• Durham University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Executive Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
"3d" AND "print"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (3D Print)

We have 28 Masters Degrees (3D Print)

  • "3d" AND "print" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 28
Order by 
Led by Professor Jo Stockham, the Print programme is a two-year specialist MA course. Renamed from Printmaking in 2015, this change signals that the study of the expanded field of Print is equal to the making of prints as a series of medium specific choices. Read more

Led by Professor Jo Stockham, the Print programme is a two-year specialist MA course. Renamed from Printmaking in 2015, this change signals that the study of the expanded field of Print is equal to the making of prints as a series of medium specific choices. We explore the mediated image approached through a range of intellectual approaches provided by a diverse team of tutors, all practicing artists. 

Access to world-class technical facilities in all print media means that we are able to both explore and expand the field of Print addressing the constant interplay between thinking and making, the image and technology. Students from a wide variety of backgrounds choose to study with us because of their interest in questions, which include, the nature of the copy, diagramming, appropriation, materiality of the image, the politics of print and print as a collaborative practice. 

Artists’ books and web based work as forms of distribution and explorations of narrative structures are a growing aspect of the course. We are benefiting from the renewed interest in the circulation, reception and creation of multiple images due to the ubiquity of digital images and computing.

We are embedded in a network of international print publishers, archives and galleries. A publishing project and exhibiting work are an integral part of the course. The potential for collaboration and residency situations where making work is a form of exchange is core to many students and we help them prepare for making applications to such opportunities. 

The aim of the programme is to enable students to work across a broad platform of media appropriate to their self defined ambitions and interests. By equipping graduates with experience of exhibiting, collaboration, editioning, lecturing, curating and a thorough critical engagement with a self defined body of work we aim to develop artists who understand the expressive nuances of different materials and forms of distribution in the expanded field of print. Evidence suggests they will be able to sustain themselves on graduation as exhibiting artists often engaged in related fields such as, teaching, publishing, curating and research.

An active research culture of staff, visiting artists, MPhil and PhD students is a core part of the programme and is shared through lectures, seminars, publications, presentations and exhibitions.

Alumni include, Andrea Buettner, Adam Dant, Mabe Bethonico, William Latham, Haris Epaminonda, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Christiane Baumgartner and Katsutoshi Yuasa.

The programme offers:

  • a critical context to understand the field of Print through making, exhibiting, discussion and writing
  • individual desk space 
  • access purpose-built workshops, offering internationally renowned printmaking facilities and instruction in relief and intaglio, screen printing, stone and plate lithography and large-format digital printing
  • access to college wide workshop facilities including metalwork casting, photography, ceramics and 3D printing. 
  • opportunities for teaching placements, workshop placements, exhibitions, overseas travel and international exchanges
  • an annual collaborative publishing project 
  • introductions to archives and collections, (eg V&A, Tate and British Museum) and editioning workshops (Paupers Press, The Thames Barrier Print Studio, Curwen)
  • a well-established publications programme which most recently published a print by Mark Titchner. Sales from these publications contribute to the Print Appeal Fund to support current students
  • continued support for alumni through Alumni RCA and programme specific events


Read less
Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The MA degree is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

A number of funding options are available including two An Foras Feasa Taught Masters Bursaries, the University wide Taught Masters Scholarships and the Maynooth University Taught Masters Alumni Scholarships. Further details may be found at: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/ma-and-phd-funding

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Digital Humanities Theory and Practice’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

The project and dissertation over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments. Student who wish not to write the final thesis have the opportunity to exit the course with a postgraduate diploma in Digital Humanities.

Career Options

Graduates of the MA in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and research projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50F/MH51F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
The first year consists of three main projects, one per term that will explore different intellectual themes and contexts in which you might work. Read more

First Year

The first year consists of three main projects, one per term that will explore different intellectual themes and contexts in which you might work.

During the autumn term, students work from the collections at the Victoria & Albert Museum to explore the notion of the role that an object might fulfil. It lays the foundations of the research skills associated with developing material and process understanding and the cultural and social history imbedded in an object.

The spring term presents students with the opportunity to explore the theme of ‘Food’: its cultural significance, presentation and consumption.

The summer term is concerned wit the terrain of Wall, Floor, Window.

