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This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Read more

Conversion Diploma

This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Satisfactory performance on the Diploma leads to entry to the SASP MLitt Programme. Many previous Conversion Diploma students have gone on to further study in philosophy at PhD level – either at St Andrews/Stirling or on another equally prestigious PhD programme.

Though Conversion Diploma students take only undergraduate modules (1000 - 4000 level), they nonetheless remain bona fide members of the large and vibrant postgraduate community at the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. You are invited to all postgraduate events, such as the various postgraduate reading parties, and are strongly encouraged to get fully involved with the many and various seminars, workshops, talks, and reading groups.

To complete the Conversion Diploma, you must take 60 credits in 3000-and/or 4000-level Philosophy modules (to include at least 30 credits of a compulsory 3000-level module) and 60 further credits which may be in 1000- through 4000-level Philosophy modules. (Most 3000-and 4000-level modules are 30 credits, so this usually means you will take four modules – two in each semester).

There is also the option of taking a not-for-credit MLitt module in Basic Logic which runs every Friday in Semester 1. This module is designed for those with little or no knowledge of logic, or for those who wish to brush up on their basic logic skills.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

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The video game industry is a vastly growing sector in both the UK and worldwide and the need for highly skilled and educated individuals is in high demand across the globe. Read more

About the course

The video game industry is a vastly growing sector in both the UK and worldwide and the need for highly skilled and educated individuals is in high demand across the globe. With Brunel’s Digital Games Theory and Design MA programme, individuals will engage in, and experiment with, practical game design focussing on the process of devising the gameplay experience itself, including (but not limited to) the creation of rules, gameplay mechanics, narrative, world design and user experience, among many other aspects that make up the art of game design.

Coupled with a theoretical underpinning that focuses on the formal characteristics of games and analysis as well as the social and cultural contexts that shape the development of games, players, and society, this exciting programme offers students the opportunity to develop a range of skills that are required for success in today’s competitive job market.

Our programme is staffed with seasoned games designers and internationally published scholars who bring with them an extensive understanding of the nature of the video game industry, the importance of networks and the need for scholarly engagement in order to create innovative games for the future.

Aims

You will gain a comprehensive and sophisticated understanding of the advanced academic study of digital games and the techniques and principles used in their design.

You will be provided with the relevant expertise, teaching and learning environment to support your critical and creative engagement with issues at the cutting edge of analysing and designing digital games. You will contribute to the process of defining ‘game studies’ as a new academic discipline.

You will develop skills and knowledge to gain employment in the digital games industry and make contributions to the development of innovative games that go beyond current markets.

You will acquire the skills necessary to undertake doctoral level research.

Course Content

The MA consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Each module will have a range of assessments; some practical, others written.

Game Design 1 (term 1, 30 credits) - practical group design projects (small); written evaluative case study 2000 words; assessed presentation

Critical Approaches (term 1, 30 credits) - 2 x 3000 word essays

Game Design 2 (term 2, 30 credits) - 1 x practical design project tailored to a specific platform (large); written evaluative case study 3000 words; assessed presentation

Socio-Cultural Contexts (term 2, 30 credits) (1 x 6000 word essays)

Dissertation in Digital Games Design: Theory and Design - either 12,000-18,000 words or 8,000 words with practical component - delivered in either digital format or as a design document (term 3, 60 credits)

Students are expected to use the MA forum for discussions and are encouraged to participate in extra-curricular support activities such as game jams, local game related and networking events in order to practice the creative and technical skills developed throughout the programme and foster conversation and connections that are an invaluable part of the post-graduate experience.

Special Features

Students will engage in, and experiment with, practical games creation, with workshops led by designers working in the industry, as well as explore a range of theories and concepts with which to analyse the values of games, play and pleasure.

This programme offers a unique focus on practical games design, informed by theory that is not offered by any other university. It is not a software or graphics training programme.

We have a team of experienced games researchers teaching on the programme, some of whom have played a pioneering role in making game studies a new academic discipline.

Assessment

Assessment is via a combination of practical games-making work, presentations and essays of varying length.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. It equips senior and mid-career professionals and managers with the relevant skills required to establish resilient and sustainable value chains / supply chains that are fit for the future.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16062

About the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)

The University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL), an institute within the School of Technology, has run executive development programmes in sustainability for 25 years, with open programmes in the UK, Europe, North America, South America, South Africa and Australia, and customised programmes for many leading organisations.

Who is the course designed for?

The course has been designed for current and future leaders working in organisations that recognise the importance of sustainable development, and are committed to sharing their knowledge, experience and learning from others. It is an award of the University of Cambridge, and equivalent to one third of a Master’s degree.

It is assumed that participants will have a reasonably good general knowledge of some of the issues dealt with during the programme. However, it is not essential to have specialised knowledge, and it is not assumed that participants have direct responsibility for sustainability or related areas, such as CSR or environmental affairs.

