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This course is for people who need to strengthen their maths knowledge fairly quickly before starting their training to become a secondary mathematics teacher. Read more
This course is for people who need to strengthen their maths knowledge fairly quickly before starting their training to become a secondary mathematics teacher.

Course overview

This 24-week fast track course will boost your maths knowledge so that you are able to teach maths up to A Level. To join the Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) course, you should already have received a conditional offer for initial teacher training – or you should at least be considering an application for it.

Typically, you should have already received a conditional offer for initial teacher training (ITT) – or you should at least be considering an application for it. Our course ends in July so that you are ready for ITT in September.

For Home/EU students, there is no tuition fee and you will be paid a bursary while you are studying on the course.

You will cover areas such as geometry, calculus, statistics, mechanics, patterns and equations as well as common errors and misconceptions in mathematics. At the initial interview, we will advise you whether this 24-week fast track course is suitable for you or whether an alternative course would be better for your circumstances.

Once you have successfully completed the SKE course and your initial teacher training, your career prospects will be very good. There is a national shortage of mathematics teachers and there are excellent job prospects, both in the North East and throughout the country.

Reports on our provision by external examiners have been very positive. Comments include: “It is clear that the course remains very successful in preparing candidates appropriately for their subsequent teacher training course”.

Course content

This course enhances your skills and knowledge in mathematics, preparing you for teacher training. You will study the following units:
-Patterns and Equations
-Structure and Pattern
-Development of Geometric Thinking
-Nature of Mathematics
-Investigating Calculus
-Enriching and Strengthening Mathematics
-Elementary Geometry
-Development of Mathematics
-Statistics
-Mechanics
-Using LOGO and 3D Geometry
-Errors and Misconceptions in Mathematics
-Matrices
-Investigating Sequences and Series

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods that include lectures, independent work, directed tasks, written assignments and use of ICT. In addition to attending taught sessions, we encourage you to undertake some voluntary work experience in a school. Assessment methods include written work, exams and presentations. We assess all units.

Facilities & location

This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at The Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. Interactive whiteboards are available in our classrooms and we encourage you to use mathematical software, such as Autograph graph-plotting software, to support your learning.

When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from over a hundred PCs in the St Peter’s Library, a dedicated computer classroom, and wireless access zones. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

The University of Sunderland is a vibrant learning environment with a strong international dimension thanks to the presence of students from around the world.

Employment & careers

This course enhances your maths subject knowledge, allowing you to progress on to a teacher training programme such as the University of Sunderland’s PGCE Mathematics Secondary Education and then achieve Qualified Teacher Status.

There is a shortage of mathematics teachers in England so there are excellent career opportunities both in the North East and nationwide.

The starting salary of a Newly Qualified Teacher is over £22,000, with extra if you work in London. Teachers can expect to see their salaries rise by an average of 30 per cent after their first four years in the job.

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There is still a shortage of qualified engineering specialists in the oil and gas sector, with skilled professionals enjoying competitive salaries. Read more

About the course

There is still a shortage of qualified engineering specialists in the oil and gas sector, with skilled professionals enjoying competitive salaries.

This programme trains specialist engineers in oilfield structural design, fabrication and installation. It is aimed both at engineering and physical science graduates who are interested in working in the oil and gas industry and practising professionals who wish to specialise in the design, analysis and construction of oil and gas installations.

Aims

With high demand for qualified oil and gas engineers, graduates enter a global job market and can expect exciting career prospects - a trend that looks likely to continue for years to come.

As the industry now seeks the rapid drilling and commissioning of new wells to meet energy demands, along with major investment in heavy oils and shale oil and gas, skilled engineers who can rapidly design and commission oilfield installations will be the backbone for growth in this industry. It is precisely this type of engineer that Brunel’s programme will develop.

A distinguishing feature of the course is its ambition to instil systems thinking, by treating structures and their operating environment holistically as a system – helping graduates develop the skills to address a wide range of complex engineering problems rapidly.

Course Content

The programme duration will be 12 months for full-time study, or 24 months for part-time.

The taught part of the programme will take place during the Autumn and Spring terms over 24 weeks. Students will be encouraged to start planning their dissertation at the beginning of the programme. During the Summer term, students will be expected to focus their effort on their dissertation project, researching the dissertation topic full-time. Part-time students will be allowed an extended period to execute their dissertation project in line with the overall programme duration. However, they will be expected to devote an equivalent of at least one day per week on their dissertation project.