During the first two terms alongside the projects, a series of short course/workshops/masterclasses will be offered to widen students skill base and material/process understanding. These cover such topics as:

- Plaster making
- Print
- Glass – hot working
- Glass – cold working
- Glass – casting
- Jigger/jolley
- Decorative processes – ceramics
- Hand forming processes
- Basic glaze technology
- Rubber moulds
- Digital Design
- Digital Manufacture
- 3D Print
- Laser Cutting

Second Year

Through the second year, individual programmes of study will be negotiated with Personal Tutors exploring the context and working methods that will inform an individual’s future practice. There are opportunities to engage with a range of staff and visiting lecturers, and student led discussions and seminars are encouraged to promote independent thinking.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

Read less
The Applied Studies Program (ASI) is a 12 month practicum that provides you, as a graduate of a technical program, with the opportunity to enhance your skills by participating in an experiential workplace paid internship program at the Army Learning Support Centre (ALSC) at 5th Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown. Read more
The Applied Studies Program (ASI) is a 12 month practicum that provides you, as a graduate of a technical program, with the opportunity to enhance your skills by participating in an experiential workplace paid internship program at the Army Learning Support Centre (ALSC) at 5th Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown.

The multi-disciplinary platform will focus on the continuation of your technical studies and is designed to give you experience in your field of study with the opportunity to develop your leadership potential.

It's the next step in your career, one that can open doors needed for you to achieve your dreams by helping you gain experience, enhance your skills and the opportunity to network.

Internships are offered in the following fields of study:
-3D Modeling, Animation and Production
-Administration Support
-Flash Programming
-Game Programming
-Graphic Design
-IT Support
-Photography
-Video/Film Production
-Web Development

The Work Environment

The Army Learning Support Centre (ALSC) integrates industry standard technologies to develop advanced training for the military. The ALSC designs and develops distance learning, 3D models, gaming applications, animations, graphic print media, videos and photography to help modernize army training.

The facilities are among the best in the country to include state-of-the-art technology and equipment; 3D print capability, Oculus technology, motion chairs and motion capture systems.

You will work daily in a production environment that uses the same software, processes and techniques that industry studios employ. You will work in a team environment as a contributing member to the success of ALSC projects and the opportunity to learn new skills while in the program.

What to Expect with the Academic Component

To enhance the technical training you already possess, you’ll focus on the following areas of study. These soft skills are important in your day to day activities and will give you added skills to succeed in industry. You will learn through a combination of online and in-class sessions at NBCC Fredericton.
-Health and Safety
-Human Relations
-Organizational Management
-Personal Development
-Project Management
-Quality Management
-Verbal Communication
-Written Communication Techniques

Mission Complete

Upon successful completion of the prescribed curriculum, you will receive a post-graduate diploma in Applied Studies Internship and one year experience as a member of the ALSC within the Department of National Defence.

You will also have the option to apply for the Mentorship program, which will give you another year in the program. The mentorship program focuses on mentoring/coaching and gives you the opportunity to learn these skills while applying them in a work environment. These skills are sought after in industry and will further enhance your leadership capability.

Read less
Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The postgraduate diploma is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a career in digital arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field.
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

Course Structure

60 ECTS are needed to complete the Diploma. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities: Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

Career Options

Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH54F Full-time / MH55F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

Read less
Transform your creative practice by engaging with print media on our Master’s course at Cambridge School of Art. Using the latest techniques, you'll work on your own projects in our world-class facilities, and get invaluable experience of exhibiting, curating and collaborating. Read more
Transform your creative practice by engaging with print media on our Master’s course at Cambridge School of Art. Using the latest techniques, you'll work on your own projects in our world-class facilities, and get invaluable experience of exhibiting, curating and collaborating.

Overview

Discover the vital contribution that printmaking has made to the language of contemporary art practice, and how recent technological advances have broadened its definition.

Much of your time will be spent independently researching and undertaking your own practice-based projects. You’ll receive technical inductions for the use of both traditional and emerging processes (including relief printing and intaglio, screen print, lithography, photo-based and digital media) and be free to experiment with, and combine, them in your creative work.

Throughout the course you’ll have support from experienced print and fine art practitioners, and benefit from working in a supportive and critically informed art school. Our connection with the MA Printmaking course at Camberwell College of Art creates opportunities for exchange crits and gives you the chance to build networks with fellow artists. And you'll get a window onto the professional art world through our visiting lecturers, field trips and links to galleries.