Format

In recognition of the practical challenges of participants undertaking study whilst holding down a full-time job, the programme does not require prolonged periods away from the workplace. Besides the short residential workshops, the core of the programme is an individual piece of work-related research and the development of a strategic action plan that is relevant to the participant's organisation.

A group project helps to ensure that as much inter-organisational learning takes place as possible. An online Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) facilitates communication and collaboration between the short, intensive workshops.

The course runs for nine months and encompasses the following key elements:

- A three-week preparatory phase;
- Two residential workshops, one held in the summer and the other in the autumn, with academic and practitioner inputs on key issues;
- Ongoing virtual and non-residential learning activities, including preparatory materials (readings / videos / audios) in advance of the residential workshops;
- Two individual assignments and a collaborative research project;
- Support and facilitation from a team of programme tutors;
- Informal and formal collaboration with fellow participants via email, teleconferences, face-to-face meetings, and the VLE.

In addition to attending the workshops, it is estimated that participants need to undertake at least 3–4 hours of work every week to complete the programme successfully.

Lectures: 40 hours
Seminars and classes: 4 hours
Small-group teaching: 6 hours
Supervision: 6 hours

Structure

Workshop 1: Understanding the challenges and opportunities and the business case for responding

- Systems, pressures and trends
- Sustainability risks and opportunities
- Understanding value chains
- Business case for sustainable value chains
- Critique of existing tools and techniques
- Taking a systems approach
- Leadership for sustainability

Workshop 2: Catalysing change within and beyond the organisation

- Sustainable value creation
- Business model innovation
- Internal engagement and influence
- External engagement, communication and partnerships
- Sustainable consumption and influencing the consumer
- Leadership for sustainability

Assessment

Analysis paper, 3000 words
Strategic action plan, 3000 words
Group project, 7,000 words

Each assignment contributes one third to the final overall grade.

Continuation

PCSVC is the equivalent to the first third of the Master of Studies in Sustainability Leadership programme. The topics covered correspond with those taught during the first Master's workshop and the assignments undertaken are similar to those completed in the first year of the Master's programme.

Alumni of PCSVC who are admitted on to the Master's may be exempt from attending the first Master's workshop (although they are welcome to join for the week), and undertaking the first-year assignments. If exemption is granted, the fee payable is reduced.

It is not necessary to complete the Postgraduate Certificate prior to applying for the Master’s. Furthermore, while completing the PCSVC successfully may strengthen applications to the Master’s, it does not result in preferential access or negate the need to satisfy the Master’s-specific admissions requirements.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Bursary funding is available for deserving candidates who are currently prevented from applying due to financial reasons. These will offer financial support of 25-30% of the programme fee, and in some exceptional cases up to 50% of the programme fee, to assist selected applicants

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Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. Read more
Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. This postgraduate course in history will help you develop the skills needed to become a historian, with a taught foundation module in the first term that will acquaint you with the theory, tools, techniques and research skills of historical analysis. We will look at the varied primary sources through which we study the past, from laws and official reports to diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers, oral testimony, paintings, cartoons, music, film, architecture, landscape, archaeological remains and the internet. We will consider how a secondary source differs from a primary one and the problems involved in interpreting a source and ascertaining its truthfulness and reliability.

Thereafter, the course offers 2 routes for you to choose between: the first route is research focused and will support you in producing a dissertation of 7000 words on the historical subject that most interests you; the taught route lets you select 1 module from any of the extensive range of option modules offered by the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology.

This programme is ideal for those who wish to pursue their passion for the past, those who want to experience postgraduate historical study without committing to a full Master’s degree, and those who are changing direction and moving to history from a different undergraduate subject.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/GCGHISTO_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Read about Birkbeck research that crosses disciplines and focuses on pressing questions within the social sciences and humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/sshp/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- This postgraduate course in history provides the opportunity to pursue your passion for history and undertake independent study and research in the time periods and subject areas that most interest you.

- If you have a degree in a subject other than history, but would like to study history at postgraduate level, this course is ideal for making the conversion between subjects.

- We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. Other nearby specialist centres of research include the Institute of Archaeology, the Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Historical Research, all of which have internationally renowned library collections and run seminars that you can attend.

- Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/) is ranked in the top 20 nationally and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.

- Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, delivering stimulating teaching.

- The department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.

- Find out more about why you should study with us (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/prospective-students/why-study-with-us).

- Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Course structure

To gain the graduate certificate, you must successfully complete modules worth 60 credits.

You take the module Foundations of History: Sources and Debates (worth 30 credits), and then choose either the:
- Research route: work towards a dissertation of 7000 words (worth 30 credits), or the
- Taught route: take 1 undergraduate module from those on offer from the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (worth 30 credits).

Module:
Foundations of History: Sources and Debates

Teaching and assessment

Teaching
This programme aims to encourage and support students in independent learning and original research. This will be facilitated through a mixture of seminars and one-to-one supervision supporting independent study.

