioners. They are carefully selected for both academic excellence and strong practical experience in running successful businesses. The small class size ensures a large degree of personal mentoring and guidance from staff.

The style of learning is highly interactive, and participants learn as much from one another as from the course leader or facilitator. Students are assigned to teams, which reflect the diversity of professional and educational backgrounds, demographics and work style preferences. These teams work together on projects, presentations, and assignments to apply business knowledge learned in academic class in real live settings, as well as hone skills such as time management, conflict resolution and problem solving.

Information for New Applicants

The course commences each year in early March. Student applications are processed as they are received on a rolling basis, and we will endeavour to complete the application process within a month. As class size is small and seats are limited, applicants are advised to submit their application early to secure their place.

Start your application by completing the application form on the Otago MBA website or contact the MBA Admissions Manager, Jenna Anderson on 03 479 4176 or email 

International students are reminded to allow sufficient time to make travel arrangements and visa application if required. Also, the full time Otago MBA requires a minimum Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score as part of the entry requirement and students need to plan for this if they have not already done so.

Programme requirements

Phase 1

BMBA 502 Marketing

BMBA 503 Organisational Leadership

BMBA 504 Statistics and Decision Tools

BMBA 505 Economics

BMBA 506 Human Resource Management

BMBA 507 Accounting

BMBA 508 Investment and Global Financial Markets

BMBA 509 Strategic Planning for International Markets

BMBA 510 Leading Sustainable Enterprises

BMBA 511 Operational Excellence

BMBA 512 International Business

BMBA 513 Strategy Implementation

Note: One BMBA 500-level paper not listed in the schedule may be substituted for another BMBA 500-level paper, with the approval of the Director of Executive Programmes in Business..

Phase 2

BUSI 540 Professional Consulting Engagement

or a minimum of 60 points for elective papers taken at the University of Otago (grouped together as BMBA 550 MBA Elective Papers)

or 60 points from international exchange (the papers involved shall be grouped together as EXCH 000 Exchange Papers; on successful completion, a student will be eligible for ad eundem credit for BMBA 535 International Exchange Papers).

or 30 points from international exchange (the papers involved shall be grouped together as EXCH 000 Exchange Papers; on successful completion, a student will be eligible for ad eundem credit for BMBA 525 International Exchange Papers) together with BMBA 530 Business Project (30 points)

or 30 points from international exchange (the papers involved shall be grouped together as EXCH 000 Exchange Papers; on successful completion, a student will be eligible for ad eundem credit for BMBA 525 International Exchange Papers) together with a minimum of 30 points for elective papers taken at the University of Otago (grouped together as BMBA 560 MBA Elective Papers)*

or 60 points for a course of study, approved by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Commerce), at another tertiary institution (on successful completion, a student will be eligible for ad eundem credit for BMBA 550 MBA Elective Papers).

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study consists of compulsory papers from Phase 1 (the core) together with a choice of a business project, or a selection from a list of elective papers, or papers from an approved international exchange partner. The core papers, the business project, and the elective papers are set out in the MBA Schedule. Papers to be taken through international exchange must be approved by the Director of Executive Programmes in Business. One BMBA 500-level paper not listed in the schedule may be substituted for another BMBA 500-level paper, with the approval of the Director of Executive Programmes in Business.

A candidate must normally pass all papers from Phase 1 before proceeding to Phase 2.

Note: A Candidate who enters the programme from the Diploma in Business Administration programme may be permitted to take one or more papers from Phase 2 before completing all papers in Phase 1.

A candidate with insufficient grounding in Accounting, Mathematics and the use of computers may be required either:

-To attend short programmes of instruction.

-To carry out prescribed reading and study..

-A formal examination may be required.

Before commencing the investigation undertaken for the purposes of the project report, a candidate shall seek the approval of the Director of Executive Programmes in Business for the topic, the supervisor(s) and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a project report which has previously been accepted for another degree. Phase 1 of the MBA programme may be undertaken on-campus or by distance learning.



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As you work towards your Master of Cyber Security (MCS), you'll develop a thorough understanding of the technical, legal, policy and management aspects of cyber security. Read more

As you work towards your Master of Cyber Security (MCS), you'll develop a thorough understanding of the technical, legal, policy and management aspects of cyber security. You'll learn about cloud computing technologies and computer infrastructure, as well as the law relating to cyber security.