Our series of workshops, tutorials, seminars, critiques, presentations and lectures, will allow you to develop research skills that you’ll use on this course and in your future career. In addition, you’ll gain experience of other areas of professional practice including curating and critical writing.

Our links with local printmaking and art organisations, such as Cambridge Original Printmakers, the Curwen Print Study Centre, Aid & Abet, Changing Spaces, Wysing Arts Centre and Cambridge Artworks, will give you the chance to take part in portfolio reviews, live projects and professional exhibitions.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10am-5pm (full-time); Wednesdays from 10am-5pm in Year 1, Tuesdays from 10am-5pm in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

As well as preparing you for a successful career in creative practice, our course will equip you for many other roles. Our past students enjoy careers in further and higher education, professional print workshops, museum and gallery management, public arts projects, artist in residence schemes and fellowship opportunities, in the UK and overseas.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Fine Art.

You’ll have access to events such as Creative Front Futures, which will give you a taste of different creative industries, and be able to take part in Fine Art Professional Practice and networking initiatives for our students and alumni.

Fortnightly lectures run by our Fine Art Research Unit (FARU) will give you a chance to hear artists and staff talk about their work, and engage in debates about art practice. Our recent speakers have included Phillip Allen, Juan Bolivar, Rebecca Fortnum, Danny Rolph, Hayley Newman, Günter Herbst, David Kefford, Cally Spooner, Tim Ellis, Andrew Grassie, Lilah Fowler, Jemima Brown, Caroline Wright and Matthew Derbyshire.

Visiting printmaking professionals have included Katherine Jones, Stephen Chambers, Sean Rorke, Rebecca Salter, Penny Brewill, Mike Taylor, Kate Palmer, Jo Love and Jane Dixon, Leo Brook and Amanda Couch.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Printmaking: Research and Context
Acts and Discourses
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

On our core modules you’ll demonstrate your progress through your visual research outcomes and supporting evaluative statements, except for the Master’s Dissertation, for which you’ll submit a 6,000-word contextual essay.

Specialist facilities

You’ll work in our fully equipped print studios, with industry-standard facilities including intaglio, screen, relief, litho and photo print processes. You’ll also have access to our 3D workshops, laser cutting facilities, large format digital printer, photography studios and dark rooms, and computer suites for video production and digital imaging.

Studio teaching takes places in our print studio and MA Fine Art studios, which also act as lively hubs for our full- and part-time students in printmaking and fine art.

Read less
BA (Hons) Fine Art. is a multidisciplinary course which allows you to work with paint, print, sculpture and hybrid, drawing, video, sound, performance, text, curation and installation practice in either a focused or pluralistic way. Read more

BA (Hons) Fine Art is a multidisciplinary course which allows you to work with paint, print, sculpture and hybrid, drawing, video, sound, performance, text, curation and installation practice in either a focused or pluralistic way.

You work from your own studio space where you can explore your practice and use the campus project spaces to exhibit your work, participate in group shows and hold meetings and events. You will have access to a broad range of workshops including 3D, print making, media suites and the drawing studio, all staffed with specialist technicians to support your practice.

Initiatives at galleries such as Wysing Arts Centre, Serpentine Galleries, Tate Modern and Camden Arts Centre provide opportunities to interact with the wider art world and you are challenged to consider wider realms of practice through lectures from practising artists such as 2013 Turner Prize winner Laure Prouvost, Cornelia Parker, Cécile B Evans, 2006 Turner Prize nominee Mark Titchner, Jack Strange and Jerwood Painting Fellows Susan Sluglett and Anthony Faroux. You will graduate with your final work shown in the NUA Degree Show, which attracts curators, collectors, critics and potential collaborators from across the UK.

 Join a community of artists and creative thinkers, experimenting, debating, developing ideas, learning new skills and acquiring further knowledge.

Facilities

3D Workshop

Sculpture workshop, foundry, mould-making, wood and plastics fabrication.

Print Making Workshop

For silkscreen, etching, lino-cut and relief printing, mono-printing and collographs.

Drawing Studio

Drawing and life drawing classes in a well-equipped naturally lit environment. Digital options include Wacom Intuos tablets and a digital microscope.