This programme has been developed with extensive consultation with the industry. It will be delivered by Brunel staff members and by industrial specialists. The programme structure is shown below and comprises two parts:

Core modules: The taught part of the course (Part 1) worth 120 credits. This includes a set of compulsory modules that provides fundamentals of structural and process engineering, and focuses on providing an understanding of how to design oil and gas structures such as pipelines, offshore and onshore to withstand internal loading induced by complex internal flows of oil and gas and also external loads such as waves and wind. Throughout fundamental mathematical, computational, experimental, testing and inspection techniques as well as codes of practice are taken into account. Civil engineering and construction aspects are also taught.

Dissertation: Your dissertation project forms Part 2 of the programme and is worth 60 credits.

Full-time (12 months) MSc and PGDip modules include:

Petroleum Production Fundamentals
Applied Engineering Mathematics
Structural Materials
Structural Integrity and FEA
Multiphase Flow Fundamentals and Flow Assurance
Dynamics of Petroleum Structures
Design and Construction of Installations
Reliability Engineering and Risk Management

Term Three (MSc Only):

Dissertation
Students will conduct a major piece of research (c. 30,000 words) in an area of oil and gas engineering.

Delivery will take place in block mode teaching with each module requiring a week-long teaching schedule. Laboratory sessions will take place at specialist facilities in the week following the module delivery and will last for up to three days each.

Part-time (24 months) MSc and PGDip:

In the part-time mode, four taught modules are taken each year with the completion of the dissertation following in term three of the second year.

Full-time and part-time (12 and 24 months) PGCert:

Students must take the Design and Construction Installations and Petroleum Production Fundamentals modules and select any other two modules.

Work Placements

Brunel has a purpose built award-winning Professional Development Centre with over 30 staff, including specialist industry consultants. The Placement service includes CV writing, one-to-one guidance and mock interviews. Brunel was named ‘Best University Placement Service’ at the Rate My Placement Awards in 2012.

Teaching

Students are introduced to subject material, including key concepts, information and approaches, through a mixture of standard lectures and seminars, laboratory practicals, self-study and individual research reports. Supporting material is available online. The aim is to challenge students and inspire them to expand their own knowledge and understanding.

Preparation for work is achieved through the development of 'soft' skills such as communication, planning, management and team work.
In addition, guest speakers from industries will provide a valuable insight into the real world of the oil and gas sector.

Many elements of coursework involve, and reward, the use of initiative and imagination. Some of the projects may be linked with research in the College's research institutes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed either by formal examination, written assignments and laboratories or a combination of these. Cut-off dates for receipt of assignments are specified at the beginning of the academic year. Examinations are normally taken in December and May.

Special Features

Students will be able to access laboratory facilities at the recently formed NSIRC site which are extensive, modern and well equipped.

Although we recruit a large number of highly qualified students to our undergraduate, postgraduate and research degrees each year, we don’t forget that you are an individual. From the beginning of your time here, you are allocated a personal tutor who will guide you through academic and pastoral issues.

The College is research intensive as our academics are actively involved in cutting-edge research. Much of this research is undertaken with collaborators outside the University, including leading oil and gas companies, construction companies, water utilities, and other leading industrial firms. We work with universities in China, Poland, Egypt, Turkey, Italy, Denmark and Japan. This research is fed directly into our courses, providing a challenging investigative culture and ensuring that you are exposed to up-to-date and relevant material throughout your time at Brunel.

We have excellent links with business and industry in the UK and overseas. This means:
Brunel degrees are designed to meet the needs of industry and the market-place;
The latest developments in the commercial world feed into your course;
You have greater opportunity at the dissertation stage of conducting a dissertation in industry;
We have more contacts to help you find a job when you graduate.

Accreditation

This course has been designed and developed in close consultation with industry and the Oil and Gas Engineering MSc is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3). We are seeking accreditation with the following professional bodies:

Institution of Mechanical Engineers
Society of Petroleum Engineers
Institution of Chemical Engineers

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This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maamasapm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmasmst

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty
Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibiltiy of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmaspmm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Essay supervision and support for lectures by means of examples classes is approximately 30 hours per year.

Formal examinable lectures and non-examinable lectures total approximately 184 hours per year, of which on average 112 hours are for examinable courses.

Some statistics courses may involve practical data analysis sessions.

There is an opportunity to participate in the Part III seminar series, either by giving a talk or through attendance. This is encouraged but does not contribute to the formal assessment.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The Master of Advanced Nursing, offered by the School of Nursing and Midwifery, will prepare you for leadership roles in clinical nursing, management and education. Read more
The Master of Advanced Nursing, offered by the School of Nursing and Midwifery, will prepare you for leadership roles in clinical nursing, management and education. Clinical specialisations include emergency nursing, intensive care nursing, mental health nursing. These specialties require concurrent employment as a registered nurse in the area. The course helps you develop advanced practice knowledge and leadership in specialist practice. It will equip you with skills to plan, implement, coordinate and evaluate health care, and formulate policy for a diverse and multicultural society.

