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The objective of this course is to provide an advanced colloquium dicussion forum that will reconnect to the major issues in the program with a unique focus on the continuously changing nature of cities and metropolitan regions. Read more
The objective of this course is to provide an advanced colloquium dicussion forum that will reconnect to the major issues in the program with a unique focus on the continuously changing nature of cities and metropolitan regions. Through a number of selected theme seminars the course integrates key issues in urbanism through a fresh theoretical and discourse approach emphasizing the importance of urban space to social life and real estate to the economy and urban development to politics of space and democracy. The students will be expected to present advanced short essays, discuss, debate and argue for their unique viewpoints. Presentations of different themes will be done by KTH faculty and International guests, coupled together with class discussions, will contextualize urbanism today and its range of opportunities and potentials. This higher seminar requires active engagement in discussions and well written essay assignment. The course offers a summary and closing of advanced studies in urbanism.

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Subjects in the course will encompass the elements and patterns of city form, visual imaging and photography, morphology of the city, analysis of ideal public spaces, static and dynamic forces of social life that compose and shape the urban realm. Read more
Subjects in the course will encompass the elements and patterns of city form, visual imaging and photography, morphology of the city, analysis of ideal public spaces, static and dynamic forces of social life that compose and shape the urban realm. Dynamics of nature and culture, social encounters, urban narratives, architectural ensembles, and urban settings will be elements that are studied in-depth throughout this module. This course will be based on the reintroduction of the utilization of “observational urbanism” as a method and tool for studying the public realm and social life therein. This course is fundamentally about researching the city which will include tools for analysis of public space using mental mapping, behavior mapping, critical city walks, photography methods, and space syntax analysis. Course will conclude with the analysis of a selected problem in the particular locality with the participants oral presentation within the closing colloquium that will include invited critic guests. The course consists of combinatory modulets - theoretical and methodological training (literature review, analysis of case studies in literature related to publis spaces), field trips and data collection (practical training of research techniques and tools) and basics in observational urbanism, city walks, visual mapping, space syntax, transect studies, link and task analysis and public participation.

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The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. Read more

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Graduate Certificate Program Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation

Workplace research indicates that managers and supervisors spend as much as forty percent of the workday resolving nonproductive conflict issues. Conflict that is poorly managed results in burdening costs for both the individual and the organization. Expanding worldwide development, the global economy, and population growth and associated social issues drive the intermingling of cultures and practices that increase the incidence of workplace conflict and destructive disagreement. Interest in and demand for conflict management has consequently risen.

The Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation provides students with the tools to manage, resolve, negotiate, and mediate conflict and to develop intrapersonal and interpersonal skills for living and earning. Conflict management training actively engages the student in self-exploration regarding issues of perception, bigotry, bias, values, beliefs, differences, and culture. The student will learn how to verbally and physically converse without allowing differences to interfere with collaboration. Business, government, and community agencies value these skills to increase productivity and to maximize a positive workplace climate. The ability to creatively manage conflict is a skill that most employers value.

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School (graduate.ua.edu). Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 (services.graduate.ua.edu/catalog/14200.html) of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Application and Admission Criteria

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education.

The required courses for the certificate are as follows:

• CSM 525 Introduction to Consumer Conflict Resolution
• CSM 527 Consumer Mediation, Negotiation and Management/Advanced I/Emotional Intelligence
• CSM 528 Consumer Conflict Mediation, Management, & Negotiation/Advanced II
• CSM 559 Techniques of Consumer Counseling
• CSM 586 Consumer Human Capital Management/Advanced III

Find out how to apply here - https://studentaccounts.ua.edu/

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A master of science degree is offered through the College of Human Environmental Sciences where students may specialize in the Consumer Sciences (CSM) program or the Family Financial Planning and Counseling program. Read more
A master of science degree is offered through the College of Human Environmental Sciences where students may specialize in the Consumer Sciences (CSM) program or the Family Financial Planning and Counseling program.