General Technical Sessions

Optional software inductions available to all students introduce you to a wide range of creative possibilities and output options.

The University Archive

House an extensive collection of exhibition materials and publications, including the NUA East Archive.

Media Resource Centre

For digital cameras, tripods, 35mm DSLRs, 35mm film cameras and lighting equipment.

NUA Library

The largest specialist are, design and media collection in the East of England including 32,000 books, 1,300 journal subscriptions and 3,000 DVDs.

Applications

The offer of entry onto a Masters Degree (MA) is based on an expectation that you have the potential to fulfil the aims of the course of study and achieve the standard required to successfully complete the award. Entrants should normally have achieved a BA (Hons)/BSc Degree of 2:1 or above (or its equivalent), in a subject related to your proposed course of study.

Applicants who hold a Degree from another discipline may also be considered for entry, subject to the submission of a satisfactory portfolio of art, design or media-related work in support of their application.

The majority of applicants to courses at NUA will be invited to attend an interview. This provides an invaluable chance to meet face-to-face and is the major factor in determining the success of your submission. The interview is an opportunity to assess your work and the suitability of your application and also provides you with a chance to assess NUA’s staff, campus and facilities and ask questions. The key focus of your application process is on your portfolio. Some courses may require additional entry requirements or passes in specific subjects.

  • Complete the application form, including a well-prepared and considered 500 word statement indicating your intentions for MA study. The form should be word-processed not hand-written.
  • Detach the Reference Form and forward to your chosen referee with a request to complete and return to NUA at the address indicated.
  • Email the completed form to: or post to Admissions, Norwich University of the Arts, Francis House, 3 – 7 Redwell St, Norwich, NR2 4SN
  • We will endeavour to contact you within two weeks of receiving your application and reference from your nominated referee. If your application is acceptable we will arrange a date for interview.

For further information on this course, please visit our website - MA Fine Art.



Read less
The brand new, broad and practice-based MA Design takes students on a creative journey where you will explore processes making, materials and context. Read more
The brand new, broad and practice-based MA Design takes students on a creative journey where you will explore processes making, materials and context. You will challenge and extend your design practice at an advanced level whilst developing a range of artistic and practical skills.

The course is delivered through a series of project-based modules 'Make', 'Play' and 'Live', through which you will engage with real-world problems and issues of relevance to contemporary design practice and work towards the production of a physical object.

Course detail

The course attracts a diverse range of practicing designers, makers and industry professionals from a range of disciplines, including but not exclusively: ceramics, fashion design, jewellery design, product design, lighting, fine art and architecture and equally broad ranging staff backgrounds in robotics, graphics, product design and fine art. You will work both independently and collaboratively, pushing boundaries and exchanging ideas across design disciplines.

Students value the experience and knowledge of staff, bringing different perspectives and industry insight to teaching in a highly professional and creative environment. Our students benefit from active links with the on-site Centre for Fine Print Research (3 teaching staff are members), leaders in 3D and 2.5D print research, bringing opportunities for placements, collaborative projects and exhibitions.

You will have access to cutting-edge facilities and technical expertise in fabrication, fashion, textiles, print and photography, in addition to regular guest speakers and live projects, bringing you up-to-date with the latest techniques and developments.

Modules

• Make (30 credits)
• Play (30 credits)
• Research Practice (30 credits)
• Practice in a Professional Context (30 credits)
• Live (60 credits)

Format

You will be taught through a combination of seminars, workshops, lectures and individual tutorials.

Students are responsible for setting their own projects, there are no set briefs and a large proportion of your time will be allocated to self-directed study with guidance from teaching and technical staff.

You will have access to a rolling programme of design-focused guest speakers from industry and academia and students are encouraged to make visits relevant to the practice.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of practical work and accompanying critical design log. Research practice is essay and presentation based.

You will present and communicate design ideas to staff and your peer group as part of the 'play' module, and the 'live' module encourages a live aspect to include the degree show or a negotiated live project with industry.

Careers / Further study

The course places strong emphasis on developing making skills, knowledge and creativity commensurate with the needs of professional practice in design and the creative industries today. It aims to prepare you for professional practice as self-employed designer/makers, artists, design teachers/lecturers and for work in design studios and interior design.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

Read less
This exciting new MA in Illustration offers you the opportunity to question, develop and reflect upon you own practice by exploring both traditional and innovative techniques. Read more

Why take this course?

