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This course has a strong student-centred focus. This is reflected both in the curriculum content but also in the tailored approach to your studies that you will take as a student on the programme. Read more
This course has a strong student-centred focus. This is reflected both in the curriculum content but also in the tailored approach to your studies that you will take as a student on the programme. You will develop a personal learning journey, with the support of your tutor, suited to your career stage and practice context. This approach will allow you to select the topics that you would like to study and to create a programme that meets your own professional development needs.

How you will be taught

The course is delivered by blended learning to local students and fully online to those studying at a distance. Distance learners will be supported in identifying and learning from opportunities local to them as part of their learning journey on the programme. Programme materials, resources and structured activities will be available through the University’s virtual learning environment, My Dundee, and students will be supported in developing an online portfolio for their assessment materials using a social media platform relevant to their practice context. Opportunities for discussion, sharing and learning with peers will also form part of the programme and each module will provide an opportunity for peer review of practice.

How you will be assessed

Associate Module

Facilitating Learning assessment patch (500 words)
Developing and Evaluating Your Teaching assessment patch (500 words)
Assessment and Feedback assessment patch (500 words)
Fourth Topic Unit choice assessment patch (500 words)
Peer review of teaching commentary patch (500 words)

Final reflexive commentary assessment patch considering the ways in which you have enhanced your practice through study, learning and assessment on the module (1,000 words)

Fellowship Module 1

Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Peer review of teaching commentary patch (500 words)

Final reflexive commentary assessment patch considering the ways in which you have extended your practice through study, learning and assessment on the module (1,000 words) (1,000 words)

Fellowship Module 2

Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Topic Unit assessment patch (500 words)
Peer review of teaching commentary patch (500 words)

Final reflexive commentary assessment patch considering the ways in which you have empowered your practice through study, learning and assessment on the module (1,000 words)

What you will study

You will work with a tutor to develop your personal learning journey through the programme. The course is structured as three modules, each based on the standards required by the UKPSF (2011):

The Associate Module
The Fellowship Module part 1
The Fellowship Module part 2

Each module comprises four Topic Units which provide the curriculum content, and you can choose the Topic Units which best meet the needs of your career stage and practice context. The first module – the Associate Module – is the core module and as such it has partly defined content of three Topic Units:

Facilitating Learning
Developing and Evaluating your Teaching
Assessment and Feedback

plus

a fourth Topic Unit from the list of options.

You then choose your Topic Units for the following two modules – the Fellowship Modules 1 & 2 – to complete your individualised programme. The currently available Topic Units are as follows:

The Flexible Learner (defined content for The Associate Module)
Developing and Evaluating your Teaching (defined content for The Associate Module
Assessment and Feedback (defined content for The Associate Module)
Inter-Professional Learning
Internationalising the Curriculum
Developing as a Supervisor
Leadership in Learning & Teaching
Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)
Collaborative Working
Nursing & Midwifery option
Negotiated Study

The Negotiated Study Topic Unit can take the form of:

a project on an agreed topic
a reflective commentary based on experiential learning drawn from engagement with continuing professional development activities
a paper prepared for submission to a teaching & learning journal.

You can also ‘double up’ on a Topic Unit to allow for more in-depth study.

Employability

As a graduate of the programme you will have gained a valuable Masters level qualification that is increasingly viewed as an essential requirement for university staff who teach and/ or support learning. Additionally, you will have gained professional recognition as a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy which is also increasingly seen as a requirement in the higher education sector both in the UK and internationally.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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The Population Health MSc will provide the core skills needed to work in public health, as well as offering a wide range of optional modules which can be targeted towards a range of careers in or parallel to this area including. Read more
The Population Health MSc will provide the core skills needed to work in public health, as well as offering a wide range of optional modules which can be targeted towards a range of careers in or parallel to this area including: health policy, programme management, health inequalities, and urban and environmental planning.

Degree information

Students will learn how to define and measure health, understand the role of socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of health, appreciate how health systems and public policy impact on health, and learn how to evaluate interventions to improve population health.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), full-time nine months, flexible study 2-5 years, is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time nine months, flexible study two years, is offered. Students take three core modules (45 credits) and one optional module (15 credits).