Specialisations include:

- emergency nursing
- general studies in advanced nursing
- intensive care nursing
- mental health nursing
- nursing education
- nursing leadership and management

You can also exit the course early with a Graduate Certificate in Advanced Nursing or a Graduate Diploma in Advanced Nursing Management if you meet the requirements.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/advanced-nursing-m6006?domestic=true

Career Opportunities:

Graduates are employed in a wide range of general and specialist clinical, educational and health care environments in senior positions. They contribute to the health of individuals, families and communities, and the development of the profession.

Professional accreditation

Applicants who wish to undertake some clinical streams of study - (Emergency Nursing, Mental Health Nursing, Intensive Care Nursing or Nurse Practitioner) will be required to have registration with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency and appropriate clinical employment in an approved clinical agency prior to application. Please see entry requirements that relate to the relevant specialisation for more details.

Progression to further studies

Students entering at Entry levels 1 and 2 can complete a research thesis (24 points) that will provide a pathway to a higher degree by research.

Alternative exit(s)

Students may exit this course early and apply to graduate with one of the following awards, provided they have satisfied the requirements for that award during their enrolment in the Masters course:

- Graduate Certificate of Advanced Nursing after successful completion of 24 points with a minimum of 18 credit points at level 4 or above. Students who complete 24 points from a particular specialisation in Part A will have the name of the specialisation on their transcript.

- Graduate Diploma of Advanced Nursing after successful completion of 48 points, with a minimum of 36 credit points at level 4 or above. Students who complete 24 points from a particular specialisation in Part A will have the name of the specialisation on their transcript.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/medicine

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Faculty is also home to a number of leading medical and biomedical research institutes and groups, and has contributed to advances in many crucial areas: in vitro fertilisation, obesity research, drug design, cardiovascular physiology, functional genomics, infectious diseases, inflammation, psychology, neurosciences and mental health.

Notwithstanding the relatively short history of our University, the Faculty is ranked in the top 50 in the world for its expertise in life sciences and biomedicine by the Times Higher Education and QS World University 2012 benchmarks.

Courses offered by the Faculty include medicine, nursing, radiography and medical imaging, nutrition and dietetics,emergency health studies, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and social work. A range of research and coursework postgraduate programs is also offered.

The Faculty takes pride in delivering outstanding education in all courses, in opening students to the possibilities offered by newly discovered knowledge, and in providing a nurturing and caring environment.

Further details may be found at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/about.html

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/advanced-nursing-m6006?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The. at Delaware Law is designed for attorneys from the U.S. and abroad who seek to expand their knowledge in a specialized area of current practice—or who want to develop a new area of legal expertise. Read more
The

master of laws (LLM)

at Delaware Law is designed for attorneys from the U.S. and abroad who seek to expand their knowledge in a specialized area of current practice—or who want to develop a new area of legal expertise. The program welcomes graduates of American JD programs as well as international students who have completed a degree in law from a qualifying non-U.S. law school.

Students who choose to complete a general master of laws program at Delaware Law School in a seated class format, may enjoy campus life with our on-campus housing, access to exercise facilities, involvement in student clubs, and the opportunity to visit local courthouses and government.

We are pleased to offer some of our general master of laws programs in an

online format

. Please note, however, that the LLM programs that are offered entirely online will not by themselves permit the graduate to take a bar examination in the United States.

Degree Requirements

To earn a general LLM, students must complete 24 semester hours of coursework. Typically, the 24 semester hours of coursework can be completed in one academic year. Students in an online LLM program have the option to structure their program at a more flexible pace, completing the program over two years. All coursework, however, must be completed within four years from the date of matriculation.

LLM CONCENTRATIONS (ON-CAMPUS ONLY)

Corporate Law & Finance (on-campus only)

With more than one million companies incorporated in Delaware, there is no better place to pursue a master of laws in corporate law and finance than Delaware Law. Our location in Wilmington – often referred to as the “Corporate Capital of America” – gives you a front-row seat to courts and law firms on the leading edge of corporate law.

To earn a LLM in corporate law and finance, students must complete 24 semester hours of coursework at the graduate level, in corporate-related areas like commercial law, business acquisitions, or intellectual property. Graduate courses in corporate law and finance are worth between two and four semester hours of credit. At least 18 of the 24 semester hours must be completed in residence at Delaware Law, although students may complete this residence requirement as either a full-time or part-time student.