This exciting new MA in Illustration offers you the opportunity to question, develop and reflect upon you own practice by exploring both traditional and innovative techniques. Through a negotiated project you will be encouraged to define your role as a creative practitioner in a broad social, political and historical context. This MA would suit graduates from arts based courses but also professionals returning to education to complete ‘unfinished creative business’.

The staff team has a wealth of experience with internationally renowned practitioners in the field of artist’s books and zines, practice-based PhDs and printmaking. The course benefits from an extensive dedicated collection of artists’ books and zines located within the illustration studios. You will consider the question “what is illustration?” and seek to redefine and cross boundaries. A strong social awareness ethos underpins the course enabling you to develop a unique voice within the creative industries.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Reflect on and challenge your illustration practice through a mix of lectures, seminars, group critiques, themed events, short projects, workshops and individual tutorials.
Engage with high profile visiting lecturers alongside the University’s dedicated careers department to build your Professional Practice skills.
Develop your existing skills through specialist workshops which could include print workshops, Adobe workshops that could lead to Adobe Certified Associate status, laser cutting and 3D printing, photography, collage and drawing.
Explore themes such as, narrative and sequential illustration, humour and satire, ethical and social positioning of the artist, and exploring literary sources for inspiration, limited edition publications, small presses and artists’ books.
Discuss the social responsibility of the illustrator as a cultural producer.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will provide you with the practical skills necessary to compete in a commercial arena and rhetorical skills to enable you to promote your work.

Our graduates could pursue careers such as:

Art director
Animator, storyboard artist and digital illustrator
Graphic/editorial designer
Toy and character designer
Comic book or graphic novelist
Printmaker and small press publisher
Zinester

Module Details

This course will help you learn independently through practice-based study, culminating in a self-defined project, with a reflective report. You will also position your work in relation to what is happening at the forefront of the subject area, with particular focus on social, political and social issues.

Here are the units you will study:

Proposal: This unit is about designing an independent practice-based project that will form the basis of your body of work. You will research a theme related to your practice and develop an independent programme of study outlining research and development.

Illustration Major Project: You will produce a resolved body of work responding to and reflecting on your initial MA proposal. This will consist of critical diary/blog, media experiments, sketchbooks and final artwork(s). It could take a variety of forms, e.g. artists book, print sequences, children’s books, comics and zines, animation etc.

A Question of Research: This unit provides an introduction to debates and research methods relevant for creative practitioners and your application to a pertinent research question. It also encourages self reflection on the research process.

Contextual Research in Illustration – You will use a variety of forms/techniques to communicate your research into your practice and the reverse. It will consist of three elements that build upon each other: a verbal presentation - sharing research and development; Illustration major project reflective document - evidencing methodology through to resolution; and a final project statement with accompanying digital portfolio of images.

Programme Assessment

You will receive guidance and supervision throughout the programme that encourages independent learning. There will be regular contact teaching time including group tutorials, 1-1 tutorials and workshops but we also aim for you to engage in the wider studio culture that develops within the subject area along side the undergraduate students in illustration.

During the final stage of the course in the summer term the learning becomes more independent and self-managed, making your timetable more flexible.

You will be assessed after the submission of your work for each unit. We also present structured feedback to ensure your project development on the right track.

Student Destinations

We anticipate that once you have completed this degree the scope of your opportunities within the creative industries will have widened giving you the rhetorical skills to enable you to effectively promote your work. You will have consolidated or repositioned your practice as a creative individual giving you a competitive edge in the commercial arena as an illustrator/artist. Alternatively, for those who wish to continue studying, there is always the option of progressing to doctoral level in your specialised area of illustration.

Our graduates could pursue careers such as:

Children’s book author/illustrator
Animator, storyboard artist and digital illustrator
Graphic/editorial designer
Comic book or graphic novelist
Educational, heritage or medical illustratort
Printmaker and small press publisher
Zinester

Read less
With state-of-the-art facilities and expert guidance from some of the UK's leading academics and technical specialists, our course will enable you to explore both experimental and traditional approaches to Printmaking. Read more
With state-of-the-art facilities and expert guidance from some of the UK's leading academics and technical specialists, our course will enable you to explore both experimental and traditional approaches to Printmaking. Using innovative resources for etching, intaglio, lino, letterpress, stone lithography, screenprint, ceramic and 3D printing, you will develop your own unique approach to Printmaking through workshop enquiry, research and critical understanding of your practice.