You'll gain skills relating to detecting security breaches, preventative security and offensive security. This includes computer system penetration testing. You'll learn how to think innovatively and develop the ability to apply your knowledge so you can work at an advanced level as a professional in cyber security.

When you study cyber security at Waikato, you'll have the opportunity to work with, and learn from award-winning cyber security experts such as Dr Ryan Ko.  Our academics also have strong international connections with industry and government, such as the National Cyber Policy Office and INTERPOL.

Course Structure

For students with an undergraduate degree, this degree requires a total of 180 points consisting of 75 points of compulsory 500 level taught papers, a 60 point dissertation, and another 45 points of appropriate 500 level taught papers. Students with an honours degree or a postgraduate diploma are required to do the compulsory taught papers and the 60 point dissertation.

* Students are to choose at least one from the following three Infrastructure papers (15 points):

(a) COMP501 Topics in Operating Systems

(b) COMP513 Topics in Computer Networks

(c) COMP514 Carrier and ISP Networks

**45 points of appropriate 500 level computer science papers.

***Capable students may opt for COMP593 Computer Science Thesis (90 points) as an alternative to COMP592, subject to the Dean's approval. This will result in 15 points remaining for a relevant 500 level paper, on top of the compulsory 15 point Infrastructure paper

Computing facilities at Waikato

The computing facilities at the University of Waikato are among the best in New Zealand. You'll have 24 hour access to computer labs running the latest industry standard software.

The University of Waikato is also home to New Zealand’s first cyber security lab, where the Cybersecurity Researchers of Waikato (CROW) operate from – the creators of the annual New Zealand Cyber Security Challenge.

Build a successful career

Demand for trained professionals in cyber security is increasing globally at 3.5 times the rate of the overall job market. Once you've completed your training in this area, you'll be qualified to do a number of different types of roles in an industry with a 'near zero' unemployment rate.

Our graduates are in high demand and most of our alumni work in the top public and private organisations in New Zealand and internationally – like Sjoerd de Feijter, who is now a Junior Software Engineer for multinational corporation Gallagher.

Career opportunities

  • Chief Information Security Officer
  • Entrepreneurs of new security products and service
  • Penetration Testers/ Security Assessment Consultants
  • IT Security Consultant


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The MSc in Population Health provides key skills needed to work in public health, as well as offering a wide range of modules which can be targeted towards a range of careers in or parallel to this area, including health policy, programme management, health inequalities and urban and environmental planning. Read more

The MSc in Population Health provides key skills needed to work in public health, as well as offering a wide range of modules which can be targeted towards a range of careers in or parallel to this area, including health policy, programme management, health inequalities and urban and environmental planning.

About this degree

Students will learn how to define and measure health, understand the role of socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of health, appreciate how health systems and public policy impact on health, and learn how to evaluate interventions to improve population health.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), full-time nine months, flexible study 2-5 years, is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time nine months, flexible study two years, is offered. Students take three core modules (45 credits) and one optional module (15 credits).

Core modules

  • Core Concepts in Population Health
  • Epidemiology or Epidemiology and Infectious Disease
  • Health Systems in a Global Context
  • Basic Statistics for Medical Science

Optional modules

Students can choose up to four of the following: 

  • Advanced Statistical Modelling
  • Behavioural Science and Cancer
  • Climate Change and Health
  • Clinical Aspects of HIV
  • Ethnicity, Migration and Health
  • Evaluating Interventions
  • Health Inequalities over the Lifecourse
  • Healthcare Quality and Evidence-Based Practice
  • Homeless and Inclusion Health
  • Immunisation and Communicable Diseases
  • Key Principles of Health Economics
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Health Research
  • Quality Improvement in Health Care
  • Regression Modelling
  • Reproductive Health
  • Research Methods in Social Epidemiology
  • Sexual Health Designing Sexual and Reproductive Health Programmes in Low and Middle Income Countries
  • Social Determinants of Global Health
  • Urban Health

A full list of modules available can be found at the programme webpage Population Health MSc

Other open UCL MSc modules can also be chosen.