In order to qualify for the LLM, students must complete all program requirements within four years from the date of matriculation.
Required courses:

Business Organizations
Business Principles
Securities Regulation
Colloquium or Seminar: Advanced Corporations

Additional required courses for students who have received their legal training abroad:

LLM Research, Writing, and Analysis
LLM Critical Legal Analysis and Writing

American Legal Studies (on-campus only)

Available only to foreign-educated students who have completed a first degree in law from an academically qualified non-U.S. law school. This concentration can help foreign-trained attorneys prepare for a bar exam and legal practice in the United States. LLM American Legal System and LLM Research, Writing, and Analysis courses are required, as well as Professional Responsibility. Students must also take at least six credits of foundational or bar-tested courses, such as:

- Contracts
- Criminal Law
- Federal Income Tax
- Criminal Procedure I and II
- Federal Civil Procedure
- Property I and II
- Torts
- Administrative Law
- Wills and Trusts
- Evidence
- Constitutional Law

LLM CONCENTRATIONS (ONLINE ONLY)

-Corporate and Business Law (online only)

Delaware Law’s Corporate and Business Law LLM concentration seeks to provide students with the skills and knowledge to succeed and excel in the world of business. Exciting course offerings include Corporate Deviance, Corporate Regulatory Rules and Standards, Business Principles, Business Organizations, Securities Regulations, and more. This is a new degree program. Please note that some classes may not be offered if enrollment capacity is not met. If this occurs, students will have the option of transferring to the Corporate Law Regulatory Analysis & Compliance LLM program.

- Corporate Law Regulatory Analysis & Compliance (online only)

This unique program prepares candidates to respond effectively to new and complex regulatory demands. Students will explore the role of in-house counsel, the corporate compliance office, the elements of compliance, risk assessment, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, codes of conduct, crisis management, corporate integrity agreements, deferred prosecution and non-prosecution agreements, and corporate social responsibility. Students will learn the basic regulatory framework and will be trained in the skills that are essential for any compliance professional. Foreign-trained attorneys are required to take Introduction to Law and Critical Legal Analysis & Writing.

- Health Law Regulatory Analysis & Compliance (online only)

This concentration is designed for attorneys who seek to expand their skills and experience in the health care field with a specialized focus on regulatory compliance. Students will explore the roll of in-house counsel, the corporate compliance office, the elements of compliance, risk assessment, the False Claims Act, codes of conduct, and corporate integrity agreements. Students will learn the basic regulatory framework and will be trained in the skills that are essential for any compliance professional. Foreign-trained attorneys are required to take Introduction to Law and Critical Legal Analysis & Writing.

- Higher Education Compliance (online only)

This concentration seeks to expand the role of the compliance officer in higher education, by offering knowledge of the regulations that impact higher education, and providing practical skills assessments focusing on how to develop, implement, and maintain a compliance program in a higher education institution. Exciting course offerings include Higher Education Law. Higher Education Compliance, Higher Education Rules and Standards, Risk Management & Auditing, and Monitoring and Reporting. Foreign-trained attorneys are required to take Introduction to Law and Critical Legal Analysis & Writing.

Admission Requirements

Learn about our admission requirements (http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/graduate-programs-admissions/).

For more information, or to request a copy of the curriculum or course offerings for the general LLM concentrations, please contact our Graduate Programs Office (http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/contact-us/).

Find out how to apply here - http://delawarelaw.widener.edu/prospective-students/graduate-programs/graduate-programs-admissions/

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IN THIS 24-MONTH INTENSIVE, PART TIME ONLINE PROGRAM YOU WILL LEARN. - Advanced skills and knowledge civil and structural engineering principles that can be applied in a variety of workplaces. Read more
IN THIS 24-MONTH INTENSIVE, PART TIME ONLINE PROGRAM YOU WILL LEARN:

- Advanced skills and knowledge civil and structural engineering principles that can be applied in a variety of workplaces
- The essential underpinning knowledge that guides a range of projects, including road, rail and drainage systems, dams, harbours, bridges, buildings and other structures
- Practical skills in the design and drafting of engineering plans to international standards
- Skills in engineering management

KEY BENEFITS OF THIS PROGRAM:

- Receive practical guidance from civil and structural engineering experts with real world industry skills
- Gain credibility in your firm
- Develop new contacts in the industry
- Improve career prospects and income

Due to extraordinary demand we have scheduled another intake this year.

Start date: September 04, 2017. Applications now open; places are limited.

There are limited placed available so contact us now to speak to a Course Advisor.

INTRODUCTION

Join the next generation of senior civil and structural engineering experts. Embrace a well paid, intensive yet enjoyable career by taking this comprehensive and practical course. It is delivered over 24 months by live distance learning and presented by some of the leading civil and structural engineering instructors in the world today.