Core modules
-Core Concepts in Population Health (to be confirmed)
-Epidemiology or Epidemiology and Infectious Disease
-Health Systems in a Global Context
-Basic Statistics for Medical Science

Optional modules
-Advanced Statistical Modelling
-Climate Change and Health
-Economic Evaluation of Health Care
-Evaluating Interventions
-Health Inequalities Over the Life Course
-Health-related Behaviours and Cognitions
-Immunisation and Communicable Diseases
-Physical and Mental Health, Stress and Aging
-Qualitative Research Methods in Health Research
-Quality Improvement in Health Care
-Reproductive Health
-Research Methods in Social Epidemiology
-Sexual Health Programming in Low and Middle Income Countries
-Urban Health
-Using Informatics in Healthcare

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 7,500 words. An oral presentation and a lay summary of 500 words are also required. The dissertation can include primary research, secondary data analysis, a literature review or a project proposal in a field related to population health.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment is through a variety of methods, including essays, unseen examinations, project proposals and oral presentations. Students will also write a research dissertation of 7,500 words, along with an oral presentation and a lay summary of 500 words.

Careers

Students interested in careers in public health, health policy and healthcare management - as well in associated areas such as urban and environmental planning and health financing - will benefit from the knowledge and transferrable skills gained during this programme.

Employability
Students will gain interdisciplinary skills and knowledge in population health which are core to careers in the health sector and beyond. Optional modules will enable students to focus the development of their skills in research methods; public health and health systems; sexual health and infectious disease; and health across the life-course. Discussions on the policy and practice of population health will help students become engaged and critical thinkers about real-world problems.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a worldwide reputation in understanding health inequalities, and the social determinants of population health and causes of diseases. Students will benefit both from learning from and networking with leaders in these fields. UCL can also bring the full power of a multi-faculty university to bear on discussions on population health, involving academics from the wide range of disciplines necessary to tackle some of the most difficult in public health.

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The course is designed to provide advanced training in psychosocial aspects of mental health to support the national initiative to enhance mental health and well-being and to acquire an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings and practice based skills in this area. Read more
The course is designed to provide advanced training in psychosocial aspects of mental health to support the national initiative to enhance mental health and well-being and to acquire an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings and practice based skills in this area.

More about this course

The course aims to integrate clinical studies into the curriculum and target those wishing to pursue clinical psychology and/or healthcare related careers. This course will focus on the theoretical explanations of psychopathology from a biological, behavioural, social and cognitive perspective and to provide the diagnostic and treatment modality of mental, emotional and behavioural problems. Part of this training will include the successful completion of two certificates in motivational interviewing and positive psychology. These modules will make a valuable contribution to the training needs of students and develop both their practical and professional skills. It also develops competencies in conducting research and analysis in relation to the psychosocial aspects of mental health.

Assessment

Autumn semester
-Psychopathology – two 1,500 word assignments
-Specialised Clinical Issues in Healthcare - one three-hour examination
-Research Methods – one qualitative and one quantitative assignment

Spring semester
-Resilience and Mindfulness - two 1,500 word assignments
-Law, Protection and Ethics - one exam and one 3,000 word assignment
-Treatment Interventions (oral exams, two transcripts along with two case studies - two 1,500 case presentations with transcripts - students would be assessed in front of the group)
-Research Dissertation – approximately 8,000 words along with a poster presentation at an in-house conferences and press release

Assessment would include your submission of one 3,000 word clinical case report (1,500 words) for each certificate (theoretically-supported) and additionally, your submission of the transcripts. These case reports would be based on a one-on-one interview with a colleague on your course in front of the group for assessment and training related group supervision.

Professional accreditation

This is a non-accredited course but students would obtain an MSc along with professional certificates in motivational interviewing and positive psychology used in NHS practices.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (core, 20 credits)
-Psychopathology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Resilience and Mindfulness (core, 20 credits)
-Specialised Clinical Issues in Healthcare (core, 20 credits)
-Treatment Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (option, 20 credits)
-Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students completing the continuing professional development (CPD) could attend either the motivational interviewing, the positive psychology certificate or both. This would support your CPD and promote good working practices for students who continue on to become health care practitioners such as psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians or counsellors working in the NHS and/or private practice.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. Read more

Why this course?

This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels.

The programme is intended to provide invaluable training and insights for those who have either a professional or academic interest in an evolving human rights culture.