Dissertation/research project

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 7,500 words. An oral presentation and a lay summary of 500 words are also required. The dissertation can include primary research, secondary data analysis, a literature/historical review or a project proposal in a field related to population health.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment is through a variety of methods, including essays, unseen examinations, project proposals and oral presentations. Students will also produce a research dissertation of 7,500 words, alongside an oral presentation and a lay summary of 500 words.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Population Health MSc

Funding

Home/EU applicants may apply for the MSc Population Health Bursaries.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Students interested in careers in public health, health policy and healthcare management - as well as in associated areas such as urban and environmental planning and health financing - will benefit from the knowledge and transferable skills gained during this programme.

Employability

Students will gain interdisciplinary skills and knowledge in population health which are core to careers in the health sector and beyond. Optional modules will enable students to focus the development of their skills in research methods; public health and health systems; sexual health and infectious disease; and health across the lifecourse. Discussions on the policy and practice of population health will help students become engaged, critical thinkers about real-world problems.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a worldwide reputation in understanding health inequalities, and the social determinants of population health and causes of diseases. Students will benefit both from learning from and networking with leaders in these fields. UCL can also bring the full power of a multi-faculty university to bear on discussions on population health, involving academics from the wide range of disciplines necessary to tackle some of the most difficult issues in public health.



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The course is designed to provide advanced training in psychosocial aspects of mental health to support the national initiative to enhance mental health and well-being and to acquire an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings and practice based skills in this area. Read more
The course is designed to provide advanced training in psychosocial aspects of mental health to support the national initiative to enhance mental health and well-being and to acquire an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings and practice based skills in this area.

More about this course

The course aims to integrate clinical studies into the curriculum and target those wishing to pursue clinical psychology and/or healthcare related careers. This course will focus on the theoretical explanations of psychopathology from a biological, behavioural, social and cognitive perspective and to provide the diagnostic and treatment modality of mental, emotional and behavioural problems. Part of this training will include the successful completion of two certificates in motivational interviewing and positive psychology. These modules will make a valuable contribution to the training needs of students and develop both their practical and professional skills. It also develops competencies in conducting research and analysis in relation to the psychosocial aspects of mental health.

Assessment

Autumn semester
-Psychopathology – two 1,500 word assignments
-Specialised Clinical Issues in Healthcare - one three-hour examination
-Research Methods – one qualitative and one quantitative assignment

Spring semester
-Resilience and Mindfulness - two 1,500 word assignments
-Law, Protection and Ethics - one exam and one 3,000 word assignment
-Treatment Interventions (oral exams, two transcripts along with two case studies - two 1,500 case presentations with transcripts - students would be assessed in front of the group)
-Research Dissertation – approximately 8,000 words along with a poster presentation at an in-house conferences and press release

Assessment would include your submission of one 3,000 word clinical case report (1,500 words) for each certificate (theoretically-supported) and additionally, your submission of the transcripts. These case reports would be based on a one-on-one interview with a colleague on your course in front of the group for assessment and training related group supervision.

Professional accreditation

This is a non-accredited course but students would obtain an MSc along with professional certificates in motivational interviewing and positive psychology used in NHS practices.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (core, 20 credits)
-Psychopathology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Resilience and Mindfulness (core, 20 credits)
-Specialised Clinical Issues in Healthcare (core, 20 credits)
-Treatment Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (option, 20 credits)
-Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students completing the continuing professional development (CPD) could attend either the motivational interviewing, the positive psychology certificate or both. This would support your CPD and promote good working practices for students who continue on to become health care practitioners such as psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians or counsellors working in the NHS and/or private practice.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This program is accredited by the Conférence des Grandes Ecoles and is accessible after a +4/5 Bac. objectives. Train future experts in transport, logistics and port operations. Read more

This program is accredited by the Conférence des Grandes Ecoles and is accessible after a +4/5 Bac .

objectives

Train future experts in transport, logistics and port operations.

Strengths

- Training 100% in English, in a very international environment: the EM Normandie annually more than 500 foreign students

- Taught by internationally renowned experts, nationalities and varied cultures

- A professional training: Mission HEC Entrepreneurs, challenge in business, business dating, professional seminars

- A campus in the heart of an international logistics center: Le Havre is the first port of France for foreign trade and container and was voted best European port by Asian professionals

- A Port Institute of Education and Research: IPER to benefit from port and maritime expertise

- Promotion human scale and an individual close monitoring

Program

- 4 modules are provided in the first semester, from September to December

- 4 modules are planned for the second half, from January to April

professionalization -

- a mission of five weeks: audit logistics business is expected. Missions are found and validated by the teaching team (HEC Entrepreneurs pedagogy).

