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Master’s Degree in Quantitative Finance and Risk Management draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in quantitative finance, and makes great use of the collaborations with the Universities of Paris-Dauphine and Cergy-Pontoise. Read more
Master’s Degree in Quantitative Finance and Risk Management draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in quantitative finance, and makes great use of the collaborations with the Universities of Paris-Dauphine and Cergy-Pontoise. The Master is primarily going to appeal to international students, "free movers" or those from our partner universities or for high-potential foreign engineers who are looking for an international career in the domain of finance. This program leads to a Master degree and a Diplôma accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research.

Objective

This Master’s degree covers the whole chain of quantitative finance, from theoretical aspects to the application in a professional setting. The chain can be described as follows:
o Description of the market and financial products
o Mathematical models of finance
o Mathematical models of risk
o Numerical resolution: computer-aided simulation
o Calibration and asset evaluation

Specific details of the Master:
o The Master came from the Financial Engineering option (IFI) taught at the ESITI for the last 13 years (all students from the option have found work as soon as their compulsory internships finished, and have an average salary 20% higher than the norm in this sector).
o In and of itself, the Master is intrinsically international.
o The theoretical teaching of this Master is very thorough, covering everything needed to know in the associated professions. As a consequence, the students are very adaptable within the work market.
o The Master offers a 3-skilled approach, in Computer Science, Mathematics and Finance.

Practical information
The Master’s degree counts for 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) in total and lasts two years. The training lasts 1316 hours (646 hours in M1 and 670 hours in M2). The semesters are divided as follows:
o M1 courses take place from September until June and count for a total of 60 ECTS
o M2 courses take place from September until mid-April and count for a total of 44 ECTS
o A five-month internship (in France) from mid- April until mid- September for 16 ECTS. Usual indemnities are around 1000 € per month.

Non-French speakers will be asked to participate to a one week intensive French course that precedes the start of the program and allows students to gain the linguistic knowledge necessary for daily interactions.

Organization

M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 646 h):
• Mathematics
• Measure and Integration (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Functional Analysis (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Stochastic Processes-Discrete/Continuous Time (5,5 ECTS, 55 h)
• Optimization (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Jump Processes and Application (3 ECTS, 30h)
• Partial Differential Equations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
 Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Monte Carlo Simulations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Finite Difference Methods (2,5 ECTS, 25 h)
• Calibration of Financial Models (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Bloomberg trading room (3ECTS, 30h)
• C++ and Object Oriented Design (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• VBA Programming (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Interdisciplinary Project (5 ECTS, 5 h)
 Finance and Insurance
• Introduction to Quantitative Finance (3 ECTS, 25 h)
• Risk Management in a mono-period Financial Market & Derivatives (4 ECTS, 40 h)
• Contingent Claims Valuation (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Management and Financial Risks (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Mathematics Applied to Insurance (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4,5 ECTS, 96 h)

M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 646 h):
• Mathematics
• Measure and Integration (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Functional Analysis (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Stochastic Processes-Discrete/Continuous Time (5,5 ECTS, 55 h)
• Optimization (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Jump Processes and Application (3 ECTS, 30h)
• Partial Differential Equations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Monte Carlo Simulations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Finite Difference Methods (2,5 ECTS, 25 h)
• Calibration of Financial Models (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Bloomberg trading room (3ECTS, 30h)
• C++ and Object Oriented Design (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• VBA Programming (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Interdisciplinary Project (5 ECTS, 5 h)
• Finance and Insurance
• Introduction to Quantitative Finance (3 ECTS, 25 h)
• Risk Management in a mono-period Financial Market & Derivatives (4 ECTS, 40 h)
• Contingent Claims Valuation (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Management and Financial Risks (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Mathematics Applied to Insurance (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4,5 ECTS, 96 h)