The College also offers a Master of Science in Human Environmental Sciences with the following areas of specialization: Consumer Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation (also available as a graduate certificate), Consumer Quality Management, Interactive Technology, and Sports Business Management.

More information can be found on the Graduate Required Courses page (http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/graduate-required-courses.html).

Visit the website http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/graduate-programs.html

CONSUMER SCIENCES

Students must complete 30 hours of coursework. A minimum of 24 semester hours of course credit, including HES 509, two courses in statistics, and 15 hours in courses in the area of specialization are required. Students must complete 6 credit hours of thesis research and write a thesis. A final oral examination is required upon completion of the thesis, and a manuscript of publishable quality based on the thesis research is expected of each Plan I degree candidate.

FAMILY FINANCIAL PLANNING AND COUNSELING

In the financial planning specialty within the 30-hour Master of Science degree program, students will study economic and social influences on the family and learn how to help individuals and families achieve their financial goals. Coursework includes 24 hours of financial planning coursework and 6 hours of electives in the area of specialization. By taking two courses each semester, students may complete this M.S. degree in less than two years. The program is offered both in Tuscaloosa and by distance.

- Financial Planning Website (http://financialplanning.ches.ua.edu/)

CONSUMER CONFLICT MANAGEMENT, NEGOTIATION, AND MEDIATION

The certificate requires the successful completion of 15 hours of course work, in addition to the hours required for the masters in the student’s discipline. All 15 hours may count toward the master’s degree. Students must apply and gain admission to the UA Graduate School. Students must adhere to all UA Graduate School admission policies and deadlines. See Section 4.3 of the UA Graduate Catalog.

Students who wish to complete the Graduate Certificate in Conflict Management, Negotiation, and Mediation must meet admissions criteria for the Master’s degree in General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences with a 3.0 or higher GPA. If the prospective student does not have the 3.0 overall GPA or a 3.0 on the last 60 hours of course work, then the student must provide the GRE or MAT with an appropriate score. The Graduate Certificate may be completed on campus or via distance education (http://www.csm.ches.ua.edu/conflict-management.html).

CONSUMER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Prepare yourself to become a quality management leader by earning your Master of Science in Human Environmental Sciences with a specialization in Consumer Quality Management from The University of Alabama. This 30-hour program is offered completely online to make earning a degree convenient for working adults. If you currently work or would like to work in quality management and would like to develop a deeper understanding of the field, this degree program can help you reach your goals. The CQM specialization will provide you with a comprehensive study of the facilitation skills necessary to lead an organization in continuous improvement.

INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGY

The Institute for Interactive Technology offers a 30-hour asynchronous Master’s degree specialization in Interactive Technology focused on computer-mediated communications (General HES Degree). Students work with professors in adapting course projects to a particular profession. The focus is on how individuals and organizations interact with technology and might be described as “the difference between doing work and going to work,” reflecting the computer-mediated nature of the program.

- Interactive Technology Website (http://iit.ches.ua.edu/)

SPORTS BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Faculty members from the College of Human Environmental Sciences (CHES) have developed a 30 hours graduate level emphasis in Sports Business Management (Sport, Hospitality, and Entertainment Operations) at The University of Alabama. The CHES Sports Business Management program, preparing students for employment and careers in the sport, hospitality and entertainment operation settings, can be viewed on-line at sportmanagement.ches.ua.edu. The mission of this master’s degree program is to provide students with a quality graduate education and fellowship experiences for entry and career employment in the sport industry. CHES Sports Business Management program is designed to educate students to manage in a wide variety of sport arenas (sport, hospitality and entertainment operation). The Keys to “Success in the Sport Industry” is quality fellowship experiences, advanced level knowledge, and ability to connect the theory to practice.

- Sports Business Management Website (http://www.sportmanagement.ches.ua.edu/)

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview. The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview

The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Designed to provide students with a strong background in psychological foundations, the program develops professional skills and competencies in assessment, counseling, consultation, and program evaluation.