Civil and structural engineering encompasses a range of disciplines, including road, rail and drainage systems, dams, harbours, bridges, buildings and other structures. Civil and structural designers and drafters plan, design, develop and manage construction and repair projects.

This qualification develops your skills and knowledge in the design and drafting of engineering plans to recognised standards. You will learn about different areas of civil engineering, including construction, project management, design and testing. You will also learn about the design and drafting of concrete, steelwork, roads and pipes, as well as hydrology, stormwater drainage and foundations.

While it is essential that those who work in the supervisory or management levels of this discipline have a firm understanding of drafting and planning principles, this qualification goes much further. To be effective on the job, you will need to know how to apply knowledge of fundamental civil and structural engineering concepts, including geotechnical engineering, hydraulic engineering, engineering maths, and properties of materials. Throughout the program this subject matter will be placed into the context of engineering management. Our aim is to ensure that you are an effective, knowledgeable and skilled supervisor or manager, someone who can work beyond a “plan and design” brief to ensure that a project is delivered effectively.
This qualification aims to provide theoretical and practical education and training such that graduates may gain employment at the engineering associate (“paraprofessional”) level within the building and construction industry.

There are eight threads in the course to give you maximum, practical coverage. These threads comprise environmental issues, engineering technologies, drawing, 2D and 3D CAD design, building materials, civil and structural sub-disciplines (roads, steel, concrete, pavement, drainage, soil, water supply, sewerage), construction sites and engineering management.

This program avoids too much emphasis on theory. This is rarely needed in the real world of industry where time is short and immediate results, with hard-hitting and useful know-how, are required as a minimal requirement. The instructors presenting this advanced diploma are highly experienced engineers from industry who have done the hard yards and worked in the civil and structural areas. The format of presentation — live, interactive distance learning with the use of remote learning technologies — means that you can hit the ground running and be of immediate benefit to your company or future employer.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Anyone who wants to gain a solid working knowledge of the key elements of civil and structural engineering that can be applied at the supervisory and paraprofessional level. See “Entrance Requirements”

This program is particularly well suited to students for who on-campus attendance is less desirable than the flexibility offered by online delivery. When work, family and general lifestyle priorities need to be juggled this world class program becomes an attractive option to many students world-wide.

- Site Supervisors
- Senior Trades Managers
- Trades Workers
- Construction Managers
- Maintenance Engineers or Supervisors
- Leading hands
- Consulting Engineers

Even those who are highly qualified in civil and structural engineering may find it useful to attend to gain practical know-how.

COURSE

This program is composed of 4 stages, delivered over 24 months. It is possible to achieve the advanced diploma qualification within the time period because the study mode is part-time intensive.

There are 8 threads around which the program is structured:

- Environmental issues
- Engineering technologies
- Drawing
- 2D and 3D CAD design
- Building materials
- Roads, steel, concrete, pavement, drainage, soil, water supply, sewerage
- Construction sites
- Engineering management

COURSE FEES

What are the fees for my country?

The Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT) provides distance education to students located almost anywhere in the world – it is one of the very few truly global training institutes. Course fees are paid in a currency that is determined by the student’s location. A full list of fees in a currency appropriate for every country would be complex to navigate and, with today’s exchange rate fluctuations, difficult to maintain. Instead we aim to give you a rapid response regarding fees that is customised to your individual circumstances.

We understand that cost is a major consideration before a student commences study. For a rapid reply to your enquiry regarding courses fees and payment options, please enquire via the below button and we will respond within 2 business days.

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The Master of Surgery at Sydney Medical School is designed to complement the practical experience you obtain through the hospital based training program of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Read more
The Master of Surgery at Sydney Medical School is designed to complement the practical experience you obtain through the hospital based training program of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

This stream is coursework based and designed for those embarking on a surgical career who are preparing to sit for the RACS Part 1 Examination.

Having chosen this stream you will undertake one core Unit of Study (PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics) and 4 stream specific core units of study. You will also be required to undertake 3 elective units of study.

Please Note: An interview with the Discipline Head or his nominee is required for this stream. Entrance may be either through the normal enrolment process or via the Graduate Certificate in Surgical Sciences pathway.

Senior medical students interested in undertaking a Graduate Certificate in Surgical Sciences may enrol in one Unit of Study per semester in years 3 and 4. After successfully completing their medical studies, students in this course may :
i. Use the 24 credit points for the Graduate Certificate
ii. Use the 24 credit points for the Graduate Certificate and take the option of putting 12 of these credit points towards the MS(Coursework)
iii. Put the 24 credit points towards the MS(Coursework) thus fulfilling half the requirements for this degree.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The Master of Arts program offers students in a wide range of disciplines the opportunity to earn a master’s degree by writing a thesis and successfully completing a limited number of courses. Read more
The Master of Arts program offers students in a wide range of disciplines the opportunity to earn a master’s degree by writing a thesis and successfully completing a limited number of courses. The number and details of the courses are determined within the first semester of the student's program.