Assessment
Assessment for Foundations of History: Sources and Debates consists of 1 essay of 2500-3000 words and either a second essay of 2500-3000 words or a literature review essay of 2500 words. Students on the research route submit a dissertation of 6000-7000 words.

Careers and employability

Graduates can pursue careers in research and archiving, education, the heritage industry, publication and the media, the charity sector, and journalism. Possible professions include historian, higher education lecturer, or archivist. This degree provides a range of transferable skills, which may be useful in becoming a journalist, heritage manager, politician’s assistant, academic librarian, or museum/gallery curator.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-history-classics-and-archaeology).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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This postgraduate programme in Environmental Science. Pollution and Monitoring provides a rigorous academic treatment of the fundamental scientific principles and practice of assessing and controlling the extent of environmental damage by Man’s activities. Read more
This postgraduate programme in Environmental Science: Pollution and Monitoring provides a rigorous academic treatment of the fundamental scientific principles and practice of assessing and controlling the extent of environmental damage by Man’s activities. The course emphasises the technology and principles behind the processes and techniques related to the reduction of emissions to air, land and water and the effects of pollution.

The course develops understanding of the complex interactions of societies and their environments, and a critical awareness of how these interactions are unevenly experienced. The course seeks to raise your ability to understand the influence of human activities on ecological system including the relationship between hazard and risk. You will be able to study the environmental and technological issues in the management and control of air, soil and water pollution. In addition, you will learn how to collect representative samples of air, soil and water for environmental monitoring. Hands on experience on the use of various analytical techniques and the use of various statistical analyses for data quality assessment (DQA) are also provided.

Accreditation

The MSc in Environmental Science: Pollution and Monitoring is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM.

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

This MSc course can be taken in part-time (from 1 day a week for 2 years) or full-time (from 2 days a week for 1 years) mode. Students can start in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modular blocks
- Environmental Monitoring (30 credits)
- Integrated Pollution (30 credits)
- Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)


Optional modular blocks
Students normally choose 2 modules from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “1 module from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “3 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

Group A (pick 2)
- Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
- Environmental Management (15 credits)
- Environment, Health and Societies (15 credits)
- Climate Change: Science and Impacts (15 credits)
- Essentials in Ecotoxicology (15 credits)
- Chemical Regulation and Legislation in the EU (15 credits)
- Biosphere (15 credits)
- Environmental Modelling (15 credits)

Group B (pick 1)
- Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
- Current Practice in Chemical Risk Assessment (15 credits)
- Clean Technology (15 credits)
- Environmental Law (15 credits)
- Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation (15 credits)
- GIS and Data Analysis (15 credits)

Dissertation (60 credits)

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This market-leading Master's course in Environmental Management addresses the management principles necessary for the successful implementation of sound environmental management practice and legal processes involved in environmental control at a range of scales. Read more
This market-leading Master's course in Environmental Management addresses the management principles necessary for the successful implementation of sound environmental management practice and legal processes involved in environmental control at a range of scales.

The course develops understanding of environmental processes and applies this to both the legal framework and management decision-making activities. The course seeks to raise your ability to understand and analyse environmental problems at Master's level, in order to develop solutions.

You will be presented with the tools needed for environmental management, including project management, life cycle analysis, accounting and reporting, environmental reviews and audits. The course includes the processes and legislative approaches related to the reduction of emissions to air, land and water, and the effects of pollution together with the legislative framework in which they are set.

Accreditation

The MSc in Environmental Science: Legislation and Management is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM.

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

This MSc course can be taken in part-time (from 1 day a week for 2 years) or full-time (from 2 days a week for 1 years) mode. Students can start in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modular blocks

- Environmental Law (15 credits)
- Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
- Environmental Management (15 credits)
- Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
- Biosphere (15 credits)
- Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modular blocks
Students normally choose 1 module from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “no modules from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “2 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

Group A (pick 1)
- Environment, Health and Societies
- Climate Change: Science and Impacts
- Chemical Regulation and Legislation in the EU
- Environmental Modelling

Group B (pick 1)
- Current Practice in Chemical Risk Assessment
- Clean Technology
- Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
- GIS and Data Analysis

Dissertation (60 credits)

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The programme is for graduates looking to broaden their previous study of accounting or for those already working in accounting or finance. Read more

Why this course?

The programme is for graduates looking to broaden their previous study of accounting or for those already working in accounting or finance.

The course gives you an international perspective on the theory and practice of accounting. You’ll study financial management and securities markets. There’s a particular focus on the move towards harmonisation with international accounting standards and the impact of leading standard-setting authorities.