M2 modules take place from September to Mid-April (60 ECTS, 670h)
• Mathematics
• Mathematical Statistics (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Mathematical Tools in Finance (4,5 ECTS, 54h)
• Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Advanced Numerical Methods for PDEs in Finance(2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Advanced Spreadsheet Programming (2 ECTS, 24h)
• Simulations (2 ECTS, 24 h)
• Calibration (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Theoretical and Practical Finance
• Theory of Contingent Claims (4,5 ECTS, 54 h)
• Interest Rate, Exchange and Inflation Markets (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Managment (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Imperfect Markets (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Dynamic Hedging and Risk Measures (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Business Evaluation (2,5 ECTS, 35 h)
• Jump Processes and Applications (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Careers and financial products (2 ECTS, 30 h)
• Practical Fixed Income Management (2 ECTS, 24 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4 ECTS, 72 h)
• Master's Thesis (9 ECTS, 150 h)
• Internship (22 weeks from mid-April to)

Teaching

Fourteen external teachers (lecturers from universities, teacher-researchers, professors etc.), supported by a piloting committee, will bring together the training given in Cergy.

All the classes will be taught in English, with the exception of:
• The class of FLE (French as a foreign language), where the objective is to teach the students how to understand and express themselves in French.
• Cultural Openness, where the objective is to enrich the students’ knowledge of French culture.
The EISTI offers an e-learning site to all its students, which complements everything the students will learn through their presence and participation in class:
• class documents, practical work and tutorials online
• questions and discussions between teachers and students, and among students
• a possibility of handing work in online

All Master’s students are equipped with a laptop for the duration of the program that remains the property of the EISTI.

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Focus. Mental Wellness. Professional counseling is a vibrant field with excellent career growth opportunities. Unlike other mental health treatment approaches, counseling focuses on wellness and prevention rather than pathology. Read more
Focus: Mental Wellness
Professional counseling is a vibrant field with excellent career growth opportunities. Unlike other mental health treatment approaches, counseling focuses on wellness and prevention rather than pathology.

CSPP’s clinical counseling master’s program integrates a strengths-based and resilience perspective to foster critical consciousness and reflective thinking, developing practitioner skills in diagnosis, treatment planning and psychological interventions with individuals and groups.

Empower Clients Through Multicultural Competence
The Clinical Counseling master’s program uses academic, experiential and research-based clinical practice approaches as well as direct community service learning in coursework and field placements. It also develops multicultural competence and a strong foundation in social justice advocacy to empower the clients and communities they will serve.

Students in the Clinical Counseling program are able to break down the walls of race, gender and age to build a community between themselves. Many students speak of not only the education they receive through this program but also the relationships they build with their peers. Being able to look past different cultures and views in the classroom helps students to be able to venture into outside communities and serve as effective counselors. This process gives students the confidence they need to reach out to those communities of need that they may have not been able to reach before.

Accreditation
The Clinical Counseling MA curriculum incorporates the educational requirements set out by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, the Masters in Counseling Accreditation Council (MCAC) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP) 2009 Standards.

Graduate Career-Ready
All students graduate positioned to pursue the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) license in California and most other states.

What is Clinical Counseling?

Clinical Counseling is a master’s level mental health profession that applies counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques to identify and remediate cognitive, mental, and emotional issues, including personal growth, adjustment to disability, psychosocial and environmental problems, and crisis intervention. The MA Clinical Counseling Program integrates the principles of mental health recovery-oriented practice.

Training Model
Students develop practitioner skills in diagnosis, treatment planning, and psychological interventions with individuals and groups. The program uses academic, experiential, research-based clinical practice approaches and direct community service learning in coursework and field placements. Integrating a strengths-based and resilience perspective, the program fosters critical consciousness and reflective thinking as students learn counseling and consultation skills found to be effective with a variety of mental health issues. Students gain multicultural competence and a strong foundation in social justice advocacy to empower the clients and communities they will serve.

Research Training
As part of the social justice advocacy training, students will engage in a two-semester collaborative community research project in the Research Methods and Masters Project courses. This will culminate with students submitting a grant proposal to support community mental health services.

Course Schedule

The Clinical Counseling master’s program is offered on two campuses: San Francisco and Fresno. In San Francisco, most courses are offered in the afternoons and evenings. Courses in Fresno are offered in the evenings and on weekends. Field placement schedules often depend on the individual clinic or agency where each student is placed, and therefore vary depending on location.