- a 2-week challenge: optimizing logistics flows is organized.

- 1 internship minimum of 5 months;

Courses taught in English by professors and experienced professionals.

Useful information

Duration of program: 12 months in basic training

Output Level: Label awarded by the Conférence des Grandes Ecoles

Rate: € 12,000

Teaching Locations: Campus du Havre

important dates -

Admission session:

Start Date: September , 2018

infrastructures -

The school offers:

- 22,200 m2 in Caen, Deauville, Le Havre, Paris and Oxford,

- 8 amphitheatres

- 2 sports complexes,

- 5 relaxation areas,

- 2 cafeterias,

- 2 media libraries with 33 500 items, 530 national and international journals and 9 databases accessible by all students,

- 12 computer rooms and multimedia,

- PC 280 self-service,

- 4 internet networks at very high speed,

- 10 rooms equipped SmartEcole®,

- Wi-Fi access on campus.

Housing -

For each campus, you have the option of renting rooms in guest houses, apartments with private individuals or in university residences, between 200 m and 1.5 km from the campus. The EM Normandie Le Havre is a member of Association for http://www.ahloet.fr student housing.

Campus Location -

The MA Normandy is located in Normandy, northwestern region of France, near Paris, easily accessible by motorway and train.

Le Havre campus enjoys a privileged location in the city center, 200 m from the beach. The train station is within 10 minutes by bus through a direct line. The tram connects the beach and the center of Havre to the entire metropolitan area. This privileged situation favors the integration of students.

Normandy town of first importance, the city center was declared World Heritage by UNESCO in 2005 which welcomed the "innovative exploitation of the potential of concrete."

Le Havre is the first port of France for foreign trade and containers.

City of art and history, Le Havre offers students a pleasant living environment, offering many cultural opportunities, intellectual and sports.

Le Havre has been classified by the site "L'Etudiant" as the 12th average city in which to study - http://www.letudiant.fr/palmares/palmares-des-villes-etudiantes/havre-le.html

Le Havre is also the 4 th city in its class cities "to complete his studies."

International candidates

Admission -

International applicants (who need a visa) must send their application at the latest by 11 June 2018. They can send their applications from the month of September 2015.

In parallel EM Normandie application, international applicants must be a record Campus France in order to facilitate obtaining their visas - http://www.campusfrance.org/fr/page/procedure-cef-creez-votre-dossier

If you are accepted (e) in the program, you will be asked to pay a deposit of € 2,500 (deductible tuition fees) to reserve your place in training. You will be accompanied (e) your visa procedures and accommodation by the International Office once you have paid the deposit.

http://www.ecole-management-normandie.fr/formation/msc-acces-bac-4/msc-international-logistics-and-port-management/candidats-internationaux_1633.html

Careers

career opportunities -

In industrial companies, logistics providers and services as well as humanitarian organizations:

- Head of Flow Management Organisation

- Head of Logistic Organisation

- logistics analyst

- Logistics Project Manager

- Port Operation Manager

- Transport Manager

- Purchaser

- Shipping business strategy

- SAP...

http://www.ecole-management-normandie.fr/formation/msc-acces-bac-4/msc-international-logistics-and-port-management/carrieres_1634.html

Admission

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ecole-management-normandie.fr/formation/msc-acces-bac-4/msc-international-logistics-and-port-management/admission_1635.html



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This programme is accredited by the French Conférence des Grandes Ecoles and is accessible after a 4 to 5 years degree. Objectives. Read more

This programme is accredited by the French Conférence des Grandes Ecoles and is accessible after a 4 to 5 years degree.

Objectives

To equip graduates with a set of competencies to manage Supply Chains and Supply Networks.

Strong Points

- A programme taught in English in a very international environment : EM Normandie welcomes over 500 foreign students every year

Innovative Logistics Topics : Green Logistics, Green Supply Chain,...