The course provides you with:
- an international perspective on accounting theories of income and value
- critical awareness of international accounting standards and their implementation
- sound understanding of financial theory and analysis
- appreciation of the nature and functioning of financial markets and institutions
- ability to apply analytical techniques in practice

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationalaccountingfinance/

You’ll study

The taught component of the course is covered in the first two semesters. Core modules include Principles of Finance and Accounting & Financial Analysis. Elective modules include Advanced Corporate Finance and Applications Advanced Accounting.

The research project will take up the third (summer) semester.

You’ll be assessed on your ability to select and apply relevant theory and research methods. This work may be linked to an issue raised by, or a problem to be solved for, an employer.

- Dissertation or three research projects (MSc only)
You’ll work on either a series of research projects or a dissertation, supported by an academic supervisor. You can choose a topic from the broad range of issues covered on the programme.
You’ll be assessed on your ability to select and apply relevant theory and research methods. This work may be linked to an issue raised by, or a problem to be solved for, an employer.

Facilities

Strathclyde’s award-winning Business School is one of the largest institutions of its kind in Europe. We've around 200 academic staff and more than 3000 full-time students.

The departments and specialist units work together to provide a dynamic, fully-rounded and varied programme of specialist and cross-disciplinary postgraduate courses.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form , or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The taught component of the course will be covered in the first two semesters. Both of these semesters will run for 12 weeks.
At MSc level the research project stage of the course is taken during the summer semester.

Assessment

Every class will either have a class test or assignment during Semester 1 and 2. The exams for all classes will take place at the end of the semester in January and June.

Careers

This course is suitable for those intending to develop their careers in finance, broadly defined as:
- corporate finance
- security analysis
- portfolio management
- options and futures
- treasury management
- the functioning of financial institutions and markets
- financial decision-taking in the public sector

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?. Read more
Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?

For 13 years, our MA Creative Writing has been enabling students to achieve some, if not all, of these goals. In 2016 alone, 11 of our graduates published novels with major publishing houses (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/news/creative-writing-alumni-success).

The course is taught through small, dynamic seminars and one-to-one tuition. We offer modules in fiction writing and options in playwriting, poetry, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.

All teaching is done by regularly published and produced award-winning writers, who will help you strengthen and professionalise your identity as a writer. Students have opportunities to interact with publishers and agents to broaden their understanding of the market and will be eligible to submit work for publication in the annual Birkbeck Creative Writing journal, The Mechanics' Institute Review and MIROnline.

To find out more, read our programme handbook (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/current-students/postgraduate/).

You will taught by successful, published authors and practitioners, including:

- Julia Bell
- David Eldridge
- Richard Hamblyn
- Russell Celyn Jones
- Toby Litt
- Luke Williams
- Benjamin Wood
- Jonathan Kemp.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/TMACWRIT_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Read about Birkbeck research that enriches our experience and understanding of our shared history, culture and art (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- Aims to develop the craft of fiction at a professional level and includes practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

- In addition to working with the established writers who teach the degree, you will have contact with industry professionals, such as publishers and literary agents, who offer a series of platform discussions in the summer term.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Our Department of English and Humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english) is a lively centre of world-class research and teaching.

- We offer a range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/study-here/world-class-research-resources).

- Our annual creative writing magazine, The Mechanics' Institute Review, is edited by Birkbeck MA Creative Writing students and features writing from the course as a showcase for the degree, with wide distribution beyond Birkbeck to literary agents, publishers, etc.

- Read an account of how our students created the most recent issue of The Mechanics' Institute Review (http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/george/2014/10/07/editing-the-mechanics-institute-review-11/).

- MIROnline is an interactive website, edited by PhD students and volunteers, with all the latest news and writing from this programme and beyond.

- Find out more about our range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research).

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Teaching and assessment

- Teaching
Teaching is seminar-based. Each session is generally 2 hours, and there are further regular one-to-one tutorials throughout the year.

- Assessment
4 short creative pieces with critical essays (50%). A dissertation (15,000 words) in one of the following genres: a novella, novel or collection of short stories, with a preface of 3000 words (50%).

Careers and employability

Birkbeck Creative Writing graduates include:

Sally Hinchcliffe
Niki Aguirre
Heidi James
Matthew Loukes
Iphgenia Baal
Nii Parkes
Emma Henderson
Liz Fremantle
Anna Hope
Karin Salvalaggio
Olya Knezevic
Phoebe Blatton
Melissa De Villiers
Nik Korpon
Louise Lee
Tray Butler
Helen Pike
David Savill
Laura Allsop
Sarah Alexander
Nadim Safdar
A. J. Grainger
Julia Gray
Nicole Burstein
Jules Grant
Amy Bird
Stefanie Seddon
Fiona Melrose.

Graduates go in to careers in editing, teaching, and writing professionally. Possible professions include creative writer, magazine or newspaper journalist, or editorial assistant. This degree can also be useful in becoming an academic librarian, English as a second language (ESOL) teacher, or information officer.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-english-and-humanities).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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Our MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability has been developed around two important principles. 1. the latest academic research from this field, which is used to give you all the necessary knowledge to work on sustainability issues;. Read more

About the Course

Our MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability has been developed around two important principles:

1. the latest academic research from this field, which is used to give you all the necessary knowledge to work on sustainability issues;
2. the skills requirements of employers in the environmental sector, so that you can be sure of your employability.