There are three potential exit points from the course, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters. Assuming satisfactory performance, it's possible to change between these exit points. For example, a student who initially registers for the certificate may opt to continue studying to the Diploma or Masters qualification. Likewise, a student originally registered for the Masters can transfer to the certificate or Diploma.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/humanrightslaw/

You’ll study

The Human Rights Law programme may be completed over two years (part-time), or over one year (full-time).

The LLM is awarded on successful completion of six modules and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

Successful completion of six modules will qualify you for the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip). A Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is awarded on completion of three modules.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is written over the summer and submitted on the last day of the academic year.

- Field dissertation
A recent innovative feature of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis and typically lasts for up to 12 weeks. It's delivered through our partnership with Challenges Worldwide, an organisation with extensive international experience in volunteer work placements.
Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law relevant to, or actually form the subject of your dissertation.
LLM students on the programme have travelled to countries such as India, Guatemala and Uganda to undertake projects in areas including right to water, law reform, developing sexual harassment policy and freedom of assembly.
The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Student competition

There is an annual LLM Human Rights Dissertation Prize sponsored by Taylor and Kelly (a leading human rights law firm in Scotland).

International students

If English is not your first language you’ll be required to provide evidence of your English language proficiency before you can begin the course.
The LLM in Human Rights entry requirements are IELTS 6.5 (with no category below 6).

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

This course is taught mainly through face-to-face teaching. Each class is delivered through two-hour weekly seminars, which students are required to attend.
Full-time students are required to take three modules per semester, with part-time students taking three modules over two semesters. The face-to-face seminars will normally be held in the evening from 6pm to 8pm. A few classes may be held during the day.
The teaching and extra-curriculum activities on the LLM are supported by the Law School’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

In addition to regular Law School staff, external staff teach on the programme including:
- Alan Miller, the current Chair of the Scottish Human Rights Commission
-Tony Kelly, a prolific human rights lawyer

Both are visiting professors in the Law School. Our faculty also includes experts in human rights and transitional justice, immigration law, equality, employment and labour law.

Assessment

Classes will be assessed by a mixture of written exams, presentations and course work comprising research essays typically of 3,500-4000 words. There will be two-hour weekly seminars for each class. Although coordinated by a tutor these will be student-led and interactive.

Careers

Our graduates can, and have progressed to research studies like MPhil and PhD in Human Rights Law leading to an academic career.
Students may also go on to work with international non-governmental organisations in the area of human rights advocacy, practice and promotion like Amnesty International.
Qualification from the course is also relevant to careers in international human rights organisations, like UN agencies for example.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). It covers the creation, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information in organisations and society at large. Read more

Why this course?

The course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

It covers the creation, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information in organisations and society at large. It encompasses both private and public sector libraries and information systems and services. This is along with related subjects such as management, publishing and the evaluation and use of information.

The course is for graduates in any discipline who wish to pursue a career in the field of information or library services.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/informationlibrarystudies/

You’ll study

Diploma and MSc students follow the same instructional course for the first two semesters.

If you meet the standard required to proceed to MSc, you’ll undertake a dissertation in the following three months.

Compulsory classes:
These classes are as follows:
- Organisation of Knowledge
- Information Retrieval & Access
- Information Law
- Library Technology & Systems
- Managing Information Services
- Libraries, Information & Society
- Research Methods

- Dissertation
This is an individual research project of up to 20,000 words on an approved topic. It allows you to pursue an area of specific interest, providing scope for original thought, research and presentation.

Work placement

There's an optional placement at the end of the second semester. The department helps to arrange this. Previous participating organisations include:
- NHS Scotland
- Scottish Television
- IDOX
- various national and local libraries
- Government agencies

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the CILIP.
Graduates will be entitled to become associate members of CILIP and will be eligible for chartership leading to the award of MCLIP, providing direct entry to a professional body and meeting the requirements of many specialist employers.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form , or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Teaching methods include lectures, tutorials and practical laboratories. Dissertation is by supervision.

Assessment

Coursework assignments involve:
- individual work
- group projects
- exams
- practical work in computer laboratories

For the award of the MSc, you’ll be required to complete an individual project under supervision. This should contain an element of original research.

Careers

The course opens up opportunities in a range of jobs.

- Public sector
Job opportunities in this sector include working in:
- Universities
- Schools
- Museums and Archives
- NHS Scotland
- Public Libraries

- Private sector
Private sector opportunities include:
- Legal & Financial Institutions
- Media Companies
- Publishing
- Bookselling
- Industrial Firms
- Consultancy
- Scottish Television
- IDOX

Not for profit:
- Research Institutes
- Voluntary Organisations

How much will I earn?