Why study MA Printmaking at Middlesex?

At Middlesex we take a highly practical approach to Printmaking that enables you to explore your interests and enhance your skills through experimentation, research and critical analysis. Flexibly designed to meet the ambitions of students from a wide range of creative backgrounds, including illustration, fine art, and design, our course will equip you with the advanced skills, contemporary knowledge and industry insights you need to develop your own practice to a professional standard.

Based in our £80 million Art and Design School and taught by a diverse range of Printmaking academics and industry professionals, our course features world-class facilities and specialist workshops fitted with both new and traditional equipment. With opportunities to build industry contacts and exhibit your work off-site, you'll also gain the employability skills, exposure and experiences you need to navigate a successful career path in today's competitive creative industries.

Course highlights:

- Our facilities are among the best in the UK with etching, intaglio, lino, letterpress, stone lithography, screenprinting, ceramic decal and glaze transfers available in a dedicated print workshop with specialist technical support
- Access to innovative software and equipment across the School of Art and Design including a 3D printer, large format digital printer, dark rooms, photographic studios, laser cutters and metalwork workshops
- An exhibition of your work in central London to create networking opportunities and build industry contacts in a professional environment
- Direct access to London's art world with valuable industry links to a range of galleries, printmakers, businesses, libraries and collections that will enhance your research and inform your practice
- Access to networking opportunities, world-leading research and expertise through the Art & Design Research Institute (ADRI) on campus

Read less
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/design/graduate-visual-communication-design. The changing landscape of people’s everyday interactions has blurred the lines between respected design fields giving designers new responsibilities to shape experiences. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/design/graduate-visual-communication-design

The changing landscape of people’s everyday interactions has blurred the lines between respected design fields giving designers new responsibilities to shape experiences. Designers must increase their knowledge in all areas of design, including print media, human-computer interaction design, motion graphics, and 3D digital graphics.

Plan of study

The MFA in visual communication design provides a learning environment for advancement in innovative research, user-centered design, and professional practice focusing on the creative potentials of visual communication through a full spectrum of media. Students may advance their design knowledge and technical skills by choosing one of three options: communication design, interaction design, or motion and 3D digital design.

The cross-disciplinary nature of the program offers a greater potential to foster innovation and creativity in visual communication design. The program reflects the current views and changes occurring in the professional design field. The skill sets required of graphic, interactive, and digital design have now crossed over and are interrelated.

Admission requirements

- Portfolio

A portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides a visual statement of the applicant’s performance to date of a candidate's design skills, aesthetic development, and maturity.

The portfolio must demonstrate a strong understanding of design principles and visual computer skills using Adobe products, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. A portfolio of 10-15 examples representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work should be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website.

Examples must demonstrate a good sense of design, typography, and digital illustration in addition to the applicant's interests in and aptitudes for advanced study and, specifically, potential for success at RIT. Applicants are encouraged to submit only their best original work. Applicants should not submit work copies from film, television, photographs, magazine/book illustrations, or other sources.

- Application deadline

The application deadline is February 15th. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications submitted. Acceptance after February 15th is based upon available space and accepted applicants may be placed on a waiting list.

Read less
This course is for designers who want to pursue their passion for particular areas of design, at an advanced level and with professional support. Read more
This course is for designers who want to pursue their passion for particular areas of design, at an advanced level and with professional support.

Course overview

This Masters is built around your personal design interests and aspirations. It allows you to push the boundaries of creativity, within a framework of academic rigour and contextual research.

You can choose to study any of the following areas:
-Advertising
-Animation
-Calligraphy and lettering
-Creative computational design
-Design thinking, innovation and ideation
-Design leadership
-Fashion, product and promotion
-Graphic communication
-Graphic design
-Illustration
-Interactive media
-Motion graphics
-Typographic design

Other specialised design disciplines will also be considered. Our specialist tutors will work with you as you create a portfolio of creative designs that will excite and impress potential employers.