Curriculum – 60 Units

Clinical Counseling Observation and Interviewing (3 units)
Human Development (3 units)
Career Development Theories and Techniques (3 units)
Group Counseling Theories and Techniques (3 units)
Clinical Counseling Assessment (3 units)
Intercultural Awareness Development (3 units)
Psychopathology for Clinical Counseling (3 units)
Clinical Counseling Research Methods (3 units)
Clinical Counseling Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues (3 units)
Psychopharmacology (3 units)
Chemical Dependence (3 units)
Crisis/Trauma Counseling (3 units)
Theories and Techniques of Clinical Practice (3 units)
Couples Counseling (3 units)
Sex Therapy (3 units)
Community Mental Health Counseling (3 units)
Practicum (3 units)
Internship (6 units total – 3 in each of 2 semesters)
Masters Project (3 units)

Self Growth Experiences

Faculty, staff and supervisors have professional, ethical obligations to evaluate and ensure the interpersonal competence of trainees. Students will at times be required to participate in learning activities that require different levels of self-disclosure. This can include, but is not limited to, exploration of one’s beliefs and values and the potential impact of one’s disposition toward the backgrounds and histories of a community, clients, peers, faculty, and supervisors.

We strongly recommend that all students complete 20-30 hours of personal growth counseling with a licensed mental health professional in individual and/or group counseling or psychotherapy prior to graduation.

Read less
Focus. Mental Wellness. Professional counseling is a vibrant field with excellent career growth opportunities. Unlike other mental health treatment approaches, counseling focuses on wellness and prevention rather than pathology. Read more
Focus: Mental Wellness
Professional counseling is a vibrant field with excellent career growth opportunities. Unlike other mental health treatment approaches, counseling focuses on wellness and prevention rather than pathology.

CSPP’s clinical counseling master’s program integrates a strengths-based and resilience perspective to foster critical consciousness and reflective thinking, developing practitioner skills in diagnosis, treatment planning and psychological interventions with individuals and groups.

Empower Clients Through Multicultural Competence
The Clinical Counseling master’s program uses academic, experiential and research-based clinical practice approaches as well as direct community service learning in coursework and field placements. It also develops multicultural competence and a strong foundation in social justice advocacy to empower the clients and communities they will serve.

Students in the Clinical Counseling program are able to break down the walls of race, gender and age to build a community between themselves. Many students speak of not only the education they receive through this program but also the relationships they build with their peers. Being able to look past different cultures and views in the classroom helps students to be able to venture into outside communities and serve as effective counselors. This process gives students the confidence they need to reach out to those communities of need that they may have not been able to reach before.

Accreditation
The Clinical Counseling MA curriculum incorporates the educational requirements set out by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, the Masters in Counseling Accreditation Council (MCAC) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP) 2009 Standards.

Graduate Career-Ready
All students graduate positioned to pursue the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) license in California and most other states.

What is Clinical Counseling?

Clinical Counseling is a master’s level mental health profession that applies counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques to identify and remediate cognitive, mental, and emotional issues, including personal growth, adjustment to disability, psychosocial and environmental problems, and crisis intervention. The MA Clinical Counseling Program integrates the principles of mental health recovery-oriented practice.

Training Model
Students develop practitioner skills in diagnosis, treatment planning, and psychological interventions with individuals and groups. The program uses academic, experiential, research-based clinical practice approaches and direct community service learning in coursework and field placements. Integrating a strengths-based and resilience perspective, the program fosters critical consciousness and reflective thinking as students learn counseling and consultation skills found to be effective with a variety of mental health issues. Students gain multicultural competence and a strong foundation in social justice advocacy to empower the clients and communities they will serve.

Research Training
As part of the social justice advocacy training, students will engage in a two-semester collaborative community research project in the Research Methods and Masters Project courses. This will culminate with students submitting a grant proposal to support community mental health services.

Course Schedule

The Clinical Counseling master’s program is offered on two campuses: San Francisco and Fresno. In San Francisco, most courses are offered in the afternoons and evenings. Courses in Fresno are offered in the evenings and on weekends. Field placement schedules often depend on the individual clinic or agency where each student is placed, and therefore vary depending on location.