Starting salaries for public librarians can be around £19,500 - £23,500.*
Gaining chartered status can increase salaries and with two to five years' experience chartered librarians could earn £23,500 - £30,000.*

*information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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This course gives you a solid foundation in the language, logic and tools of policy analysis. This allows you to investigate specific science and technology issues arising across public policy, industrial innovation and strategy, and to recommend policy solutions. Read more
This course gives you a solid foundation in the language, logic and tools of policy analysis. This allows you to investigate specific science and technology issues arising across public policy, industrial innovation and strategy, and to recommend policy solutions.

These skills, together with the high-level connections and global networks enjoyed by SPRU – Science Policy Research Unit, will equip you for working in organisations that seek to tackle society’s most important social and environmental challenges.

How will I study?

You’ll study through a combination of core modules and options.

Modules are assessed through a variety of means such as analysis assignments, project presentations and extended essays. You also work on a supervised 20,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

SPRU 50th Anniversary Scholarship (2017)
- £10,000 towards fees with any remaining funds to be used to support maintenance.
- Application deadline: 1 July 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/754

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
- up to 100 £5,000 Masters scholarships
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/711

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from India
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/714

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Malaysia
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/715

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships to overseas fee paying students from Nigeria
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/717

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Pakistan
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/716

For more information on any Scholarships: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships

Careers

Our graduates have gained employment in governments, and a wide range of businesses and NGOs all over the world, often in ministries for:
-Science and technology
-Development
-Industry
-Trade
-Education
-Employment
-Environment

Employers of our graduates include:
-The UK’s Government Office for Science, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, Environment Agency, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
-The European Commission
-The European Environment Agency
-The Royal Society of London
-The Council of Canadian Academies
-The Chinese Academy of Engineering

This course is also an ideal grounding for further study at PhD level.

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Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start. Read more
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start.

Why study Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

This degree gives you the opportunity to translate creative interests into a fully accredited postgraduate programme of study, with flexibility and individual needs built into its delivery. It has been created and is directed by Professor Kirsty Gunn, an award winning international author whose work has been translated and published in a number of territories all over the world.

Our programme is distinctive in its approach and teaching, and highly engaged in the world of contemporary publishing, offering students the opportunity to meet with writers and publishers from around the UK and beyond and to take part in our varied and exciting range of literary activities, from performing their own work to being "showcased" at our Literary Festival.

You will learn how to:
Create and develop your own writing practice through a series of creative and practical workshops
Present and talk about your own work with authority and confidence - in the context of literary studies and a knowledge of the creative marketplace.
Read others' writing with sensitivity, intelligence and critical awareness.
Build a significant folio of creative work and develop this into work of a standard that is ready for formal presentation.
Each module can be studied separately, or as part of a full degree or diploma that can be taken part time or full time.

We can guarantee that your writing during the course of your programme will be productive, intellectually stimulating and highly creative.

What's so good about Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

In addition to producing a range of finished work for assessment during the year, you will also learn about the details of publishing, finding agents, setting your work in a context and making the important connection between the scale and shape of your writing and your aspirations for it. You'll have the opportunity to undertake specialist master classes with top-name authors, and go on visits to sites of special interest for the creative student - in the past these have included the D'Arcy Thomson Museum and the Scottish Poetry Library.

Literary Dundee

With an annual Literary Festival, regular and varied literary salons, poetry workshops, readings from internationally renowned and local authors, and much more, the events organised under the umbrella of Literary Dundee complement the course perfectly.

"Studying for an MLitt gave me the time and opportunity to work on my debut novel which was published soon after I graduated. I found the teaching and supportive environment to be invaluable during that time and it has had a great impact on my confidence since."
Zoe Venditozzi - graduated MLitt 2012

Zoe's novel is Anywhere's Better Than Here, published by Sandstone Press Ltd

How you will be taught

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a fulltime basis.

This programme is varied in delivery and content, comprising four-hour writing workshops to seminars to individual tutorials, helping you to develop practical, intelligent and highly creative methods by which you can approach your writing.