Students may complete their degrees in either a full- or part-time capacity. Full-time students complete a 24-month program while part-time students complete a 48-month program. Part-time students will normally complete all required course work in the first 24 months, with the subsequent months committed to continued research and production of the thesis.

Although degrees are awarded in specific disciplines, the program is administered centrally by the School of Graduate Studies, rather than by individual departments or faculties/schools.

Course detail

Graduate degrees traditionally have been awarded for the successful completion of a satisfactory thesis. The thesis route expresses the fundamental tradition of academic scholarship. It also relates to the University’s undergraduate programs, because the creation of a thesis in any discipline calls for a range of skills which are central to the liberal education tradition, including analysis and synthesis of ideas, empirical investigations, the construction and articulation of arguments, and writing skills.

Because of the nature of the M.A. program, the thesis forms the central requirement of the program. At the master’s level, a thesis involves close collaboration between supervisor and student. Consequently, it is necessary for a candidate to establish contact with potential supervisors prior to application for admission. Candidates seeking potential supervisors should contact either the relevant academic department or the School of Graduate Studies.

Format

The program is typically completed in 24 months and contains rigorous training in microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, and econometrics, as well as elective courses in a range of applied fields. The program is limited to a small number of students to enhance scholastic achievement through close faculty interaction.

The program comprises two components. The first component is scheduled for the first year and requires students to take a minimum of five courses. The second component is the thesis project which must be completed by the end of the second year. The details of the program components are:

Why study at the University of Lethbridge?

As a graduate student at the University of Lethbridge, you’ll find yourself at the centre of a student-focused environment that nurtures innovation, critical thinking and creativity.

The University of Lethbridge is one of Canada’s top-ranked universities and leading research institutions.

At the foundation of our graduate programs is a multidisciplinary and personalized experience. A collaborative environment is encouraged between faculty and students. This means you have flexibility in decisions regarding the research and learning path you take.

At the U of L, we are committed to helping every one of our students thrive. From aiding with financial support to one-on-one mentorship to individualized career advice, you’ll find support every step of the way.

When you graduate, you will have the confidence you need to succeed in whatever you do, whether that means pursuing further education, teaching in an academic setting or establishing a professional career.

We’re here to help as you find the answers to your questions. As Alberta’s Destination University, the U of L gives you room to think, create and explore, providing a university experience unlike any other.

How to apply

In order to apply, you will need to provide the following documentation:

• Academic Transcripts
• Curriculum Vitae
• Three Letters of Reference
• Letter of Intent
• English Language Proficiency (ELP)

All applications and supporting documents must be provided through the online portal: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/apply

Co-operative Education & Internships Option

The Co-operative Education/Internship Option is available to students for the Master of Arts (MA) and Master of Science (MSc) programs. Co-operative education is an educational model that formally integrates academic study at the master’s level with relevant, paid work experience in appropriate employment fields such as government, institutions, and industry. The University, the employer, and the student are in partnership to ensure an enriching experience toward the student's professional development.

Further information visit the website: http://www.uleth.ca/artsci/coop/co-operative-education-internship-option-graduate-studies

Funding

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/master-arts/award-opportunities

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The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions to manage projects within this sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. Our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which is made up of practitioners in the field, exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work. In addition, we use our alumni network to benefit from the views of professionals in prominent positions, who were also students at Oxford Brookes University.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time (FT) programme or as an distance-learning (DL) programme, which is normally taken over two years (minimum). Both FT and DL study modes include intensive study periods on-campus in Oxford, which are not compulsory. There is a compulsory European Field-trip. There are two entry points: September and January.

Why choose this course?

Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction, and professional institutions (the RICS and the CIOB), who can provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work. Our alumni network spans the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, South Africa, Russia, Turkey, Hong Kong, India and USA. Professional Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) accreditation.

Problem-based learning (PBL) approach which ensures that the MSc is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach. One intensive study period in each semester where full-time and distance learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops; and to share experiences. Extensive online learning material provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Teaching backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) we were 11th in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment (UoA 16). The School's membership of a select group of RICS accredited universities acting as RICS' ambassadors; and to be among the signatories to the RICS Initiative to Drive the Adoption of Sustainable Development Principles in Built Environment Higher Education in line with the Six Principles under UN PRME (Principles for Responsible Management Education).