A school psychologist works with young children (birth to age five); elementary, junior high, and high school students; teachers and administrators; parents; and professionals to offer services that lead to the amelioration of existing student difficulties and attempts to prevent school problems. Through diagnostic testing, counseling, consultation, and intervention, school psychologists help students deal with learning and behavioral difficulties and help improve students’ adjustment to school and their community.

The master of science degree is awarded after students have completed all course work, an internship, and have passed a portfolio review.

Plan of study

A minimum of 66 semester credit hours are required for completion of the program. Before registering for the internship, students must pass a portfolio review. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above is required.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in school psychology, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university,

- Have a minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0,

- Have completed at least 18 semester hours in behavioral sciences with a grade of B (3.0) or above,

- Have completed prerequisite undergraduate courses in general psychology, elementary statistics, child or developmental psychology, and abnormal psychology,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Submit letters of reference,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit an essay outlining the candidate's goals and related experience that shows evidence of a professional commitment and the potential for developing effective relationships with children, youth, and adults,

- Complete an individual interview, and

- Complete an application for graduate study.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 580 (paper-based) is required. This requirement is waived for native speakers of English and those submitting transcripts from American universities.

All credentials must be submitted and reviewed before the student completes 9 semester credit hours of graduate work in the program. Applications are due by February 1. Later applications will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

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Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission. Read more

State Authorizations

Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission.

Visit the website http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=184

Transfer of Graduate Credit for MSN:

Acceptable graduate credit of up to twelve credit hours, earned in a regionally accredited institution in which the student was enrolled in that institution’s graduate school, may be transferred and applied to the requirements for a master’s degree if approved by the CCN and Graduate School.

Consideration of credit does not guarantee transfer. Evaluation of credit for transfer will not be made until after the student has enrolled in the Graduate School of The University of Alabama.

Further information can be found in the UA Graduate Student Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/academics/doctoral.html#credit).

Admission Requirements for MSN:

Admission requirements are consistent with those of the Graduate School. Applicants for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) will be considered on a competitive basis.

- Nurses who are interested in the Case Management Program, NP Concentration, and CNL Program are encouraged to contact the Capstone College of Nursing (CCN) Graduate Recruitment and Retention Liaison. Currently only residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for the Nurse Practitioner Concentration.

Note: Currently, only baccalaureate prepared registered nurses who are residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for admission to the NP concentration. There is no post-master’s certificate option. Please check this site in the future for changes in the residency requirement.

Application Process for MSN:

Enrollment into the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is available for fall semester each year. Your completed application must be received by the April 1st deadline.

MSN Application Process

1. Begin your graduate application at the Graduate School’s Application Center.

2. Request transcripts following the Graduate School’s transcript instructions.

3. Submit supporting documents. Within 48 hours of submitting the initial part of your application, you will receive an e-mail with your Campus-Wide Identification (CWID) number. It is very important that you safeguard this number. Once you have received this e-mail, you will need to submit the following documents through Manage Supporting Documents.

- Statement of purpose
- Resume or curriculum vitae
- Contact information for two references – The references should be professionals who can provide insight regarding your potential for success in the doctoral program. The Graduate School will contact these references via e-mail.
- Copy of active RN license from every state in which you are licensed. Note: Licensure must be maintained throughout the program.

Additionally, we may require the following:

- Official MAT or GRE score – If your grade point average (GPA) is lower than a 3.0, based on a 4.0 sytem, either overall or in your last 60 hours, an acceptable Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or must be submitted by the testing service to the Graduate School, Box 870118, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. Test scores may not be older than 5 years of the application date. Use school code 1012 for MAT and 1830 for GRE.

- English proficiency exam score – Whether an international or a permanent resident, if your first language is not English, you must submit an official score report from one of the following proficiency examinations: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or Pearson Test of English (PTE).

Upon admission, you will receive written notification of admission from the Dean of the Graduate School. You will also receive a letter from the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at CCN outlining requirements for entry into the MSN program.

Documents Required Prior to Registration (after admitted)

Documents below should be completed and signed where appropriate and sent to Christina Horen at or faxed to 205-348-6674. A hold will be placed on your student record until all documents have been received. You are responsible for keeping all documents current throughout enrollment including annual health requirements (see CCN Graduate Student Handbook).