Whether you want to work in the public, private, charitable or academic sector, our course has the flexibility to give you the focused knowledge and skills that are needed to start, or re-energise, your career.

The programme is based around 5 compulsory modules that provide the essential background to climate change and sustainability. Students then chose 3 optional modules to focus their studies on their particular area of interest e.g. energy, policy and law, environmental management, modelling and data analysis or environmental science. Indeed, our alumni have gone on to work in all these areas.

Aims

We aim to provide students with an interdisciplinary knowledge of the science and potential impacts of climate change across a variety of key areas, including energy, health, business, policy and technology. This is underpinned by a critical understanding of the concept of sustainability as applied to resource and energy use. The course will give you the skills and confidence required to develop creative and evidenced solutions to climate change and sustainability.

In so doing, we aim to meet the changing needs of society by generating graduates able to tackle the challenges presented by climate change, thus preparing them for careers that will span the transition to a post-carbon economy. The course content has been developed in consultation with our alumni, employers and using the findings of national surveys of environmental sector employers (i.e. the NERC Most Wanted Skills survey).

Accreditation

The MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM. Our teaching team is NUS Green Impact (Bronze) accredited

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

The programme can be taken Full- or Part-time (from 2-days or 1-day contact time per week, respectively, depending on the optional modules chosen) and has a start date in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modules
* Climate Change: Science and Impacts (15 credits)
* Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
* Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation (15 credits)
* Environment, Health and Societies (15 credits)
* Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
* Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modular blocks

Group A (pick 2)
* Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
* Environmental Management (15 credits)
* Biosphere (15 credits)
* Environmental Modelling (15 credits)
* Renewable Energy Technologies I - Solar (15 credits) (September start only)
* Renewable Energy Technologies II - Wind, Tidal, Wave, Hydroelectricity (15 credits) (September start only)

Group B (pick 1)
* Clean Technology (15 credits)
* Environmental Law (15 credits)
* GIS and Data Analysis (15 credits)

Students normally choose 2 modules from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “1 module from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “3 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

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The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. Read more
The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. The University’s location in the centre of London, with its unrivalled resources for all aspects of book history within easy reach, together with the expertise that exists in its many colleges and institutes, makes it an ideal place in which to carry out research of an interdisciplinary nature. The history of the book has developed rapidly over the last 40 years as its power to clarify problems in many other disciplines has become evident. Scholars have come to see the study of the book as an aid to understanding literary and other texts and, more recently, as a way of understanding broader social, cultural, and intellectual processes in history.

The programme aims to:

Give students a broad understanding of book history from c. 3000 BCE to 2000 CE

Introduce students to the range of disciplines that make up the subject, including historical bibliography, palaeography, codicology, history of printing, bibliometrics, history of publishing, history of reading, and library history

Provide frequent opportunities to handle archaeological and historical objects relating to the subject

Give students the ability and confidence to deal with primary sources for book history (both manuscript and printed)

In addition, the MRes will:

Provide selected students with a foundation of three appropriately specialised taught courses (60 points in all), which will equip them to undertake a more extensive programme of master’s level research than that offered by the MA

Provide the opportunity for able students to write an extended dissertation (30,000 words) on a subject that requires treatment at a much greater length and depth than the usual MA topic

Offer students a degree programme that satisfies the needs of those who wish to undertake more extensive research or go on to do an MPhil or PhD

Structure

The MA consists of a series of six taught courses (including two core courses) plus a dissertation of 15,000 words.

The MRes consists of a series of three taught courses and a 30,000 word dissertation.

Students may also choose courses from the London Rare Books School programme under the guidance of the Course Director and Course Tutor.

London Book Trade Internship

Students have the option to substitute one of the modules with an internship at a London bookselling firm. The internships offer a key opportunity for students to experience life in a bookselling firm, to undertake projects for the company (everything from stocktaking to cataloguing to running a book stall at a fair), and to make connections in the book trade. In the past, students have been placed in Maggs Bros., Jarndyce Booksellers, Robert Frew Ltd., and Ash Rare Books.

Teaching and Supervision

Teachers are recognised experts drawn from the Institute, the British Library, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Lambeth Palace Library, and other institutions, at which some of the teaching takes place.

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This course recognises the need for skilled graduates to address the world’s major issues in electrical energy and power systems. Read more

Why this course?