Professional accreditation

RICS and/or CIOB members are well-sought after in the job market.

If you have no or very limited relevant experience in the industry, holding this RICS & CIOB accredited MSc reduces the duration of your structured training (or relevant experience post-qualification) to become a member from five years to 24 months.
Many of our open-learning students run their structured training along-side the course. Thus, they become members of these institutions shortly after the completion of the course.

In summary, the programme offers a relatively quick route to RICS & CIOB membership for people who have no or very limited experience in the industry, and hence increases their potential for employment.

This course in detail

There are two modes of delivery for the MSc PMBE: full-time on campus or distance learning, and there are two entry points - September and January. PGCert and PGDip are offered as 'exit' awards. Candidates who are wishing to graduate with one of these awards, should also apply for a MSc place in the first instance.

Extensive on-line learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site. Students have access to this site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The course is assessed by 100% coursework submitted via the VLE. Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, e-mail, telephone and Skype.

Intensive Study Periods - all students can attend four intensive study periods during their programme and these are normally around 3 days long. Students (and staff) enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections that extend into the industry. The open-learning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff. The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts that are among the key features.

Distance learners must find their own accommodation and are asked to cover expenses for travel to Oxford, accommodation and food.

Field Trips and Site Visits - there are a number of field trips and site visits which take place mainly during the intensive study periods. There is one European field trip during the MSc programme and this normally takes place at the end of January each year - usually to the Netherlands. As well as bringing together full-time and open-learning students, the aim of this field trip is to integrate knowledge gained in the early part of the programme, to develop team skills and to build relationships. With the European field trip we also expose students to project management practices outside the UK and encourage them to observe and report on the different approaches to managing projects in the UK, their own countries and overseas.

The European Field Trip takes place at the end of January for the duration of five days and four nights. Heavily subsidised by the School, a coach is also provided to transport students and staff from Oxford Brookes to the field trip destination. Please read the details further down the page for information about additional costs for the field trip.

In order to attend site visits as part of the programme of study, we ask that students provide their own Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):
-Safety boots
-Hard hat
-High visibility vest
-Eye protection
-Gloves

Problem Based Learning - the programme will develop knowledge of current practice and issues in the built environment sector as well as building real-life skills including the exploration of interdisciplinary problems. We have responded to requests from industry to make our masters more practical by using an applied approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing students to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real situations. As real problems cross discipline boundaries and require research and collaboration, we use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise the problems we use in class. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which encourages students to learn by applying theoretical principles in appropriate case studies. PBL leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study periods and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for open-learning study. Where necessary, open-learning students are supported by email, Skype, on-line lectures and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Careers and professional development

Graduates of the School of the Built Environment have an outstanding employment record. Usually, 100% of the graduates of MSc PMBE are in employment within six months after graduation.

Local, national and international construction companies, developers, project management consultancies, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department regularly to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

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This course stands out from others because it is integrated with our award-winning radio station, Spark FM. There are opportunities for practical experience at every stage. Read more
This course stands out from others because it is integrated with our award-winning radio station, Spark FM. There are opportunities for practical experience at every stage.

Course overview

This Masters develops skills that are relevant not only in radio but also TV, film and multi-platform production. It’s an outstanding way to gain a fast start in any area of production.

The production modules cover areas such as targeting ideas for audiences, budgeting, research, editing, live studio production and post programme evaluation.

‌MA Radio has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.‌

We are accredited to teach the industry-leading SADiE6 editing system. We also teach two systems for music playout: RCS Selector and Master Control.

You will be taught by professionals who currently work in radio, producing their own programmes for BBC so you can be sure that the course is completely up-to-date.

The practical work will be supported by contextual studies. The final stage of the course takes the form of research leading to a dissertation, or a major practical project with a contextual report.

Sunderland’s Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. Our research expertise includes broadcast technology, radio formats, programming, participatory radio, voice in radio and cinema, radio drama, and women and radio.

All production material will be broadcast on Spark FM and you can expect to be actively involved in running the 24/7 Community Radio station based in the campus Media Centre. Spark FM has won many awards including four golds at the Student Radio Awards 2012.

For more information on the part time option of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/radio-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Radio 1 (60 Credits)
-Radio Studies 1
-Radio Station Management 1
-Production Management and Research

Radio 2 (60 Credits)
-Advanced Radio Production and Broadcasting (40 Credits). This module will include a portfolio of work with a choice from: radio feature, documentary, radio drama, commercials, experimental radio, podcasts and Spark FM production and presentation. Plus either:
-Radio Studies 2 (20 Credits)
Or
-Radio Station Management 2 (20 Credits)

Radio 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice. As the culmination of the course, it will build on all the skills and knowledge that you have gained up to this point.