Curriculum – 60 Units

Clinical Counseling Observation and Interviewing (3 units)
Human Development (3 units)
Career Development Theories and Techniques (3 units)
Group Counseling Theories and Techniques (3 units)
Clinical Counseling Assessment (3 units)
Intercultural Awareness Development (3 units)
Psychopathology for Clinical Counseling (3 units)
Clinical Counseling Research Methods (3 units)
Clinical Counseling Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues (3 units)
Psychopharmacology (3 units)
Chemical Dependence (3 units)
Crisis/Trauma Counseling (3 units)
Theories and Techniques of Clinical Practice (3 units)
Couples Counseling (3 units)
Sex Therapy (3 units)
Community Mental Health Counseling (3 units)
Practicum (3 units)
Internship (6 units total – 3 in each of 2 semesters)
Masters Project (3 units)

Self Growth Experiences

Faculty, staff and supervisors have professional, ethical obligations to evaluate and ensure the interpersonal competence of trainees. Students will at times be required to participate in learning activities that require different levels of self-disclosure. This can include, but is not limited to, exploration of one’s beliefs and values and the potential impact of one’s disposition toward the backgrounds and histories of a community, clients, peers, faculty, and supervisors.

We strongly recommend that all students complete 20-30 hours of personal growth counseling with a licensed mental health professional in individual and/or group counseling or psychotherapy prior to graduation.

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A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.
• Submission of a copy of current teaching certificate within the first 15 credit hours completed in the program.
• Six credit hours of undergraduate study in literacy education focusing on teaching methods.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Literacy Specialist program has been designed to meet the certification regulations of the New York State Education Department, as well as the Standards for Literacy Professionals of the International Reading Association. This program allows candidates to qualify for initial certification in one of the following levels, as well as satisfying the academic requirements for Professional certification in their Initial New York certification area: Early Childhood and Childhood (Birth- Grade 6) and Middle Childhood and Adolescence (Grade 5-12). Program courses also available at Watertown JCC campus. Program Start Date: Fall (Preferred), Spring, Summer

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 36 credit hours:

GRDG 600, Foundations of Literacy ...................................3 credits
GRDG 605, Literacy Assessment and Evaluation .....................3 credits
GRDG 610, Seminar: Literacy Research ...............................3 credits
GRDG 615, Literacy:Family/School/Community Collaboration ...3 credits
GRDG 620, Literacy and Linguistically Diverse Learners ..........3 credits
GRDG 625, Using Technology to Teach Literacy ...........................3 credits

Early Childhood/Childhood Literacy Concentration (B-6):
GRDG 655, Literacy Intervention Strategies, B-6 .................3 credits
GRDG 660, Teaching Writing, B-6 .................................3 credits
GRDG 665, Emergent Literacy .......................................3 credits
GRDG 690, Literacy Practicum, B-2................................3 credits
GRDG 691, Literacy Practicum, 3-6 ................................3 credits

Middle Childhood/Adolescent Literacy Concentration (5-12):
GRDG 656, Literacy Intervention Strategies, 5-12 ...............3 credits
GRDG 661, Teaching Writing, Grades 5-12 .......................3 credits
GRDG 670, Teaching Reading and Study Skills in Content ....3 credits
GRDG 696, Literacy Practicum, 5-8 ................................3 credits
GRDG 697, Literacy Practicum, 9-12 ..............................3 credits

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation pro- gram candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking ad- mission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Uniqueness of Program

The program is designed so that full-time candidates who begin their study on campus in the Fall or Summer semesters may complete their program in three semesters. Most, but not all, degree requirements for the Literacy Specialist program may also be completed in Watertown, NY, on the Jefferson Community College campus.

Testimonial

“The Literacy Specialist profession is rapidly growing and is one of the most highly desired certification areas by school districts today.”

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The Master’s specialisation in Transnational Ecosystem-based Water Management (TWM) is partly taught at Radboud University and partly at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany. Read more
The Master’s specialisation in Transnational Ecosystem-based Water Management (TWM) is partly taught at Radboud University and partly at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany. At each University you will take different courses concering for example Water governance and Spatial Planning.