What you will study

During the first two semesters (September to December and January to April), students take the following core modules:

Creating Writing*
Studying Writing
Each student also selects two optional modules (40 credits each) from a list available each year. The currently available modules are:

Publishing Writing
Performing Writing
Refining Writing
Writing, Texts & Books
Planning Writing
You will then (from May to September) go on to undertake a dissertation worth 60 credits. You develop the theme or idea for your dissertation over the year, with the help of tutors.

*Creating Writing may be taken on a stand-alone basis.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by creative folio (6,000 words) and accompanying essay (2,500 words), or two essays.
Assessment for the research-led modules is normally by essay (2,000-2,500 words or 2,500-3,000 words).
The dissertation or creative manuscript has a word limit of 15,000, and includes a reflective piece of writing (3,000 words).
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Our graduates go on to be involved in a range of exciting literary activities - that range from publication of creative work to participation in national festivals and reading events. Recent students' successes include a first novel coming out with Sandstone this year, a placement in Canongate Publishing, Writers' Awards from Creative Scotland and the Scottish Books Trust, and the performance of a play. Our ex-students tend to stay part of our literary and creative community at Dundee after they have finished their formal studies with us - for as much as we believe in involving participants as fully and creatively as we can while they are with us, so do we not like to see them go!

This alone, makes our programme distinctive and individual and the very opposite of a large, more anonymous school. As a result our students are highly proactive and fully creatively engaged in the publishing and cultural world after they receive their degree.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, graduate

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Take on a defining challenge for humanity in the 21st century – creating a global low-carbon economy while providing modern energy services to the world’s population. Read more
Take on a defining challenge for humanity in the 21st century – creating a global low-carbon economy while providing modern energy services to the world’s population.

This MSc is unique in combining ideas from economics, innovation studies and policy studies while requiring no prior training in these fields. The course provides a broad-based, social science training in energy policy, focusing in particular on the role of technological innovation.

You learn from internationally recognised faculty from SPRU – Science Policy Research Unit, a world-leading research centre on science, technology and innovation policy, and the Sussex Energy Group, one of the largest energy policy research groups in the world.

You gain the skills to analyse policy problems and to propose and evaluate viable policy solutions. The course provides an essential foundation for careers in government, international organisations, the private sector and NGOs.

How will I study?

Teaching is via small, highly interactive lectures and seminars that foster a culture of knowledge sharing, ideas generation, critical thinking and enthusiastic debate.

You’ll study a combination of core modules and options, assessed through:
-Coursework
-Group projects
-Examinations
-Extended essays
-Presentations
-Policy briefs

In the summer, you work on a research-based dissertation. We encourage interaction, collaboration and creativity. You’re invited to participate in our programme of research seminars as well as conferences and workshops.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

SPRU 50th Anniversary Scholarship (2017)
- £10,000 towards fees with any remaining funds to be used to support maintenance.
- Application deadline: 1 July 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/754

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
- up to 100 £5,000 Masters scholarships
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/711

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from India
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/714

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Malaysia
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/715

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships to overseas fee paying students from Nigeria
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/717

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)
- scholarships worth £3,500 for all overseas fee paying students from Pakistan
- Application deadline: 1 August 2017
- Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/view/716

For more information on any Scholarships: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships

Careers

With the growing importance of energy on political, corporate and even social agendas around the world, there is increasing demand for energy policy professionals.

All our graduates have successfully obtained employment in a variety of sectors. For example, recent MSc graduates have gained employment in:
-International organisations (such as the OECD, UNDP, UNEP, IEA, and IREAN)
-Government departments (such as the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change, Government of British Columbia, Canada)
-Local authorities (such as the Brighton & Hove Council sustainability team)
-Businesses (such as RWE npower, Ecofys, EDF, Unilever, Southern Solar, Renaissance Re, Centro de Apoio a Inovação Social-CAIS)
-NGOs (such as the International Social Science Council, Green Jobs Alliance, People and Planet)

Other graduates have gone on to work for independent consultancies, or to study for PhDs in this area.

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The curriculum is based on the specialist training curriculum developed by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians. Read more

Sports & Exercise Medicine Courses

The curriculum is based on the specialist training curriculum developed by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians. It therefore meets the highest standards for SEM education and would enhance national and international employability. This fact, in conjunction with our affordable prices, promises a truly accessible course of the highest standard.

The Sports & Exercise Medicine courses have been developed for health professionals who are interested in a leadership role within Sports Medicine including GP’s, doctors, nurses, physicians, surgeons, physiotherapists, dieticians, psychologists, and counsellors running clinics.