- Current RN license verification
- Current CPR certification for healthcare professionals
- Program of Study
- OSHA Training for Infection Control, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Safety
- HIPAA Privacy and Security Training
- Information Literacy for the 21st Century Training
- Nursing Student Health and Physical Exam Form
- Graduate Student TB Test and Immunization Form
- Substance Abuse Policy and Drug/Alcohol Testing Policy
- Academic Dishonesty Form
- Progression Policy
- Consent to Release and Disclose Form

MSN Degree Requirements:

The MSN will be awarded to the student who has met the following requirements:

- GPA of 3.0 or higher
- Good standing at the time of graduation
- Successful completion of the required coursework

In addition for CNL only:

- Completion of CNL Self-assessment Exam and CNL Certification Exam

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. Read more

Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. With increases in the application and uses of information technology in the medical industry, there is an unprecedented need for professionals who can combine their knowledge of computing and health care to improve the safety and quality of care delivery, as well as to help control costs.

The MS degree in health informatics applies the creative power of information technology to the information and data needs of health care. This includes the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of patient data, as well as access to electronically maintained medical knowledge for use in patient care, research, and education. Professionals in the field require computing expertise; an understanding of formal medical terminology, clinical processes, and guidelines; and an understanding of how information and communication systems can be used to successfully deliver patient information in various health care settings. The program is offered online only.

The program offers two tracks: the clinician track and analyst track.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission into the MS program in health informatics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college (MD, RN, or other professional degree).
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a professional essay describing relevant employment or other experience and career plans (recent undergraduate students without extensive employment experience should discuss their career plans as well as any courses they have completed that are relevant to medical informatics, health care, or information technology).
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who are able to assess the applicant’s potential for success in the program.
  • Have completed at least one year of computer programming in a current object-oriented language or have equivalent work experience.*
  • Have knowledge of medical terminology/vocabulary, clinical processes, and information systems that are used to support health care activities and processes.
  • Have a familiarity with anatomy and physiology, including the major systems of the human body, including the skeletal system, muscle tissue physiology, muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urinary system, and histology.
  • Have completed the equivalent of one statistics course that covers the fundamental statistical principles necessary to interpret data and present results, including descriptive statistics, random sampling, normal distribution, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. (This prerequisite may be completed post-admission if necessary.)
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.

International Applications

  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • Applicants without previous graduate study and with an undergraduate GPA that is less than 3.0 may be considered for admission, but will be required to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Applicants from international universities are required to submit GRE scores.
  • An interview with the program’s admissions committee may also
  • be required.


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The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. Read more
The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense which includes not only environmental issues strictly speaking but also all the links that they have with other areas such as natural resources, human rights, economic development trade or intellectual property rights.

The SOAS degree offers a distinct mix of modules that covers all the main areas of environmental law in their international and national dimensions. The international and global nature of many environmental issues makes the international law component a key part of the LLM in Environmental Law. We offer all the general topics that make up the core of international environmental law. Additionally, we focus specifically on the North-South dimension of international environmental issues given the key role this plays in most international environmental negotiations.

The LLM in Environmental Law specifically seeks to put international environmental law in its national context and examines the broad legal frameworks negotiated at the international level in the context of their implementation in selected countries of the South. It thus provides a much more grounded context to the study of environmental law.

Further, we also study the legal regimes of individual countries of the South to provide much more specific analysis of the discipline at the level of its implementation in specific contexts. The LLM in Environmental Law gives specific emphasis to different regions of the South, including South Asia, China and sub-Saharan Africa.

For further information about the general LLM at SOAS and a list of all the modules, please visit the General LLM description (http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmenvlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Environmental Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Water and Development: conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Water Law: justice and governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Global Energy and Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit)
- Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawmena/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law in the Middle East and North Africa specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmchineselaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Courses or the following modules associated with the Chinese Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.
- Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a course offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the course will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each course may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintcompcomlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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