-Compulsory courses at Radboud University

Orientation in Biology and Environmental Sciences (3 EC)
Ecological and Environmental Concepts (3 EC)
Management of Ecosystems (3 EC)
Biodiversity and Ecological Assessment (3 EC)
Ecological and Environmental Modelling (3 EC)
Water Governance and Spatial Planning (3 EC)
Integrated Water Management (3 EC)
Environmental Economics for Water Management (3 EC)
Social Aspects of Water Management (3 EC)
Philosophy of water management (3 EC)

-Compulsory courses at the University of Duisburg-Essen

Hydroclimatology and Sustainable Water Management (2 EC)
Hydrogeology and Application (4 EC)
Hydraulics and Sediment Transport (3 EC)
Ecology and Protection of Freshwater Ecosystems and Aquatic Organisms (5 EC)
Field Trips (2 EC)
Water-borne Diseases (2 EC)
Basics in Hydraulic Planning and Facility Design (3 EC)
Waste Water Treatment (3 EC)
Flood Management (3 EC)
River Basin Management (3 EC)

Furthermore, you’ll profit from the expertise at two universities and become familiar with different cultures and research approaches. And after successful completion of the programme, you'll receive a German and a Dutch diploma. With that broad background, our graduates often find a job as manager or project leader, with an all-encompassing view in national or international water-related projects.

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This popular and highly renowned course has been running for over thirty years. The course offers a rigorous and ethical professional practice course that is designed to be compatible with office working practice. Read more
This popular and highly renowned course has been running for over thirty years. The course offers a rigorous and ethical professional practice course that is designed to be compatible with office working practice.

The Course consists of a series of 18 evening lectures held weekly starting at 6.30 pm on Wednesdays. During the course students are tutored on a one to one basis in the preparation of their 10,000 word Case Study, their 2,000 word Career Evaluation and their PEDR, professional experience record, monitored by the Course Director.

The Part 3 Course is validated by RIBA and prescribed by the Architects Registration Board. Appropriately qualified candidates who pass the Part 3 Examination with two years professional experience are eligible to apply to the Architects Registration Board to register as Architects.

Candidates who do not have a recognised Part 2 in Architecture may wish to do the taught course as a CPD activity and to improve their knowledge of Professional Practice. In this instance they will not be eligible to apply for RIBA Part 3 examination.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/riba-professional-practice-part-3

Modules

The course starts with a eighteen week evening lecture course supplemented with tutorials, case-study seminars and study groups.

This course aims to prepare Architecture students who have RIBA Part 2 with adequate professional experience coming forward to the Part 3 Professional Practice examination. The Professional Practice course covers salient and significant areas of the Professional Practice syllabus as set out by RIBA including; current building legislation, planning, contract law, types of building contract, management of architecture, practice and construction, financial control, business management, professional liability and dispute resolution.

Four weeks before the written examinations there is an examination preparation seminar to guide students for the examination and by "playing the contract game" acquaint them with the workings of a JCT contract.

- Lecture series and exam
- Case study
- Career evaluation and professional interview

Employability

The Professional Practice course is suitable for candidates who wish to prepare for the RIBA Part 3 Examination or for those who wish to gain a greater understanding of professional practice as it relates to Architecture as part of a CPD Programme. Candidates who wish to undertake the course as a CPD activity will not be permitted to sit the Part 3 examination.

The following firms have recently sponsored their staff on this course:
Foster and Partners, EPR, Hamiltons, Hawkins/Brown, Squire and Partners, Allies and Morrison, Broadway Malyan, Sheppard Robson, Terry Farrell, Tangram, Porphyrios Associates, Grimshaw, Fletcher Priest Architects, and The Richard Rogers Partnership.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

- Professional accreditation
Successful completion of the course and passing all parts of the Professional Practice Examination gives exemption from the RIBA Part 3 examination and enables candidates to register with the Architecture Registration Board (ARB) of the UK and also join RIBA as a corporate member. We are also accredited by the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

The members' organisation Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture. They provide standards, training, support and recognition that put members around the world at the peak of their profession.

The Architects Registration Board (ARB) is the UK's statutory register of architects, ensuring that graduates from our courses are competent to practice.

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Admission to this program is a competitive process, with candidates (students) admitted in cohorts. Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/edle/ma/. Read more
Admission to this program is a competitive process, with candidates (students) admitted in cohorts.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/edle/ma/

Application Process

Visit the UA Graduate School website where you will:

- Complete the online application http://graduate.ua.edu/application.

- Submit official GRE or MAT scores.

- Submit official transcripts from all previous post-secondary institutions attended.

- Submit a statement of purpose.