This course recognises the need for skilled graduates to address the world’s major issues in electrical energy and power systems. It offers an integrated programme focusing on:
- the design, operation and analysis of power supply systems
- power plant
- renewables and industrial electrical equipment relating to a liberalised power supply industry
- globalised markets and environmental drivers

The course provides the advanced level of knowledge and understanding required for challenging, well paid and exciting careers in the dynamic and high growth electrical power and renewable energy sectors.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/electricalpowerengineeringwithbusiness/

You’ll study

There’s two semesters of compulsory and optional classes, followed by a three-month summer research project in your chosen area. There’s the opportunity to carry this out through the department's competitive MSc industrial internships.

The internships are offered in collaboration with selected department industry partners, including ScottishPower, Smarter Grid Solutions and SSE. You'll address real-world engineering challenges facing the partner, with site visits, access and provision of relevant technical data and/or facilities provided, along with an industry mentor and academic supervisor.

Facilities

You'll have exclusive access to our extensive computing network and purpose built teaching spaces, including our outdoor test facility for photovoltaics high voltage laboratory, equipped with the latest technologies, including:
- LDS 6-digital partial discharge test & measurement system
- Marx impulse generators & GIS test rigs
- £1M distribution network and protection laboratory comprising a 100kVA microgrid, induction machines and programme load banks

You'll have access to the UK’s only high-fidelity control room simulation suite and the Power Networks Demonstration Centre (PNDC). This is Europe’s first centre dedicated to the development and demonstration of “smart-grid” technologies.

Accreditation

The course is fully accredited by the professional body, the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

We use a blend of teaching and learning methods including interactive lectures, problem-solving tutorials and practical project-based laboratories. Our technical and experimental officers are available to support and guide you on individual subject material.
Each module comprises of approximately five hours of direct teaching per week. To enhance your understanding of the technical and theoretical topics covered in these, you're expected to undertake a further five to six hours of self-study, using our web-based virtual learning environment (MyPlace), research journals and library facilities.
The teaching and learning methods used ensure you'll develop not only technical engineering expertise but also communications, project management and leadership skills.
You'll undertake group projects. These will help to develop your interpersonal, communication and transferable skills essential to a career in industry.

- Industry engagement
Interaction with industry is provided through our internships, teaching seminars and networking events. The department delivers monthly seminars to support students’ learning and career development. Iberdrola, National Grid, ScottishPower, SSE, Siemens and Rolls-Royce are just a few examples of the industry partners you can engage with during your course.

Assessment

A variety of assessment techniques are used throughout the course. You'll complete at least six modules. Each module has a combination of written assignments, individual and group reports, oral presentations, practical lab work and, where appropriate, an end-of-term exam.

Assessment of the summer research project/internship consists of four elements, with individual criteria:
1. Interim report (10%, 1500 to 3000 words) – The purpose of this report is to provide a mechanism for supervisors to provide valuable feedback on the project’s objectives and direction.

2. Poster Presentation (15%) – A vital skill of an engineer is the ability to describe their work to others and respond to requests for information. The poster presentation is designed to give you an opportunity to practise that.

3. Final report (55%) – This assesses the communication of project objectives and context, accuracy and relevant of background material, description of practical work and results, depth and soundness of discussion and conclusions, level of engineering achievement and the quality of the report’s presentation.

4. Conduct (20%) - Independent study, project and time management are key features of university learning. The level of your initiative & independent thinking and technical understanding are assessed through project meetings with your supervisor and your written logbooks.

Careers

The course provides the advanced level of knowledge and understanding required for challenging, well paid and exciting careers in the dynamic and high growth electrical power and renewable energy sectors.
Employment prospects are excellent, with recent graduates operating in power engineering consultancy, global power utilities (generation, supply and distribution), the renewable energy sector and manufacturing. They've taken up professional and technical positions as electrical engineers, power systems specialists, distribution engineer and asset managers in large energy utilities such as ScottishPower Energy Networks, Aker Solutions, National Grid & EDF Energy. Graduates have also taken up roles in project management and engineering consultancy with companies such as Arup, Atkins Global, Ramboll, Moot MacDonald and AMEC.

How much will I earn?

Salaries for electrical engineers start at around £20,000 to £25,000. Experienced or incorporated engineers can earn between £28,000 and £40,000. A chartered electrical engineer can earn higher salaries of £40,000 to £55,000 or more.*

*information is intended only as a guide. Figures taken from Prospects.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/engineering/electronicelectricalengineering/ourscholarships/.

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This MSc is specifically designed for students who wish to pursue advanced studies across the broad range of subjects relevant to electronic and electrical engineering. Read more

Why this course?

This MSc is specifically designed for students who wish to pursue advanced studies across the broad range of subjects relevant to electronic and electrical engineering.

You can select classes from the extensive range of postgraduate taught courses delivered by our Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering. This unique flexible structure allows you to build a personalised MSc programme that meets your academic interests and career aspirations.