- Lecturing by world class experts from a variety of countries and cultures

- A professionally-oriented programme : Junior Consulting Projects (HEC Entrepreneurs), In-company Contests, Business Dating Sessions, Professional Conventions

- A campus right in the heart of an exception logistics area : Le Havre is the n°1 French Port for External Trade & Containers, Elected Best European Port by Asian Professionals

- A Research Institute (IPER) as a resource for maritime and port management expertise

- A cohort of manageable size and individual coaching

Programme

- 4 modules are scheduled during the first semester, from September to December

- 3 modules are scheduled during the second semester, from January to April

Professionalisation -

- One 5-week Junior Consulting Project: Logistics Auditing in a company. JCPs are found and validated by the Programme staff (Pédagogie HEC Entrepreneurs);

- One 2-week Challenge contest: Flow Optimisation;

- One 5-week minimum work placement/internship. stage en entreprise de 5 mois minimum.

All courses taught in English by EM Normandy Faculty Members, Visiting Faculty from various countries, and Experienced Professionals in the Marketing, Sales, International Business, and Cross-cultural Management industries.

Practical Information

Program duration: One academic year (on campus)

Tuition: €12,000

Teaching Campus: Le Havre

Important dates -

Admission session:

Intake: September, 2018

Infrastructure -

The School offers:

- 22,200 m2 of teaching facilities in Caen, Deauville, Le Havre, Oxford and Paris,

- 8 Amphitheatres,

- 2 Sports Centres,

- 5 Relaxation Areas,

- 2 Cafeterias,

- 2 Media Centre & Library with 33,500 books, 530 national and international journals, and 9 data banks open to all students,

- 12 PC and Multimedia Rooms

- 280 PCs on free access,

- 4 Very High Speed Internet Networks,

- 10 LaSmartEcole® equipped rooms,

- Wi-Fi access on all campuses.

Accommodation -

On each of the campuses, you may rent rooms with local people, flats with landlords or in university residences, located from 200 m to 1.5km from the campuses. EM Normandie is a member of Association havraise pour le logement étudiant http://www.ahloet.fr .

Location of the Campus -

EM Normandie located in Normandy, a region in the Northwestern part of France, close to Paris, which can easily be reached by train and motorway. Several ferries a day to the UK (Portsmouth).

The Le Havre Campus enjoys an exceptional location in the city centre, less than 200 meters from the sea-front and beach. A tramway line links the seafront and city centre to the rest of the town. This privileged location helps the integration of foreign students.

In this major Normandy city, the downtown area has been listed as a Unesco World Heritage since 2005 for its ‘innovative way of using concrete'.

Le Havre is the number 1 port in France for Exports and containers.

A city of Arts and History, Le Havre offers a pleasant living environment to students, with many cultural, intellectual and sports options.

Le Havre was ranked by the L'Etudiant website as the 12th medium-range city for pleasant studying conditions - http://www.letudiant.fr/palmares/palmares-des-villes-etudiantes/havre-le.html

Le Havre is also ranked as the 4th city where to ‘study successfully and graduate'.

International Candidates

Admission -

International Applicants (who require a visa) must send their applications by June 11th 2018 at the latest. Application files will be accepted as from September 2015.

Alongside their EM Normandie application files, international applicants must file in a Campus France application to make easier to obtain their visas - http://www.campusfrance.org/fr/page/procedure-cef-creez-votre-dossier

If you are admitted, you will be requested to send in a first down payment of € 2,500 (which will be deducted from the total tuition fee) in order to secure your place in the programme. Once the down payment has been received, you will then be helped in your accommodation and visa application formalities by the International Relations Service.

http://www.ecole-management-normandie.fr/uk/formation/msc/msc-supply-chain-management/international-candidates-_1674.html

Careers

Career Opportunities -

The relevant sectors of activity include Transport, Mass Distribution, Industrial Production as well as Banking or Insurance Services.

Professional openings are found in Strategic Information Management and Supply Chain Process Optimisation. Graduates will be purchasing services for Global Logistics Integrators or International Supply and Purchasing Managers in sectors as varied as Agrifood, Cosmetics, our even Luxury Hotel Industries. Finally, when becoming Strategic Planners, they will be able to match their economic and financial objectives with their solutions for better logistics organisation.

Examples;

- Supply Chain Manager

- Head of Industrial Operations

- Head of Planning/Scheduling

- Head of Procurement

- Head of Logistics Flows

- Products Manager

- Industrial Buyer

- Supply Chain Controller

- Consultant in Supply Chain Management

http://www.ecole-management-normandie.fr/uk/formation/msc/msc-supply-chain-management/careers_1675.html

Admission

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ecole-management-normandie.fr/uk/formation/msc/msc-supply-chain-management/admission_1676.html



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This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. Read more

Why this course?