The course includes a theoretical element which contextualises your chosen areas of study within the broader field of design.
By the end of the course, you will have completed a major project that has evolved from your practice and research. The project will be supported by a critical evaluation report.

At Masters level, the specialisms of tutors are an important factor. Our Department offers a wide range of research expertise within design. For example, we host the International Research Centre for Calligraphy (IRCC) which promotes and supports the development of calligraphy both nationally and internationally. We have excellent engagement with industry, locally, nationally and internationally and have several academic partners overseas including Hong Kong, Malaysia and the USA.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the design industry around the world. A Masters qualification not only opens doors in the workplace but also helps you progress more rapidly once your career is underway.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/design-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors and industry speakers and visits.

Modules on this course include:
-Design Studies 1 (60 Credits)
-Design Studies 2 (60 Credits)
-Design Studies 3 (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this MA Design programme requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods, which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Facilities & location

Our Design Centre allows you to develop your creativity while taking advantage of state-of-the-art facilities and, importantly, your own workspace. We provide well-equipped facilities and industry-standard design software so it's easy to make a seamless transition from your studies to the workplace. The Design Centre also attracts international exhibitions and conferences, and it provides a highly stimulating environment.

Facilities at the University include:
-Five computer suites incorporating the latest Mac Pros
-Digital design suites using industry standard software like Adobe Creative Suite, Maya and Toon Boom
-Digital SLR and HD video cameras
-Fully equipped Photography studio
-Fully equipped printmaking studio
-Laser cutting machine
-Large format colour printers
-Access to 3D printers and scanners
-Large format digital fabric printer and full garment design and making facilities

Arts and Design Library
Our Arts and Design Library has a specialist collection of over 120,000 books, videos, slides and one of the largest electronic information networks in the sector.

Journals and research
We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for media and arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Potential roles include animator, graphic designer, illustrator, calligrapher, lettering designer, typographic designer, interactive designer, lecturer or broad-based designer.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies, such as MPhil or PhDs.

Read less
Visual Communication is an integral part of our increasing visual culture. Graphic designers, illustrators and advertisers play key roles in how the world around us is explained, dressed and garnished. Read more
Visual Communication is an integral part of our increasing visual culture. Graphic designers, illustrators and advertisers play key roles in how the world around us is explained, dressed and garnished.

Course Overview

MA Visual Communication within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

The range of avenues available to the visual communicator is both vast and diverse and ranges from countless variations of print to the ever-expanding digital outputs. Almost everything that you interact with, consume, and see will communicate with you on some level. We help to get the message across and for you to understand it.

MA Visual Communication enables its students to explore two distinct spectrums of work. Firstly, there is the broadening process that is at the very heart of the contemporary dialogues portfolio of study. Students will be encouraged to develop their theoretical understanding as well as how they would normally approach a practical response to a user centered visual design problem. The process of expansive creative thinking and problem solving allows for the inclusion of a variety of experiences for the student to reflect upon in their work. The second spectrum gives the student the ability to develop a portfolio of practice led research that will build to an extensive major body of work within their specialist field of study which may span a diverse range of outputs across the fields of illustration, graphic, advertising and brand design.

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

Visual Communication is such a vast area that there are many different skill sets that can be covered by the term. Our graduates have ample skills to be able to gain employment in most of the areas associated with the creative industries. Examples of employment opportunities where graduates have been successful are as follows:

Sky Creative, SapientNitro, Nike, Adidas, Lego, Apple, Stag & Hare, Waters Creative, Icon, Blue Stag Studio, Tigerprint, Oxford University Press, Enigma Creative Solutions, Aston Villa, Manchester United, Dirty Little Serifs, W12 Studios, Dr. Organic, Barclays Bank, Swansea City FC…and so many more

Read less
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe. This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to glass and ceramics. Read more
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.

Course overview

This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to glass and ceramics. The subject is explored and contextualized in its widest sense through both practical and theoretical investigation and application.

We do not have a ‘house style’, instead you will be encouraged and supported to develop your own focus, independent creativity, improve your technical skills through expert support, and develop academic skills in research and communication.

You’ll be joining the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, made up of an international team of creative and experienced educators and practitioners. All academic staff on this course are engaged in professional practice or research and are at the forefront of their discipline.