The course can lead to a wide range of career opportunities. Recent graduates have gained well paid positions in:
- electrical supply industries
- telecommunications and IT
- consulting and design companies
- healthcare and aerospace

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/electronicelectricalengineering/

You’ll study

There’s two semesters of compulsory and optional classes, followed by a three-month research project in your chosen area. There’s the opportunity to carry this out through the department's competitive MSc industrial internships.

The internships are offered in collaboration with selected department industry partners, including ScottishPower, Smarter Grid Solutions and SSE. You'll address engineering challenges facing the partner, with site visits, access and provision of relevant technical data and/or facilities provided, along with an industry mentor and academic supervisor.

Facilities

You'll have exclusive access to our extensive computing network and purpose-built teaching spaces, including our outdoor test facility for photovoltaics high voltage laboratory, equipped with the latest technologies including:
- LDS 6-digital partial discharge test & measurement system
- Marx impulse generators & GIS test rigs
- £1M distribution network and protection laboratory comprising a 100kVA microgrid, induction machines and programme load banks

You'll have access to the UK’s only high-fidelity control room simulation suite and the Power Networks Demonstration Centre (PNDC). This is Europe’s first centre dedicated to the development and demonstration of “smart-grid” technologies.

Accreditation

The course is fully accredited by the professional body, the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). This means that you'll meet the educational requirements to become a “Chartered Engineer” – a must for your future engineering career.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

We use a blend of teaching and learning methods including interactive lectures, problem-solving tutorials and practical project-based laboratories. Our technical and experimental officers are available to support and guide you on individual subject material.
Each module comprises of approximately five hours of direct teaching per week. To enhance your understanding of the technical and theoretical topics covered in these, you're expected to undertake a further five to six hours of self-study, using our web-based virtual learning environment (MyPlace), research journals and library facilities.
The teaching and learning methods used ensure you'll develop not only technical engineering expertise but also communications, project management and leadership skills.
You'll undertake group projects. These will help to develop your interpersonal, communication and transferable skills essential to a career in industry.

- Industry engagement
Interaction with industry is provided through our internships, teaching seminars and networking events. The department delivers monthly seminars to support students’ learning and career development. Siemens, Rolls-Royce, Xilinx, Selex ES and Mott MacDonald are just a few examples of the industry partners you can engage with during your course.

Assessment

A variety of assessment techniques are used throughout the course. You'll complete at least six modules. Each module has a combination of written assignments, individual and group reports, oral presentations, practical lab work and, where appropriate, an end-of-term exam.
Assessment of the summer research project/internship consists of four elements, with individual criteria:
1. Interim report (10%, 1500 – 3000 words) – The purpose of this report is to provide a mechanism for supervisors to provide valuable feedback on the project’s objectives and direction.

2. Poster Presentation (15%) – A vital skill of an engineer is the ability to describe their work to others and respond to requests for information. The poster presentation is designed to give you an opportunity to practise that.

3. Final report (55%) – This assesses the communication of project objectives and context, accuracy and relevant of background material, description of practical work and results, depth and soundness of discussion and conclusions, level of engineering achievement and the quality of the report’s presentation.

4. Conduct (20%) - Independent study, project and time management are key features of university learning. The level of your initiative & independent thinking and technical understanding are assessed through project meetings with your supervisor and your written logbooks.

Careers

The flexible structure of the course means graduates are able to design their own personalised programme to suit individual interests. Career opportunities are vast and include the electrical supply industries, oil and gas sector, telecommunications, IT, banking and finance, consulting and design companies, healthcare and aerospace.

Recent graduates have secured technical positions such as control engineers, design engineers and electronics engineers with organisations including GE, Jaguar LandRover and BP. They've also taken up managerial roles such as technology analysts, project managers and risk assessors with Morgan Stanley, Mott MacDonald and Atkins Global.

The MSc is also a great starting point for research within the department.

How much will I earn?

Salaries for electrical engineers start at around £20,000 to £25,000. Experienced or incorporated engineers can earn between £28,000 and £40,000. A chartered electrical engineer can earn higher salaries of £40,000 to £55,000 or more.*

*information is intended only as a guide. Figures taken from Prospects.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/engineering/electronicelectricalengineering/ourscholarships/.

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Understanding about hazards, vulnerability and the risk of disaster, underpinned by a practical awareness of the planning and logistics of an emergency, are at the core of this degree. Read more

Why take this course?

Understanding about hazards, vulnerability and the risk of disaster, underpinned by a practical awareness of the planning and logistics of an emergency, are at the core of this degree. Our internationally-recognised academics, with cross-disciplinary expertise from our School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and our Business School, will ensure you gain the ability to contribute successfully in the face of a crisis.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by experts with strong research proposals, who have extensive industrial and consultancy experience with government agencies, businesses and NGOs.
Gain experience of using disaster risk reduction techniques, plus a range of other skills such as mapping using GIS, GPS and remote sensing technologies
Opt to do a work placement with an emergency planning, crisis management or disaster response organisation

What opportunities might it lead to?