- Submit 3 letters of recommendation (one from your principal or supervisor).

Due Date for Applications

Applications for admission will be due in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies by April 1 for entry into a cohort that will begin the program in the subsequent summer. All applications for entry into a cohort that will begin in the spring are due November 1, and all applications for entry into a cohort that will begin the subsequent fall will be due in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies by July 1. All applicants for this program must provide a Supplemental EXP completed by their current and/or previous school system(s) verifying at least three full years of full-time, acceptable professional educational experience including at least one full year of full–time P-12 teaching experience. The original notarized form(s) should be sent to:

Dawn Bryant
Student Services & Certification
College of Education
The University of Alabama
Box 870321
Tuscaloosa, Al, 35487-0231

Portfolio

In addition to the general application materials required by the University of Alabama Graduate School and the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies, applicants must construct an application portfolio, as required by Ala. Admin. Code §290-3-3-.48(1)(b). For entry into a cohort beginning in the Summer Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by April 1. For entry into a cohort beginning in the Spring Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by November 1. For entry into a cohort beginning in the Fall Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by July 1.

The application portfolio must contain the following items:

- Three letters of recommendation, including one from the applicant’s principal or supervisor;

- Completed copy (all forms) of most recent performance appraisal to include the professional development component if available;

- Evidence of ability to improve student achievement;

- Evidence of leadership and management potential including evidence of most recent accomplishments in the area of educational leadership;

- Summary statement of applicant’s reasons for pursuing instructional leadership certification;

- Summary statement of what the applicant expects from the program; and,

- The applicant’s vitae.

Items should be placed in a large envelope in the order of the above list, have divider pages between items, and mailed to Vanessa Williams, The University of Alabama, Box 870302, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0302 or hand-delivered to 301 Graves Hall (main campus) or to the UA Gadsden Center.

Assessment Center

The purpose of the Assessment Center is to first fulfill the regulatory requirement of a face-to-face interview with each applicant. The Assessment Center will also include other activities designed to provide additional information, particularly with respect to candidate dispositions and candidate writing skills, to adequately assess candidate aptitude for instructional leadership.

Scheduled Assessment Centers appear below. Candidates electing to participate in an Assessment Center at the Gadsden Center should contact Dr. Brenda Mendiola ().

Cohort Numbers

Cohorts will be limited to twenty-five participants at two locations: Tuscaloosa (main campus) and at the UA Gadsden Center. Additional cohorts will be admitted at either location, if there are sufficient eligible candidates and available faculty members.

Program of Study

The program of study for the Master of Arts Degree in Educational Leadership, leading to initial certification in Alabama for Instructional Leadership, will be composed of thirty (30) semester hours of coursework, including the following courses:

AEL 520: Leadership for Communities and Stakeholders (3 semester hours)
AEL 521: Leadership for Continuous Improvement (3 semester hours)
AEL 522: Leadership for Teaching and Learning (3 semester hours)
AEL 523: Human Resource Development (3 semester hours)
AEL 524: Ethics and Law (3 semester hours)
AEL 525: Management of Learning Organizations (3 semester hours)
AEL 526: Data-Informed Decision-Making (3 semester hours)
AEL 527: Internship in Instructional Leadership (3 semester hours)
BER 540: Quantitative Research; Statistics (3 semester hours)
BEF graduate-level Foundations Course from approved list (3 semester hours)
Total: 30 semester hours for Masters Degree in Educational Leadership

*Note: To receive certification at the “A” level, students are also required to have taken a special education survey course (SPE 300 or SPE 500 or the equivalent). If students have taken a special education survey course as part of the requirements for an earlier certificate, it will not have to be taken again. If students have not taken a special education survey course for an earlier certificate, SPE 500 must be taken in addition to the 30 semester hours detailed above.