Both our Postgraduate Diploma and Masters course in Sports & Exercise Medicine can be completed online and are available 24/7, giving you the flexibility to learn at a time that suits your busy schedule.

Diploma in Sports & Exercise Medicine

The course is designed to be practical and clinically focused. On completion of the Postgraduate Diploma, students have:
- a systematic understanding of the basics of Sports medicine, exercise physiology including the behavioural and life science basis.
- a critical awareness of current issues affecting the care of patients with certain sports related injuries and the tailored benefits of exercise.
- an advanced knowledge of Sports and Exercise Medicine including physiology and anatomy of exercise.
- an ability to use knowledge to adapt professional practice to meet the changing demands of health care systems.

It is envisaged that most students will be in primary care or aspiring to such posts. The course is designed to be relevant to all health professionals who have exposure to people with sports related injuries and is particularly relevant to:

Physiotherapists, Sports Therapists, Chiropractors and Primary Care Physicians with a specialist interest in Sports and Exercise Medicine.

Course Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma course is based on the Royal College of Physicians Specialty Training curriculum. It therefore meets the highest standards for SEM education and would enhance national and international employability. The online course lasts one calendar year and is a part time distance learning course. It consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks duration.

Module 1 - Anatomy, Physiology and Psychology of Sport and Exercise
Module 2 - Exercise and Sport in Relation to Chronic Disease and Populations
Module 3 - Common Sports Injuries and Investigation
Module 4 - Management and Rehabilitation Planning of Sports and Exercise Related Injuries
Module 5 - Injury Prevention, Rehabilitation and Return to Exercise
Module 6 - The Multidisciplinary Team in Exercise and Sport
Assessment

The course puts assessment at the heart of learning by using clinical scenarios to facilitate problem-solving, critical analysis and evidence-based care. The scenarios act as both the focus for learning and assessment thus embedding assessment within the learning process.

Each of the 6 modules has the same assessment format. Due to the online nature of the course, students are expected to login and participate in the course regularly throughout the module (ideally on a daily basis).

Students are split into groups of 10-15 students and are assigned a dedicated expert tutor who:

Facilitates clinical case discussions with the group.
Monitors, assesses and marks each student throughout the module.
Students use the skills gained during the lectures to engage with the different activities (see below).
Clinical case scenarios with case based discussion - 40%
Individual learning portfolio - 10%
Group/individual activity - 20%
Case based examination - 30%

MSc in Sports & Exercise Medicine

The Sports and Exercise MSc course provides a progression route for the Postgraduate Diploma in Sports and Exercise Medicine course offered by the University.

The Masters in Sports and Exercise Medicine runs over 1 calendar year. Students undertake an initial 12 week online module to develop their skills in critical appraisal and knowledge of research methodologies. Thereafter they are able to select a 1,500 word proposal and 10,500 word professional project.

On completion of the MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine course, you will be able to demonstrate:

An applied understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in an appropriate clinical setting.
An in-depth knowledge and understanding of Sports and Exercise Medicine informed by current scholarship and research.
Course Structure

Module 1 - Research Methodologies in Sport and Exercise Medicine
Module 2 - Professional Project
Teaching Methods

Module 1 - Research Methodologies in Sport and Exercise Medicine

MSc teaching methods for this module of our Sports and Exercise Medicine MSc are similar to the PG Diploma course modules however it is run over 12 weeks.

Module 2 - Professional Project

To produce the professional project, students continue to use the online course however much of the work is self-directed.

Students are expected in the first 8 weeks to interact with their tutor on a weekly basis. Students select a specific project and submit a project summary/proposal (approximately 1500 words).

Once the proposal has been approved, the professional project (10,500 words) itself is then completed through online guidance and supervision offered by the tutor. The student and tutor will interact regularly (weekly) on the dedicated students/tutor discussion area or through any other means of communication deemed appropriate by both parties (telephone/SKYPE/email). Note of any verbal communication with the tutor is recorded on the student's journal by the student.

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The LLM in Internet Law & Policy is also known as the LLM in IT & Telecommunications Law. The course structure and module choices are identical. Read more

Why this course?

The LLM in Internet Law & Policy is also known as the LLM in IT & Telecommunications Law. The course structure and module choices are identical. You'll have the choice of an interchangeable title that best reflects your desired sector and country of employment.