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, workshops and practical demonstrations. Your active involvement in our on-campus radio station, Spark FM, is integral to your learning experience. Theory and practice will go hand in hand as you plan, undertake and evaluate projects and programmes. You will have high levels of contact with tutors, who give regular feedback and support, and you will also work in groups to develop skills in communication and teamwork.

Sunderland’s tutors have recent experience of working in public service, commercial and community radio. In addition, the University has long-standing links with radio industry organisations such as the UK Radio Academy, Community Media Association and Northern Arts.

Facilities & location

Sunderland is the only university in the North of England with a full-time community radio licence. Spark FM broadcasts from purpose-built studios at the David Puttnam Media Centre. This is a centre for excellence in training students, with continual investment in industry-standard equipment.

Radio studios
We have six radio studios including the transmission suite for 107 Spark FM. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24-year-olds. There is a radio drama/music recording/general purpose studio and four voice over booths.

Digital editing
There are over 30 workstations capable of using Abode Audition and the state-of-the-art SADiE6 editing systems.

Other media facilities
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane and we also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems.

There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Useful resources for your studies include archival sound recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles in the radio industry, and also throughout the broader media industry.

Recent Sunderland graduates have moved into jobs at a variety of radio stations and companies, including BBC Radio 1, 6Music, 5live, BBC Radio Drama, Sun FM, Metro Radio and BBC Newcastle. Sunderland graduates are also employed at radio stations in Europe, USA and Australia.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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This course allows you to explore a wide range of films, contextual studies and critical debates, as well as the politics and cultural power of other media forms and institutions. Read more
This course allows you to explore a wide range of films, contextual studies and critical debates, as well as the politics and cultural power of other media forms and institutions.

Course overview

This Masters is for people who want to study films and culture at an advanced level. There is a high level of engagement with theories and practices of film studies and cultural studies, as well as a strong emphasis on rigorous research skills.

Given the importance of theory, an important attraction of this Masters is Sunderland’s research specialisms. These include star studies, performance, distribution and national cinemas, as well as sexualities, identities and how technology changes the way we experience the world.

The course is taught at the David Puttnam Media Centre on our Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s by staff from Sunderland’s Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which promotes a lively and inclusive research environment. As part of the course, you will have the opportunity to attend CRMCS’s regular research seminar series, which hosts both visiting and internal speakers discussing their latest research. You will also have the opportunity to benefit from the centre’s annual programme of national and international conferences, symposia and other research events.

You will focus on areas that you find particularly fascinating while contextualising your interests within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies. The course culminates in a dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with tutors.

Throughout the course, you will refine your powers of analysis, research and communication. These skills are highly valued by employers and will boost your employability. Postgraduates earn more, on average than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree.

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course are:
-Film and Cultural Studies 1 (60 Credits)
-Engaging with Theory: Key Thinkers, Texts and Concepts (30 Credits)
-Research Methods in Film, Media and Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Film and Cultural Studies 2 (60 Credits)
-Consumption and Everyday Life (30 Credits)
-Special Topic: Film, Media and/or Cultural Studies (30 Credits)

Film and Cultural Studies 3 (60 Credits)
-You will complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Teaching and assessment

All modules are team taught, drawing on the wide range of research specialisms of our staff.

Co-taught with MA Media and Cultural Studies, this MA enables you to contextualise your own work within the wider field of film, media and cultural studies, as well as pursue your own specific interest in film. This approach is excellent preparation if you are thinking of continuing on to PhD level. You will also be able to specialise and pursue your own specific interests film via choice of assignment questions on the taught modules and via negotiation of topics in the Special Topic and Dissertation modules.
Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques and workshops. Via CRMCS’s research seminar programme, these are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. From stage 2 you will be expected to engage in a greater degree in self-directed study in preparation for the stage 3 dissertation. Your tutors will also give regular feedback and support.

Assessment methods include essays, projects, presentations, and a dissertation.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is home to the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS), which engages in world leading research, as well as hosting international visiting scholars, conferences, external speakers and two international refereed research journals.

Teaching rooms
We have well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, with overhead projection and full internet access.

Cinema
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. The library buildings provide a variety of study spaces, IT facilities and experience library staff during core hours, with online services and support available at any time off-campus. In addition, both the St Peter’s and Murray libraries offer 24/7 access during main teaching weeks.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Sony EX1 and EX3 models, with associated location kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations with state-of-the-art HD Edit systems, including Final Cut Pro, Avid and Media Composer. There is also a digital audio postproduction area with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for a range of roles in the media and cultural industries. A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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