Field experience objectives, including progression from observation through participation to leading behaviors, will be embedded in each course and assessed by the faculty member of record for each course. Throughout this program, instructional activities are aligned with instructional objectives. The faculty member of record has the responsibility of assigning the LiveText assessment (1, 2, 3, 4) for each objective, and instructional activities will also generate documentation for the electronic portfolio aspect of LiveText, which will append to the assessment ratings.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in English is designed to meet the teacher education regulations of the New York State Education Department, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) stan- dards, the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), as well as Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. The program leads to Initial/Professional Adolescence Education, English (Grades 7-12) certification. This program is nationally recognized by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 47 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 549, Adol Lit and Teaching of Reading/Literacy .............3 credits
GRED 550, Intro to Teaching ELA, Grades 7-12 ....................3 credits
GRED 555, Classroom Mgmt/Leadership, Middle/Sec Schools .....3 credits
GRED 582, Teaching Writing/Lang/Comm, Grades 7-12 ..........3 credits
GRED 584, Teaching Literature and Literacy, Grades 7-12 ........3 credits
GRED 588, Practicum I, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools..............2 credits
GRED 589, Practicum II, Teaching ELA in Sec Schools ............2 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 671, Dev Prof Portfolio: Culminating Experience ...........3 credits
GRED 677, Development and Learning in Adolescence .............3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Education elective ........................................................3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 692, Student Teaching in Jr High School (7-9) ..............6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. If the psychology requirement is fulfilled through un- dergraduate course work, a second education elective shall be taken.

Full or conditional admission is available.

Testimonial

“I made the tough decision to apply for graduate school after a fruitful career in social work because I desperately needed a change. After this epiphany, I resigned from my position, and soon after applied to the MST program at SUNY Potsdam. As it turned out, it was a decision that not only changed my life, but altered the course of my family’s as well. The MST program prepared me for teaching in ways that I couldn't have imagined, and continues to mold me into the teacher I am well on my way to becoming.” —Johnny Dundon

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

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A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the social science major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the social science major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in Social Studies is designed to meet the New York State Education Department’s regulations on Teacher Education, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) standards, and the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), along with Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. This program is nationally recognized by the NCSS and leads to Initial Adolescence Education, Social Studies (Grade 7-12) with an extension for Middle Childhood Social Studies Education (Grade 5-6) certification. Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 51 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 556, Reading in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 557, Writing in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 590, Special Soc St Education Content Topic ................3 credits
GRED 600, Philosophical Foundations of Education ................3 credits
GRED 606, Adv Secondary Social Studies Education ...............3 credits
GRED 670, Social Studies Culminating Experience .................3 credits
GRED 681, Soc St Curr in Middle and Secondary School ..........3 credits
GRED 682, Research in Social Studies Education ....................3 credits
GRED 684, Social Studies Content Portfolio ............................1 credit
GRED 688, Soc St Instruction in Middle and Sec School ...........2 credits
GRED 689, Practicum in Middle/Sec Soc St Instruction ............4 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

Technology Elective: 3 credit hours

Additional Elective: 3 credit hours

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 694, Student Teaching in Mid/Jr High School (7-9) ........6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

Testimonial

“Coming out of my undergraduate program, I had a lot of experience with subject material but didn't have the first clue about teaching. Potsdam’s graduate program provided a great mix of theory and practice; the 100 hour practicum, as well as graduate level theory and research courses, allows you to try to mix some of the things you've learned into your curriculum as you work in the classrooms. A personal highlight for me was the degree of interest that the staff and faculty took in making sure the students got the most out of their education.” —Colin French

The GRE Exam (or equivalent, such as the MAT) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Read less
A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the science major. A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program. Read more
• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 in the science major.
• A letter of intent written by the applicant expressing professional and educational goals as applied to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education program in Science is designed in accordance with the New York State Education Department’s certification regulations, the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE) standards, and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards, along with Advisory Board recommendations and alumni feedback. This program leads to Initial/Professional certification in Adolescence Education, Science (biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics). Program start date: Summer.

Required Program Courses
Minimum of 47 credit hours
(Prerequisite coursework may be required prior to, or concurrent with, program studies.)