Internet Law, Internet Policy, IT & Telecoms Law are fast-changing areas of legal specialisation that have a large international reach and strong employment prospects.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internetlawpolicy/

You’ll study

This course is offered on a full-time and part-time basis for session 2016/17.
You'll complete six modules.

- Compulsory module: Legal Research (LLM/PgDip)

The following modules are also available:
- E-Commerce Law
- Intellectual Property Law
- International Intellectual Property (only available for the distance learning route)
- Internet Governance (only available for the distance learning route)
- Telecommunications Law (compulsory for LLM IT & Telecommunications Law)
- Privacy, Crime & Security
- Digital Copyright Law & Policy-making
- Domain Name Regulation (only available for the distance learning route)

Satisfactory completion of three modules qualifies you for the PgCert. If you complete six modules you'll gain the award of PgDip. To qualify for the LLM you must submit a dissertation of 15,000 words on an approved topic.

Course awards

The LLM in Internet Law & Policy has been awarded five Commonwealth Distance Learning Scholarships which will cover full tuition costs. Applications for 2015/16 are now closed. Details of the scholarships for 2016/17 will be available soon.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You’ll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

The School of Law is home to Scotland’s first Law Clinic. It provides a ‘real life’ learning experience for students and an invaluable service to members of the public who do not qualify for legal aid, and cannot otherwise afford legal advice.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you’ll be required to provide evidence of your English language proficiency before you can begin the course.
You'll need an IELTS score of 6.5, with no area scoring below 6.0, and it must be valid for two years.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The majority of this work is conducted on a self-study basis using the course materials provided.

This includes:
- completing the readings for each session
- participation in online forum discussions
- writing a 1,500-word theme report as a mid-term assessment

This is prior to the main assignment.
Online discussions use the MyPlace platform and include tutor-led discussions and discussions on specific activities listed in the reading materials.

Assessment

20% of the class grade is your engagement with online discussions. You're expected to contribute at least 200 words to each of the 10 sessions.
You're also required to submit a 1,500-word report in the same format as the final assignment. This is worth 20% of the grade to determine your understanding of the course material.
Finally, a written assignment of approximately 4,500 words will be submitted, worth 70% of your grade.

Careers

This course is an ideal choice for law graduates, lawyers and IT specialists, recently graduated or those who've been working for some time.
It is for those wanting to gain the skills and knowledge to formulate and apply law in the information society.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The MPols is a one-year (full-time) degree, which encompasses both coursework and research. The coursework component is spread across two semesters. Read more
The MPols is a one-year (full-time) degree, which encompasses both coursework and research. The coursework component is spread across two semesters. It consists of four papers including the core paper, 'The Political': Theory and Practice, which introduces students to the contested notion of politics and key methodological issues in theory and practice. Students also undertake a research dissertation of 20,000 words under the supervision of a politics staff member over a 12 month period and are expected to attend workshops designed to assist with the process of writing a dissertation. The degree is also available to part-time students.

Students may enrol in the MPols either for first semester (February) or second semester (July).

Graduates will be prepared for careers in the private and public sectors as researchers, policy makers, advisors and analysts. The degree also provides a pathway to doctoral-level study in Politics.

Programme Requirements

POLS 501 “The Political”: Theory and Practice (30 Points)
Three further 500-level POLS papers (60 Points)
POLS 590 Research Dissertation (90 Points)

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of:
-Four 30-point 500-level papers, which must include POLS 501 and three further POLS 500-level papers;
-A 60-point research dissertation (POLS 590).
The research dissertation shall be completed over the course of one calendar year. It should be started at the beginning of the programme and submitted no later than twelve months following first enrolment. The limit is 20,000 words of text, exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tabular material, bibliography or equivalent. Before commencing the investigation to be described in the research dissertation, a candidate shall obtain the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator and the supervisor(s) of the proposed topic. A candidate may not present a dissertation which has previously been accepted for another degree.

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Starting in fall 2014, graduate students can enroll in the new Bioinformatics Specialization, as part of the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Graduate Program. Read more
Starting in fall 2014, graduate students can enroll in the new Bioinformatics Specialization, as part of the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Graduate Program. This unique program at the University of Calgary will provide students with advanced training in the development of computational approaches for understanding large-scale biomedical data.