This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels.

The programme is intended to provide invaluable training and insights for those who have either a professional or academic interest in an evolving human rights culture.

There are three potential exit points from the course, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters. Assuming satisfactory performance, it's possible to change between these exit points. For example, a student who initially registers for the certificate may opt to continue studying to the Diploma or Masters qualification. Likewise, a student originally registered for the Masters can transfer to the certificate or Diploma.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/humanrightslaw/

You’ll study

The Human Rights Law programme may be completed over two years (part-time), or over one year (full-time).

The LLM is awarded on successful completion of six modules and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

Successful completion of six modules will qualify you for the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip). A Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is awarded on completion of three modules.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is written over the summer and submitted on the last day of the academic year.

- Field dissertation
A recent innovative feature of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis and typically lasts for up to 12 weeks. It's delivered through our partnership with Challenges Worldwide, an organisation with extensive international experience in volunteer work placements.
Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law relevant to, or actually form the subject of your dissertation.
LLM students on the programme have travelled to countries such as India, Guatemala and Uganda to undertake projects in areas including right to water, law reform, developing sexual harassment policy and freedom of assembly.
The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Student competition

There is an annual LLM Human Rights Dissertation Prize sponsored by Taylor and Kelly (a leading human rights law firm in Scotland).

International students

If English is not your first language you’ll be required to provide evidence of your English language proficiency before you can begin the course.
The LLM in Human Rights entry requirements are IELTS 6.5 (with no category below 6).

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

This course is taught mainly through face-to-face teaching. Each class is delivered through two-hour weekly seminars, which students are required to attend.
Full-time students are required to take three modules per semester, with part-time students taking three modules over two semesters. The face-to-face seminars will normally be held in the evening from 6pm to 8pm. A few classes may be held during the day.
The teaching and extra-curriculum activities on the LLM are supported by the Law School’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

In addition to regular Law School staff, external staff teach on the programme including:
- Alan Miller, the current Chair of the Scottish Human Rights Commission
-Tony Kelly, a prolific human rights lawyer

Both are visiting professors in the Law School. Our faculty also includes experts in human rights and transitional justice, immigration law, equality, employment and labour law.

Assessment

Classes will be assessed by a mixture of written exams, presentations and course work comprising research essays typically of 3,500-4000 words. There will be two-hour weekly seminars for each class. Although coordinated by a tutor these will be student-led and interactive.

Careers

Our graduates can, and have progressed to research studies like MPhil and PhD in Human Rights Law leading to an academic career.
Students may also go on to work with international non-governmental organisations in the area of human rights advocacy, practice and promotion like Amnesty International.
Qualification from the course is also relevant to careers in international human rights organisations, like UN agencies for example.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). It covers the creation, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information in organisations and society at large. Read more

Why this course?

The course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

It covers the creation, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information in organisations and society at large. It encompasses both private and public sector libraries and information systems and services. This is along with related subjects such as management, publishing and the evaluation and use of information.

The course is for graduates in any discipline who wish to pursue a career in the field of information or library services.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/informationlibrarystudies/

You’ll study

Diploma and MSc students follow the same instructional course for the first two semesters.

If you meet the standard required to proceed to MSc, you’ll undertake a dissertation in the following three months.

Compulsory classes:
These classes are as follows:
- Organisation of Knowledge
- Information Retrieval & Access
- Information Law
- Library Technology & Systems
- Managing Information Services
- Libraries, Information & Society
- Research Methods

- Dissertation
This is an individual research project of up to 20,000 words on an approved topic. It allows you to pursue an area of specific interest, providing scope for original thought, research and presentation.

Work placement

There's an optional placement at the end of the second semester. The department helps to arrange this. Previous participating organisations include:
- NHS Scotland
- Scottish Television
- IDOX
- various national and local libraries
- Government agencies

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the CILIP.
Graduates will be entitled to become associate members of CILIP and will be eligible for chartership leading to the award of MCLIP, providing direct entry to a professional body and meeting the requirements of many specialist employers.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form , or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Teaching methods include lectures, tutorials and practical laboratories. Dissertation is by supervision.