GRED 501, Seminar: Teaching Science in the Sec School ...........3 credits
GRED 502, Issues in Science, Technology, and Society ...............3 credits
GRED 555, Classroom Mgmt/Leadership, Middle/Sec Schools .....3 credits
GRED 556, Reading in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 557, Writing in the Middle/Secondary School ...............3 credits
GRED 571, Science Education Instruction in Sec Schools ...........3 credits
GRED 670, Culminating Experience ...................................3 credits
GRED 672, Science, Curricula, Programs and Standards ...........3 credits
GRED 673, Secondary Science Field Work ............................3 credits
GRED 675, Secondary Science Teaching Research ....................3 credits
SPED 505, Introduction to Special Education .........................3 credits

HLTH 530, School Health (certification requirement) ..............3 credits

GRED 676, Student Teaching Seminar ................................2 credits
GRED 692, Student Teaching in Jr High School (7-9) ..............6 credits
GRED 697, Student Teaching in Sr High School (10-12) ..........6 credits

GRED 677 is required if the candidate’s undergraduate work does not include a course in developmental, adolescent, or educational psychology. This course may count as the education elective, with permission of the advisor.

Full or conditional admission is available.

The GRE Exam (or equivalent) is required for all teacher preparation program candidates who are seeking certification (for applicants seeking admission for Fall 2015 forward). All other graduate programs, including non-certification options, do not require this exam. More information on the GRE exam can be found by visiting http://www.gre.org. SUNY Potsdam’s code for sending score reports is 2545.

Testimonials

“I chose to enroll in SUNY Potsdam in 2007 because I wanted to become a high school Physics teacher. Potsdam’s MST program meant that I could get my Master’s degree in record time, while I was still in school and not working full-time. To top it off, the teaching principles I learned in the program have shaped me into the educator I am today.” —Brendan Burkhart

“The MST program allowed me to achieve my Bachelor’s degree in Biology, as well as my Master’s in Secondary Science Education, in 5 years. The program not only saved time, but money as well! The classes gave me practical knowledge that allowed me to be more successful in the classroom after graduation in 2012. I am now in my third year of teaching biology full-time!” —Jennifer Shimaitis

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Master in BIG DATA. Read more
Master in BIG DATA : Data Analytics, Data Science, Data Architecture”, accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research, draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in business intelligence and has grown from the specializations in Decision Support, Business Intelligence and Business Analytics. The Master is primarily going to appeal to international students, "free movers" or those from our partner universities or for high-potential foreign engineers who are looking for an international career in the domain of Business Analytics.

This program leads to a Master degree and a Diplôma accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and research.

Objectives

Business Intelligence and now Business Analytics have become key elements of all companies.

The objective of this Master is to train specialists in information systems and decision support, holding a large range of mathematic- and computer-based tools which would allow them to deal with real problems, analyzing their complexity and bringing efficient algorithmic and architectural solutions. Big Data is going to be the Next Big Thing over the coming 10 years.

The targeted applications concern optimization in the processing of large amounts of data (known as Big Data), logistics, industrial automation, but above all it’s the development of BI systems architecture. These applications have a role in most business domains: logistics, production, finance, marketing, client relation management.

The need for trained engineering specialists in these domains is growing constantly: recent studies show a large demand of training in these areas.

Distinctive points of this course

• The triple skill-set with architecture (BI), data mining and business resource optimization.
• This master will be run by a multidisciplinary group: statistics, data mining, operational research, architecture.
• The undertaking of interdisciplinary projects.
• The methods and techniques taught in this program come from cutting-edge domains in industry and research, such as: opinion mining, social networks and big data, optimization, resource allocation and BI systems architecture.
• The Master is closely backed up by research: several students are completing their end-of-studies project on themes from the [email protected] laboratory, followed and supported by members from the laboratory (PhD students and researcher teachers).
• The training on the tools used in industry dedicated to data mining, operational research and Business Intelligence gives the students a plus in their employability after completion.
• Industrial partnerships with companies very involved in Big Data have been developed:
• SAS via the academic program and a ‘chaire d’entreprise’ (business chair), allowing our students access to Business Intelligence modules such as Enterprise Miner (data mining) and SAS-OR (in operational research).

Practical information

The Master’s degree counts for 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) in total and lasts two years. The training lasts 1252 hours (611 hours in M1 and 641 hours in M2). The semesters are divided as follows:
• M1 courses take place from September until June and count for a total of 60 ECTS
• M2 courses take place from September until mid-April and count for a total of 42ECTS
• A five-month internship (in France) from mid- April until mid- September for 9 ECTS is required and a Master thesis for 9 ECTS.

Non-French speakers will be asked to participate to a one week intensive French course that precedes the start of the program and allows students to gain the linguistic knowledge necessary for daily interactions.

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