Come study science in the Canadian Rocky Mountains! Research in our department is diverse, and at the forefront of many fields. Research interests span from biochemistry to molecular, cellular and developmental biology, genetics, immunology and bioinformatics, with applications to cancer and clinical research. Our departmental members are grouped into four "streams" with common research interests: Molecular and Developmental Genetics, Molecular Biology of Disease, Genomics Proteomics and Bioinformatics and Cell Signalling and Structure. Additionally our faculty are members of the Faculty of Medicine's research-based Institutes and Centres.

Our department offers outstanding graduate training leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and postdoctoral training. Effective April 1, 2014, guaranteed minimum stipends will be $23,000 for Ph.D. students and $21,000 for M.Sc. students. All students admitted into the BMB graduate program during the 2013-2014 year, and receiving the guaranteed minimum stipend, will receive a BMB Entrance Award. This award is valued at $5,000 for PhD students ($2,500 to be paid in their first year, and $2,500 to be paid in their second year), and $2,500 for MSc students. Entrance Awards will be reduced by any amount a stipend is over the program's minimum levels.

Those with outstanding achievement or potential will be eligible for additional support through scholarships and subsidies.

New students may spend their first six months in the program doing rotations in up to three different laboratories, although they may also apply to directly enter a research laboratory.

Calgary, which has a population of approximately one million, is a youthful, dynamic and friendly city. Situated one hour's drive from the Rocky Mountains, Calgary offers a wide variety of cultural, sporting and outdoor activities. Come to Calgary to be stimulated by the science and the scenery!

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The Department of Physics and Astronomy is one of the oldest departments at the University of Calgary, and since its establishment it has excelled in both research and teaching. Read more
The Department of Physics and Astronomy is one of the oldest departments at the University of Calgary, and since its establishment it has excelled in both research and teaching.

Master's (MSc) Thesis-based

This degree must be completed on a full-time basis.

Program Requirements
1. The student must choose one of five broad areas of specialization: Astrophysics, Physics, Radiation Oncology Physics, Space Physics, and Medical Imaging (interdisciplinary).

2. All students must have a supervisor. When admitted to our graduate program, you are assigned an interim supervisor to assist you with your course selection, registration, etc., however this may not be your final supervisory. You have a maximum of four months from the time your program begins (either September or January) to finalize your supervisor. Your supervisor is then responsible for directing the research component of your degree, as well as for some fraction of your financial support package.

3. Course requirements:
-For students specializing in Astrophysics, Physics, or Space Physics, four half-course equivalents, including at least two of PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613, and PHYS 615, plus two elective courses at the 500- or 600-level, as approved by the Graduate Chair.
-For students specializing in Radiation Oncology Physics, eight half-course equivalents. Six of which are MDPH 623, MDPH 625, MDPH 633, MDPH 637, MDPH 639, MDSC 689.01, then two Physics graduate core courses such as PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613 or PHYS 615.
-In addition, all students are required to take a minimum of three terms of the Graduate Seminar, although the normal load is four terms, and additional terms may be required of students on an as need basis.

4. Thesis submission and defense

Master's (MSc) Course-based

This program may be done part time or full time, and in fact we encourage professionals in the field to consider doing this program as a part-time, professional development student.

Suitable for students not necessarily oriented towards research activity.

Program Requirements
1. The student must choose one of three broad areas of specialization: Astrophysics, Physics, or Space Physics. The Radiation Oncology Physics specialization is not available as a course-based degree.

2. All graduate students must have a supervisor. For a course-based MSc program, this is quite straightforward, as the graduate chair acts as supervisor for all course-based MSc students.

3. The student must complete ten half-course equivalents, made up of:
All six of the core experimental and theoretical physics courses: PHYS 603, PHYS 605, PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613, PHYS 615. Plus four half course equivalents determined by the specialization area:
-Astrophysics - ASPH 699 plus three half-course equivalents labeled ASPH (two of these may be at the 500-level). PHYS 629 and SPPH 679 may be taken instead of ASPH courses
-Physics - PHYS 699, one half-course equivalent labeled PHYS, at the 600-level or above, and two half-course equivalents labeled ASPH, PHYS, or SPPH (these may be at the 500 level)
-Space Physics - SPPH 699, plus three half-course equivalents labeled SPPH at the 600-level or above. PHYS 509 may replace a SPPH course

4. A comprehensive examination with a written and oral component.

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