We will give you the knowledge and practical skills to ensure an interesting and rewarding career in the emergency planning, crisis management or disaster response sectors, both in the UK and overseas.

The Crisis and Disaster Management course is endorsed by the Emergency Planning College (EPC) of the UK Cabinet Office. If you have attended appropriate professional development short courses at the Cabinet Office Emergency Planning College (EPC) you may be eligible for exemption from attendance of up to two thirds of our degree programme. Accreditation of Prior Learning requires evidence of good practice in the topics of study and of applying this appropriately at your workplace. If you wish to take advantage of this offer, after enrolment on the course a personal tutor will aid you in submission of your evidence.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Contingency planning
Humanitarian aid organisations
Community resilience
Flood management
Military-civilian emergency liaison
(Re)insurance and risk management

Module Details

The course is a mixture of taught units and a research project, covering:

hazard, vulnerability and risk assessments; disaster risk reduction; emergency planning; crisis management; logistics and financial planning; business continuity; community resilience; humanitarian emergency response, and disaster management techniques, such as Geographical Information Systems (GIS).

The course consist of the following core units:

Disasters: Hazard, Vulnerability and Risk
Emergency Management and Planning
Disaster Management Techniques and Study Visits
Crisis Management and Governance (option)
Humanitarian Emergency Response and Recovery (option)
Research Project 


Programme Assessment

You will be part of a large postgraduate community in a vibrant and friendly department. The course units are delivered as a series of three-day teaching blocks, at three to four-week intervals from October to May, with all assessment by coursework assignments. Formal classes, such as lectures and seminars, enable you to gain the relevant knowledge, which is developed further through activity-based practicals, simulation exercises and study visits. The in-class teaching is supplemented by extensive use of web-based and library learning resources.

Assessment is varied, aimed at developing skills relevant to a range of working environments. Here’s how we assess your work:

3000-word illustrated reports
Poster and oral presentations
Literature reviews and research proposals
An individual Research Project

Student Destinations

The vocational nature of the course will give you transferable skills such as project planning, literature and data reviewing, field mapping, report writing, meeting deadlines, team work, presentation, communication and emergency simulation exercises. It also has strong research and analytical components, providing training for those who are interested in pursuing further research at PhD level.

You will have the opportunity to complete voluntary work placements with organisations (businesses, government departments, NGOs) in the emergency planning and disaster management sector, in the UK and overseas. Jobs are largely within the following sectors: emergency planning, crisis communication, epidemiology, risk management, insurance and re-insurance, utility companies, emergency logistics, civil defence and disaster relief.

The Crisis & Disaster Management MSc course is endorsed by the Emergency Planning College of the UK Government Cabinet Office.

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Master of Fine Art (MFA) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Fine Art. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Fine Art (MFA) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Fine Art. Typically this might include teachers, practicing artists, community workers, arts administrators, or recent graduates in Fine Art who wish to further their professional practice.

The MFA is designed to respond to students who already have a practice and who are able to readily determine where they are in relation to a field and its histories of practices and ways of working. It is the role of the MFA to work outwards, as it were, towards a context for the students practice.

​The student focus will be on their development of Art Practice relevant to the CSAD Subjects of: Fine Art; Textiles; Ceramics; Artist Designer Maker; and Illustration.

The MFA curriculum is designed so that students in the field of Fine Art:
- Kick-start a career or develop an idea
- Develop professional skills
- Become able, professional and directed
- Have a trajectory towards progression to a future Professional Doctorate

Course Content

The MFA programme is offered as One Year Full Time.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MFA students:
- ART7007: Position (60 credits).
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits)
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits)
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits. All students must attend the year-long Research & Ideas Seminars which happen on a weekly basis.)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing the Context module (60 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.
- On competing the Context and Exploration modules (120 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing Realisation in addition to the above, (180 credits in total) students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (Master of Fine Art).

Learning & Teaching

The MFA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MFA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MFA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MFA Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours).
- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours).
- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- ART7007: Position (60 credits). Design practice, Website / blog & reflective commentary / report (Personal Development Plan/Portfolio - PDP)/ 4,000 words.
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits) Portfolio Submission: Substantial body of practical work. PDP: 1,000-2,000 words
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits) Final body of work in the form of a public presentation through exhibition. A 3000 word Critical Paper and Viva Voce.
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits). Assessed through PDP undertaken in the other modules.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group) after each lecture, exploring the theme of the lecture and allowing students to clarify their understanding. These sessions may also be run as workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run.

This may include, for example, communal writing (via computer and data projector) or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

The MFA programme acts as a gateway for students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers or architectural technologists, leading towards a career or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MFA programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. It goes without saying that the MFA programme develops increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

The MFA is particularly focused on students who have already commenced their professional practice, designed about the provision of opportunities for ‘learning in employment’, and thus by implication exhibit the qualities necessary for employment.

All students’ will complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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