Assessment

Coursework assignments involve:
- individual work
- group projects
- exams
- practical work in computer laboratories

For the award of the MSc, you’ll be required to complete an individual project under supervision. This should contain an element of original research.

Careers

The course opens up opportunities in a range of jobs.

- Public sector
Job opportunities in this sector include working in:
- Universities
- Schools
- Museums and Archives
- NHS Scotland
- Public Libraries

- Private sector
Private sector opportunities include:
- Legal & Financial Institutions
- Media Companies
- Publishing
- Bookselling
- Industrial Firms
- Consultancy
- Scottish Television
- IDOX

Not for profit:
- Research Institutes
- Voluntary Organisations

How much will I earn?

Starting salaries for public librarians can be around £19,500 - £23,500.*
Gaining chartered status can increase salaries and with two to five years' experience chartered librarians could earn £23,500 - £30,000.*

*information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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This course gives you a solid foundation in the language, logic and tools of policy analysis. This allows you to investigate specific science and technology issues arising across public policy, industrial innovation and strategy, and to recommend policy solutions. Read more
This course gives you a solid foundation in the language, logic and tools of policy analysis. This allows you to investigate specific science and technology issues arising across public policy, industrial innovation and strategy, and to recommend policy solutions.

These skills, together with the high-level connections and global networks enjoyed by SPRU – Science Policy Research Unit, will equip you for working in organisations that seek to tackle society’s most important social and environmental challenges.

How will I study?

You’ll study through a combination of core modules and options.

Modules are assessed through a variety of means such as analysis assignments, project presentations and extended essays. You also work on a supervised 20,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

SPRU 50th Anniversary Scholarship (2017)
- £10,000 towards fees with any remaining funds to be used to support maintenance.
- Application deadline: 1 July 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/754

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
- up to 100 £5,000 Masters scholarships
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/711

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from India
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/714

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Malaysia
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/715

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships to overseas fee paying students from Nigeria
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/717

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Pakistan
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/716

For more information on any Scholarships: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships

Careers

Our graduates have gained employment in governments, and a wide range of businesses and NGOs all over the world, often in ministries for:
-Science and technology
-Development
-Industry
-Trade
-Education
-Employment
-Environment

Employers of our graduates include:
-The UK’s Government Office for Science, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, Environment Agency, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
-The European Commission
-The European Environment Agency
-The Royal Society of London
-The Council of Canadian Academies
-The Chinese Academy of Engineering

This course is also an ideal grounding for further study at PhD level.

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Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start. Read more
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start.

Why study Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

This degree gives you the opportunity to translate creative interests into a fully accredited postgraduate programme of study, with flexibility and individual needs built into its delivery. It has been created and is directed by Professor Kirsty Gunn, an award winning international author whose work has been translated and published in a number of territories all over the world.

Our programme is distinctive in its approach and teaching, and highly engaged in the world of contemporary publishing, offering students the opportunity to meet with writers and publishers from around the UK and beyond and to take part in our varied and exciting range of literary activities, from performing their own work to being "showcased" at our Literary Festival.

You will learn how to:
Create and develop your own writing practice through a series of creative and practical workshops
Present and talk about your own work with authority and confidence - in the context of literary studies and a knowledge of the creative marketplace.
Read others' writing with sensitivity, intelligence and critical awareness.
Build a significant folio of creative work and develop this into work of a standard that is ready for formal presentation.
Each module can be studied separately, or as part of a full degree or diploma that can be taken part time or full time.

We can guarantee that your writing during the course of your programme will be productive, intellectually stimulating and highly creative.

What's so good about Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

In addition to producing a range of finished work for assessment during the year, you will also learn about the details of publishing, finding agents, setting your work in a context and making the important connection between the scale and shape of your writing and your aspirations for it. You'll have the opportunity to undertake specialist master classes with top-name authors, and go on visits to sites of special interest for the creative student - in the past these have included the D'Arcy Thomson Museum and the Scottish Poetry Library.

Literary Dundee

With an annual Literary Festival, regular and varied literary salons, poetry workshops, readings from internationally renowned and local authors, and much more, the events organised under the umbrella of Literary Dundee complement the course perfectly.