Sunderland is a thriving research hub and hosts the Ceramics Arts Research Centre (CARCuos), which aims to develop, support and disseminate new knowledge and scholarly activity whilst also providing a platform both practically and theoretically for discussion aligned to the ceramic arts.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the creative industries. MA graduates have also wished to extend their work through a research degree either at MPhil or PhD level and continue studies within CARCuos the ceramic arts research centre at the University.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/ceramics-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Stage 1 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Critical and Professional Contexts in Contemporary Art and Design (30 credits)
-Experimentation in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)

Stage 2 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Professional Practice in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)
-Developing Practice in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)

Stage 3 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Research Project in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)
-Synthesis in Glass and Ceramics Practice (30 credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Facilities & location

Facilities for this course include:
-26 glass kilns, including a large glass casting kiln
-13 ceramic kilns and two large gas kilns
-Ceramics mould-making and glaze workshops
-Hot glass workshop with international-quality equipment
-Two cold working studios (sandblasting, cutting, grinding and polishing)
-Printing facility for ceramics, glass and other surfaces
-Architectural glass studio
-Decal printer
-3D MakerBot Printer
-Water-jet machine/Computer Aided Design
-Project and exhibition space
-Multi-function creative and social space
-Lampworking and future light workshop
-Computer suite and project space
-Arts and Design Library
-Journals and research

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course are:
-Key Glass and Ceramics magazines and journals
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

National Glass Centre
The Glass and Ceramics Department is based in National Glass Centre, a nationally recognised glass production and exhibition centre with a world-class programme of creative projects.

Studying here puts you at the heart of an international network of professionals in the ceramics sector. You will be exposed to the latest ways of working through visiting artists and designers, and you can become involved in exhibitions that help launch your career.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working as self-employed practitioners as well as being employed in arts administration and education.

During the course we encourage you to gain professional industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability.

The University has close links with arts organisations including Arts Council England, the BALTIC, Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Tyne and Wear Museums Service and Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art. We also have international links in USA, China and Czech Republic.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

Read less
Our Master of Architecture (MArch) is centred on studio work that is intended to stretch the boundaries of your design imagination. Read more
Our Master of Architecture (MArch) is centred on studio work that is intended to stretch the boundaries of your design imagination. It is a modular course based on design project work, supported by lectures and seminars that examine the theoretical, practical and material dimensions of architecture.

This course is designed to help you define the kind of architect you want to be. You can tailor your portfolio towards the practices in which you want to work or areas in which you want to demonstrate your expertise. Our School Gallery has examples of our student's work and images from our Degree Shows and publications.

Design projects in the first year (Stage 5) are based on a visit to a major European city. Your work focuses on the urban scale and the detail scale with studios exposed to a diversity of design approaches. In the second year (Stage 6), you choose from a range of thematic studios on offer to pursue a self-led design thesis.

Alongside design, you can choose from a range of modules. These include the stimulating 'Tools for Thinking About Architecture' which leads either to a dissertation, a live build project or research work with a member of staff. Alternatively, you can opt to pursue modules from another of our Masters' programmes – Urban Design, Town Planning, or Design and Emergence – and students who take these modules are also eligible for an accelerated route onto one of these programmes after the MArch.

The whole school 'Conversations with Practice' lecture series introduces new ideas from prominent practitioners and academics.

Through the programme you will:
-Develop an appreciation of design as a collective cultural endeavour involving the acquisition and exercise of complex knowledge and skills
-Learn to think and act critically, thinking harder and deeper about architecture, what it can achieve and what you can do with it
-Define the kind of architect you want to be and tailor your portfolio towards the practices in which you want to work or areas in which you want to demonstrate expertise
-Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to work in the architectural profession with an independent, research-led attitude towards design

Our Erasmus and international exchange programmes provide opportunities to study abroad for one or two semesters in Stage 5. Exchange partners include The University of Sydney and KTH Stockholm.

Accreditation

This course is Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part II professionally accredited and will give you a sound preparation for a career in the architectural profession.

Facilities

You will have access to a well-equipped graduate studio space and, in the second year (Stage 6), a personal workspace within one of two 'Atelier' spaces. We have a fully equipped workshop set-up for timber and metalwork including laser-cutting and 3D-printing facilities. Our computing resources include print and plot, and video-editing facilities.

Studio spaces in the School are supplemented as social spaces with the student-run coffee bar.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X