"Studying for an MLitt gave me the time and opportunity to work on my debut novel which was published soon after I graduated. I found the teaching and supportive environment to be invaluable during that time and it has had a great impact on my confidence since."
Zoe Venditozzi - graduated MLitt 2012

Zoe's novel is Anywhere's Better Than Here, published by Sandstone Press Ltd

How you will be taught

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a fulltime basis.

This programme is varied in delivery and content, comprising four-hour writing workshops to seminars to individual tutorials, helping you to develop practical, intelligent and highly creative methods by which you can approach your writing.

What you will study

During the first two semesters (September to December and January to April), students take the following core modules:

Creating Writing*
Studying Writing
Each student also selects two optional modules (40 credits each) from a list available each year. The currently available modules are:

Publishing Writing
Performing Writing
Refining Writing
Writing, Texts & Books
Planning Writing
You will then (from May to September) go on to undertake a dissertation worth 60 credits. You develop the theme or idea for your dissertation over the year, with the help of tutors.

*Creating Writing may be taken on a stand-alone basis.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by creative folio (6,000 words) and accompanying essay (2,500 words), or two essays.
Assessment for the research-led modules is normally by essay (2,000-2,500 words or 2,500-3,000 words).
The dissertation or creative manuscript has a word limit of 15,000, and includes a reflective piece of writing (3,000 words).
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Our graduates go on to be involved in a range of exciting literary activities - that range from publication of creative work to participation in national festivals and reading events. Recent students' successes include a first novel coming out with Sandstone this year, a placement in Canongate Publishing, Writers' Awards from Creative Scotland and the Scottish Books Trust, and the performance of a play. Our ex-students tend to stay part of our literary and creative community at Dundee after they have finished their formal studies with us - for as much as we believe in involving participants as fully and creatively as we can while they are with us, so do we not like to see them go!

This alone, makes our programme distinctive and individual and the very opposite of a large, more anonymous school. As a result our students are highly proactive and fully creatively engaged in the publishing and cultural world after they receive their degree.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, graduate

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Take on a defining challenge for humanity in the 21st century – creating a global low-carbon economy while providing modern energy services to the world’s population. Read more
Take on a defining challenge for humanity in the 21st century – creating a global low-carbon economy while providing modern energy services to the world’s population.

This MSc is unique in combining ideas from economics, innovation studies and policy studies while requiring no prior training in these fields. The course provides a broad-based, social science training in energy policy, focusing in particular on the role of technological innovation.

You learn from internationally recognised faculty from SPRU – Science Policy Research Unit, a world-leading research centre on science, technology and innovation policy, and the Sussex Energy Group, one of the largest energy policy research groups in the world.

You gain the skills to analyse policy problems and to propose and evaluate viable policy solutions. The course provides an essential foundation for careers in government, international organisations, the private sector and NGOs.

How will I study?

Teaching is via small, highly interactive lectures and seminars that foster a culture of knowledge sharing, ideas generation, critical thinking and enthusiastic debate.

You’ll study a combination of core modules and options, assessed through:
-Coursework
-Group projects
-Examinations
-Extended essays
-Presentations
-Policy briefs

In the summer, you work on a research-based dissertation. We encourage interaction, collaboration and creativity. You’re invited to participate in our programme of research seminars as well as conferences and workshops.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

SPRU 50th Anniversary Scholarship (2017)
- £10,000 towards fees with any remaining funds to be used to support maintenance.
- Application deadline: 1 July 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/754

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
- up to 100 £5,000 Masters scholarships
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/711

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from India
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/714

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Malaysia
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/715

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships to overseas fee paying students from Nigeria
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/717

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Pakistan
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/716

For more information on any Scholarships: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships

Careers

With the growing importance of energy on political, corporate and even social agendas around the world, there is increasing demand for energy policy professionals.

All our graduates have successfully obtained employment in a variety of sectors. For example, recent MSc graduates have gained employment in:
-International organisations (such as the OECD, UNDP, UNEP, IEA, and IREAN)
-Government departments (such as the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change, Government of British Columbia, Canada)
-Local authorities (such as the Brighton & Hove Council sustainability team)
-Businesses (such as RWE npower, Ecofys, EDF, Unilever, Southern Solar, Renaissance Re, Centro de Apoio a Inovação Social-CAIS)
-NGOs (such as the International Social Science Council, Green Jobs Alliance, People and Planet)

Other graduates have gone on to work for independent consultancies, or to study for PhDs in this area.

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